This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Regulation (EU) 2017/852'.


Ref. Ares(2018)680414 - 05/02/2018
S T A T U T O R Y   I N S T R U M E N T S  
2017 No. 1200 
ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION 
The Control of Mercury (Enforcement) Regulations 2017 
Made 
- 
- 
- 
- 
4th December 2017 
Laid before Parliament 
5th December 2017 
Coming into force in accordance with regulation 2 
CONTENTS 
PART 1 
Introductory 
 
1. 
Citation and application 

2. 
Commencement 

3. 
Interpretation 

4. 
Definitions relating to offshore installations 

5. 
“Enforcing authority” 

6. 
Designation of competent authority 

 
PART 2 
Civil enforcement in England and Wales 
 
7. 
Application of this Part 

8. 
Enforcement notices 

9. 
Action by authority to ensure compliance with enforcement notices 

10. 
Civil penalties 

11. 
Further provision about civil penalties 

12. 
Civil penalties: late payment interest 

13. 
Recovery of enforcement costs 

14. 
Enforcement costs: late payment interest 

15. 
Further provision about appeals 

16. 
Multiple enforcement 
10 
17. 
Publication of civil enforcement 
10 
18. 
Civil proceedings 
10 
 
PART 3 
Enforcement specific to Northern Ireland 
 
19. 
Application of this Part and interpretation 
11 

20. 
Enforcement notices 
11 
21. 
Action by DAERA to ensure compliance with enforcement notices 
12 
22. 
Recovery of enforcement costs 
12 
23. 
Late payment interest 
13 
24. 
Further provision about appeals 
13 
 
PART 4 
Enforcement specific to Scotland 
 
25. 
Application of this Part 
14 
26. 
Enforcement notices 
14 
27. 
Action by SEPA to ensure compliance with enforcement notices 
15 
28. 
Recovery of enforcement costs 
15 
29. 
Late payment interest 
16 
30. 
Further provision about appeals 
16 
31. 
Enforcement by the courts 
17 
32. 
Monetary penalties, costs recovery and enforcement undertakings 
17 
 
PART 5 
Further provision about enforcement 
 
33. 
Imports and exports: assistance by customs officials 
18 
34. 
Information sharing 
18 
35. 
Information notices 
19 
36. 
Further provision about giving notices 
20 
37. 
Authorising imports 
21 
38. 
Notification of new mercury-added products and manufacturing processes 
21 
 
PART 6 
Offshore installations: assistance by Secretary of State 
 
39. 
Offshore installations: assistance by Secretary of State 
22 
40. 
Admissibility etc. 
23 
 
PART 7 
Criminal enforcement 
 
41. 
Offences  in  respect  of  laws  relating  to  mercury,  enforcement  notices  and 
information 
23 
42. 
Limitation of regulation 41 offences in England and Wales only 
24 
43. 
Offences relating to customs officials 
24 
44. 
Offences relating to inspections of offshore installations 
24 
45. 
Proceedings: partnerships etc. 
24 
46. 
Offences by bodies corporate etc. 
25 
47. 
Offences: penalties 
26 
 
PART 8 
Amendments and revocation 
 
48. 
Amendment to section 41 of the Environment Act 1995 
26 
 
2

49. 
Amendment to the Control of Major Accident Hazards Regulations 2015 
26 
50. 
Amendment to the Environment (Northern Ireland) Order 2002 
26 
51. 
Revocation of the Mercury Export and Data (Enforcement) Regulations 2010 
27 
 
 
SCHEDULE 1  —  Laws relating to mercury 
27 
 
SCHEDULE 2  —  Definitions relating to offshore installations 
29 
 
SCHEDULE 3  —  Provisions relating to appeals in Scotland 
31 
 
PART 1  —  Appeals procedure 
31 
 
PART 2  —  Public hearings 
32 
 
PART 3  —  Determination of appeals 
34 
The Secretary of State is designated for the purposes of section 2(2) of the European Communities 
Act 1972(a) in relation to the environment(b). 
The  Secretary  of  State  makes  these  Regulations  in  exercise  of  the  powers  conferred  by  section 
2(2) of that Act(c). 
PART 1 
Introductory 
Citation and application 
1.—(1) These Regulations  may  be  cited  as  the Control  of  Mercury  (Enforcement)  Regulations 
2017. 
(2) These  Regulations  apply  to  the  regulation  of  activities  relating  to  mercury  in  the  United 
Kingdom including— 
(a)  in the territorial sea (see regulation 3), and 
(b)  in  respect  of  offshore  installations  in  the  offshore  area  (see  paragraphs  1  and  2  of 
Schedule 2). 
Commencement 
2.—(1) These Regulations (except Parts 2 and 3) come into force on 1st January 2018. 
(2) Parts 2 and 3 (which are about civil enforcement except in Scotland and the Scottish offshore 
area) come into force on 1st April 2018. 
                                                                                                                                           
(a)  1972 c.68. Section 2(2) was amended by section 27(1)(a) of the Legislative and Regulatory Reform Act 2006 (c.51) and by 
Part 1 of the Schedule to the European Union (Amendment) Act 2008 (c.7). The Secretary of State continues to be able to 
implement  European  Union  law,  so  far  as  it  is  devolved,  under  section  57  of  the  Scotland  Act  1998  (c.46)  (in  respect  of 
Scotland) and paragraph 5 of Schedule 3 to the Government of Wales Act 2006 (c.32) (in respect of Wales). 
(b)  S.I. 2008/301. 
(c)  1972 c.68. Section 2(2) was amended by section 27(1)(a) of the Legislative and Regulatory Reform Act 2006 (c.51) and by 
Part 1 of the Schedule to the European Union (Amendment) Act 2008 (c.7). The Secretary of State continues to be able to 
implement  European  Union  law,  so  far  as  it  is  devolved,  under  section  57  of  the  Scotland  Act  1998  (c.46)  (in  respect  of 
Scotland) and paragraph 5 of Schedule 3 to the Government of Wales Act 2006 (c.32) (in respect of Wales). 
 
3

Interpretation 
3. In these Regulations— 
“the Mercury Regulation” means Regulation EU 2017/852 of the European Parliament and of 
the Council on mercury, and repealing Regulation (EC) No 1102/2008(a); 
“the EA 1995” means the Environment Act 1995(b); 
“the EO 2002” means the Environment (Northern Ireland) Order 2002(c); 
“the TSWR 2007” means the Transfrontier Shipment of Waste Regulations 2007(d); 
“the  WCLO  1997”  means  the  Waste  and  Contaminated  Land  (Northern  Ireland)  Order 
1997(e); 
“the Agency” means the Environment Agency; 
“civil penalty” is to be read in accordance with regulation 10(2) and (5); 
“civil penalty notice” is to be read in accordance with regulation 10(2); 
“DAERA” means the Department of Agriculture, Environment and Rural Affairs in Northern 
Ireland; 
“enforcement notice” is to be read in accordance with the following— 
(a)  regulation 8(2), in the case of an enforcement notice given by the Agency or NRW; 
(b)  regulation 20(2), in the case of an enforcement notice given by DAERA; 
(c)  regulation 26(2), in the case of an enforcement notice given by SEPA; 
“England” includes the territorial sea which does not form part of Northern Ireland, Scotland 
or Wales; 
“information notice” is to be read in accordance with regulation 35(2); 
“Northern  Ireland”  includes  the  Northern  Irish  area  within  the  meaning  given  by  regulation 
4(1)  of  the  TSWR  2007  (which  describes  an  area  of  territorial  sea  adjacent  to  Northern 
Ireland); 
“NRW” means the Natural Resources Body for Wales; 
“relevant provision” means a provision listed in Schedule 1; 
“Scotland”  includes  the  area  of  territorial  sea  falling  within  the  Scottish  area  within  the 
meaning given by regulation 4(1) of the TSWR 2007 (which describes an area of sea adjacent 
to Scotland); 
“SEPA” means the Scottish Environment Protection Agency; 
“territorial sea” means the territorial sea adjacent to the United Kingdom(f); 
“Wales”  includes  the  Welsh  area  within  the  meaning  given  by  regulation  4(1)  of  the  TSWR 
2007 (which describes an area of territorial sea adjacent to Wales). 
                                                                                                                                           
(a)  OJ No L 137, 24.5.2017, p1. 
(b)  1995 c.25. Relevant amending enactments are as follows. For section 41, S.I. 2017/1200. For section 108, section 55 of the 
Anti-social  Behaviour  Act  2003  (c.38),  section  53  of  the  Clean  Neighbourhoods  and  Environment  Act  2005  (c.16), 
paragraph 3 of Schedule 2 to the Protection of Freedoms Act 2012 (c.9) and section 46 of the Regulatory Reform (Scotland) 
Act 2014 (asp 3) (“the RRSA 2014”) and S.I. 2013/755 and 2016/475. For section 110, paragraph 29 of Schedule 3 to the 
RRSA 2014. For Schedule 18, section 46 of the RRSA 2014. 
(c)  S.I.  2002/3153  (N.I.  7),  amended  by  S.I.  2011/2911  and  2017/1200.  There  are  other  amending  instruments  but  none  is 
relevant. 
(d)  S.I. 2007/1711, amended by S.I. 2014/861. There are other amending instruments but none is relevant. 
(e)  S.I.  1997/2778  (N.I.  19).  Relevant  amending  enactments  are  as  follows.  For  Article  72,  section  5  of,  and  paragraph  2  of 
Schedule 1 and paragraph 1 of Schedule 2 to, the Waste and Contaminated Land (Amendment) Act (Northern Ireland) 2011 
(c.  5)  (“the  WCLA  2011”)  and  S.I.  2007/611  (N.I.  3).  For  Article  74,  S.I.  2007/611.  For  Schedule  4,  paragraph  1  of 
Schedule 2 to the WCLA 2011. 
(f)  Section  1(5)  of  the  Territorial  Sea  Act  1987  (c.49)  has  the  effect  that  the  reference  to  the  territorial  sea  adjacent  to  the 
United  Kingdom  must  be  construed  in  accordance  with  that  section  and  with  any  provision  made,  or  having  effect  as  if 
made, under that section. S.I. 1989/482 and 2014/1353 are relevant instruments made under that section. 
 
