This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Financing the distribution of dairy products as part of the response to humanitarian crises'.

link to page 1 link to page 4 link to page 5 link to page 5 link to page 7 link to page 8 link to page 10 link to page 15 link to page 17


Ref. Ares(2018)3414598 - 27/06/2018
Ref. Ares(2018)4147635 - 07/08/2018
 
 
 
 
Milk contribution from the European Union 
WFP Syria 
Update as of 1 February 2017 
 
 
1. 
Background, Receipts and Distributions to Date ................................................................ 1 
2. 
Documentation Process ................................................................................................. 4 
3. 
Testing of UHT Milk ....................................................................................................... 5 
4. 
Mitigation Measures and Way Forward ............................................................................. 5 
Annex 1: Label placed on milk cartons included in GFA ................................................................ 7 
Annex 2: Consignments and Expiry Dates .................................................................................. 8 
Annex 3: WFP Specifications for UHT Milk ................................................................................ 10 
Annex 4: Photos from WFP’s Warehouse and Distributions at Schools .......................................... 15 
Annex 5: Syria CONOPS Map .................................................................................................. 17 
 
 
1. Background, Receipts and Distributions to Date 
The objective for the project is to distribute the milk in the WFP supported schools together with the 
fortified date bars across two academic years (2016-2017 and 2017-2018). WFP’s school activities take 
place in schools located in areas that have a high prevalence of food insecurity, high number of IDPs 
and low education indicators; during 2017 the programme aims to reach up to 750,000 children. The 
project is in line with the objectives of the European Commission’s Implementing Decision (ECHO/-
ME/BUD/2016/01000),  Financing  the  distribution  of  dairy  products  as  part  of  the  response  to 
humanitarian crises from the general budget of the European Union
, which state that “The humanitarian 
actions financed under this Decision shall be implemented in order to address food and nutrition needs 
of internally displaced persons, refugees and other vulnerable people affected by humanitarian crises” 
(article 2(1)).  
According to Syrian regulations, it is generally not permitted to import liquid milk into Syria from non-
Arabic countries and WFP therefore had to work with all relevant authorities to obtain an exemption 
and pave the way for the generous contribution from the European Union. Nonetheless, despite the 
obtained approvals, the milk still had to undergo extensive testing as outlined in Section 3. Prior to the 
departure  of  the  vessel  from  the  countries  of  origin,  the  producers  also  had  to  comply  with 
documentation requirements as outlined in Section 2.  
Preliminary plans had called for the first batch of milk to arrive at the port of Lattakia in Syria by mid-
August  in  time  for  the  commencement  of  the  new  academic  year  in  September.  However,  due  to 
challenges faced with Syrian customs regulations, the first shipment did not arrive into Lattakia until 
the latter half of October 2016. Syria has a strong regulatory framework related to food, and therefore 



 
page 2 
 
 
upon arrival into Syria, the UHT milk underwent thorough testing (details in Section 3) before it was 
possible to transfer the milk to WFP warehouses in late November.  
The quantities received by month are outlined below; however, the month refers to when the batch is 
received  at  the  port  level,  not  when  all  required  testing  had  been  completed  and  the  commodities 
transferred to WFP warehouses for onward dispatch.  It should be noted that WFP is not allowed to 
move  the  commodities  from  the  port  to  WFP’s  warehouses  until  all  documents  have  been  properly 
legalized and submitted to the veterinary directorate.  
Net quantity received (MT) 
Month 
as of 30 January 2017 
October 
                   1,496.668  
November 
                   1,047.857  
December 
                      740.139  
January 
                   1,220.228  
Total 
                4,504.892  
 
