This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'The EU notification procedure for services (Services Directive)'.



 
 

STRATEGY PAPER 
 
 
15 December 2014 
 
 
 
Remaining obstacles to a true single market for services 
 
 
 
 
SERVICES IN EUROPE 
 
 
  While services in Europe account for about 70% of EU GDP, cross-border provision 
of  services  is  still  underdeveloped.  Companies  still  face  many  obstacles  when 
wanting to provide their services across borders  and experience  that a true single 
market for services is not a reality yet.  
 
  At the same time, it is essential that services markets become more integrated and 
more competitive to create growth and jobs, and to be able to compete with the rest 
of the world. 
 
  Despite  the  progress  made  through  the  2006  Services  Directive,  many  barriers 
remain due to its diverse interpretation and application on the ground.  
 
  Also outside the remit of the Services Directive companies face many challenges. 
These  are  often  linked  to  diverse  national  standards,  a  lack  of  recognition  of 
professional  qualifications,  the  high  number  of  regulated  professions,  heavy 
insurance  obligations,  strains  on  company  mobility,  barriers  to  online  service 
provision (e-commerce) and complexity in tax activities. 
 
  The  remaining  barriers  are  often  sensitive  and  originate  from  national  traditions, 
making  them  difficult  to  address.  The  political  will  and  momentum  required  to  do 
this is often lacking, primarily at national level. 
 
  Yet,  if  remaining  obstacles  are  not  removed,  there  is  a  risk  of  a  structural  and 
increasing  competitive  disadvantage for  European  companies  leading  to losses  in 
terms  of  jobs  and  growth.  It  would  also  further  encourage  outsourcing  and 
relocation of services and businesses to other parts of the world.  
 
  Building a true single market for services must be a key priority for Europe. 
 
KEY FACTS AND FIGURES 
 
Services account for 71% of EU GDP and two-thirds of employment. 
 
Yet, only 20% of the services in the EU are provided across borders, accounting for just 5% of EU GDP compared 
with 17% for manufactured goods. 
 
 
Service activities falling within the scope of the 2006 Services Directive cover 46 % of EU GDP. Currently, 90% of 
the services provided in Europe are already in some way covered by EU legislation. 
 
 
75% of trade in services concerns the supply to other businesses (B2B), hence their importance for the overall 
competitiveness of the EU economy. 
 
 



 
 

STRATEGY PAPER 
 
KEY POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS  
 
 
National  governments  must  commit  to  ensuring  more  ambitious  implementation 
1  and  stronger  enforcement  of  the  Services  Directive,  which  alone  can  bring 
additional  gains  up  to  1.8%  of  EU  GDP.  It  entails  that  Member  States  need  to  revisit 
national requirements under Article 15 and 16 that were subject to poor proportionality 
analyses and adapt or remove burdensome requirements where possible, or re-assess 
if there is not a less restrictive alternative measure to achieve the same goal. 
 
To facilitate more ambitious implementation, the European Commission should clarify 
2  the concept of proportionality concerning the interpretation of Article 15 and 16 of 
the Services Directive by issuing guidelines for Member States on how to apply it when 
assessing national rules and authorisation schemes. 
 
The  European  Commission  must  stick  to  its  “zero  tolerance  policy”  by  launching 
3  infringement procedures in cases on non-compliance with the undisputable obligations 
of the Services Directive (Article 14) and other relevant EU legislation. 
 
The  European  Commission  should  identify  and  address  all  remaining  barriers  to  the 
4  free movement of services (also outside the remit of the Services Directive), taking a 
targeted,  sector-based-approach,  starting  with  the  sectors  with  greatest  economic 
significance, such as business and professional services, construction, health services, 
tourism and retail. 
 
National  governments  -  with  the  support  of  the  European  Commission  -  should 
5  reinforce the horizontal mutual recognition principle” in services. In areas where 
full  harmonisation  is  not  desirable  or feasible,  mutual  recognition  can  help  to  improve 
the functioning of Europe’s services markets by providing a certain degree of flexibility 
and  cross-border  acceptance,  for  instance  in  areas  such  as  expert  accreditation, 
authorisations or the recognition of certificates.  
 
Member States must transform the existing Points of Single Contact into fully-fledged 
6  online  business  portals  (for  goods  and  services)  offering  companies  all  the 
information  and  assistance  they  need  to  operate  across  borders  and  on  the  home 
market, including offering the possibility to complete procedures entirely online. 
 
The  European  Commission  should  reintroduce  formal  reporting  to  the 
7  Competitiveness  Council  and  the  European  Parliament  on  the  state  of  the  single 
market for services as was done until early 2012  through “information notes”  to better 
and more regularly take stock of progress made. 
 
Show  renewed  political  will  and  commitment  at  European  and  national  level. 
8  Governments  must  truly  commit  to  make  the  necessary  reforms.  Some  of  the 
remaining barriers might be sensitive to address, but once removed it will create growth 
and jobs, and enhance European competitiveness. 
 
 
 


 
 
 
STRATEGY PAPER 
 
15 December 2014 
 
 
REMAINING OBSTACLES TO A TRUE SINGLE MARKET FOR 
SERVICES 
 
MAKING THE SINGLE MARKET WORK FOR GROWTH AND JOBS 
 
 
I. 
INTRODUCTION 
 
Services  in  Europe  account  for  71  %  of  EU  GDP  and  two-thirds  of  employment, 
representing the largest chunk of the EU economy.   
 
Yet,  only  20%  of  the  services  in  the  EU  are  provided  across  borders,  accounting  for 
just 5% of EU GDP compared with 17% for manufactured goods. This figure illustrates 
what European companies are still experiencing: the single market for  services is still 
incomplete  and  persistent  obstacles  hamper  free  movement.  Moreover,  in  the 
aftermath  of  the  crisis  we  have  seen  the  emergence  of  protectionist  trends  which 
negatively affect the functioning of the single market. 
 
At the same time, many studies confirm that the growth potential in the area of services 
is  huge,  also  linked  to  the  development  of  the  digital  economy  and  e-commerce  in 
particular.  
 