4

Definitions relating to offshore installations 
4. In  these  Regulations,  “offshore  installation”,  “offshore  area”,  “English  offshore  area”  and 
“Scottish offshore area” have the meanings given by Schedule 2. 
“Enforcing authority” 
5. In these Regulations, “enforcing authority” means— 
(a)  the Agency, for England and offshore installations in the English offshore area; 
(b)  DAERA, for Northern Ireland; 
(c)  SEPA, for Scotland and offshore installations in the Scottish offshore area; 
(d)  NRW, for Wales. 
Designation of competent authority 
6. The  enforcing  authority  is  designated  as  the  competent  authority  in  accordance  with Article 
17  of  the  Mercury  Regulation  (which  requires  the  designation  of  authorities  responsible  for 
performing certain functions under that Regulation). 
PART 2 
Civil enforcement in England and Wales 
Application of this Part 
7.—(1) This Part applies to civil enforcement— 
(a)  in  England  and  in  respect  of  offshore  installations  in  the  English  offshore  area  (see 
paragraphs 1 and 3 of Schedule 2), and 
(b)  in Wales. 
Enforcement notices 
8.—(1) An enforcing authority may give a person an enforcement notice if condition A or B is 
met. 
(2) An enforcement notice is a notice requiring the person to take action (including to stop doing 
any thing). 
(3) Condition A is that the enforcing authority is of the opinion that the person has failed or is 
failing to comply with a relevant provision or provisions. 
(4) Condition B is that the enforcing authority is of the opinion that the person is likely to fail to 
comply with a relevant provision or provisions. 
(5) The action which the enforcing authority may require the person to take is any one or more 
of the following— 
(a)  action to ensure compliance with the relevant provision or provisions in question; 
(b)  action  to  remediate  any  environmental  damage  attributable  to  the  non-compliance  in 
question; 
(c)  action  to  remove  or  mitigate  any  risk  of  non-compliance  with  the  relevant  provision  or 
provisions in question. 
(6) An enforcement notice must state— 
(a)  the matters constituting the failure or likelihood of failure, 
(b)  the action which must be taken under paragraph (5), 
(c)  the period (the “compliance period”) within which the action must be taken, 
 
5

(d)  that there is a right to appeal against the enforcement notice and how that right may be 
exercised, and 
(e)  the consequences of failing to comply with the enforcement notice (see regulations 9, 10, 
18 and 41 which relate to action to ensure compliance, civil penalties, civil proceedings 
and offences respectively). 
(7) An  enforcing  authority  may  withdraw  an  enforcement  notice  given  by  it  by  informing  the 
person to whom it was given in writing. 
(8) A  person  to  whom  an  enforcement  notice  is  given  may  appeal  to  the  First-tier  Tribunal 
against it on one or more of the following grounds— 
(a)  that the decision to give the enforcement notice was based on an error of fact; 
(b)  that the decision was wrong in law; 
(c)  that the nature of what is required by the enforcement notice is unreasonable; 
(d)  that the decision was unreasonable for any other reason; 
(e)  any other ground. 
Action by authority to ensure compliance with enforcement notices 
9.—(1) This regulation applies where— 
(a)  an enforcing authority has given an enforcement notice to a person, and 
(b)  the enforcing authority is of the opinion that the person has not carried out one or more of 
the  actions  referred  to  in  the  enforcement  notice  within  the  compliance  period  (see 
regulation 8(6)(c)). 
(2) The  enforcing  authority  may  take  any  of  the  following  action  (whether  the  same  as  or 
different to any action referred to in the enforcement notice)— 
(a)  action to ensure compliance with the relevant provision or provisions in question; 
(b)  action  to  remediate  any  environmental  damage  attributable  to  the  non-compliance  in 
question; 
(c)  action  to  remove  or  mitigate  any  risk  of  non-compliance  with  the  relevant  provision  or 
provisions in question. 
(3) If the enforcing authority proposes that any of the action under paragraph (2) be taken on any 
premises, the provisions referred to in paragraphs (4) and (5) (which relate to powers of enforcing 
authorities and persons authorised by them and related matters) apply but as if modified in the way 
shown. 
(4) Where the Agency proposes to take the action, sections 108, 109 and 110 of, and Schedule 
18 to, the EA 1995 (as they apply in England) apply but as if— 
(a)  in section 108 there were a reference to the purpose of taking action to ensure compliance 
with a relevant provision or provisions referred to in an enforcement notice at the end of 
the list of purposes in subsection (1); 
(b)  in  section  108  there  were  a  reference  to  taking  action  to  ensure  compliance  with  a 
relevant provision or provisions referred to in an enforcement notice at the end of the list 
of powers in subsection (4); 
(c)  in paragraph 6(1) of Schedule 18 the reference in the words before paragraph (a) to any 
power conferred by section 108(4)(a) or (b) or (5) of this Act included a reference to the 
power conferred by virtue of sub-paragraph (b) above. 
(5) Where NRW proposes to take the action, sections 108, 109 and 110 of, and Schedule 18 to, 
the EA 1995 (as they apply in Wales) apply but as if— 
(a)  in section 108 there were a reference to the purpose of taking action to ensure compliance 
with a relevant provision or provisions referred to in an enforcement notice at the end of 
the list of purposes in subsection (1); 
 
6

(b)  in  section  108  there  were  a  reference  to  taking  action  to  ensure  compliance  with  a 
relevant provision or provisions referred to in an enforcement notice at the end of the list 
of powers in subsection (4); 
(c)  in paragraph 6(1) of Schedule 18 the reference in the words before paragraph (a) to any 
power conferred by section 108(4)(a) or (b) or (5) of this Act included a reference to the 
power conferred by virtue of sub-paragraph (b) above. 
Civil penalties 
10.—(1) An enforcing authority may give a person a civil penalty notice if condition A or B is 
met. 
(2) A civil penalty notice is a notice requiring the person to pay a civil penalty. 
(3) Condition A is that the enforcing authority is satisfied, on the balance of probabilities, that 
the person has failed or is failing to comply with a relevant provision. 
(4) Condition B is that the enforcing authority is satisfied, on the balance of probabilities, that 
the  person  has  failed  or  is  failing  to  fully  comply  with  an  enforcement  notice  or  information 
notice. 
(5) An enforcing authority may determine the amount of civil penalty in respect of a failure but 
the amount must not exceed £200,000. 
(6) A civil penalty notice must not be given to a person in respect of a failure— 
(a)  where the enforcing authority has started criminal proceedings against the person under 
regulation 41 for the failure and those proceedings have not concluded, or 
(b)  where the person has been convicted of an offence under regulation 41 for the failure. 
(7) A civil penalty notice must state— 
(a)  the matters constituting the failure, 
(b)  the amount of the civil penalty, 
(c)  how payment must be made, 
(d)  the period (the “payment period”) within which payment must be made, which must not 
be  less  than  the  period  of  28  days  beginning  with  the  day  on  which  the  civil  penalty 
notice is given, 
(e)  that there is a right to appeal against the civil penalty notice and how that right may be 
exercised, 
(f)  the consequences of failing to make payment within the payment period (see regulation 
41 which relates to offences and paragraph (9)). 
(8) Regulation 11 sets out action which must be taken by an enforcing authority before a civil 
penalty notice can be given by the enforcing authority. 
(9) Following  the  payment  period,  the  enforcing  authority  may  recover  the  civil  penalty  (and 
any interest payable under regulation 12)— 
(a)  as a civil debt, or 
(b)  on the order of the court, as if payable under a court order. 
(10) An enforcing authority  may  withdraw  a  civil  penalty  notice  given  by  it  by  informing  the 
person to whom it was given in writing. 
(11) A  person  to  whom  a  civil  penalty  notice  is  given  may  appeal  to  the  First-tier  Tribunal 
against it on one or more of the following grounds— 
(a)  that the decision to give the civil penalty notice was based on an error of fact; 
(b)  that the decision was wrong in law; 
(c)  that the amount of the civil penalty is unreasonable; 
(d)  that the decision was unreasonable for any other reason; 
(e)  any other ground. 
 
7

Further provision about civil penalties 
11.—(1) An enforcing authority must not give a civil penalty notice to a person unless— 
(a)  the enforcing authority has given a notice (a “notice of intent”) to the person stating that it 
proposes to give a civil penalty notice to the person, and 
(b)  the period for representations referred to in paragraph (6) has expired. 
(2) A notice of intent must state— 
(a)  the matters constituting the failure to comply  with the relevant provision in question or 
the enforcement notice or information notice, 
(b)  the maximum amount of the civil penalty, 
(c)  that the civil penalty will be payable within a period specified in the civil penalty notice, 
which  must  not  be  less  than  28  days  beginning  with  the  day  on  which  the  civil  penalty 
notice is given, 
(d)  that there is a right to make representations against the notice of intent and how that right 
may be exercised (see paragraphs (3) to (6)), and 
(e)  that the enforcing authority has power to vary the amount of civil penalty referred to in 
the notice. 
(3) A  person  to  whom  a  notice  of  intent  is  given  may  make  representations  to  the  enforcing 
authority about the proposal to give a civil penalty notice to the person. 
(4) The  right  to  make  representations  includes  (but  is  not  limited  to)  the  right  to  make 
representations  about  the  amount  of  civil  penalty  which  the  enforcing  authority  has  power  to 
determine under regulation 10(5). 
(5) The representations must be in writing. 
(6) The  representations  must  be  given  to  the  enforcing  authority  within  a  period  of  28  days 
beginning with the day on which the notice of intent was given. 
(7) An enforcing authority may withdraw a notice of intent by informing the person to whom it 
was given in writing. 
(8) An enforcing authority must pay any civil penalty and interest under regulation 12 into the 
Consolidated Fund. 
Civil penalties: late payment interest 
12.—(1) If a person fails to pay a civil penalty in full within the payment period (see regulation 
10(7)(d)), interest is payable on the outstanding amount. 
(2) Interest falls to be paid at a rate of 8% per annum calculated on a daily basis for the period 
beginning with the day after the last day of the payment period and ending on the day payment is 
made or recovered. 
(3) The total amount of interest payable is not to exceed the civil penalty in question. 
Recovery of enforcement costs 
13.—(1) An  enforcing  authority  may  give  a  costs  recovery  notice  to  a  person  if  any  of 
conditions A to C are met. 
(2) A  costs  recovery  notice  is  a  notice  requiring  the  person  to  pay  the  enforcing  authority’s 
costs. 
(3) Condition A is that the enforcing authority has given the person an enforcement notice. 
(4) Condition  B  is  that  the  enforcing  authority  has  taken  action  to  ensure  compliance  with  an 
enforcement notice under regulation 9. 
(5) Condition C is that the enforcing authority has given the person a civil penalty notice. 
(6) In paragraph (2), the reference to costs is a reference— 
 
8

(a)  if condition A is met, to any costs relating to preparing and giving the enforcement notice, 
(b)  if condition B is met, to any costs relating to the action taken, and 
(c)  if condition C is met, to any costs relating to preparing and giving the civil penalty notice, 
and includes a reference to the costs of any related investigation or expert advice (including legal 
advice). 
(7) The costs must be paid by the person within the period (the “payment period”) of 28 days 
beginning with the day on which the costs recovery notice is given. 
(8) The costs recovery notice must state— 
(a)  the amount of the costs which must be paid, 
(b)  in general terms, how those costs have arisen, 
(c)  the payment period, 
(d)  how payment must be made, 
(e)  the consequences of failing to make payment within the payment period (see paragraph 
(9)), and 
(f)  that there is a right to appeal against the costs recovery notice and how that right may be 
exercised. 
(9) Following the payment period, the enforcing authority may recover the costs referred to in 
the costs recovery notice and any related interest under regulation 14— 
(a)  as a civil debt, or 
(b)  on the order of the court, as if payable under a court order. 
(10) An enforcing authority may withdraw a costs recovery notice given by it by informing the 
person to whom it was given in writing. 
(11) A  person  to  whom  a  costs  recovery  notice  is  given  may  appeal  to  the  First-tier  Tribunal 
against it on one or more of the following grounds— 
(a)  that the decision to give the costs recovery notice was based on an error of fact; 
(b)  that the decision was wrong in law; 
(c)  that the amount of the costs is unreasonable; 
(d)  that the decision was unreasonable for any other reason; 
(e)  any other ground. 
Enforcement costs: late payment interest 
14.—(1) If a person fails to pay the costs referred to in a costs recovery notice in full within the 
payment period (see regulation 13(7)), interest is payable on the outstanding amount. 
(2) Interest falls to be paid at a rate of 8% per annum calculated on a daily basis for the period 
beginning with the day after the last day of the payment period and ending on the day payment is 
made or recovered. 
(3) The total amount of interest payable is not to exceed the amount of costs in question. 
Further provision about appeals 
15.—(1) Following an appeal under regulation 8(8), 10(11) or 13(11), the First-tier Tribunal (the 
“Tribunal”) may— 
(a)  cancel the notice; 
(b)  vary the notice; 
(c)  confirm the notice; 
(d)  take  any  action  which  the  enforcing  authority  is  empowered  to  take  in  relation  to  the 
failure referred to in the notice; 
 
