This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'NOx emission tests'.


 
EUROPEAN COMMISSION 
JOINT

 
 RESEARCH CENTRE (JRC)  
C4-
 
DIRECTORATE FOR ENERGY, TRANSPORT & CLIMATE 
SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORT UNIT 
 
                   WPK 4845 REDEEM 
           
 
 
Progress report Real Driving Emissions of new diesel vehicles (REDEEM)  
2017 Progress report on the Procedure for selecting vehicles and subsequent 
start of actual testing. 
 
 
The  purpose  of  this  document  is  to  provide  DG  ENV  with  an 
independent  assessment  of  the  real-driving  pollutant  emissions 
(specifically NOx and/or PN) of new light-duty vehicles. 
 
 
Introduction:   
Air pollution remains the most important environmental cause of premature death in 
the EU as well as globally. Despite notable improvements during the last decades, 
poor air quality continues to cause over 400.000 premature deaths in the EU each 
year.  These  figures  represent  only  a  fraction  of  the  health  and  environmental 
impacts  which  extend  to  acute  and  chronic  respiratory,  cardiovascular  and  other 
diseases  and  associated  socio-economic  costs.  The  European  Clean  Air 
Programme  considers  the  high  concentrations  of  particulate  matter,  nitrogen 
dioxide and ground-level ozone of most concern. Hence the strategic objectives are 
set  accordingly  based  on  an  extensive  evaluation  and  impact  assessment.  It  is 
furthermore  noted  that  EU  air  quality  standards  are  less  strict  than  the  specific 
guideline  values  provided  by  World  Health  Organization  (WHO).  To  achieve 
compliance  with  the EU  air  quality  standards  and,  in the  long  term,  move  towards 
those stated in the WHO guidelines, air pollutant emissions need to be reduced at 
local, national and transboundary levels. 
The  successive  revisions  of  the  EU  type  approval  legislation  aimed  at  reducing 
emissions from cars through the introduction of the respective EURO standards (1-
 
Page 1 of 11 
File Name  
Progress report Real Driving Emissions of new diesel vehicles (REDEEM) 2017 
Progress Report-C4 DOCUMENT FOR POLICY SUPPORT_Dec_2017.doc 
Based on 
Document  
 

  
6). The latest focus was on PM and NOx. The latter was the main focus of the Euro 
6  norm  for  passenger  cars  which  came  into  force  in  September  2014  (albeit  still 
relying on standardized laboratory tests). However, in 2011, also the JRC identified 
that cars actually emit more than the legal standards under real driving conditions, 
thereby  confirming  earlier  speculations  about  a  growing  problem  in  this  field.  The 
difference in emissions can be anywhere between 2 to 20 times the legal emission 
limits. 
These  high  real-driving  emissions  create  a  direct  challenge  to  Member  States  in 
terms of meeting their air quality objectives set for the purpose of protecting citizens 
against  the  harmful  effects  of  air  pollution.  Despite  the  growing  consequences  on 
the problem, it remained difficult to gather the political will to act. The Volkswagen 
case has brought this matter to the forefront of the political agenda both in the EU 
and  in  the  Member  States,  and  has  undermined  consumer  confidence  in  the  car 
industry and the regulator. 
The  overall  objective  of  this  Administrative  Agreement  is  to  gain  targeted 
independent  evidence  and  assessments  about  the  sector's  progress  in  reducing 
real-driving exhaust emission levels of air pollutants, especially NOx and PN, from 
new vehicles added to the EU market. 
Undersigning  the  Administrative  Agreement  №  070201/2016/743134/SER/ENV.C3 
DG  Environment  (DG  ENV),  requested  the  DG  Joint  Research  Centre  (JRC),  an 
independent  assessment  of  the  real  driving  pollutant  emissions  (specifically  NOx 
from diesel vehicles, later PN from petrol vehicles was also requested) of new light-
duty  vehicles.  Efforts  will  focus  on  the  most  popular  new  diesel  and  petrol 
passenger  car  models  available  in  the  EU  with  the  aim  to:  (i)  provide  the 
Commission  and  the  public  with  information  about  the  level  of  real  driving 
emissions,  (ii)  provide  technical  input  for  the  further  development  of  vehicle 
emissions  policy  by  the  Commission,  and  (iii)  support  informed  decision  making 
towards a voluntary system for the identification of low-emission vehicles. 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 2 of 11 
 