The  first  quantities  received  in  October  and  November  were  scheduled  for  almost  immediate 
distribution.  However,  due  to  the  aforementioned  delays,  some  of  the  quantities  were  no  longer 
compliant with Syrian regulations, which have two stipulations related to shelf life: 
1)  The shelf life of UHT milk in Syria is six months compared to nine months in European Union 
countries; and  
2)  Food items such as UHT milk need to arrive in Syria with at least half of its shelf life remaining.  
The majority of the milk that arrived in the first batches had a “best by date” of late January or early 
February and consequently was not compliant with Syrian regulations. As a consequence of the short 
shelf  life  of  the  initial  batches,  WFP  was  negotiating  and  dealing  with  no  less  than  six  different 
governmental ministries, the Prime Minister’s office as well as departments at the governorate level. 
Actors  included  Ministry  of  Foreign  Affairs,  Ministry  of  Local  Administration,  Ministry  of  of  Health, 
Ministry of Agriculture and Agrarian Reforms, Ministry of Internal Trade, and the Customs Department 
of the Ministry of Finance which enforces the food import laws amongst other key actors.  
Following  extensive  efforts,  the  milk  was  approved  for 
usage  despite  the  shorter  shelf  life.  Hence,  distributions 
started  in  the  schools  during  December  as  seen  in  the 
photo  as  well  as  in  the  larger  photo  gallery  in  Annex  4. 
During  December  2016  and  January  2017,  an  estimated 
239,000  children  in  four  different  governorates 
(Damascus,  Tartous,  Hama  and  Homs)  received  milk 
together with the fortified date bars. A carton with 200 ml 
of UHT milk provides 120 kcal, while an 80 g fortified date 
bar provides 340 kcal for a combined 460 kcal per school 
day or almost 30 percent of the daily energy requirement 
for school children of that age.  




 
page 3 
 
 
In  spite  of  the  successful  distributions,  there  were  concerns  that  WFP 
would not be able to distribute all the milk with a “best by date” of late 
January or early February, particularly as Syrian schools observe a winter 
break during the month of January. This prompted the need to identify 
an alternative way of distributing the milk to school age children to avoid 
any possible destruction of the commodities and to ensure effective use 
of  the  contribution.  Following  extensive  consultations  with  WFP’s 
nutrition  advisor  and  the  Nutrition  Sector,  a  decision  was  reached  to 
include some of the milk into its standard food rations to reach families 
with children with the understanding that the distribution of milk under 
the  general  food  assistance  (GFA)  modality  is  likely  to  be  a  one-off 
mitigation action as a direct response to an unforeseen circumstance.  
WFP, as an active participant in the Nutrition Sector, is cognizant of the 
potential risk of milk being utilized as breast milk substitute. Hence, the 
situation  was  shared  with  the  Sector,  and  in  close  coordination  and 
agreement with the Sector a number of preventive measures were put 
in place to minimize the risk and to ensure that the donation would be 
used only by the intended beneficiaries, i.e. children between the ages 
of five and 12. The following measures were implemented to sensitize 
both the partners that would distribute the food rations as well as the families that would receive the 
milk.  
 
Large adhesive labels advising the specific age group targeted by the 
milk  were  placed  on  each  distributed  carton  of  milk.  The  label  used 
both visual and written communication in Arabic stating that the milk 
is only to be consumed by children between five and 12 years of age. 
The label can be seen in the photo as well as in Annex 1.  
 
WFP’s cooperating partners carrying out the actual distributions were 
sensitized by WFP staff, so that they in turn could advise beneficiaries 
on the proper usage of the milk. WFP staff maintained a high level of 
vigilance at the distribution points in Aleppo, Homs, Hama and Tartous 
to ensure that beneficiary families received clear instructions. 
 
Regular post distribution monitoring is ongoing and will also follow-up 
on compliance with distribution protocols. 
To date, the majority of this milk has been used for the response in Aleppo, where WFP has scaled up 
its response to the dire situation in the city following the siege and long unrest. An estimated 145,000 
children  have  so  far  benefitted  from  the  distributions  done  within  the  framework  of  GFA.  While 
distribution to children within the framework of the GFA programme was not covered by the proposal, 
it is nonetheless in line with the objectives stated in the European Commission’s Implementing Decision 
focusing on vulnerable Syrians.     
A summary of receipts to date as well as distributions in schools and through general food assistance 
can be seen in the table below.  
 
 


 
page 4 
 
 
Details 
  
Quantity (in MT)  Percentage 
Total quantity of milk received as of 31 January 
  
            
  
4,484.889  
              
Total quantity of milk distributed in schools 
  
1,082.860  
24% 
Damascus 
      543.624  
  
  
Tartous  
      160.131     
  
Homs 
      267.865     
  
Hama 
      111.240     
  
Total quantity distributed to children age 5-12 under 
                
general food assistance (GFA)  
  
405.524  
9% 
Aleppo 
      200.000  
  
  
Tartous 
        80.000  
  
  
Homs 
          6.137  
  
  
Lattakia 
      119.387  
  
  
Quantity still remaining to be distributed 
             2,988.462  
67% 
 
The quantity that still remains to be distributed as of 31 January has vastly different expiry dates (as 
seen in Annex 2). All quantities with an expiry date of 12 February and onward will be distributed within 
the framework of the school meals programme.    
 