9

(e)  remit any decision relating to the notice to the enforcing authority. 
(2) A civil penalty notice or costs recovery notice which is the subject of an appeal is suspended 
pending the decision of the Tribunal. 
(3) An  enforcement  notice  which  is  the  subject  of  an  appeal  is  not  suspended  pending  the 
Tribunal’s decision on the appeal. 
Multiple enforcement 
16.—(1) An enforcing authority may give (whether or not at the same time)— 
(a)  an enforcement notice, and 
(b)  a civil penalty notice, 
to the same person in respect of the same failure to comply with a relevant provision. 
(2) An  enforcing  authority  must  not  (except  in  the  circumstances  described  in  paragraph  (3)) 
give a civil penalty notice under regulation 10(3) to the same person more than once for the same 
failure. 
(3) If  a  civil  penalty  notice  is  given  to  a  person  under  regulation  10(3)  but  subsequently 
withdrawn,  the  enforcing  authority  may  give  a  further  civil  penalty  notice  to  the  person  for  the 
failure described in the original notice. 
(4) An  enforcing  authority  must  not  (except  in  the  circumstances  described  in  paragraph  (5)) 
give a civil penalty notice under regulation 10(4) to the same person more than once for the same 
failure. 
(5) If  a  civil  penalty  notice  is  given  to  a  person  under  regulation  10(4)  but  subsequently 
withdrawn,  the  enforcing  authority  may  give  a  further  civil  penalty  notice  to  the  person  for  the 
failure described in the original notice. 
Publication of civil enforcement 
17.—(1) Each enforcing authority must from time to time publish reports about cases in which 
civil penalty notices have been given. 
(2) A report must, for each civil penalty notice which has been given, state— 
(a)  the person to whom the notice was given, 
(b)  the nature of the breach, and 
(c)  the amount of the penalty. 
(3) An  enforcing  authority  must  not  publish  information  under  this  regulation  about  a  civil 
penalty notice unless the appeal period referred to in the civil penalty notice has ended. 
(4) An  enforcing  authority  must  not  publish  information  under  this  regulation  about  a  civil 
penalty notice which is the subject of an appeal under regulation 8(8), 10(11) or 13(11) before the 
appeal is decided. 
(5) An  enforcing  authority  must  not  publish  information  under  this  regulation  about  a  civil 
penalty notice which has been withdrawn or cancelled. 
Civil proceedings 
18.—(1) An enforcing authority may (subject to paragraph (5)) start proceedings in the County 
Court or the High Court to secure a remedy against a person if any of conditions A to C are met. 
(2) Condition A is that the enforcing authority is of the opinion that the person has failed or is 
failing to comply with a relevant provision or provisions. 
(3) Condition B is that the enforcing authority is of the opinion that the person is likely to fail to 
comply with a relevant provision or provisions. 
(4) Condition  C  is  that  the  enforcing  authority  is  of  the  opinion  that  the  person  has  failed  to 
comply with all or part of an enforcement notice. 
 
10

(5) Before  starting  proceedings  under  this  regulation  the  enforcing  authority  must  be  of  the 
opinion that any other remedy under these Regulations would be ineffectual. 
PART 3 
Enforcement specific to Northern Ireland 
Application of this Part and interpretation 
19.—(1) This Part applies to enforcement by DAERA in Northern Ireland. 
(2) In this Part, “appeals commission” means the planning appeals commission which continues 
to be established in accordance with section 203 of the Planning Act (Northern Ireland) 2011(a). 
Enforcement notices 
20.—(1) DAERA may give a person an enforcement notice if condition A or B is met. 
(2) An enforcement notice is a notice requiring the person to take action (including to stop doing 
any thing). 
(3) Condition  A  is  that  DAERA  is  of  the  opinion  that  the  person  has  failed  or  is  failing  to 
comply with a relevant provision or provisions. 
(4) Condition B is that DAERA is of the opinion that the person is likely to fail to comply with a 
relevant provision or provisions. 
(5) The  action  which  DAERA  may  require  the  person  to  take  is  any  one  or  more  of  the 
following— 
(a)  action to ensure compliance with the relevant provision or provisions in question; 
(b)  action  to  remediate  any  environmental  damage  attributable  to  the  non-compliance  in 
question; 
(c)  action  to  remove  or  mitigate  any  risk  of  non-compliance  with  the  relevant  provision  or 
provisions in question. 
(6) An enforcement notice must state— 
(a)  the matters constituting the failure or likelihood of failure, 
(b)  the action which must be taken under paragraph (5), 
(c)  the period (the “compliance period”) within which the action must be taken, 
(d)  that there is a right to appeal against the enforcement notice and how that right may be 
exercised, and 
(e)  the  consequences  of  failing  to  comply  with  the  enforcement  notice  (see  regulation  21 
which relates to action to ensure compliance). 
(7) DAERA may withdraw an enforcement notice by informing the person to whom it was given 
in writing. 
(8) A  person  to  whom  an  enforcement  notice  is  given  may  appeal  to  the  appeals  commission 
against it on one or more of the following grounds— 
(a)  that the decision to give the enforcement notice was based on an error of fact; 
(b)  that the decision was wrong in law; 
(c)  that the nature of what is required by the enforcement notice is unreasonable; 
(d)  that the decision was unreasonable for any other reason; 
(e)  any other ground. 
                                                                                                                                           
(a)  2011 c.25. 
 
11

Action by DAERA to ensure compliance with enforcement notices 
21.—(1) This regulation applies where— 
(a)  DAERA has given an enforcement notice to a person, and 
(b)  DAERA is of the opinion that the person has not carried out one or more of the actions 
referred  to  in  the  enforcement  notice  within  the  compliance  period  (see  regulation 
20(6)(c)). 
(2) DAERA may take any of the following action (whether the same as or different to any action 
referred to in the enforcement notice)— 
(a)  action to ensure compliance with the relevant provision or provisions in question; 
(b)  action  to  remediate  any  environmental  damage  attributable  to  the  non-compliance  in 
question; 
(c)  action  to  remove  or  mitigate  any  risk  of  non-compliance  with  the  relevant  provision  or 
provisions in question. 
(3) If  DAERA  proposes  that any  of  the  action  under  paragraph  (2) be  taken  on  any  premises, 
Articles  72,  73,  73A  and  74  of,  and  Schedule  4  to,  the  WCLO  1997  (which  relate  to  powers  of 
DAERA and persons authorised by it and related matters) apply but as if— 
(a)  in Article 72 there were a reference to the purpose of taking action to ensure compliance 
with a relevant provision or provisions referred to in an enforcement notice at the end of 
the list of purposes in sub-paragraph (1); 
(b)  in Article 72 there were a reference to taking action to ensure compliance with a relevant 
provision  or  provisions  referred  to  in  an  enforcement  notice  at  the  end  of  the  list  of 
powers in sub-paragraph (2); 
(c)  in  paragraph 5  of Schedule 4  the  reference  in  the  words  before  sub-paragraph  (1)(a)  to 
any  power  conferred  by  Article  72(2)(a)  or  (b)  or  (3)  included  a  reference  to  the power 
conferred under sub-paragraph (b) above. 
Recovery of enforcement costs 
22.—(1) DAERA may give a person a costs recovery notice if condition A or B is met. 
(2) A costs recovery notice is a notice requiring the person to pay DAERA’s costs. 
(3) Condition A is that DAERA has given the person an enforcement notice. 
(4) Condition  B  is  that  DAERA  has  taken  action  to  ensure  compliance  with  an  enforcement 
notice under regulation 21. 
(5) In paragraph (2), the reference to costs is a reference— 
(a)  if condition A is met, to any costs relating to preparing and giving the enforcement notice, 
and 
(b)  if condition B is met, to any costs relating to the action taken, 
and includes a reference to the costs of any related investigation or expert advice (including legal 
advice). 
(6) The costs must be paid by the person within the period (the “payment period”)— 
(a)  of 56 days beginning with the day on which the costs recovery notice is given, where the 
costs recovery notice has not been appealed under paragraph (9); 
(b)  of  28  days  beginning  with  the  day  on  which  the  appeal  has  been  determined  or 
withdrawn, where the costs recovery notice has been appealed under paragraph (9). 
(7) The costs recovery notice must state— 
(a)  the amount of the costs which must be paid, 
(b)  in general terms, how those costs have arisen, 
(c)  the payment period, 
 
12

(d)  how payment must be made, 
(e)  the consequences of failing to make payment within the payment period (see paragraph 
(8)), and 
(f)  that there is a right to appeal against the costs recovery notice and how that right may be 
exercised. 
(8) Following  the  payment  period,  DAERA  may  recover  the  costs  referred  to  in  the  costs 
recovery notice and any related interest under regulation 23 as a civil debt. 
(9) DAERA may withdraw a costs recovery notice given by it by informing the person to whom 
it was given in writing. 
(10) A person to whom a costs recovery notice is given may appeal to the appeals commission 
against it on one or more of the following grounds— 
(a)  that the decision to give the costs recovery notice was based on an error of fact; 
(b)  that the decision was wrong in law; 
(c)  that the amount of the costs is unreasonable; 
(d)  that the decision was unreasonable for any other reason; 
(e)  any other ground. 
Late payment interest 
23.—(1) If a person fails to pay the costs referred to in a costs recovery notice in full within the 
payment period, interest is payable on the outstanding amount. 
(2) Interest falls to be paid at a rate of 8% per annum calculated on a daily basis for the period 
beginning with the day after the last day of the payment period and ending on the day payment is 
made or recovered. 
(3) The total amount of interest payable is not to exceed the amount of costs in question. 
Further provision about appeals 
24.—(1) A  person  (the  “appellant”)  who  wishes  to  appeal  to  the  appeals  commission  under 
regulation 20(8) or 22(10) must— 
(a)  give the appeals commission written notice of the appeal (the “notice of appeal”), 
(b)  pay the relevant fee (see paragraph (4)), and 
(c)  as soon as is reasonably practicable, give DAERA a copy of the notice of appeal. 
(2) A notice of appeal must include a statement of the grounds of the appeal. 
(3) A notice of appeal must be given before the expiry of the period of 28 days beginning with 
the day on which the enforcement notice was given. 
(4) The  relevant  fee  is  the  amount  specified  in  regulation  9(1)  of  the  Planning  Fees  (Deemed 
Planning Applications and Appeals) Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2015(a). 
(5) The  appeals  commission  may  determine  that  an  appeal  is  to  be  determined  solely  by 
reference to written representations. 
(6) The  appellant  and  DAERA  may  make  written  representations  to  the  appeals  commission 
about its determination under paragraph (5). 
(7) The  appeals  Commission  must  take  any  such  representations  into  account  in  its 
determination under paragraph (5). 
(8) A costs recovery notice which is the subject of an appeal is suspended pending the appeals 
commission’s decision on the appeal. 
                                                                                                                                           
(a)  S.R. (N.I) 2015/136. 
 