link to page 4 Procedure for selecting vehicles 
The  JRC  has  been  performed  real  world  testing  of  light  duty  vehicles  for  many 
years now, as documented in several publications. JRC has also been fully involved 
in the preparation of the RDE acts, supporting discussions with scientific evidence 
throughout  the  whole  process  and  has  been  actively  involved  in  setting  new 
emission factors for use in air quality modelling through the ERMES group. 
DG-ENV  requested  that  efforts  will  focus  on  testing  and  assessing  10  of the most 
popular  new  diesel  and  petrol  models  on  the  market,  as  these  are  assumed  to 
contribute  most  to  total  emissions,  especially  in  urban  areas.  This  will  provide 
further  technical  input  to  vehicle  emissions  policy  considerations  by  the 
Commission, particularly in relation to considerations towards setting up a voluntary 
system for identification of low emission vehicles. Another objective is to provide a 
better  indication  of  the  current  state  of  real  driving  emissions  to  the  Commission 
and the public at large.  
As required in the Regulation 443/2009, Members States have to record information 
on each new passenger cars registered in its territory. This information is recorded 
by  the  European  environment  Agency  and  made  available  through  a  publically 
available dataset. These data were filtered and summarized in tidy data, based on 
the type approval number and make of the vehicle before to be cross-checked with 
consolidated  data  from  European  Automobile  Manufacturers  Association  (ACEA) 
registered for the enlarged Europe. Figure 1 presents the 2016 registration number 
of passenger cars in EU broken down by main group of manufacturer as defined in 
the ACEA data.  
It  has  to  be  noted  that  ACEA  data  includes  registration  made  in  EU28  (excluding 
Malta  and  Cyprus)  and  from  Iceland,  Norway  and  Switzerland.  Data  from  EEA 
includes  registration  made  in  EU28.  This  difference  can  explain  the  higher 
registration  number  displayed  by  the  ACEA.  In  addition,  the  tidy  data  process  on 
the EEA original dataset may also result in discarded data (misspelling or wrongly 
annotated  entry)  which  resulted  in  lower  registration  number  in  the  final  dataset. 
The total number of  new registration of  passenger car in  2016 obtained  after data 
Page 3 of 11 

processing (excluding small-volume1 and niche manufacturers2) from the EEA and 
ACEA sources were 13.87M and 15.11M respectively. 
Figure 1: New passenger car registrations in EU28 (source EEA) and in enlarged Europe (source ACEA) broken 
down by main vehicle manufacturer groups. 
VAG
RENAULT
PSA
JAPAN
EA)
FORD
AC .cc
G.M.
(a s
Source
p
BMW - Mini
u
ACEA
ro
g
KOREA

EEA
re
ut
DAIMLER
c
afu
FIAT
n
a
M
TOYOTA
OTHERS
JAGUAR LAND ROVER
PORSCHE
0
1
2
3
New Registration [M]
As  the  project  was  focussed  on  high  sales  vehicles  and  technologies,  small-
volume 3  and  niche  manufacturers 4  were  excluded  from  the  testing  program  for 
2017. The remaining car manufacturers were included and considered for the entire 
selection  process.  The  choice  of  the  regions  and  the  grouping  for  the  selected 
1 Manufacturers responsible for less than 10 000 new vehicle registrations per year. 
2 Manufacturers responsible for 10 000 to 300 000 new vehicle registrations per year. 
3 Manufacturers responsible for less than 10 000 new vehicle registrations per year. 
4 Manufacturers responsible for 10 000 to 300 000 new vehicle registrations per year. 
Page 4 of 11 

  
manufacturers  was  purely  arbitrary  and  only  meant  to  ensure  that  vehicles  are 
picked throughout the different regions and possibly for most manufacturers. 
 
JRC  selected  top  best-selling  models  on  the  EU  market  following  the  criteria 
described  below.  This  section  summarizes  a  list  of  selection  criteria,  to  ensure  a 
wide and fair coverage of the European market. 
 
Vehicle Selection criteria 
 
1. Vehicle Types and Segments: 
- A&B: Mini and Small cars 
- C: Medium cars 
- D&E: Large and executive cars 
- Light Commercial Vehicles 
 
2. Vehicle Emissions Control and Powertrain Technologies (Euro 6+): 
- Diesel (EGR+SCR+DPF, EGR+LNT+DPF,...) 
- Gasoline (PFI, GDI, GDI + GPF,...) 
 
3. Mainstream" manufacturers (EU and non-EU) to choose from: 
- DE: VW (VW/Skoda/Seat), BMW, Daimler, Audi 
- US/DE: Ford, Opel 
- FR: Renault (Renault, Dacia), PSA (Peugeot, Citroen, DS) 
- IT/UK/SE: FCA (Fiat, Jeep), JLR (Jaguar Land Rover), Mini, Volvo 
- Japan: Toyota, Honda, Suzuki, Nissan, Mitsubishi, Mazda 
- Korea: Hyundai, Kia 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 5 of 11 
 

  
 
 
Table 2: Vehicles selected to be tested in the laboratory and under RDE and their characteristics. 
 