2. Documentation Process  
There is an extensive documentation process required in order to bring the milk to Syria. As per the 
agreement, the milk was procured in Ireland and Portugal respectively.  
For the shipment from Ireland, both the shipment documents and commercial documents need to be 
stamped by the following authorities in the exact order:  
1)  The company in Ireland;  
2)  Chamber of Commerce of Ireland; 
3)  Arab-Irish Chamber of Commerce in Ireland; 
4)  Union Chamber of Commerce in Damascus; and  
5)  Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MOFA) in Damascus 
For  the  milk  shipment  from  Portugal  two  parallel  processes  must  take  place:  one  for  shipping 
documents, and another for the commercial invoices, as the shipment originates from Portugal, while 
the supplier is registered in the Netherlands.  The approval process (legalization) is as follows: 
For the shipping documents (from Lactogal) 
1)  The company in Portugal;  
2)  Chamber of Commerce in Portugal;  
3)  Arab-Portuguese Chamber of Commerce in Portugal;  


 
page 5 
 
 
4)  MOFA in Portugal;  
5)  Syrian Embassy in France (this Embassy covers Portugal);  
6)  Union Chamber of Commerce in Damascus; and  
7)  MOFA in Damascus 
For the commercial invoices (from Hoogwegt) 
1)  The company (Hoogwegt) in the Netherlands;  
2)  Chamber of Commerce of the Netherland;  
3)  MOFA in the Netherlands;  
4)  Syrian Embassy in Brussels (this Embassy covers the Netherlands);  
5)  Union Chamber of Commerce in Damascus, and  
6)  MOFA in Damascus 
 
3. Testing of UHT Milk 
As  explained  in  Section  1,  imported  UHT  milk  is  subject  to  an  extensive  regime  of  tests  to  ensure 
adequate food safety measures. The types of tests can be grouped into three different categories as 
illustrated in the table below.  
Physical tests 
Chemical tests 
Microbiological tests 
 
Organoleptic 
 
Fat content 
 
Total plate count  
characteristics: smell, 
 
Non-fat solids 
 
Salmonella 
color, taste, texture, 
 
Acidity 
 
Coliforms 
impurities and foreign 
 
Alcohol test 
matter 
 
Filling size 
 
 
Shelf life 
 
Markings  
 
Fungi visual test 
 
The required microbiological testing of UHT milk requires at least 21 days at the laboratory in Syria.  
In recognition of the extensive testing regime and strict Syrian standards and regulations, the Food 
Quality & Safety team located at WFP’s regional bureau in Cairo and at headquarters in Rome developed 
a detailed specification sheet for UHT milk to be imported into Syria. The document can  be seen in 
Annex 3.  
 
4. Mitigation Measures and Way Forward  
Based on the lessons learned from the initial received batches, WFP has already taken several steps to 
mitigate any further challenges.  
The Syria Country Office is currently in dialogue with the Ministry of Foreign Affairs to: 
 
Streamline and clarify the documentation requirement for the legalization process;  


 
page 6 
 
 
 
Reduce some steps to shorten the overall processing time; and 
 
Adopt the European standard shelf life for milk (nine months) rather than the Syrian standard shelf 
life (six months) for the milk donated by the European Union to WFP’s operations in Syria.  
Furthermore, as highlighted in Section 2, WFP Syria is currently engaged in discussions with the two 
suppliers in order to: 
 
Provide consignments in large lots with the same expiry date, rather than numerous small lots of 
varying expiry dates which cause significant delays due to the extensive testing regime (as can be 
seen in Annex 2, the current stock has 46 different expiry dates); and  
 
Improve  the  consistency  and  accuracy  of  documentation  to  avoid  delays  in  custom  clearance 
process.  
 