13

(9) An  enforcement  notice  which  is  the  subject  of  an  appeal  is  not  suspended  pending  the 
appeals commission’s decision on the appeal. 
(10) The appellant may withdraw a notice of appeal by— 
(a)  giving written notice to the appeals commission stating that the appeal is withdrawn, and 
(b)  as soon as is reasonably practicable, notifying DAERA. 
(11) The  appeals  commission  may  (in  addition  to  its  power  to  confirm,  reverse  or  vary  a 
determination under section 204 of the Planning Act (Northern Ireland) 2011))— 
(a)  take any action DAERA is empowered to take in relation to the failure referred to in the 
notice; 
(b)  remit any decision relating to the notice to DAERA. 
(12) A determination of the appeals commission is final. 
PART 4 
Enforcement specific to Scotland 
Application of this Part 
25. This Part applies to enforcement— 
(a)  in Scotland, and 
(b)  in respect of offshore installations in the Scottish offshore area (see paragraphs 1 and 4 of 
Schedule 2). 
Enforcement notices 
26.—(1) SEPA may give a person an enforcement notice if condition A or B is met. 
(2) An enforcement notice is a notice requiring the person to take action (including to stop doing 
any thing). 
(3) Condition A is that SEPA is of the opinion that the person has failed or is failing to comply 
with the relevant provision or provisions. 
(4) Condition B is that SEPA is of the opinion that the person is likely to fail to comply with the 
relevant provision or provisions. 
(5) The  action  which  SEPA  may  require  the  person  to  take  is  any  one  or  more  of  the 
following— 
(a)  action to ensure compliance with the relevant provision or provisions in question; 
(b)  action  to  remediate  any  environmental  damage  attributable  to  the  non-compliance  in 
question; 
(c)  action  to  remove  or  mitigate  any  risk  of  non-compliance  with  the  relevant  provision  or 
provisions in question. 
(6) An enforcement notice must state— 
(a)  the matters constituting the failure or likelihood of failure, 
(b)  the action which must be taken under paragraph (5), 
(c)  the period (the “compliance period”) within which the action must be taken, 
(d)  that there is a right to appeal against the enforcement notice and how that right may be 
exercised, and 
(e)  the  consequences  of  failing to  comply  with  the  enforcement  notice  (see  regulations  27, 
31, 32 and 41 which relate to action to ensure compliance, court proceedings, monetary 
penalties and offences respectively). 
 
14

(7) SEPA may withdraw an enforcement notice by informing the person to whom it was given 
in writing. 
(8) A  person  to  whom  an  enforcement  notice  is  given  may  appeal  to  the  Scottish  Ministers 
against it on one or more of the following grounds— 
(a)  that the decision to give the enforcement notice was based on an error of fact; 
(b)  that the decision was wrong in law; 
(c)  that the nature of what is required by the enforcement notice is unreasonable; 
(d)  that the decision was unreasonable for any other reason; 
(e)  any other ground. 
Action by SEPA to ensure compliance with enforcement notices 
27.—(1) This regulation applies where— 
(a)  SEPA has given an enforcement notice to a person, and 
(b)  SEPA  is  of  the  opinion  that  the  person  has  not  carried  out  one  or  more  of  the  actions 
referred  to  in  the  enforcement  notice  within  the  compliance  period  (see  regulation 
26(6)(c)). 
(2) SEPA may take any of the following action (whether the same as or different to any action 
referred to in the enforcement notice)— 
(a)  action to ensure compliance with the relevant provision or provisions in question; 
(b)  action  to  remediate  any  environmental  damage  attributable  to  the  non-compliance  in 
question; 
(c)  action  to  remove  or  mitigate  any  risk  of  non-compliance  with  the  relevant  provision  or 
provisions in question. 
(3) If  SEPA  proposes  that  any  of  the  action  under  paragraph  (2)  be  taken  on  any  premises, 
sections 108, 108A, 109 and 110 of, and Schedule 18 to, the EA 1995 (as they apply in Scotland) 
apply but as if— 
(a)  in section 108 there were a reference to the purpose of taking action to ensure compliance 
with a relevant provision or provisions referred to in an enforcement notice at the end of 
the list of purposes in subsection (1); 
(b)  in  section  108  there  were  a  reference  to  taking  action  to  ensure  compliance  with  a 
relevant provision or provisions referred to in an enforcement notice at the end of the list 
of powers in subsection (4); 
(c)  in paragraph 6(1) of Schedule 18 the reference in the words before paragraph (a) to any 
power conferred by section 108(4)(a) or (b) or (5) of this Act included a reference to the 
power conferred by virtue of sub-paragraph (b) above. 
Recovery of enforcement costs 
28.—(1) SEPA may give a person a costs recovery notice if condition A or B is met. 
(2) A costs recovery notice is a notice requiring the person to pay SEPA’s costs. 
(3) Condition A is that the SEPA has given the person an enforcement notice. 
(4) Condition B is that SEPA has taken action to ensure compliance with an enforcement notice 
under regulation 27. 
(5) In paragraph (2), the reference to costs is a reference— 
(a)  if condition A is met, to any costs relating to preparing and giving the enforcement notice, 
and 
(b)  if condition B is met, to any costs relating to the action taken, 
and includes a reference to the costs of any related investigation or expert advice (including legal 
advice). 
 
15

(6) The costs must be paid by the person within the period (the “payment period”)— 
(a)  of 56 days beginning with the day on which the costs recovery notice is given, where the 
costs recovery notice has not been appealed under paragraph (10); 
(b)  of  28  days  beginning  with  the  day  on  which  the  appeal  has  been  determined  or 
withdrawn, where the costs recovery notice has been appealed under paragraph (10); 
(c)  of so many days as the Scottish Ministers may specify, where the costs recovery notice 
has been appealed under paragraph (10) and the Scottish Ministers have so specified. 
(7) The costs recovery notice must state— 
(a)  the amount of the costs which must be paid, 
(b)  in general terms, how those costs have arisen, 
(c)  the payment period, 
(d)  how payment must be made, 
(e)  the consequences of failing to make payment within the payment period (see paragraph 
(9)), and 
(f)  that there is a right to appeal against the costs recovery notice and how that right may be 
exercised. 
(8) Following the payment period, SEPA may recover the costs referred to in the costs recovery 
notice and any related interest under regulation 29 as a civil debt. 
(9) The costs are recoverable as if they were payable under an extract registered decree arbitral 
bearing a warrant for execution issued by a sheriff of any sheriffdom. 
(10) SEPA may withdraw a costs recovery notice given by it by informing the person to whom it 
was given in writing. 
(11) A  person  to  whom  a  costs  recovery  notice  is  given  may  appeal  to  the  Scottish  Ministers 
against it on one or more of the following grounds— 
(a)  that the decision to give the costs recovery notice was based on an error of fact; 
(b)  that the decision was wrong in law; 
(c)  that some or all of the costs were not incurred or were unnecessarily incurred; 
(d)  any other ground. 
Late payment interest 
29.—(1) If a person fails to pay the costs referred to in a costs recovery notice in full within the 
payment period, interest is payable on the outstanding amount. 
(2) Interest falls to be paid at a rate of 8% per annum calculated on a daily basis for the period 
beginning with the day after the last day of the payment period and ending on the day payment is 
made or recovered. 
(3) The total amount of interest payable is not to exceed the amount of costs in question. 
Further provision about appeals 
30.—(1) Following an appeal under regulation 26(8) or 28(11), the Scottish Ministers may— 
(a)  cancel the notice; 
(b)  vary the notice; 
(c)  confirm the notice; 
(d)  take any action which SEPA is empowered to take in relation to the failure referred to in 
the notice; 
(e)  remit any decision relating to the notice to SEPA. 
(2) A determination of an appeal by the Scottish Ministers is final. 
 
16

(3) The Scottish Ministers may— 
(a)  appoint a person to exercise any function under this regulation on the Scottish Ministers’ 
behalf, or 
(b)  refer a matter relating to the exercise of any function under this regulation to a person the 
Scottish Ministers may appoint for that purpose. 
(4) An  enforcement  notice  which  is  the  subject  of  an  appeal  is  not  suspended  pending  the 
Scottish Minister’s decision on the appeal. 
(5) A costs recovery notice which is the subject of an appeal is suspended pending the decision 
of the Scottish Ministers. 
(6) Schedule 3 sets out further provision about appeals to the Scottish Ministers. 
Enforcement by the courts 
31.—(1) SEPA  may  start  proceedings  in  a  court  of  competent  jurisdiction  to  secure  a  remedy 
against a person of any of conditions A to C are met. 
(2) Condition A is that SEPA is of the opinion that the person has failed or is failing to comply 
with a relevant provision or provisions. 
(3) Condition B is that SEPA is of the opinion that the person is likely to fail to comply with a 
relevant provision or provisions. 
(4) Condition C is that SEPA is of the opinion that the person has failed or is failing to comply 
with all or part of an enforcement notice. 
Monetary penalties, costs recovery and enforcement undertakings 
32.—(1) The  Environmental  Regulation  (Enforcement  Measures)  (Scotland)  Order  2015(a)  is 
amended as follows. 
(2) At the end of the table in Schedule 4 (which relates to relevant offences and fixed penalty 
amounts) insert— 
 
“The Control of Mercury (Enforcement) Regulations 2017 
Regulation 41(1) (non-
YES 
YES 
YES 
MEDIUM 
compliance with a relevant 
provision) 
Regulation 41(2) (non-
YES 
YES 
YES 
MEDIUM 
compliance with an 
enforcement notice) 
Regulation 41(3) (non-
YES 
YES 
YES 
LOW 
compliance with an information 
notice) 
Regulation 41(4) (giving 
YES 
NO 
NO 
HIGH 
information which is false or 
misleading) 
Regulation 41(5) (failing to 
YES 
NO 
NO 
LOW” 
produce a document or record) 
                                                                                                                                           
(a)  S.S.I. 2015/383, amended by S.S.I. 2016/161; there are other amending instruments but none is relevant. 
 
17

PART 5 
Further provision about enforcement 
Imports and exports: assistance by customs officials 
33.—(1) A  customs  official  may  assist  an  enforcing  authority  by  seizing  and  detaining  any 
material if the condition in paragraph (2) is met. 
(2) The condition is that the customs official has reasonable grounds to suspect the material is 
being  exported  or  imported  in  breach  of  any  one  or  more  of  the  following  provisions  of  the 
Mercury Regulation— 
(a)  Article 3(1) (which prohibits the export of mercury); 
(b)  Article 3(2) (which prohibits the export of listed mercury compounds); 
(c)  Article 3(4) (which prohibits the export of mercury compounds not listed under Article 
3(2) for the purposes of reclaiming mercury); 
(d)  Article  4(1)  (which  prohibits  the  import  of  mercury  and  listed  mixtures  of  mercury, 
including  mercury  waste,  other  than  for  disposal  as  waste  where  the  exporting  country 
has no conversion capacity); 
(e)  Article  4(2)  (which  prohibits  the  import  of  other  mixtures  of  mercury  and  mercury 
compounds for purposes of reclaiming mercury); 
(f)  Article 4(3) (which prohibits the import of  mercury for use in artisanal and small-scale 
gold mining and processing); 
(g)  Article  5(1)  (which  prohibits  the  export,  import  and  manufacturing  of  listed  mercury-
added products); 
(h)  Article 8(1) (which prohibits placing on the market new mercury-added products). 
(3) A customs official is for the purposes of this regulation a person who is— 
(a)  a  general  customs  official  designated  under  section  3  of  the  Borders,  Citizenship  and 
Immigration Act 2009(a), or 
(b)  a customs revenue official designated under section 11 of that Act. 
(4) Anything seized and detained must— 
(a)  not be detained for longer than 5 working days, and 
(b)  be dealt with in such manner as the Secretary of State may direct. 
(5) A  working  day  is  for  the  purposes  of paragraph  (4)  any  day  except  a  Saturday,  a  Sunday, 
Christmas  Day,  Good  Friday  or  a  day  which  is  a  bank  holiday  under  the  Banking and  Financial 
Dealings Act 1971(b) in any part of the United Kingdom. 
Information sharing 
34.—(1) A  relevant  authority  may  disclose  information  obtained  by  it  in  the  course  of 
performing a relevant function to any other person if condition A or B is met. 
(2) Condition  A  is  that  the  disclosure  is  made  in  circumstances  where  it  is  necessary  for  the 
other person to have the information for the purpose of performing a function of that person under 
any enactment. 
(3) Condition B is that the disclosure is made for the purpose of facilitating the performance by 
the relevant authority of any relevant function. 
(4) A relevant function is a function conferred on the relevant authority— 
(a)  under or by virtue of these Regulations, 
                                                                                                                                           
(a)  2009 c.11. 
(b)  1971 c.80, amended by section 1 of the St Andrew’s Day Bank Holiday (Scotland) Act 2007 (asp 2). 
 