In this context, BUSINESSEUROPE fully supports the “stakeholder exercise” that was 
launched by the European Commission in June this year to gather evidence regarding 
the remaining obstacles to cross-border service provision and establishment abroad.  
 
European  companies  across  the  continent  have  responded  to  the  questionnaire  and 
participated – also with the support of BUSINESSEUROPE’s member federations – to 
the stakeholder workshops that were organised in the various Member States. 
 
This  strategy  paper  is  meant  to  contribute  to  the  consultative  process  which  should 
lead  to  a  comprehensive  Commission  Report  by  mid-2015,  as  requested  by  the 
Competitiveness Council in its December 2013 Conclusions.  
 
Besides  a  thorough  analysis,  BUSINESSEUROPE  expects  the  European 
Commission  -  with  the  publication  of  its  mid-2015  report  -  to  also  present  an 
ambitious and  innovative  action  plan  to  address  the remaining  obstacles  in the 
area of services
.  
 
This  action  plan  should  go  beyond  the  challenges  linked  to  the  Services  Directive. 
Europe  needs  a  vision  and  coherent  strategy  to  be  able  to  build  a  genuine  single 
market for services. 
 
This strategy paper describes the state of the single market for services and identifies 
the  most  disrupting  remaining  barriers  to  free  movement  in  this  area  identified  by 
companies  across  Europe.  It  also  offers  concrete  recommendations  how  to  address 
some of these barriers and further integrate national service markets to create growth.  
 
BUSINESSEUROPE a.i.s.b.l 
AVENUE DE CORTENBERGH 168 – BE 1000 BRUSSELS – BELGIUM 
TEL +32 (0)2 237 65 11 – FAX +32 (0)2 231 14 45 – E-MAIL [email address] 
 
WWW.BUSINESSEUROPE.EU 
EU Transparency register 3978240953-79 
 


 
II. 
STRONG LINKS WITH MANUFACTURING 
 
Services appear at any stage in the value chain and across all sectors of the economy, 
including  manufacturing.  In  fact,  the  competitiveness  of  manufacturing  in  Europe 
greatly depends upon the availability of low-cost, high quality services.  
 
Recent figures from the World Input-Output Database indicate that 15% to 30% of the 
inputs  in  European  manufacturing  come  from  the  services  sector,  making  it  the  most 
important “raw material” of the manufacturing process. 
  
Services  also  make  our  manufacturing  exports  more  valuable.  The  OECD  has 
calculated  that  an  increase  of  1%  in  business  services  content  is  correlated  with  an 
increase between 6 and 7.5% in export prices.  
 
While  the  biggest  client  of  service  companies  are  still  service  companies,  revealing  a 
genuine  “economy  of  services”,  we  also  see  that  manufacturing  companies  are 
providing  more  and  more  additional  services  related  to  their  product(s),  a  so-called 
process of “servicification”.  
 
However,  at  present  uncompetitive  services  markets  are  holding  back  manufacturers, 
particularly the most productive firms that compete at global level.  As a matter of fact, 
since  2004,  trade  in  services  between  the  EU  and  the  rest  of  the  world  has  been 
growing  faster  than  inside  Europe.  Furthermore,  the  McKinsey  Global  Institute  has 
identified  the  lack  of  dynamism  in the  EU’s  service sectors  as the  main cause of  the 
productivity gap with the USA. 
 
At  the  moment,  we  witness  increasing  competition  from  upcoming  service  countries 
such as China and India. It will be a great challenge to prevent further outsourcing and 
relocation of European services, such as ICT and supporting services, to other parts of 
the world. 
    
It  is  clear  that  completing  the  single  market  for  services  must  be  a  top  priority  for 
Europe.  Removing  remaining  barriers  to  the  free  movement  of  services  and  further 
integrating  national  service  markets  will  make  Europe  more  competitive  and  a  more 
attractive  place  to  invest.  This  is  not  only  fundamental  for  creating  new  growth,  jobs 
and business opportunities, but also to be able to better compete at global level. 
 
 
III. 
REMAINING BARRIERS – linked to the 2006 Services Directive 
 
The  Services  Directive  adopted  in  2006  was  the  most  significant  step  forward  to 
facilitate the free movement of services since the establishment of the single market in 
1992  under  the  Single  European  Act.  Service  activities  falling  within  its  scope  cover 
46% of EU GDP.  
 
Thanks  to  the  Services  Directive  many  existing  procedures,  formalities  and 
authorisation  schemes  have  been  simplified  and  made  more  business  friendly,  in 
particular  for  service  providers  from  another  Member  State.  In  addition,  many 
unjustified and discriminatory national requirements and disproportionate burdens have 
been adapted or abolished. Also, we have seen further development of e-governance, 
also related to the establishment of the Points of Single Contact. 
 
 
Strategy paper - Remaining obstacles to a true single market for services – December 2014 
 



 
Yet,  almost  five  years  after  its  transposition  deadline,  BUSINESSEUROPE  regrets  to 
observe that the Directive is still not fully implemented in every Member State and that 
the  quality  of  implementation  greatly  differs  between  countries,  causing  barriers  to 
remain.  
 
Main challenges with implementation 
 
  Diverse  interpretation  and  application  at  local,  regional  and  national  level
Ensuring  that  all  national  and  sectoral  rules  applicable  to  service  providers  are  in 
line  with  the  Directive  and  that  its  provisions  are  indeed  correctly  applied  and 
enforced on the ground has proven to be a huge challenge. 
 
  Too  much  leeway  for  Member  States  in  implementing  the  Directive.  The 
decision to abolish certain restrictions described in Article 15 and 16, which may be 
justified for an overriding reason of general interest were left to national authorities 
to  make,  creating  a  large  area  of  discretion  for  Member  States,  a  so  called  “grey 
zone
”,  where  they  solely  decide  on  the  basis  of  proportionality  whether  a  certain 
national restriction is justified or not, and thus to adapt or remove it or not.  
 
In principle, this is justified. However, BUSINESSEUROPE observes that in several 
cases  responsible  authorities  did  not  conduct  a  proper  proportionality  analysis  for 
national  rules  and  authorisation  schemes.  As  a  result,  overly  burdensome  and 
disproportionate  national  requirements  often  remain  in  place.  Or  worse,  they  are 
kept  to  protect  local,  regional  or  national  interests  going  entirely  against  the 
European  spirit  of  the  Directive.  The  Commission’s  2010  Mutual  Evaluation 
Exercise revealed that about 34.000 requirements have remained in place. 
 