Another important step has been the development of the specification sheet to ensure that suppliers 
are fully aligned and aware of all Syria standards and regulations.  
 



 
page 7 
 
 
Annex 1: Label placed on milk cartons included in GFA 
 

 


 
page 8 
 
 
Annex 2: Consignments and Expiry Dates  
 
Expiry date 
 Qty (MT)  
24-Jan-17 
                      0.667  
January 
29-Jan-17 
                      0.667  
12-Feb-17 
                    17.336  
February 
18-Feb-17 
                      1.068  
19-Feb-17 
                    29.907  
10-Mar-17 
                    12.817  
19-Mar-17 
                      8.668  
20-Mar-17 
                  117.485  
21-Mar-17 
                  141.720  
March 
22-Mar-17 
                  109.258  
23-Mar-17 
                    89.999  
25-Mar-17 
                    45.342  
26-Mar-17 
                    33.506  
1-Apr-17 
                    80.063  
5-Apr-17 
                  181.500  
6-Apr-17 
                    18.681  
13-Apr-17 
                    10.679  
14-Apr-17 
                    14.658  
April 
15-Apr-17 
                    54.017  
16-Apr-17 
                  116.728  
17-Apr-17 
                    39.341  
28-Apr-17 
                      2.001  
29-Apr-17 
                    80.016  
30-Apr-17 
                  108.021  
1-May-17 
                  100.686  
2-May-17 
                    72.680  
3-May-17 
                    79.004  
4-May-17 
                  100.903  
5-May-17 
                    65.721  
6-May-17 
                    71.098  
May  
17-May-17 
                      7.335  
18-May-17 
                  110.633  
19-May-17 
                    99.352  
20-May-17 
                    47.342  
21-May-17 
                  110.723  
22-May-17 
                    96.625  


 
page 9 
 
 
23-May-17 
                    80.646  
24-May-17 
                    73.408  
6-Jun-17 
                    38.676  
7-Jun-17 
                    90.022  
8-Jun-17 
                    73.352  
9-Jun-17 
                      7.334  
June 
10-Jun-17 
                  100.692  
11-Jun-17 
                  102.026  
12-Jun-17 
                    58.015  
13-Jun-17 
                    88.688  
Total 
  
             2,989.107  
 
 


 
page 10 
 
 
Annex 3: WFP Specifications for UHT Milk 
 
 
Technical Specifications for 
UHT MILK 
 
Specification code: DAIMLK010 
V16.0 is the 1st version of WFP 
Version: V16.0  
specification for Sterilized milk 
Date of issue: 01/06/2016 
Developed: 
 
Reviewed: 
 
Approved
 
1. SCOPE 
This standard prescribes the requirements for UHT milk that WFP receives from donors or purchases then 
distributes to beneficiaries. 
2. STANDARDS AND RECOMMENDATIONS 
The specification of UHT milk was elaborated after consulting the standards of potential recipient countries, 
of international regulations and the requirements of country of origins. Since the standards and regulations 
of countries of origins (such as EU countries) and recipient countries are quite variable, the first version of 
the specification illustrates principle requirements and controls to ensure that the products will be accepted 
by main potential recipient countries. Further update would be conducted to make the specification fully fit 
for WFP operations.      
The  following  referenced  standards  are  indispensable  for the  application of this  specification.  For  dated 
references,  only  the  edition  cited  applies.  For  undated  references,  the  latest  edition  of  the  referenced 
standard (including any amendments) applies. 

CAC/MRL 02-2006, Maximum residue limits for veterinary drugs in foods 

CAC/RCP 57, Code of hygiene practice for milk and milk products 

CODEX STAN 1: General standard for the labelling of pre-packaged foods 

CODEX STAN 192, Codex general standard for food additives 

CODEX STAN 193, Codex general standard for contaminants and toxins in foods 

CODEX STAN 206, General Standard for the Use of Dairy Terms  

Milk and Milk products_ Codex second edition, 2011. 
 