18

(b)  under section 108 of the EA 1995, or 
(c)  under Article 72 of the WCLO 1997. 
(5) The Welsh Ministers may disclose relevant information to any other person if the condition 
in paragraph (7) is met. 
(6) Relevant  information  is  information  obtained  by  the  Welsh  Ministers  in  the  course  of 
investigating compliance with Article 10(4) of the Mercury Regulation (which relates to amalgam 
separators) in accordance with powers conferred under any enactment. 
(7) The condition is that the disclosure is made in circumstances where it is necessary  for the 
other person to have the information for the purpose of performing a function of that person under 
any enactment. 
(8) Disclosure which is authorised by this regulation does not breach— 
(a)  an obligation of confidence owed by the person making the disclosure, or 
(b)  any other restriction on the disclosure of information (however imposed). 
(9) But nothing in this regulation authorises the disclosure of information— 
(a)  where doing so contravenes the Data Protection Act 1998(a), or 
(b)  where that disclosure would, in the opinion of the Secretary of State, be contrary to the 
interests of national security. 
(10) This  regulation  does  not  limit  the  circumstances  in  which  information  may  be  disclosed 
apart from this regulation. 
(11) A  person  to  whom  information  is  disclosed  under  this  regulation  may  disclose  that 
information onwardly to any other person, subject to paragraph (12). 
(12) Paragraphs (1) to (4) and (8) to (10) apply in respect of the onward disclosure but as if— 
(a)  references to a relevant authority were to the person proposing the onward disclosure; 
(b)  the  requirement  under  paragraph  (1)  that  the  information  be  obtained  in  the  course  of 
performing a relevant function were met. 
(13) In paragraph (4), the reference to a function conferred under section 108 of the EA 1995 or 
Article  72  of  the  WCLO  1997  is  a  reference  to  the  function  only  in  so  far  as  the  function  is 
performed in connection with these Regulations. 
(14) In this regulation— 
“enactment” includes— 
(a)  an enactment comprised in, or in an instrument made under, an Act of the Parliament of 
Northern Ireland, 
(b)  an  enactment  comprised  in,  or  in  an  instrument  made  under,  an  Act  of  the  Scottish 
Parliament, and 
(c)  an  enactment  comprised  in,  or  in  an  instrument  made  under,  a  Measure  or  Act  of  the 
National Assembly for Wales; 
“relevant authority” means— 
(a)  a customs official (within the meaning of regulation 33(3)), 
(b)  an enforcing authority, or 
(c)  the Secretary of State. 
Information notices 
35.—(1) An  enforcing  authority  may  give  a  person  an  information  notice  if  the  condition  in 
paragraph (3) is met. 
                                                                                                                                           
(a)  1998 c.29. 
 
19

(2) An information notice is a  notice requiring the person to give  information specified in the 
notice to the enforcing authority. 
(3) The condition is that the enforcing authority is of the opinion that it requires the information 
to  perform  any  one  or  more  of  the  functions  conferred  on  it  under  or  by  virtue  of  these 
Regulations. 
(4) An information notice must state— 
(a)  the information which is required by the enforcing authority, 
(b)  the period within which the information must be given to the enforcing authority, and 
(c)  the consequences of failing to comply with the information notice. 
(5) An enforcing authority may require information to be given in a particular form (for example 
in an electronic form) by stating this and describing the form in the information notice. 
(6) An  enforcing  authority  may  withdraw  an  information  notice  given  by  it  by  informing  the 
person to whom it was given in writing. 
Further provision about giving notices 
36.—(1) This regulation applies to the giving of notices under regulations 8 to 13, 20, 22, 26, 28 
and 35. 
(2) A notice takes effect when given. 
(3) A notice may be given to a person by— 
(a)  handing it to the person, 
(b)  leaving it at the person’s proper address, 
(c)  sending it by post to the person at that address, or 
(d)  sending  it  to  the  person  by  electronic  means  (see  paragraph  (9)  which  sets  out  the 
circumstances in which a notice may be sent by electronic means). 
(4) A notice to a body corporate may be given to the secretary or clerk of that body. 
(5) A  notice  to  a  partnership  may  be  given  to  a  partner  or  a  person  who  has  the  control  or 
management of the partnership business. 
(6) For the purposes of this regulation and of section 7 of the Interpretation Act 1978(a) (which 
relates  to  service  of  documents  by  post)  in  its  application  to  the  section,  the  proper address  of  a 
person is— 
(a)  in  the  case  of  a  body  corporate  or  its  secretary  or  clerk,  the  address  of  the  body’s 
registered or principal office; 
(b)  in the case of a partnership, a partner or person having the control or management of the 
partnership business, the address of the principal office of the partnership; 
(c)  in any other case, the person’s last known address. 
(7) For  the  purposes of  paragraph  (6)  the  principal  office  of  a  company  registered  outside  the 
United  Kingdom,  or  of  a  partnership  carrying  on  business  outside  the  United  Kingdom,  is  its 
principal office within the United Kingdom. 
(8) If a person has specified an address in the United Kingdom, other than the person’s proper 
address  within  the  meaning  of  paragraph  (6),  as  the  one  at  which  the  person  or  someone  on  the 
person’s behalf will accept notices of the same description as a notice under regulation 8, 10, 11, 
13, 20, 22, 26, 28 or 35 (as the case may be), that address is also treated for the purposes of this 
regulation and section 7 of the Interpretation Act 1978 as the person’s proper address. 
(9) A notice may be sent to a person by electronic means only if— 
(a)  the person has indicated that notices of the same description as a notice under regulation 
8,  10,  11,  13,  20,  22,  26,  28  or  35  (as  the  case  may  be)  may  be  given  to  the  person  by 
                                                                                                                                           
(a)  1978 c.30. 
 
20

being  sent  to  an  electronic  address  and  in  an  electronic  form  specified  for  that  purpose, 
and 
(b)  the notice is sent to that address in that form. 
(10) A notice sent to a person by electronic means is, unless the contrary is proved, to be treated 
as having been given at 9 am on the working day (within the meaning given by regulation 33(5)) 
immediately following the day on which it was sent. 
(11) In this regulation, “electronic address” means any number or address used for the purposes 
of sending or receiving documents or information by electronic means. 
Authorising imports 
37.—(1) A  person  (the  “applicant”)  may  make  an  application  to  an  enforcing  authority  for 
authorisation  to  import  mercury  or  a  mixture  of  mercury  listed  in  Annex  I  of  the  Mercury 
Regulation in accordance with the second subparagraph of Article 4(1) of that Regulation. 
(2) An application must— 
(a)  be in writing in such form as the enforcing authority may determine (for example in an 
electronic form); 
(b)  contain such information as the enforcing authority may require; 
(c)  in  respect  of  an  application  to  the  Agency,  NRW  or  SEPA,  be  accompanied  by  any 
charge which it may require pursuant to section 41(1)(k) of the EA 1995; 
(d)  in respect of an application to DAERA, be accompanied by any charge which DAERA 
may require pursuant to paragraph 9C of Schedule 1 to the EO 2002. 
(3) After receiving an application the enforcing authority must either— 
(a)  grant the authorisation (subject to conditions if appropriate), or 
(b)  refuse to grant the authorisation. 
(4) If an enforcing authority requires the applicant to give further information before reaching its 
decision, the enforcing authority may write to the applicant stating that it requires that information 
before any decision is reached. 
(5) If  an  enforcing  authority  requests  further  information  under  paragraph  (4),  the  duty  to 
determine the application under paragraph (3) does not apply until the authority has received the 
information. 
(6) The enforcing authority must inform the applicant in writing of— 
(a)  its decision under paragraph (3), and 
(b)  where the decision is to refuse to grant the authorisation, the reasons for the refusal. 
Notification of new mercury-added products and manufacturing processes 
38.—(1) The  enforcing  authority  must  perform  the  functions  of  the  United  Kingdom  under 
Article  8(4)  of  the  Mercury  Regulation  (which  refers  to  assessing  and  forwarding  notifications 
under Article 8(3) of that Regulation if certain criteria are fulfilled). 
(2) A  notification  to  the  Agency,  NRW  or  SEPA  pursuant  to  paragraph  (1)  must  be 
accompanied by any charge which it may require pursuant to section 41(1)(k) of the EA 1995. 
(3) A  notification  to  DAERA  pursuant  to  paragraph  (1)  must  be  accompanied  by  any  charge 
which DAERA may require pursuant to paragraph 9C of Schedule 1 to the EO 2002. 
 
21

PART 6 
Offshore installations: assistance by Secretary of State 
Offshore installations: assistance by Secretary of State 
39.—(1) The  Secretary  of  State  may  assist  an  enforcing  authority  performing  functions 
conferred on the authority under these Regulations in respect of an offshore installation situated in 
any one or more of the following areas— 
(a)  the territorial sea (see regulation 3); 
(b)  the English offshore area (see paragraphs 1 and 3 of Schedule 2); 
(c)  the Scottish offshore area (see paragraphs 1 and 4 of Schedule 2). 
(2) The  power  to  assist  includes  (but  is  not  limited  to)  power  to  do  either  or  both  of  the 
following— 
(a)  inspect the offshore installation; 
(b)  provide the enforcing authority with information about the offshore installation. 
(3) For  those  purposes  the  Secretary  of  State  may  appoint  in  writing  a  person  (an  “appointed 
person”) to exercise the powers set out in paragraph (4). 
(4) The powers are— 
(a)  to board the offshore installation at any reasonable time; 
(b)  to be accompanied by any other person authorised by the Secretary of State; 
(c)  to take any equipment or materials which might be required; 
(d)  to investigate any matter and examine any thing; 
(e)  to direct that any part of the offshore installation be left undisturbed (whether generally or 
in particular respects); 
(f)  to take measurements or photographs or make recordings; 
(g)  to take samples of any thing found on the offshore installation or in the atmosphere or any 
land, seabed (including its subsoil) or water in the vicinity of the offshore installation; 
(h)  to require a person who the appointed person believes is able to give information which is 
relevant— 
(i)  to attend at a place and time specified by the appointed person, 
(ii)  to answer questions, and 
(iii)  to sign a declaration of truth of that person’s answers; 
(i)  to require the production of any document or record or extract of one and, if required— 
(i)  make a copy of it; 
(ii)  take  possession  of  it  for  so  long  as  is  necessary  in  the  opinion  of  the  appointed 
person (paragraph (6) contains further provision about this); 
(j)  to require a person to provide facilities and assistance in relation to— 
(i)  any matters or things within that person’s control, or 
(ii)  which that person has responsibilities. 
(5) An appointed person must show the person’s written appointment to another person if— 
(a)  the  appointed  person  is  proposing  to  exercise  or  is  exercising  a  power under  paragraph 
(4), and 
(b)  the other person asks to see it. 
(6) An appointed person must not under paragraph (4)(i)(ii)— 
(a)  take  possession  of  a document  or  record  (other  than  to make  a  copy)  if  making  a  copy 
would be enough; 
 