  Avoiding gold-plating is a challenge. Member States should always respect the 
substance  of  a  Directive  or  Regulation,  avoid  ambiguities  and  refrain  from  adding 
additional  requirements  (i.e.  goldplating),  which  could  lead  to  additional 
unnecessary  costs  for  businesses.  Unfortunately,  there  are  instances  where  for 
various  reasons  (e.g.  relating  to  safety)  additional  national  requirements  were 
added when implementing the Directive.  
 
This  reality  is  unacceptable,  especially  as  the  Commission  estimates  that  achieving 
ambitious and high quality implementation and stronger enforcement of the Directive in 
all Member States alone can bring additional gains of about 1.8% of EU GDP. 
 
BUSINESSEUROPE  does  not  ask  for  a  revision  of  the  Services  Directive.  The 
Directive already covers a wide range of service activities and those falling outside its 
scope are often covered by European sectoral legislation due to their specific nature or 
special  characteristics,  for  instance  in  the  area  of  financial  services  or  certain  social 
services.  In  fact,  90%  of  the  services  provided  in  Europe  are  already  in  some  way 
covered by EU legislation. 
 
Rather, the focus should be on achieving better implementation and application of the 
Directive on the ground. In this context, we fully support the Commission’s approach to 
apply  a  “zero  tolerance  policy”  through  infringement  procedures  in  cases  of  non-
compliance  with  the  undisputable  obligations  of  the  Directive  (e.g.  the  prohibited 
requirements in Article 14). 
Strategy paper - Remaining obstacles to a true single market for services – December 2014 
 



 
We  also  observe  that  the  economic  crisis  has  triggered  new  protectionist  trends  and 
has  led  to  the  emergence  of  new  barriers  to  trade.  For  example  in  Poland,  a  recent 
review  of  pharmaceutical  legislation  has  introduced  a  total  ban  on  advertising  for 
pharmacies.  The  ban  is  not  only  discriminating  pharmacies,  selling  not  only  medical 
products,  in  relation  to  other  competitors,  but  is  also  hindering  access  to  the  Polish 
market  for  pharmacies  from  different  Member  States.  Another  example  is  the  food 
supervisory fee to be introduced in Hungary (see page 12 on the retail sector). 
 
 
The Points of Single Contact 
 
Companies  can  greatly  benefit  from  the  information  and  assistance  provided  by  the 
Points  of  Single  Contact  (PSCs)  set  up  under  the  Services  Directive,  but  only  if  they 
truly relieve administrative burdens and respond well to business’ needs. 
 
Over the last years, BUSINESSEUROPE’s member federations have observed some 
progress regarding the development of the PSCs, in particular in terms of improvement 
of  the  quality  of  information,  lay-out  and  availability  of  certain  procedures  for  online 
completion.  
 
However,  progress  has  not  been  satisfactory  in  most  countries.  It  seems  that  the 
improvement of the PSCs is not a priority for most governments. 
 
What European companies want is a fully-fledged online business portal that offers 
a wide range of services in various languages beyond what is required by the Services 
Directive. All information, online procedures and formalities for doing business abroad 
should be made available through upgraded PSCs, e.g. true European online business 
portals (for goods and services) in every Member State that offer: 
 

The  possibility  to  complete  all  necessary  procedures  and  formalities  to  provide  a 
service  or  sell  a  good  domestically  or  in  another  Member  State  on  a  temporary 
basis or through establishment, entirely online through the business portal to save 
both time and costs. 
 

This requires better cooperation between management of the business portals and 
the authorities responsible for final approval of these administrative procedures. In 
general,  the  portals  should  answer  any  request  as  rapidly  as  possible.  In  many 
instances,  automatic  authorisation  (i.e.  tacit  approval)  after  a  certain  period  could 
offer a pragmatic solution.  
 

More  and  accurate  information  on  a  wide  variety  of  activities,  not  only  regarding 
services, but also goods. For instance, also including practical information needed 
for  doing  business,  such  as  information  on  applicable  labour  law,  tax  and  VAT 
rules, insurance, social security or on providing services in an online environment. 
This can already be partly achieved by creating links with websites of other relevant 
authorities, public bodies and information sources.  
 

Building  on  national  e-governance  policies,  the  business  portals  should  offer  their 
services in multiple languages to attract foreign companies and trigger investment. 
In addition, interoperability between the different national  portals must be ensured 
by offering cross-border e-signatures and user-friendly e-identification.  
Strategy paper - Remaining obstacles to a true single market for services – December 2014 
 



 
The Services Directive - BUSINESSEUROPE recommendations 
 
 
1.  Member  States  must  urgently  remove  all  remaining  discriminatory  and 
unjustified  national  requirements  –  such  as  discriminatory  residence 
requirements,  restrictions  on  multidisciplinary  activity,  “economic  needs  tests”  or 
prohibitions  on  commercial  communication  –  that  should  have  already  been 
removed by the Services Directive and avoid the introduction of new ones.  
 
2.  The  Commission  should  see  to  this  through  the  full  application  of  its  “zero 
tolerance policy”, launching infringement procedures for clear breaches of EU law. 
The European Parliament must take stock of progress made through more precise 
benchmarking, making using of “naming and shaming” and detailed reporting to put 
pressure on the Member States that are lagging behind.  
 
3.  As also requested by the Heads of State and Government in the Conclusions of the 
October  2013  European  Summit,  the  Commission  should  clarify  the  concept  of 
proportionality
  by  issuing guidelines for  Member  States  on  how  to  apply  it  when 
assessing  national  rules  and  authorisation  schemes.  On  the  basis  of  such 
guidelines,  national  authorities  should  revisit  the  national  requirements  under 
Article  15  and  16  that  were  subject  to  poor  proportionality  analyses  and  adapt  or 
remove overly burdensome requirements where possible, or re-think if there is not 
a less restrictive alternative measure to achieve the same goal. 
 