 
 
Segment 
Engine  After-treatment 
Engine 
Engine 
Euro 
type 
displacement 
power 
(cm3) 
(kW) 
Fiat Panda 

PFI 
TWC 
1242 
51 
Euro 6b - 2016 
Audi A1 

GDI 
TWC 
999 
70 
Euro 6b - 2016 
Renault Twingo 

PFI 
TWC 
 
 
Euro 6b - 2017 
Opel Astra 

GDI 
TWC 
999 
77 
Euro 6b - 2017 
VW Golf 

TDI 
DOC+ DPF+LNT 
1968 
110 
Euro 6b - 2015 
Kia Sportage 

TDI 
DOC+ LNT+ DPF 
1685 
85 
Euro 6b - 2017 
Peugeot 308 

TDI 
DOC+ DPF+SCR 
 
 
Euro 6d-TEMP - 
2017 
VW Tiguan 

GDI 
TWC+ GPF 
 
 
Euro 6d-TEMP - 
2017 
BMW 530 

TDI 
DOC+ LNT+ SCR+ DPF 
2993 
193 
Euro 6b - 2016 
Peugeot Partner 

HDI 
DOC+ DPF+SCR 
1560 
73 
Euro 6b - 2015 
 
 
 
Vehicles test procedure 
 
The selected vehicles are tested in the laboratory under the NEDC and the WLTP. 
The  test  performed  using  the  NEDC  is  needed  to  ensure  that  vehicle  is  in  good 
operating  conditions.  The experience  gain  over  these  years  shows  that  a  vehicles 
that  is  type-approved  under  the  NEDC  will  present  emission  factors  close  to  its 
corresponding Euro standard. Hence, using the NEDC will give a first indication of 
the vehicle fitness. On the other hand, the WLTP test is need to obtained the CO2 
emission factors that will be used for the data processing of the on-road data during 
RDE. 
 
Once the laboratory testing are performed the selected vehicles are tested on-road. 
Vehicles are tested using state of the art PEMS equipment for measuring of all RDE 
regulated  pollutants  in  accordance  with  applicable  RDE  provisions.  It  should  be 
 
Page 6 of 11 
 

ensured that the main part of testing is performed in line with RDE trip requirements 
(i.e.,  urban/rural/motorway  shares)  and  boundary  conditions.  Additional  data 
coming from testing outside the scope of RDE parameters and boundary conditions 
will also be produced. On-road tests were performed following four different routes, 
namely Esperia, Labiena, Sacromonte e Milano (see below).  
The routes Esperia and Labiena were performed as RDE compliant tests and also 
tests  that  were  driving  dynamically,  i.e.,  aiming  at  exceeding  b*A  boundary.  The 
route  Sacromonte  give  address  the  positive  gain  boundary  as  during  this  test  we 
reaches  1100  m  above  sea  level  and  1800m  cumulative  gain.  Finally,  the  route 
Milano  foresees  a  motorway  share  longer  than  what  is  required,  and  allowed,  in 
RDE legislation allowing evaluating the effect  of long motorway driving.  This route 
also  include  city  driving,  which  is  of  paramount  importance  to  study  the 
performance of the vehicle and its emission control systems in actual cities. 
The different routes and their main features are described below: 
Page 7 of 11 



Route# 1 - Esperia 
Total Distance [km] 
 Ca. 79
Urban Rural Motorway Distance Shares [%] 
 38.5 – 27.5 – 34.0
Average speed [km/h] 
 48.8
Average urban speed [km/h] 
 27.5
Cumulative altitude gain [m/100km] 
 631
Page 8 of 11 



Route# 2 - Labiena 
Total Distance [km] 
 Ca. 94
Urban Rural Motorway Distance Shares [%] 
 36.7 – 25.7 – 37.6
Average speed [km/h] 
 51.0
Average urban speed [km/h] 
 27.5
Cumulative altitude gain [m/100km] 
 739
Page 9 of 11 



Route# 3 - Sacromonte 
Total Distance 
 Ca. 62
Urban Rural Motorway Distance Shares [%] 
 95.5 – 4.5 – 0%
Average speed [km/h] 
 34.5
Average urban speed [km/h] 
 33.8
Cumulative altitude gain [m/100km] 
 1800
Page 10 of 11 



Route# 4 - Milano 
Total Distance 
 Ca. 141
Urban Rural Motorway Distance Shares [%] 
 30.1 – 13.7 – 56.2
Average speed [km/h] 
 60.3
Average urban speed [km/h] 
 30.9
Cumulative altitude gain [m/100km] 
 374
Page 11 of 11