22

(b)  remove a document or record from any place which is required by law to be kept at the 
place. 
(7) An appointment (or authorisation) under any of the following is treated as an appointment 
for the purposes of paragraph (3), unless the Secretary of State specifies to the contrary— 
(a)  regulation 16 of the Offshore Chemicals Regulations 2002(a); 
(b)  regulation 12 of the Offshore Petroleum Activities (Oil Pollution Prevention and Control) 
Regulations 2005(b); 
(c)  regulation 50B of the Transfrontier Shipment of Waste Regulations 2007(c). 
Admissibility etc. 
40.—(1) An  answer  given  by  a  person  in  response  to  a  requirement  under  regulation  39(4)(h) 
may be used in evidence against the person, subject to paragraphs (2) to (4). 
(2) In criminal proceedings against the person— 
(a)  no evidence relating to the answer may be adduced by  or on behalf of the prosecution, 
and 
(b)  no question relating to it may be asked by or on behalf of the prosecution. 
(3) Paragraph (2) does not apply if the proceedings are for an offence under— 
(a)  regulation 44(3), 
(b)  section 5 of the Perjury Act 1911 (false statutory declarations and other false statements 
without oath)(d), 
(c)  section 44(2) of the Criminal Law (Consolidation) (Scotland) Act 1995 (false statements 
and declarations not on oath)(e), or 
(d)  Article 10 of the Perjury (Northern Ireland) Order 1979 (false statutory declarations and 
other false unsworn statements)(f). 
(4) Paragraph (2) does not apply if, in the proceedings— 
(a)  evidence relating to the answer is adduced by or on behalf of the person who gave it, or 
(b)  a question relating to it is asked by or on behalf of that person. 
(5) Nothing in this Part is to be taken in England and Wales or Northern Ireland to confer power 
to compel the production by any person of a document or information in respect of a claim to legal 
professional privilege. 
(6) Nothing in this Part is to be taken in Scotland to confer power to compel the production by 
any  person  of  a  document  or  information  in  respect  of  a  claim  to  confidentiality  of 
communications. 
PART 7 
Criminal enforcement 
Offences in respect of laws relating to mercury, enforcement notices and information 
41.—(1) A person commits an offence if the person fails to comply with a relevant provision. 
(2) A person commits an offence if the person fails to comply with an enforcement notice. 
                                                                                                                                           
(a)  S.I. 2002/1355, to which there are amendments not relevant to these Regulations. 
(b)  S.I. 2005/2055, to which there are amendments not relevant to these Regulations. 
(c)  S.I. 2007/1711, amended by S.I. 2014/861; there are other amending instruments but none is relevant. 
(d)  1911 c.6. 
(e)  1995 c.39. 
(f)  S.I. 1979/1714 (N.I. 19). 
 
23

(3) A person commits an offence if the person fails to comply with an information notice. 
(4) A person commits an offence if the person gives an enforcing authority information which— 
(a)  the person knows is false or misleading, and 
(b)  is given in connection with the performance of any function conferred on the enforcing 
authority under or by virtue of these Regulations. 
(5) A  person  commits  an  offence  if  the  person  fails  to  produce  a  document  or  record  for  an 
enforcing authority performing a function pursuant to regulation 6. 
Limitation of regulation 41 offences in England and Wales only 
42.—(1) Proceedings against a person for an offence under regulation 41(1) must not be started 
if— 
(a)  a civil penalty notice has been given to the person under regulation 10(3) for the failure, 
and 
(b)  the civil penalty notice has not been withdrawn. 
(2) Proceedings against a person for an offence under regulation 41(2) or (3) must not be started 
if— 
(a)  a civil penalty notice has been given to the person under regulation 10(4) for the failure, 
and 
(b)  the civil penalty notice has not been withdrawn. 
(3) Proceedings against a person for an offence under regulation 41(1) or (2) must not be started 
if  civil  proceedings  have  been  started  against  the  person  under  regulation  18  in  respect  of  the 
failure. 
Offences relating to customs officials 
43.—(1) A  person  commits  an  offence  if  the  person  intentionally  obstructs  a  customs  official 
performing a function under regulation 33(1). 
(2) A  person  commits  an  offence  if  the  person  fails,  without  reasonable  excuse,  to  give  a 
customs  official  performing  a  function  under  regulation  33(1)  information  which  the  customs 
official requires. 
(3) A  person  commits  an  offence  if  the  person  gives  a  customs  official  performing  a  function 
under regulation 33(1) information knowing it to be false or misleading. 
(4) A  person  commits  an  offence  if  the  person  fails  to  produce  a  document  or  record  for  a 
customs official performing a function under regulation 33(1) when required to do so. 
Offences relating to inspections of offshore installations 
44.—(1) A person commits an offence if the person intentionally obstructs an appointed person 
performing a function under regulation 39. 
(2) A  person  commits  an  offence  if  the  person  fails,  without  reasonable  excuse,  to  give  an 
appointed  person  performing  a  function  under  regulation  39  information  which  the  appointed 
person requires. 
(3) A person commits an offence if the person gives an appointed person performing a function 
under regulation 39 information knowing it to be false or misleading. 
(4) A  person  commits  an  offence  if  the  person  fails  to  produce  a  document  or  record  for  an 
appointed person performing a function under regulation 39 when required to do so. 
Proceedings: partnerships etc. 
45.—(1) Proceedings  for  an  offence  under  this  Part  alleged  to  have  been  committed  by  a 
partnership must be started in the name of the partnership (and not in that of any of its members). 
 
24

(2) Proceedings  for  an  offence  under  this  Part  alleged  to  have  been  committed  by  an 
unincorporated association must be started in the name of the association (and not in that of any of 
its members). 
(3) A fine imposed on a partnership (other than a Scottish partnership) on its conviction of an 
offence is to be paid out of the funds of the partnership. 
(4) A fine imposed on an unincorporated association on its conviction of an offence is to be paid 
out of the funds of the association. 
(5) Rules  of  court  relating  to  the  service  of  documents  have  effect  as  if  a  partnership  or 
unincorporated association were a body corporate. 
(6) In  proceedings  for  an  offence  under  this  Part  started  against  a  partnership  or  an 
unincorporated association in England and Wales, section 33 of the Criminal Justice Act 1925(a
and  Schedule  3  to  the  Magistrates’  Courts  Act  1980(b)  apply  as  they  do  in  relation  to  a  body 
corporate. 
(7) In  proceedings  for  an  offence  under  this  Part  started  against  a  partnership  or  an 
unincorporated  association  in  Northern  Ireland,  section  18  of  the  Criminal  Justice  (Northern 
Ireland) Act 1945(c) and Schedule 4 to the Magistrates’ Courts (Northern Ireland) Order 1981(d
apply as they do in relation to a body corporate. 
Offences by bodies corporate etc. 
46.—(1) If an offence under this Part committed by a body corporate is shown to be one or both 
of the following— 
(a)  to  have  been  committed  with  the  consent  or  the  connivance  of  an  officer  of  the  body 
corporate; 
(b)  to be attributable to any neglect on the part of an officer, 
the  officer  (as  well  as  the  body  corporate)  is  guilty  of  the  offence  and  is  liable  to  be  proceeded 
against and punished accordingly. 
(2) If  the  affairs  of  a  body  corporate  are  managed  by  its  members,  paragraph  (1)  applies  in 
relation to the acts and defaults of a member in connection with their functions of management as 
if the member was a director of the body. 
(3) If an offence under this Part committed by a partnership is shown to be one or both of the 
following— 
(a)  committed with the consent or the connivance of an officer; 
(b)  attributable to any neglect on the part of an officer, 
that officer (as well as the partnership) is guilty of the offence and is liable to be proceeded against 
and punished accordingly. 
(4) If  an  offence  under  this  Part  committed  by  an  unincorporated  association  (other  than  a 
partnership) is shown to be one or both of the following— 
(a)  committed with the consent or the connivance of an officer of the association; 
(b)  attributable to any neglect on the part of an officer, 
that officer (as well as the association) is guilty of the offence and is liable to be proceeded against 
and punished accordingly. 
(5) “Officer” means— 
(a)  in relation to a body corporate— 
                                                                                                                                           
(a)  1925  c.86. Relevant  amending  enactments  are  Schedule  6  to  the  Magistrates’  Court  Act  1952  (c.55) and paragraph 19  of 
Schedule 8 to the Courts Act 1971 (c.23). 
(b)  1980 c.43.  Relevant amending  enactments are  sections  25  and 101  of,  and  Schedule  13  to, the Criminal  Justice  Act  1991 
and paragraph 51 of Schedule 3 to, and Schedule 37 to, the Criminal Justice Act 2003 (c.44). 
(c)  1945  c.15  (N.I.  1).  Relevant  amending  enactments  are  paragraph  1  of  Schedule  12  to  the  Justice  (Northern  Ireland)  Act 
2002 (c.26) and S.I 1972/538 (N.I. 1). 
(d)  S.I. 1981/1675 (N.I. 26). 
 
25

(i)  a director, secretary, chief executive, member of the committee of management, or a 
person purporting to act in such a capacity, or 
(ii)  an  individual  who  is  a  controller  of  the  body,  or  a  person  purporting  to  act  as  a 
controller; 
(b)  in relation to an unincorporated association, means any officer of the association or any 
member of its governing body, or a person purporting to act in such a capacity; 
(c)  in relation to a partnership, means a partner, and any manager, secretary or similar officer 
of the partnership, or a person purporting to act in such a capacity. 
Offences: penalties 
47. A person who commits an offence under this Part is liable— 
(a)  on summary conviction in England and Wales, to a fine or to imprisonment for a term not 
exceeding three months or to both; 
(b)  on  summary  conviction  in  Northern  Ireland,  to  a  fine  not  exceeding  level  5  on  the 
standard scale or to imprisonment for a term not exceeding three months or to both; 
(c)  on summary conviction in Scotland, to a fine not exceeding the statutory maximum or to 
imprisonment for a term not exceeding three months or to both; 
(d)  on conviction on indictment, to a fine or to imprisonment for a term not exceeding two 
years or to both. 
PART 8 
Amendments and revocation 
Amendment to section 41 of the Environment Act 1995 
48. In  section  41(1)  of  the  EA  1995(a)  (which  confers  power  to  make  schemes  imposing 
charges), after paragraph (h) insert— 
“(k) as a means of recovering costs incurred by it in performing functions conferred by 
Regulation EU 2017/852 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 17 May 
2017  on  mercury,  and  repealing  Regulation  (EC)  No  1102/2008(b),  the  Agency, 
the Natural Resources Body for Wales or SEPA may require the payment to it of 
such charges as may from time to time be prescribed;”. 
Amendment to the Control of Major Accident Hazards Regulations 2015 
49. In regulation 3 of the Control of Major Accident Hazards Regulations 2015(c) (which relates 
to the application of those regulations), omit paragraph (2)(g)(ii). 
Amendment to the Environment (Northern Ireland) Order 2002 
50. In  Schedule  1  to  the  EO  2002  (which  lists  purposes  for  which  regulations  may  be  made 
under Article 4 to that Order), after paragraph 9B insert— 
9C. Without prejudice to paragraph 9, authorising the Department to make schemes for 
the charging by enforcing authorities of fees or other charges as a means of recovering costs 
incurred  by  them  in  performing  functions  conferred  by  Regulation  EU  2017/852  of  the 
                                                                                                                                           
(a)  1995 c.25. Relevant amending enactments are paragraph 39 of Schedule 4 to the Flood and Water Management Act 2010 
(c.29) and S.I. 2007/1711, 2007/3106, 2008/3087, 2009/890, 2011/2911, 2012/2788, 2013/755 and 2013/1821. 
(b)  OJ No L 137, 24.5.2017, p1. 
(c)  S.I. 2015/483, to which there are amendments not relevant to these Regulations. 
 