4.  When implementing  EU  legislation,  Member  States should  be  transparent  if they 
add additional burdens (gold-plating) and assess any extra costs. 
 
5.  Member States must respect the obligation in the Services Directive (Article 15 and 
35)  to  notify  the  Commission  of  any  new  laws,  regulations  or  administrative 
provisions
  which  set  national  requirements  together  with  the  reasons  for  those 
requirements. The  Commission  must  ensure  swift  and  accurate  communication  of 
the  provisions  concerned  to  the  other  Member  States.  Any  new  requirements 
should also be made public in a transparent database for companies to understand 
their  rights  and  obligations  in  the  single  market.  This  should  be  extended  to  all 
national requirements, so also outside the scope of the Services Directive. 
 
6.  Member States must establish on the basis of the existing Points of Single Contact 
and  the  agreed  2013  PSC  Charter,  online  business  portals  (for  goods  and 
services)  for  companies  to  find  all  the  information  and  assistance  they  need  for 
doing  business  across  borders  in  multiple  languages,  including  information  on 
taxation  and  social  security  and  offer  the  possibility  to  complete  administrative 
procedures and formalities entirely online. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Strategy paper - Remaining obstacles to a true single market for services – December 2014 
 



 
IV.  REMAINING BARRIERS TO FREE MOVEMENT 
 
  A lack of recognition of professional qualifications: The recognition of professional 
qualifications throughout Europe is fundamental for a well-functioning services industry 
as the free movement of labor is often a prerequisite for cross-border service provision 
and establishment abroad.  
 
Currently just 3% of EU citizens live and work in a country other than their own. There 
are several  barriers to intra-EU mobility from  language barriers,  access to information 
about  being  mobile  within  the  EU,  heavy  bureaucracy,  transfer  of  social  security 
provisions,  to  heavily  regulated  professions  and  overregulated  specialisations. 
However, one of the most prominent ones is the worry that professional and academic 
qualifications will not be recognised in another Member State (see box I).  
 
There  are  several  ongoing  initiatives  at  EU  level  to  facilitate  labour  mobility.  These 
include the implementation of the revised Professional Qualifications Directive and the 
Directive on the enforcement of rights for EU migrant workers. 
 
 
 
Box I. Example: Barriers for tour guides 
 
The practice of a (educational) tour guide  outside one’s own country can be  problematic. The 
revised Professional Qualifications  Directive requires (educational) tour guides with temporary 
cross-border  activities  to  register  with  the  competent  authority  in  the  host  Member  State.  In 
most cases, they will have to provide evidence of 1 year of professional experience within the 
last ten years. In practice this creates difficulties for two reasons:  
 
1)  Tour  guides  are  generally  self-employed.  Thus  they  are  unable  to  provide  evidence  of  a 
year continuous employment relationship, despite the fact that they often have professional 
experience of many years. 
 
2)  Tour guides are in most cases specialised in one holiday destination. Practical experience 
is  an  inevitable  prerequisite. Tour  guides  have  to  work  in  their  holiday  destination  to  gain 
that  experience.  However,  without  a  year  of  professional  experience,  guides  will  not 
receive the permission under the Directive to practice in another Member State. That leads 
to  the  result  that  any  tour  guide,  despite  an  interest  to  specialise  in  a  specific  holiday 
destination,  has  to work  in  his  or  her  own country  for  a  year  in  order  to gain  professional 
experience. Only after that period the guide will be able to practice in another country.  
 
 
 
  Burdensome insurance obligations: Certain insurance obligations can pose barriers 
to  cross-border  service  provision.  Yet,  this  issue  requires  further  examination.  The 
availability of insurance, legal insurance obligations and access to insurance can differ 
greatly  per  Member  State  and  possible  barriers  need  to  be  further  assessed  on  a 
country-by-country basis (see box II). 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Strategy paper - Remaining obstacles to a true single market for services – December 2014 
 



 
 
Box II. Example: Insurance obligations can pose barriers 
 
In France, the occupation architect is protected. In order to carry out an assignment in France 
an architect will therefore have to register for a permit. To obtain a permit the architect has to 
submit  proof  of  a  French  professional  indemnity  insurance  together  with  the  registration 
application.  That  signifies  that  the  architect  has  to  pay  a  premium  for  this  insurance.  That  is 
discriminatory against architects from other Member States who cannot insure assignments in 
France with their existing insurer and who have to pay for an insurance without being certain of 
obtaining an assignment or obtaining a registration in time to carry out a specific assignment.  
 
To  participate  in  public  procurement  procedures,  it  is  often  required  that  an  architect  already 
has such a registration in France. In practice, the requirement to be registered as an architect 
and  to  submit  proof  of  a  French  professional  indemnity  insurance  prevents  architects  from 
other Member States to participate in public procurement procedures in France. Germany has 
a similar registration system. 
 
 
Some  problems  have  also  been  reported  regarding  certain  obligations  included  in 
delivery  agreements  that  are  proposed  or  required  by  clients  in  other  Member  States 
(see box III).  
 
 
Box III. Reported burdensome insurance obligations included in delivery agreements 
 

High, unreasonable insurance amounts that either are too expensive or impossible to insure 

Long periods of liability. Up to 20 years can be asked / required 

Overall  obligations,  that  is  to  say  the  client  requires  a  company  to  be  liable  for  all  parties 
within a project such as contractors, sub- or other consultants 

Waiver of subrogation 

The client requires to be additionally insured in the insurance of the company 

Broad  “hold  harmless”  clauses  which  can  include  for  example  strict  liability  and  overal  
liability against third parties 

Requirements regarding insurance protection for infringement of intellectual property rights 
 
 
The legal and the insurance culture can differ per Member State. For example in some 
countries,  parties  to  an  assignment  can  be  more  inclined  to  sue  the  other  party  and 
legal  processes  can  be a  lot  more  common  in  certain  Member  States. This  results  in 
higher premiums for professional indemnity insurance. The insured amount can also be 
a lot higher for historical or legal reasons. This  hampers the provision of cross-border 
services as companies are more inclined to refrain from providing across borders due 
to the risks and consequently higher premiums with such assignments. 
 