 


 
page 11 
 
 
3. DEFINITIONS 
3.1 Products  
Products are Sterilized Milk that are covered by the provision of this specification.  
3.2 Raw cow milk  
The normal mammary secretion of cow obtained from one or more milkings without either addition to it or 
extraction from it, intended for consumption as liquid milk or for further processing. 
3.3 Homogenization  
Process by which milk fat globules are finely divided and interspersed to form a homogeneous product so 
as to prevent the fat from floating on the surface and adhering to the inside of the container.  
3.4 Commercial sterilization  
The  application  of  heat  at  high  temperatures  for  a  time  sufficient  to  render  milk  or  milk  products 
commercially  sterile,  thus  resulting  in  products  that  are  safe  and  microbiological  stable  at  room 
temperature. 
4. PRODUCT SPECIFICATIONS 
4.1 General requirements 
4.1.1 Contaminant 
The products covered by this specification shall comply with the Maximum Levels for contaminants that are 
specified for the product in the General Standard for Contaminants and Toxins in Food and Feed (CODEX 
STAN 193-1995).  
The  milk  used  in  the  manufacture  of  the  products  covered  by  this  specification  shall  comply  with  the 
Maximum Levels for contaminants and toxins specified for milk by the General Standard for Contaminants 
and Toxins in Food and Feed 
(CODEX STAN 193-1995) and with the maximum residue limits for veterinary 
drug residues and pesticides established for milk by the CAC. 
4.1.2 Hygiene 
It is recommended that the products covered by the provisions of this specification be prepared and handled 
in accordance with the appropriate sections of the General Principles of Food Hygiene (CAC/RCP 1-1969), 
the Code of Hygienic Practice for Milk and Milk Products (CAC/RCP 57-2004) and other relevant Codex texts 
such  as  Codes  of  Hygienic  Practice  and  Codes  of  Practice.  The  products  should  comply  with  any 
microbiological criteria established in accordance with the Principles and Guidelines for the Establishment 
and Application of Microbiological Criteria Related to Foods 
(CAC/GL 21-1997). 
4.1.3 Food additives 
No additives are allowed.  
4.1.4 Fit for human consumption guarantee 
Suppliers shall have to check the quality of the products and guarantee that the products covered by the 
provision of this specification are ‘fit for human consumption’. 


 
page 12 
 
 
4.2 Specific requirements  
4.2.1 Product type 
The products shall be made from cow milk that is homogenised, standardised to a specific level of fat and 
processed to be commercially sterile. Fat level and type of milk (Full fat milk, Fat reduced milk, or Fat free 
milk) are specified in the contract. 
4.2.2 Characteristics 
The products shall also comply with all requirements from table 1.  
4.2.3 Shelf life 
The products shall retain table 1 qualities for at least 6 months from date of manufacture when stored dry 
at ambient temperatures prevalent in the country of destination.  
5. PACKAGING 
The products covered by the provision of this specification must be packed in appropriate packaging which 
safeguard the hygienic, nutritional, technological, and organoleptic qualities of the product. The containers, 
including packaging material, shall be made of substances which are safe and suitable for their intended 
use. They should not impart any toxic substance or undesirable odour or flavour to the product. 
5.1 Primary packaging 
Unless otherwise specified in the contract, the products shall be packed in only one type of packaging such 
as Tetra Pak® Aseptic, Combibloc® Aseptic, or equivalent. Net volume and any additional requirement are 
specified  in  the  contract.  Filled  Milk  should  occupy  at  least  90%  of  the  internal  volume  capacity  of  the 
packing unit.  
5.2 Secondary packaging 
The cartons used to pack the primary packaging of the products shall be fit for export and multiple-harsh 
handing.  The  cartons  for  15kg  of  products  (including  primary  packaging)  should  meet  the  following 
requirements:  
- Number of ply: 5  
- Total grammage: MIN. 870 gsm  
- Edge Crush Test: MIN. 12 kN/m  
Carton must be fully filled and glued. Secondary packaging (e.i. cartons with full product) must pass the drop 
test as per ISTA 2A standard (after each drop, there shall be no rupture or loss of contents).  
Two percent empty, marked cartons (included in the price) must be sent with the lot.  
Unless fully shrink wrapped pallets are used, dunnage (of strong sheets such as carton, plywood, etc.) should 
be placed inside each container at every three layers of cartons to provide the required stacking strength. 
In addition protecting material like air bag, carton, polystyrene, can be used.  
Note: For shipping containers, unless fully shrink wrapped pallet are used, and unless otherwise specified in 
the contract, kraft paper must be adhered to all internal sides, door, and floor of container. Kraft paper also 
need to be placed on the top of packaging. Desiccant needs to be placed/laid in container at appropriate 



 
page 13 
 
 
location in order to absorb moisture. Supplier needs to use high quality desiccant and calculate the quantity 
of desiccant based on: 
 
Efficiency of desiccant  
Length of time in transit in container  
Container capacity  
Supplier needs to provide in the offer the type of desiccant and quantity to be used for the consignment. If 
silica gel is used, 15 bags of at least 1 kg each must be placed in each 20 feet container.
 