26

European  Parliament  and  of  the  Council  on  mercury,  and  repealing  Regulation  (EC)  No 
1102/2008.”. 
Revocation of the Mercury Export and Data (Enforcement) Regulations 2010 
51. The Mercury Export and Data (Enforcement) Regulations 2010(a) are revoked. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Thérèse Coffey 
 
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State 
4th December 2017 
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs 
 
 
SCHEDULE 1 
Regulation 3 
Laws relating to mercury 
1. The provisions of the Mercury Regulation are— 
 
Provision 
Subject matter 
 
Article 3(1) 
Prohibits the export of mercury 
 
Article 3(2) 
Prohibits the export of listed mercury 
compounds 
 
Article 3(4) 
Prohibits the export of mercury compounds not 
listed under Article 3(2) for the purposes of 
reclaiming mercury) 
 
Article 4(1) 
Prohibits the import of mercury and listed 
mixtures of mercury including mercury waste 
for purposes other than disposal as waste 
 
Article 4(2) 
Prohibits the import of other mixtures of 
mercury and mercury compounds for purposes 
of reclaiming mercury 
 
Article 4(3) 
Prohibits the import of mercury for use in 
artisanal and small-scale gold mining and 
processing 
 
Article 5(1) 
Prohibits the export, import and manufacturing 
of listed mercury-added products 
 
Article 7(1) 
Prohibits the use of mercury compounds in 
                                                                                                                                           
(a)  S.I. 2010/265. 
 
27

listed manufacturing processes 
 
Article 7(2) 
Makes the use of mercury compounds in other 
listed manufacturing processes subject to 
certain requirements 
 
Article 8(1) 
Prohibits manufacturing new mercury-added 
products or placing them on the market 
 
Article 8(2) 
Prohibits new manufacturing processes 
involving the use of mercury or mercury 
compounds 
 
Article 9(1) 
Prohibits the use of mercury in artisanal and 
small-scale gold mining 
 
Article 10(4) 
Requires the operators of certain dental 
facilities to have amalgam separators 
 
Article 10(6) first subparagraph (but see 
Requires dental practitioners to ensure that 
paragraph 2 of this Schedule which contains the  amalgam waste is handled and collected by 
definition of “authorised waste management 
authorised waste management establishment 
establishment”) 
 
 
Article 10(6) second subparagraph 
Requires dental practitioners not to release 
amalgam waste into the environment under any 
circumstances 
 
Article 12(1) 
Requires operators in listed industries to report 
on large sources of mercury 
 
Article 13(3) first subparagraph 
Requires operators to convert mercury before 
its permanent disposal 
 
Article 13(3) second subparagraph 
Requires operators to use one of a list of 
facilities to permanently dispose of mercury 
 
Article 13(3) third subparagraph 
Requires operators of permanent storage 
facilities to store converted mercury separately 
 
Article 14(1) first subparagraph 
Requires operators of facilities for the 
temporary storage of mercury to establish a 
register 
 
Article 14(1) second subparagraph 
Requires operators of facilities for the 
temporary storage of mercury to issue a 
certificate for mercury waste leaving temporary 
storage 
 
Article 14(1) third subparagraph 
Requires operators of facilities for the 
temporary storage of mercury to transmit the 
certificate about mercury waste leaving 
temporary storage 
 
Article 14(2) first subparagraph 
Requires operators of facilities for the 
conversion of mercury to establish a register 
 
28

 
Article 14(2) second subparagraph 
Requires operators of facilities for the 
conversion of mercury to issue a certificate for 
mercury waste after the conversion 
 
Article 14(2) third subparagraph 
Requires operators of facilities for the 
conversion of mercury to transmit the 
certificate about conversion 
 
Article 14(3) first subparagraph 
Requires operators of facilities for the 
permanent storage of converted mercury to 
issue a certificate relating to its permanent 
disposal 
 
Article 14(3) second subparagraph 
Requires operators of facilities for the 
permanent storage of converted mercury to 
transmit the certificate about the mercury’s 
permanent disposal 
 
2. The reference to an authorised waste management establishment in the first subparagraph of 
Article 10(6) of the Mercury Regulation is— 
(a)  in England and Wales, a reference to a person (or authority) listed in section 34(3) of the 
Environmental Protection Act 1990 (as it applies to England and Wales); 
(b)  in  Scotland,  a  reference  to  a  person  (or  authority)  listed  in  section  34(3)  of  the 
Environmental Protection Act 1990 (as it applies to Scotland). 
 
SCHEDULE 2 
Regulation 4 
Definitions relating to offshore installations 
“Offshore installation” 
1.—(1) “Offshore  installation”  means  an  installation  or  structure,  other  than  a  ship,  situated  in 
waters or on or under the seabed and used for carrying on any of the following activities— 
(a)  the exploitation, or the exploration with a view to exploitation, of mineral resources in or 
under the shore or bed of waters in the offshore area; 
(b)  the exploration of a place in, under or over such waters with a view to the storage of gas; 
(c)  the conversion of a place under the shore or bed of such waters for the purpose of storing 
gas; 
(d)  the storage of gas in, under or over such waters or the recovery of gas so stored; 
(e)  the unloading of gas at a place in, under or over such waters; 
(f)  the conveyance of things by means of a pipe, or system of pipes, constructed or placed 
on, in or under the shore or bed of such waters; 
(g)  the provision of accommodation for persons who work on or from an installation which is 
or has been maintained, or is intended to be established, for the carrying on of an activity 
in this paragraph. 
(2) In paragraph (1)— 
(a)  “gas” means— 
 
29

(i)  gas as defined in section 2(4) of the Energy Act 2008(a), or 
(ii)  carbon dioxide; 
(b)  “installation” includes an installation as defined in section 16 of the Energy Act 2008; 
(c)  “ship”  includes  a  hovercraft,  submersible  craft  and  any  other  floating  craft  but  not  a 
vessel which— 
(i)  permanently rests on or is permanently attached to the seabed, or 
(ii)  is an installation as defined in section 16 of the Energy Act 2008; 
(d)  references to storing gas include storing gas with a view to its permanent disposal. 
“Offshore area” 
2. “Offshore area” means— 
(a)  the  seabed  and  the  subsoil  within  any  area  designated  under  section  1(7)  of  the 
Continental Shelf Act 1964 (exploration and exploitation of continental shelf)(b), and 
(b)  waters superjacent to the seabed and the seabed and its subsoil within any area designated 
under subsection (4) of section 84 of the Energy Act 2004 (exploitation of areas outside 
the territorial sea for energy production)(c). 
“English offshore area” 
3. “English offshore area” means that part of the offshore area which is not the Scottish offshore 
area. 
“Scottish offshore area” 
4.—(1) “Scottish offshore area” means such of the offshore area adjacent to Scotland which lies 
to the north of the Scottish border. 
(2) The Scottish border is— 
(a)  in the North Sea, a line beginning with the co-ordinate 55º 50’ 00” N; 1º 27’ 31” W and 
then  following,  in  an  easterly  direction,  the  parallel  of  latitude  55º  50’  00”  N  until  its 
intersection with the line dividing the United Kingdom and Germany; 
(b)  in the Irish Sea, a line between the following co-ordinates— 
(i)  54° 30’ 22” N; 4° 04’ 50” W; 
(ii)  54° 30’ 00” N; 4° 05’ 29” W; 
(iii)  54° 30’ 00” N; 5° 00’ 00” W. 
(3) In this paragraph— 
“co-ordinate”  means  a  co-ordinate  of  latitude  and  longitude  on  the  World  Geodetic  System 
1984; 
“line  dividing  the  United  Kingdom  and  Germany”  means  the  dividing  line  as  defined  in 
Article  1  of  the  Agreement  between  the  United  Kingdom  and  the  Federal  Republic  of 
Germany  relating  to  the  Delimitation  of  the  Continental  Shelf  under  the  North  Sea  between 
the two countries, signed in London on 25th November 1971(d); 
“line” means a loxodromic line. 
                                                                                                                                           
(a)  2008 c.32. 
(b)  1964 c.29.  Relevant  amending  enactments  are paragraph 1  of  Schedule  3  to  the  Oil  and  Gas  (Enterprise)  Act 1982  (c.23) 
and section 103 of the Energy Act 2011 (c. 16), paragraph 1 of Schedule 3. Areas have been designated under section 1(7) 
by S.I. [1974/1489, 1976/1153, 1977/1871, 1978/178, 1978/1029, 1979/1447, 1982/1072, 1987/1265, 1993/1782, 1993/599, 
1997/268, 1999/2031, 2000/3062, 2001/3670 and 2013/3162]. 
(c)  2004 c.20. 
(d)  Treaty Series No. 7 (1973) Cmnd. 5192. 
 
30

 
SCHEDULE 3 
Regulation 30(6) 
Provisions relating to appeals in Scotland 
PART 1 
Appeals procedure 
1. A person (the “appellant”) who wishes to appeal under regulation 26(8) or 28(11) must— 
(a)  give  the  Scottish  Ministers  written  notice  of  the  appeal  together  with  the  relevant 
documents (together these are referred to as the “notice of appeal”), and 
(a)  at the same time, give SEPA a copy of the notice of appeal. 
2. The relevant documents are— 
(a)  a written statement of the grounds of appeal; 
(b)  a copy of any relevant correspondence between the appellant and SEPA; and 
(c)  a copy of any enforcement notice which is the subject of the appeal. 
3. The notice of appeal must be given in accordance with paragraph 31 before the expiry of the 
period of 28 days beginning with the day on which the enforcement notice was given. 
4. The appellant may withdraw a notice of appeal by— 
(a)  giving the Scottish Ministers written notice stating that the appeal is withdrawn, and 
(b)  giving a copy of the written notice to SEPA. 
5. The Scottish Ministers may, in a particular case, allow a notice of appeal to be given after the 
expiry of the period mentioned in paragraph 3. 
6. SEPA  must,  within  14  days  of  receipt  of  the  notice  of  appeal  given  in  accordance  with 
paragraph 1, give notice of it to any person SEPA considers it appropriate to notify. 
7. Notice given under paragraph 6 must— 
(a)  describe the subject of the appeal; 
(b)  include  a  statement  that  representations  about  the  appeal  may  be  made  to  the  Scottish 
Ministers in writing within a period of 21 days beginning with the date of the notice; 
(c)  explain that if a hearing is to be held wholly or partly in public (see Part 2), a person who 
makes representations about the appeal will be notified of the date of the hearing. 
8. SEPA must, within 14 days of giving notice under paragraph 6, notify the Scottish Ministers 
of the persons to whom and the date on which the notice was given. 
9. If an appeal is withdrawn, SEPA must give notice of the withdrawal to every person to whom 
notice was given under paragraph 6. 
10. SEPA may make written representations about the appeal to the Scottish Ministers. 
11. Any representations by SEPA must be given to the Scottish Ministers within the period of 28 
days beginning with the day on which SEPA receives the copy of the notice of appeal. 
12. The Scottish Ministers may, in a particular case, allow SEPA’s representations to be given 
after the expiry of the period mentioned in paragraph 10. 
13. SEPA must, at the same time as giving the representations to the Scottish Ministers, give a 
copy of the representations to the appellant. 
14. The appellant  may  make  further  written  representations  relating  to  SEPA’s  representations 
within  the  period  of  28  days  beginning  with  the  day  on  which  the  appellant  receives  a  copy  of 
SEPA’s representations. 
 