  Access to insurance: Concerning the availability of insurance, it is often possible for a 
company to obtain professional indemnity insurance for temporary services in another 
Member  State.  A  primary  solution  will  often  be  sought  with  the  current  insurer  of  a 
company.  In  case  that  is  not  possible,  a  solution  will  often  be  sought  through  the 
network of the insurance broker or through the network of the insurer. In that case it will 
often result in a higher premium for the company compared to the companies that are 
already established in that particular Member State and carry out permanent business 
there.  This  is  partly  due  to  the  fact  that  foreign  companies  are  considered  to  be  a 
higher risk for the insurer. 
Strategy paper - Remaining obstacles to a true single market for services – December 2014 
 



 
  Diverse national standards: National standards are often de facto mandatory and as 
such,  they  can  pose  a  barrier  to  cross-border  service  provision.  An  example  is  the 
great variety of safety passports used in the construction sector.  BUSINESSEUROPE 
believes that voluntary European service standards can benefit the services industry by 
reducing  the  number  of  diverse  national  standards  and  thus  removing  potential  trade 
barriers.  However,  the  need  to  develop  a  certain  standard  must  be  determined  on  a 
case-by-case  analysis  based  on  thorough  impact  assessment  and  must  always  be 
market driven, following a comprehensive consultation of relevant stakeholders. 
 
In  practice,  however,  stakeholder  involvement  is  not  always  easy  to  secure. 
Companies experience that current working methods of national standardisation bodies 
(NSBs)  are  often  too  time-consuming.  Service  companies,  especially  SMEs  have 
difficulties to allocate time for meetings outside their core business. Better  use of ICT 
and  digital  tools  in  the  working  methods  of  the  NSBs,  for  instance,  could  enhance 
stakeholder participation by allowing participation at distance. 
 
In this context, BUSINESSEUROPE is closely following the ongoing process where the 
European  Committee  for  Standardisation  (CEN)  has  been  mandated  by  the 
Commission to identify by the end of 2014 where new Horizontal European Standards 
(EN) could be introduced to improve the functioning of the single market for services. 
There  are  possible  areas  where  the  introduction  of  a  voluntary  European  Horizontal 
Standard could be of added value, which need to be further assessed. These areas are 
services  contracts for  the  service  sectors that  explicitly  wish  to  participate fully  based 
on self-regulation; service terminology, and information to the client. 
 
Yet,  it  is  fundamental  to  assess  whether  the  benefits  outweigh  the  costs  of 
development  and  implementation  of  a  new  European  standard.  Even  though  it  is 
voluntary,  its  introduction  might  in  practice  force  companies  to  follow  and  create  de 
facto  requirements,  often  also  developing  into  certification  schemes.  It  is  essential  to 
fully  take  into  account  the  needs  of  the  economic  operators  and  determine  how  new 
standards  would  actually  positively  affect  the  quality  of  service  without  restricting 
creativity and innovation. This is key to the success of any new European standard. 
 
  High number of regulated professions: There are about 800 different activities in the 
EU that are considered to be regulated professions in one or more Member States and 
are reserved for providers with specific qualifications. Whilst in certain cases there may 
be  valid  policy  reasons  to  justify  this  practice  -  for  complexity,  security  or  safety 
reasons  - this  does  not  always  seem  to  be  the  case.  Many  activities  are  regulated  in 
only  a  few  Member  States  and  more  than  25%  of  them  are  regulated  in  just  one 
Member  State.  The  high  number  of  regulated  professions  and  specialisations  is 
fragmenting  labour  markets  and  hampering  service  provision  or  establishment  across 
borders.  BUSINESSEUROPE  fully  supports  the  analysis  that  the  Commission  is 
carrying  out  to  precisely  see  which  professions  are  regulated  in  each  Member  State. 
This  overview  should  stimulate  the  discussion  to  reduce  the  number  of  regulated 
professions  and  burdensome  requirements,  prioritising  the  professions  and  sectors 
which have the largest growth potential and are most regulated or only regulated in one 
Member State. 
 
  Barriers  to  online  services:  The  selling  of  goods  online  is  a  service.  Hence,  the 
(overall  positive)  impact  that  the  rise  of  the  internet  and  e-commerce  in  particular  is 
having  on  existing  business  models  and  the  daily  operations  of  companies  providing 
Strategy paper - Remaining obstacles to a true single market for services – December 2014 
 
10 


 
services.  Yet, while e-commerce  is rapidly taking off at  national level, cross-border e-
commerce is still lagging behind. There is a strong need to boost consumer confidence 
and  business  trust  in  cross-border  e-commerce  by  addressing  the  remaining 
fragmentation  of  applicable  rules,  for  instance  in  the  area  of  VAT,  data  protection, 
payment systems, copyright and consumer protection.  
 
  Legal  fragmentation  in  contract  law  and  consumer  legislation:  Due  to  a  lack  of 
harmonisation, companies experience fragmentation regarding differences in consumer 
protection legislation and contract law in the “B2C” environment, for example regarding 
legal guarantees.  
 
  A lack of mutual recognition: Trust and mutual recognition are essential elements of 
a  well-functioning  single  market  in  services.  In  areas  where  full  harmonisation  is  not 
desirable  or  feasible,  the  principle  of  mutual  recognition  can  help  to  improve  the 
functioning of Europe’s services markets by providing a certain degree of flexibility and 
cross-border  acceptance.  More  mutual  recognition  would  also  lead  to  a  significant 
reduction  of  administrative  and  regulatory  burdens  –  as  business  would  have  the 
possibility  to  provide  their  services  in  another  Member  States  without  additional 
formalities or heavy procedures as long as they comply with the essential national and 
European (safety, health, consumer protection, etc.) requirements. For example, more 
mutual  recognition  in  areas  such  as  expert  accreditation,  authorisations  or  the 
recognition  of  certificates  can  greatly  facilitate  cross-border  service  provision  and 
establishment abroad. 
 