6. MARKING 
The making of the products shall comply with the provisions of the General Standard for the Labelling of 
Prepackaged Foods  (CODEX  STAN 1-1985) and the  General Standard for the Use  of Dairy Terms  (CODEX 
STAN 206-1999). 
Unless otherwise specified in the contract, the products covered by the provision of this specification must 
have below making: 
  Name of the product (as per contract requirement)  
  Net content (ml)  
  Name and address of the supplier (including country of origin)  
  Production lot  
  Production date  
  Best use before date / expiration date (as per contract requirement)  
  Recommended storage condition: stored dry at ambient temperatures  
Additional marking is as per contractual agreement. 
7. STORING 
The  products  shall  be  stored  under  dry,  ventilated  and  hygienic  conditions  and  far  from  all  source  of 
contaminations.  
8. ANALYTICAL REQUIREMENTS 
As  per  contractual  agreement,  WFP  will  appoint  an  inspection  company  that  will  check  if  quality  and 
characteristics of the products match the requirements specified in table 1. Additional tests may be defined 
in case further quality assessment is required. The tests in table 1 will be performed in addition to analysis 
performed by supplier according to his own sampling plan.  
 
 


 
page 14 
 
 
Table 1: List of compulsory tests and reference methods 
No 
Tests 
Requirements 
Reference methods 
(Or equivalent, 
Full fat 
Fat reduced 
latest version) 
milk 
milk 
Fat free milk 

Fat (%, m/m)  
MIN. 3.0 
0.5 – 3.0 
MAX. 0.5  ISO 1211  
ISO 1211 and ISO 
 

Milk solids not fat (%, m/m)  
MIN. 8.25 
6731  
Acidity (expressed in lactic acid) (%, 

MAX. 0.17 
DIN 10316  
m/m)  

Alcohol test (68% ethanol)  
Negative 
 

Phosphatase test  
Negative 
ISO 11816-1  

Coliforms  
Absent in 1g 
ISO 4832  

Salmonella  
Absent in 25g 
ISO 6785  

Total Plate Count (cfu/ml)  

AOAC 986.32  

Aflatoxin M1 (mcg/kg)  
MAX. 0.1 
AOAC 986.16  
Normal in colour, smell, taste and 
texture. 
Organoleptic 
10  Organoleptic characteristics  
Homogenous and free from impurities  examination  
and foreign matters. 
Volumetric 
11  Net content (ml)  
As per contractual agreement 
measurement  
 
 
 
 
 






 
page 15 
 
 
Annex 4: Photos from WFP’s Warehouse and Distributions at Schools 
 
 
 
Milk arriving at the Port of Lattakia 
 
Milk being loaded at WFP warehouse 
 
 
 
 
 
The packaging of the milk 
 
A WFP staff member visits Abi Zaid Al Ansari elementary school in 
Tabbaleh neighbourhood in Damascus where 300 school children 
received milk for the first time, as well as locally produced date bars. 





 
page 16 
 
 
 
 
 
Eight year old Ahmed says “Milk is my favorite drink. I learned that if I 
 
Eight-year-old Zeina (left) learns about the importance of milk for her 
drink it every day, it will help me to concentrate in school and succeed in 
growth and success in school. “Milk is good for me. It gives me calcium 
my future.”  
for my bones and helps me to focus on my learning,” she said. 
 
Students at Abi Zaid Al Ansari elementary school in Tabbaleh neighbourhood in Damascus hold up their milk cartons 


 
page 17 
 
 
Annex 5: Syria CONOPS Map 
The map was developed to illustrate how the milk travels from the European Union to Syria and is stored in WFP warehouses before being 
dispatched to the schools for distribution to the school children. The map was produced in 2016 and therefore some of the indicated figures 
may have changed slightly.  
During the school year 2016-2017, WFP targets up to 750,000 children. By the spring of 2018 (for the 2017-2018 academic year), the planned 
target is one million children.   



 
page 18