31

15. The Scottish Ministers may, in a particular case, allow the appellant’s further representations 
to be given after the expiry of the period mentioned in paragraph 14. 
16. The  appellant  must,  at  the  same  time  as  giving  the  further  representations  to  the  Scottish 
Ministers, give a copy of the representations to SEPA. 
17. The Scottish Ministers must— 
(a)  give to the appellant and SEPA a copy of any representations made to them by persons to 
whom notice was given under paragraph 6, and 
(b)  allow the appellant and SEPA a period of 14 days beginning with the date on which the 
copy  of  the  representations  are  given  under  paragraph  (a)  in  which  to  make  written 
representations on them. 
18. The Scottish Ministers may require exchanges of written representations between the parties 
in addition to those mentioned in paragraphs 10 and 14. 
PART 2 
Public hearings 
19. Before determining an appeal under regulation 26(8) or 28(11), the Scottish Ministers may 
give the appellant and SEPA an opportunity to appear before and be heard by a person appointed 
by the Scottish Ministers (the “appointed person”). 
20. A hearing must be held wholly or partly in private if the appointed person so decides. 
21. Where  the  Scottish  Ministers  cause  a  hearing  to  be  held,  they  must  give  the  appellant  and 
SEPA  at  least  28  days’  written  notice  of  the  date,  time  and  place  fixed  for  the  holding  of  the 
hearing. 
22. If  the  Scottish  Ministers,  the  appellant  and  SEPA  agree,  the  period  for  notice  under 
paragraph 21 may be less than 28 days. 
23. Where any part of a hearing is to be held in public, the Scottish Ministers must, at least 21 
days before the date fixed for the holding of the hearing— 
(a)  publish  notice  of  the  date,  time  and  place  fixed  for  the  holding  of  the  hearing  in  a 
newspaper circulating in the locality in which the regulated activity which is the subject 
of the appeal is carried on or is to be carried on; 
(b)  give  written  notice  of  the  date,  time  and  place  fixed  for  the  holding  of  the  hearing  to 
every person who was given notice under paragraph 6 and who has made representations 
to the Scottish Ministers. 
24. The Scottish Ministers may vary the date fixed for the holding of any hearing. 
25. If the Scottish Ministers vary the date under 24, they must give such notice of the variation 
as appears to them to be reasonable. 
26. The persons entitled to be heard at a hearing are— 
(a)  the appellant; 
(b)  SEPA. 
27. Nothing in paragraph 26 prevents the appointed person from allowing any other persons to 
be heard at the hearing and such permission must not be unreasonably withheld. 
28. The appointed person must cause notice of the time and place of the hearing to be given to 
persons appearing to him or her to be interested. 
29. The appointed person may do one or any combination of the following— 
 
32

(a)  give a person written notice requiring that person to attend a hearing, at a time and place 
stated in the notice, to give evidence; 
(b)  give  a  person  written  notice  requiring  that  person  to  produce  any  books  or  other 
documents in the custody or under the control of the person which relate to any matter in 
question at the hearing; 
(c)  take evidence on oath, and for that purpose administer oaths. 
30. But the appointed person must not require any person to produce any book or document or to 
answer  any  question  which  that  person  would  be  entitled,  on  the  ground  of  privilege  or 
confidentiality,  to  refuse  to  produce  or  to  answer  if  the  inquiry  were  a  proceeding  in  a  court  of 
law. 
31. A  person  who  is  required  to  give  evidence  at  a  hearing  or  to  produce  any  books  or  other 
documents  is  entitled  to  have  the  necessary  expenses  of  attendance  and  production  of  books  or 
other documents reimbursed. 
32. The expenses are to be treated as part of the expenses of the hearing. 
33. The  Scottish  Ministers  or  the  appointed  person  may  make  an  order  as  to  the  expenses 
incurred in relation to a hearing (including a hearing for which arrangements have been made and 
does not take place)— 
(a)  by the Scottish Ministers or the appointed person, and 
(b)  by the parties to the appeal. 
34. The order may specify the person or persons by whom any of the expenses must be paid. 
35. The Scottish Ministers or the appointed person may treat as expenses incurred— 
(a)  the standard amount in respect of each day (or an appropriate proportion of that amount in 
respect of a part of a day) on which the hearing sits or the appointed person is otherwise 
engaged on work connected with the hearing; 
(b)  expenses  actually  incurred  in  connection  with  the  hearing  on  travelling  or  subsistence 
allowances or the provision of accommodation or other facilities for the hearing; 
(c)  any expenses attributable to the appointment of an assessor to assist the appointed person; 
(d)  any  legal  expenses  or  disbursements  incurred  or  made  by  or  on  behalf  of  the  Scottish 
Ministers in connection with the hearing; 
(e)  the  entire  administrative  expense  of  the  hearing,  including  an  amount  as  appears  to  the 
Scottish  Ministers  or  the  appointed  person  to  be  reasonable  in  respect  of  general  staff 
expenses and overheads. 
36. In  paragraph  35(a),  “the  standard  amount”  means  an  amount,  if  any,  as  the  Scottish 
Ministers may from time to time determine and make details of publicly available. 
37. Where  the  Scottish  Ministers  or  the  appointed  person  make  an  order  under  paragraph  33 
requiring a person to pay expenses, the Scottish Ministers or the appointed person must certify the 
amount of the expenses. 
38. The amount certified is a debt due by that person to the Scottish Ministers or the appointed 
person and is recoverable accordingly. 
39. After the conclusion of a hearing of an appointed person, the appointed person must give a 
written report to the Scottish Ministers. 
40. The  report  must  include  the  conclusions  and  recommendations  of  the  appointed  person  or 
the reasons for not making any recommendation. 
 
33

PART 3 
Determination of appeals 
41. The Scottish Ministers must— 
(a)  give written notice to the appellant setting out their determination of the appeal, 
(b)  set out in the notice the reasons for their determination, and 
(c)  provide the appellant with a copy of any report under paragraph 39. 
42. At  the  same  time  as  giving  notice  under  paragraph  41,  the  Scottish  Ministers  must  give  a 
copy of the documents listed in paragraph 41(a) to (c) to— 
(a)  SEPA, 
(b)  any person notified under paragraph 6, if that person subsequently made representations 
to the Scottish Ministers, and 
(c)  if  a  hearing  was  held,  to  any  other  person  who  made  representations  in  relation  to  the 
appeal at the hearing. 
 
EXPLANATORY NOTE 
(This note is not part of the Regulations) 
These  Regulations  supplement  Regulation  EU  2017/852  of  the  European  Parliament  and  of  the 
Council  on  mercury  (“the  Mercury  Regulation”)  by  establishing  offences,  penalties  and 
enforcement powers relating to that Regulation. 
These  Regulations  also  implement  Article  17  of  the  Mercury  Regulation  which  requires  the 
designation of authorities responsible for performing functions under that Regulation. 
Regulation 5 defines “enforcing authority” as— 
(a)  for  England  and  offshore  installations  in  the  English  offshore  area,  the  Environment 
Agency; 
(b)  for  Northern  Ireland,  the  Department  of  Agriculture,  Environment  and  Rural  Affairs 
(“DAERA”); 
(c)  for  Scotland  and  offshore  installations  in  the  Scottish  offshore  area,  the  Scottish 
Environment Protection Agency (“SEPA”); 
(d)  for Wales, the Natural Resources Body for Wales (“NRW”). 
The definitions of England, Wales, Northern Ireland and Scotland include in each case an area of 
territorial  sea  adjacent  to  the  United  Kingdom  (see  regulation  3).  Each  area  of  territorial  sea  is 
defined  by  reference  to  co-ordinates  set  out  in  the  Transfrontier  Shipment  of  Waste  Regulations 
2007 (S.I. 2007/1711) (“the TSWR 2007”). 
The  English  offshore  area  and  the  Scottish  offshore  area  are  areas  of  sea  which  lie  beyond  the 
territorial sea adjacent to the United Kingdom (see Schedule 2). The co-ordinates of the Scottish 
border  (which  is  used  to  differentiate  the  English  offshore  area  and  the  Scottish  offshore  area) 
coincide  with  the  relevant  co-ordinates  of  the  Scottish  border  within  the  meaning  given  by 
regulation 4A(2) of the TSWR 2007. 
Part 2 provides for civil enforcement by the Environment Agency and NRW who may— 
(a)  give enforcement notices requiring a person to take action (including to stop doing any 
thing); 
(b)  take action where an action in an enforcement notice has not been complied with; 
(c)  give  a  penalty  notice  to  a  person  requiring  payment  of  a  civil  penalty  not  exceeding 
£200,000; 
(d)  give a costs recovery notice requiring payment of costs relating to enforcement; 
 
34

(e)  start  proceedings  in  the  County  Court  or  High  Court  where  other  remedies  would  be 
ineffectual. 
A  person  may  appeal  to  the  First-tier  Tribunal  against  an  enforcement  notice,  civil  penalty 
decision or a costs recovery notice (see regulations 8(8), 10(11), 13(11) and 15). 
Parts 3 and 4 respectively provide for enforcement by DAERA and SEPA who may— 
(a)  give enforcement notices requiring a person to take action (including to stop doing any 
thing); 
(b)  take action where an action in an enforcement notice has not been complied with; 
(c)  give a costs recovery notice requiring payment of costs relating to enforcement. 
A  person  may  appeal  to  the  planning  appeals  commission  in  Northern  Ireland  against  an 
enforcement  notice  or  costs  recovery  notice  given  by  DAERA.  A  person  may  appeal  to  the 
Scottish Ministers against an enforcement notice or costs recovery notice given by SEPA. Further 
provisions relating to appeals to the Scottish Ministers are set out in Schedule 3. 
Regulation  32  amends  the  Environmental  Regulation  (Enforcement  Measures)  (Scotland)  Order 
2015 (the “ERO 2015”) to add the offences in regulation 41 to the list of offences for which SEPA 
may take enforcement action under the ERO 2015. 
Regulation  33  confers  power  on  customs  officials  to  assist  with  enforcement  by  seizing  and 
detaining material. 
Regulation 34 confers power on the enforcing authority and Welsh Ministers to share information 
obtained during the performance of certain functions related to the Mercury Regulation with other 
persons. 
Regulation  35  confers  power  on  the  enforcing  authority  to  give  information  notices  requiring  a 
person to give information. 
Regulation  39  confers  power  on  the  Secretary  of  State  to  assist  with  enforcement  in  respect  of 
offshore installations. 
Part  7  creates  offences  relating  to  the  provisions  of  the  Mercury  Regulation  which  are  listed  in 
Schedule  1,  enforcement  notices,  information  notices  and  activities  performed  under  the 
Regulations by customs officials and the Secretary of State. 
Part 8 contains amendments to other legislation. 
A full regulatory impact assessment has not been produced for this instrument as no impact on the 
private or voluntary sectors is foreseen. 
  
  
© Crown copyright 2017 
Printed  and  published  in  the  UK  by  The  Stationery  Office  Limited  under  the  authority  and  superintendence  of  Jeff  James, 
Controller of Her Majesty’s Stationery Office and Queen’s Printer of Acts of Parliament. 
 
35

 
 
UK201712041010   12/2017   19585 
http://www.legislation.gov.uk/id/uksi/2017/1200