  Strains  on  company  mobility:  Heavy  legal  form  and  ownership  requirements  -  that 
significantly differ between Member States - can hamper or even prevent establishment 
abroad.  Article  15  of the  Services  Directive  lists  a  series  of  requirements  imposed  on 
service  providers,  among  which  legal  form,  shareholding  and  tariffs.  These 
requirements  are  not  strictly  prohibited  but  have  been  identified  by  the  EU  Court  of 
Justice  as  creating  obstacles  to  the  single  market  in  services.  They  can  only  be 
maintained  in  so  far  as  they  are  non-discriminatory,  justified  by  an  overriding  reason 
relating  to the  public  interest  and  proportionate,  i.e.  no  less  restrictive  measure  could 
be used. However, BUSINESSEUROPE observes that the screening exercise of these 
requirements  -  as required  by  the  Services  Directive  -  has  often  not  been  carried  out 
satisfactorily, causing burdensome requirements and thus barriers to remain (see box 
IV
).  
 
 
 
Box IV. Examples of remaining burdensome legal form and shareholding requirements 
and tariffs  
 

If  an  accounting  company  wants  to  set  up  a  subsidiary  in  Italy,  at  least  66.6%  of  the 
owners need to be registered with the Italian professional accountants order (whilst in most 
countries it is 51% or there are even no restrictions).  
 

The  ownership  requirement  that  51%  of  the  shares  of  accounting  firms  must  be  held  by 
accountants  will  make  it  impossible  for  such  firms  to  associate  with  tax  advisers,  if  tax 
advisers  are  subject  to  the  same  51%  ownership  requirement.  Such  ownership  rules 
hamper  the  emergence  of  new,  more  innovative  business  models  which  would  enable 
companies to offer a wider range of services. 
 
Strategy paper - Remaining obstacles to a true single market for services – December 2014 
 
11 


 
 

For  architects  in  Germany,  the  legal  form  and  shareholding  requirements  are  exclusively 
linked  to  the  use  of  the  professional  title  by  the  company,  but  not  to  the  provision  of  the 
service. If the company is to bear the professional title ‘architect’ in its name (e.g. “Schmidt 
Architekten”),  then  it  must  meet  legal  form  and  shareholding  requirements.  But  architects 
may  set  up  any  other  form  of  company,  through  which  they  can  provide  architectural 
services, as long as the company does not include the word “architect” or “architectural” as 
part of its name (e.g. “Schmidt Design”). 
 

A  75%  capital  ownership  requirement  exists  in  Slovakia  for  tax  advisors,  in  France  for 
veterinarians, though France reduced the minimum capital ownership requirement to 51% 
for most other professions.  
 
Multidisciplinary activities 
 

In Belgium, Denmark, France and Spain, veterinarians may not associate with companies 
distributing  medicines  and  sanitary  products.  In  Austria,  architects  cannot  have 
multidisciplinary activities with construction related businesses. 
 
Tariffs 
 

Fixed  tariffs  for  architectural  services  seem  to  apply  only  in  Germany.  Tariffs  for  tax 
advising  services  exist  in  Cyprus  where  minimum  tariffs  apply  in  the  absence  of  an 
agreement to the contrary between the parties. In Germany, minimum tariffs apply and the 
parties to a contract for tax services can only agree a price that is higher than the minimum 
rate  set  by  the  Federal  Ministry  of  Finance.  In  Poland,  the  Ministry  of  Justice  sets 
compulsory minimum tariffs for patent attorney services. As regards veterinarian services, 
a  general  system  of  fixed  tariffs  applies  in  Austria,  and  binding  minimum  fees  apply  in 
Bulgaria, without any possibility in either Member State to deviate from them by contractual 
agreement. 
 
 
 
  Disproportionate  spatial  planning  rules:  We  observe  that  in  some  cases  service 
providers  are  hindered  by  disproportionate  spatial  planning  rules,  for  instance  by 
imposing economic needs tests or additional requirements, which are used in a manner 
that  restricts  competition  and  protects  local  interests.  For  instance,  the  bundesland 
Baden  Wüttemberg  measures  a  city’s  purchasing  power  before  letting  foreign  retail 
competitors  establish  operations  here.  Another  example  are  regional  laws  in  the 
bundesland  North  Rheine  Westphalia  which  control  what  product  assortment  can  be 
sold outside of city regions. Several  Member  States, on a regional or  municipal  level, 
use  town  and  country  planning  legislation  to  specifically  regulate  service  activity  as 
opposed to town and country planning that only regulates “land-use”. 
 
  Specific obstacles facing the retail sector: BUSINESSEUROPE welcomed many of 
the  initiatives  announced  in  the  Commission’s  Retail  Action  Plan  of  February  2013. 
However,  in  practice,  companies  active  in  the  retail  sector  -  especially  from  abroad  - 
are still facing many obstacles. For example, in Hungary retailers are faced with a new 
system of levies to finance official controls of food products (an amendment of Act XLVI 
of  2008)  to  come  into  force  on  1  January  2015.  The  progressive  rate  of  the  fee  is 
indirectly  discriminatory  against  foreign  retailers.  Such  examples  illustrate  a  worrying 
trend  where  businesses  in  the  retail  sector  are  faced  with  more  new  financial 
obligations such as special crisis, internet and advertisement taxes. These are often de 
facto acting as protectionist obstacles. 
Strategy paper - Remaining obstacles to a true single market for services – December 2014 
 
12 


 
  Challenges  linked  to  the  posting  of  workers:  The  Posting  of  Workers  Directive 
ensures  a  level  playing  field  between  companies  and  a  range  of  equal  minimum 
standards  for  posted  and  host  country  workers.  This  Directive  does  not  need  to  be 
revised. It is necessary that all Member States now put efforts into transposition of the 
Enforcement  Directive.  Appropriate  implementation  of  this  new  Directive  will  help 
address abuses of posting that sometimes happen on the ground through strengthened 
cooperation  between  national  authorities,  more  transparency,  and  improved  cross-
border enforcement of fines and penalties. 
 
  Unleashing  opportunities  for  health  services:  The  growing  common  challenges  in 
Member States such as increasing cost of healthcare, an ageing population associated 
with a rise of chronic diseases and multi-morbidity, shortages and uneven distribution 
of  health  professionals,  health  inequalities  and  inequities  in  access  to  healthcare  call 
for a closer cooperation between Member States in order to avoid barriers in providing 
health  care  services  across  borders.  Equally,  both  the  Directive  (2011/24)  on  the 
application  of  patients’  rights  in  cross-border  healthcare  and  the  EU  e-Health  action 
plan  for  2012-2020  (Com  2012/736)  call  for  solutions  to  ensure  interoperability  and 
cross-border opportunities in healthcare services. 
 
  Compatibility  of  different  rules:  Service  companies  have  to  comply  with  a  whole 
range  of  different  rules  and  complete  procedures  before  being  able  to  provide  their 
service.  They are subject to rules stemming from EU legislation such as the Services 
Directive,  the  e-Commerce  Directive  and  the  Directive  on  Professional  Qualifications. 
Also, companies need to comply with sectoral legislation and additional national rules. 
It is not always clear  which rules apply and they are not always fully compatible (see 
box V
).  
 
 
Box V. Example: Car rental – barriers for operating across borders 
 
In  the  car  hire  sector,  challenges  remain  regarding  cross-border  traffic  and  the  statutory 
regulations for vehicle registration. The use of vehicles registered in the name of foreign group 
companies is very restricted for instance in Germany. In principle, vehicles envisaged for rental 
for  a  longer  period  of  time  in  Germany  must  be  deregistered  abroad  and  re-registered  in 
Germany.  Besides  the  administrative  burden,  this involves  considerable  costs  and  impedes 
cross-border rental, leading to higher prices. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Strategy paper - Remaining obstacles to a true single market for services – December 2014 
 
13 


 
Remaining barriers - BUSINESSEUROPE recommendations 
 
  The European Commission should identify and address remaining barriers to the free 
movement  of  services  (also  outside  the  remit  of  the  Services  Directive),  taking  a 
targeted,  sector-based-approach,  starting  with  the  sectors  with  greatest  economic 
significance, such as business and professional services, construction, health services, 
tourism and retail.  In this context, BUSINESSEUROPE welcomes recent  Commission 
initiatives  such  as  the  Retail  Action  Plan  and  Report  on  business  services,  and 
supports  the  setting-up of  High  Level  Groups  (HLGs)  on  specific  sectors  such  as  the 
HGLs on Retail and on Business-Related Services.       
 
Furthermore: 
 
1.  Through  ongoing  initiatives  at  EU  level,  but  also  through  better  application  of  the 
mutual recognition principle, public authorities should ensure better recognition of 
professional and academic qualifications
 across the EU. 
 
2.  We encourage the Commission to further assess challenges with cross-border 
insurance on a country-by-country basis. 
 
3.  Develop  voluntary  European  Horizontal  Standards  where  they  add  value
always driven by market-needs and developed through comprehensive stakeholder 
consultation. 
 
4.  On the basis of the country-analyses, Member States should reduce the number 
of regulated professions. To this end, a joint evaluation of the different regulated 
professions in Member States should be carried out. 
 
5.  It  is  essential  to  tackle  the  remaining  barriers  to  the  provisions  of  online 
services.  In  the  area  of  copyright,  areas  to  be  addressed  include  cross-border 
licensing,  territoriality  of  copyright,  transfer  of  copyright.  As  the  digital  world 
changes very quickly, policy-makers need to ensure that the approach to regulation 
in this area is proportionate and future-proof. 
 
6.  Ensure  strong  enforcement  of  the  Posting  of  Workers  Directive  without 
creating new barriers. 
 
7.  Better ex-post monitoring by the Commission of the transposition of regulation at 
national level to detect potential barriers or demotivating factors for businesses. 
 
8.  Further  develop  the  SOLVIT  system  and  other  problem  solving  tools  to  assist 
companies when encountering difficulties.  
 
9.  National  governments  and  policy-makers  at  EU  level  need  to  take  a  truly 
integrated  approach  to  services  in  Europe.  It should  be  clear  which  rules  apply 
and  which  piece  of  European  or  national  legislation  is  concerned.  The  company 
perspective should be central is addressing remaining barriers. 
 
10. To  create  the  necessary  political  momentum  and  commitment  at  national  and 
European  level  to  address  the  remaining  obstacles,  Member  States  should  jointly 
organise a high level conference before the end of 2015 to discuss how to build 
a  true  single  market  for  services,  following  the  publication  of  the  Commission’s 
report expected in mid-2015.  
Strategy paper - Remaining obstacles to a true single market for services – December 2014 
 
14 


 
V. 
NON-REGULATORY BARRIERS 
 
There  are  also  non-regulatory  obstacles  to  free  movement  that  act  as  demotivating 
factors for operating across borders. These barriers are sometimes a result of a lack of 
harmonisation or mutual recognition at EU level. Others spur from national traditions or 
cultural differences. Nevertheless, they pose real obstacles to trade in services. 
 
  An  information  gap:  Access  to  information  is  an  issue  for  many  companies,  in 
particular  for  start-ups  and  SMEs.  They  struggle  to  find  the  right  information  on 
necessary  procedures,  certification  or  other  requirements  for  temporary  cross-border 
service provision or setting-up a business in another Member State. It has often proven 
a challenge to identify the right authority in charge of issuing permits, licenses or other 
administrative  arrangements.  There  is  often  a  need  to  address  multiple  institutions. 
Moreover,  information  is  in  many  cases  only  available  in  the  language(s)  of  the 
Member State, leading to delays, translation and legal costs, for instance to participate 
in tendering procedures. 
 
  Perceptions  of  doing  business  abroad:  Very  often  companies  and  in  particular 
SMEs  and  micro-enterprises  perceive  operating  abroad  as  complicated  and  difficult 
and would therefore not consider expanding to foreign markets. Currently only 10% of 
all  SMEs  in  Europe  operate  across  borders  illustrating  this  mind-set.  Bridging  the 
information gap can make a great difference here.    
 
  Administrative  difficulties:  Many  administrative  procedures  remain  slow,  often 
unnecessarily  complicated  and  offline.  Also  their  complexity  and  diversity  of 
requirements differs strongly per country. Registration procedures can take a long time 
and  often  tacit  approval  provisions  are  lacking.  Also,  bankruptcy  procedures  are 
lengthy and inefficient in many countries.  
 
  Cultural  differences  and  language  barriers:  Differences  in  consumer  and  client 
behaviour  can  be  challenging.  Customs  and  habits  can  differ,  which  are  the  core 
element of service provision. Bridging the information gap can make a great difference 
here.  Furthermore,  companies  report  that  language  barriers,  including  translation 
difficulties regarding terminology remain challenging.  
 
  Access to finance: In these difficult economic times, access to finance in particular for 
start-ups and SMEs remains of great concern. 
 
  Mismatch  between  education  systems  and  labour  market  needs:  To  help 
overcome  skills  mismatches  it  is  important  that  education  and  training  systems  are 
better  aligned  with  labour  market  needs.  This  includes  greater  involvement  of 
employers’  organisations  and  companies  in  the  design  and  implementation  of 
education  and  training  curricula  at  all  levels,  in  particular  at  secondary  and  higher 
levels.    
 
  A lack of innovation: Service innovation can help Europe to transform and modernise 
the  way  products  and  services  are  offered,  while  driving  up  productivity  and  creating 
competitive  advantages  for  companies.  Competition  is  often  the  best  way  to  foster 
service  innovation.  Therefore,  it  is  fundamental  to  remove  remaining  barriers  in  the 
single market to create a competitive and dynamic environment and to enhance other 
framework conditions through smart regulation, the availability of adequate funding and 
Strategy paper - Remaining obstacles to a true single market for services – December 2014 
 
15 


 
public procurement of innovative solutions. In this regard, it is positive that the scope of 
activities  eligible  for  funding  has  been  broadened  in  the  Horizon  2020,  also  to  better 
accommodate service innovation. 
 
  A lack of data and expertise on services: Still the data collection on the specificities 
of Europe’s services sectors is scarce and economic analyses of the services industry 
much  less  advanced  than  for  classical  economic  sectors,  such  as  manufacturing, 
fisheries or agriculture. The basis of well-designed European and national policy is that 
they are built on facts and figures, evidence-based. A lack of this information will result 
in inaccuracies and possibly bad policy. There is a need to allocate more resources to 
the collection of relevant data. 
 
  Complexity  in  the  administration  of  tax  for  EU  cross-border  activities:  Less 
complexity  in  the  administration  of  taxes  for  both  companies  and  citizens  would 
enhance mobility and therefore benefit the free movement of services. 
 
 
Non-regulatory barriers - BUSINESSEUROPE recommendations 
 
1.  As mentioned in chapter III, establish on the basis of the existing Points of Single 
Contact,  online  business  portals  for  companies  to  find  all  the  information  and 
assistance they need for doing business across borders in multiple-languages. This 
must  include  for  instance  information  on  taxation  and  social  security  and  the 
possibility to complete administrative procedures and formalities entirely online. 
 
2.  EUROSTAT  but  also  Universities  in  Europe,  think  tanks  and  other  data collecting 
and  research  institutions  need  to  refocus  on  services  and  step  up  their  efforts  to 
collect more precise and comparable data on Europe’s service sectors. 
 
3.  In addition to existing platforms such as the EUGO network, an exchange of best 
practices between the Member States on how to reduce administrative burdens for 
businesses should be put in place.  
 
 
VI.  GOVERNANCE 
 
To  ensure  better  implementation,  correct  application  and  strong  enforcement  of  EU 
legislation that impacts the free movement of services, regular reporting and accurate 
benchmarking are fundamental. 
 
In  this  regard,  BUSINESSEUROPE  is  very  pleased  that  general  single  market 
governance  and  reporting  has  significantly  improved  via  the  annual  single  market 
integration  reports,  which  use  concrete  benchmarks  with  quantitative  and  qualitative 
indicators  to  measure  single  market  performance  (e.g.  transposition  delays, 
infringements,  etc.),  also  in  the  area  of  services.  These  reports  feed  directly  into  the 
European  Semester  and  in  particular  in  the  Annual  Growth  Survey  and  the  resulting 
country  specific  recommendations  for  reforms.  This  is  key  to  show  national 
governments where progress, for instance in the area of services, must be made. 
 
BUSINESSEUROPE  fully  supports  the  “front-runners-initiative”  taken  by  a  number  of 
like-minded Member States to improve the functioning of the single market, also in the 
Strategy paper - Remaining obstacles to a true single market for services – December 2014 
 
16 


 
area  of  services  via  pilot  projects.  It  is  encouraging  to  see  the  commitment  from 
national governments to make progress for a better single market. 
 
 
Governance - BUSINESSEUROPE recommendations  
 
1.  The  Commission  should  make  the  State  of  the  Single  Market  Integration  Reports 
even  more  detailed,  using  quantitative  and  comparable  indicators  to  adopt  a 
more  scientific  and  objective  approach  to  policy-making.  This  offers  more 
transparency and puts the necessary pressure on Member States to make progress 
via active “naming and shaming”. 
 
2.  The Commission should reintroduce its formal reporting on services in the form of 
“information notes” as done in 2009 and 2010 to the Competitiveness Council, and 
also  the  European  Parliament  to  raise  awareness  of  remaining  barriers,  put 
pressure  on  national  governments  to  improve  and  help  to  create  the  necessary 
political momentum to address remaining obstacles. 
 
3.  The  Commission  and  Member  States  should  further  improve  existing  problem-
solving  tools  such  as  SOLVIT  and  allocate  sufficient  resources  to  handle  the 
increasing  number  of  cases.  This  included  better  promotion  to  ensure  companies 
are aware of such a system. Also, the EURES portal should be further improved to 
enhance job mobility.  
 
4.  Furthermore,  all  problems  that  companies  experience  should  be  addressed  in  a 
reasonable  timeframe  through  all  available  instruments,  whether  it  is  SOLVIT, 
courts or other paths.  
 
5.  National  governments  must  further  invest  in  and  develop  the  Internal  Market 
Information  (IMI)  system,  which  is  despite  the  more  than  7000  connected 
authorities across the EU still underused. Public authorities should make better use 
of  the  IMI  system  to  alleviate  the  administrative  burden  on  service  providers,  by 
checking directly with their counterparts in other Member States if there is a need to 
verify certain information or not, saving both time and costs. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
*  *  * 
 
 
Strategy paper - Remaining obstacles to a true single market for services – December 2014 
 
17