This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'The EU notification procedure for services (Services Directive)'.



 
 
Contribution to the forthcoming 
Commission Single Market strategy 2015 

POSITION PAPER 
Date: 
03 July 2015 
 
Interest Representative Register ID number: 84973761187-60 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Ilya Bruggeman 
Adviser, Internal Market 
T: +32 2 738 06 41 
[email address] 
 
 
EuroCommerce and the retail and wholesale sector
 
 
EuroCommerce  is  the  principal  organisation  representing  the  retail  and  wholesale  sector.  It  embraces 
national  federations  representing  5.5  million  companies,  both  leading  multinational  retailers  such  as 
Carrefour, IKEA, Tesco and REWE and many small family operations. Retail and wholesale provide a link 
between producers and 500 million European consumers over a billion times a day. It generates 1 in 7 
jobs, providing a varied career for 29 million Europeans, many of them young people. It also supports 
millions  of  further  jobs  throughout  the  supply  chain,  from  small  local  suppliers  to  international 
businesses. 
 
http://www.eurocommerce.eu 
 
 


 
In the experience of traders
 
authorisation  procedures  and  proportionality  assessments  for  commercial 
establishment differ widely. This causes real problems for retailers who want to open 
new stores in other markets; 
 
some  authorisation  procedures  and  levies  (e.g.  regional  taxes  in  Spain)  deter  new 
players from entering new markets; 
 
some local authorities still use economic needs tests despite this being prohibited by 
the Services Directive; 
 
decision-making is not always transparent e.g. unclear procedures, unclear timelines, 
unclear or absence of objective criteria beforehand, no clear explanation of decisions 
and with high costs; 
 
the  EU  notification  procedure  for  national  laws  within  the  scope  of  the  Services 
Directive  is  not  transparent.  It  is  unclear  which  and  if  all  relevant  laws  have  been 
notified,  and  if  the  Commission  has  followed  up  comments  made  with  the  Member 
State; 
 
developments in society influence the retail market at local level and regional level, 
this should be reflected in retail establishment policies. 
 
Recommendations: 
  as  part  of  the  Better  Regulation  agenda  the  Commission  and  Member  States 
should simplify existing procedures based on the work of the Services Directive 
Expert Group; 
  the  Commission  should  provide  guidance  on  ensuring  that  any  restrictions  to 
establishment  are  justified,  necessary  and  proportionate,  while  respecting  the 
principle of subsidiarity; 
  an  objective,  transparent  and  non-discriminator  approach  should  form  the 
basis of all establishment rules and procedures; 
  the  Commission  should  develop  a  timeline  for  follow-up  of  the  peer  review  among 
the  Member  States  to  ensure  an  ongoing  process  among  all  the  stakeholders  to 
improve the current situation. This ‘roadmap’ should include: 

clear goals and actions of how to improve the proportionality assessments of 
authorisations for retail establishment 

regular performance checks of the retail sector 

development and use principles of good practice 
  the Commission should make a proposal to make the notification procedure for 
national rules more transparent, accessible for stakeholders and include a 
standstill period. 
This could be modelled on Directive 98/34/EC to prevent non-EU 
compliant legislation being adopted. 
Equal treatment of all business in the Single Market 
 
Many traders have reaped the benefits of the Single Market in the past decades. They have 
invested  in  new  markets,  introduced  modern  retail  concepts  throughout  Europe  and  are 
providing consumers with safe and high quality products and services for the best price. This 
has  brought  a  new  dynamic  to  local  markets,  increasing  competition,  and  offering  more 
choice and lower prices to consumers. 
 
In the experience of traders: 
  many  Member  States  (especially  in  Central  and  Eastern  Europe)  have  introduced 
legislation to the disadvantage of international retailers, which is very often directly 
or indirectly discriminating international investors. These laws do not always directly 
involve the Single Market, but can have an impact on it, by preventing new players 
from entering the market and diminishing competitiveness in the national economy, 
thus affecting EU competitiveness overall; 
  national  laws  on  tax,  food  and  competition  often  restrict  commercial  practices  that 
are  legal  in  other  Member  States  or  impose  unjustified  financial  burden  to 
international retailers. 
 
8 of 12 


 
Recommendations: 
  the  Commission  should  together  with  the  Member  States  involved  assess 
whether national laws  which  might be restrictive to  cross-border retail are 
in line with EU law 
(non-discriminatory, justified and proportionate); 
  Member  States’  national  laws  should  meet  Better  Regulation  Guidelines16
making laws simpler and reducing regulatory costs; 
  the Commission should act more rapidly on possible infringement by quickly opening 
EU pilot cases and speeding up infringement procedures. 
  the  Commission  should  use  the  European  Semester  and  annual  country-specific 
recommendations  (CSR)  as  an  additional  opportunity  for  dialogue  between  the 
Commission  and  the  Member  States  to  address  barriers  which  do  not  fall  directly 
under the scope of the single market but hinder competitiveness and market entry.  
2. 
Streamline  and  simplify  labelling  &  information 
requirements  
 
Labelling  &  information  enables  retail  and  wholesale  businesses  to  convey  important 
information about the quality and use of products to consumers, professional customers and 
competent  authorities.  Retailers  are  the  closest link  to  consumers,  and  directly  affected  by 
labelling  rules  for  their  own-brand  products.  Wholesalers  also  need  to  inform  their 
professional  customers  who  have  different  information  needs  from  consumers.  Competent 
authorities also need sufficient information to assess a product’s compliance and to be able 
to  take  action  where  necessary.  Over  the  years  national  and  EU  legislation  have  imposed 
increasing labelling and information requirements, covering such areas as compliance, safety 
warnings, energy labels, food content labels, nutrition labels, washing information, country of 
origin information, consumer rights information and environmental information, etc.  
 
In the experience of traders: 
 
the  multiplicity  of  requirements  causes  an  information  overload  for  consumers  and 
unnecessary  costs  for  business  (see  illustration  below).  Consumers  are  not  able  to 
distinguish  essential  from  nice-to-know  information,  ignore  labels  or  don’t 
understand them; 
 
professional customers (businesses) may require technical information but not what 
a consumer might need. Professional customers often ignore out of shortage of time, 
what  have  become  too  comprehensive  paper  instructions  manuals,  thus  defeating 
their objective; 
 
information requirements have not embraced modern technology. Digital technology 
offers  new  ways  of  providing  information;  allowing  consumers  and  professional 
customers to access information in other ways that suit them (online, mobile phone);  
 
national  authorities  sometimes  use  information  requirements  to  restrict  market 
access to foreign products. 
 
Recommendations: 
  the  Commission  should  pursue  the  European  Retail  Action  Plan17  proposal  of 
mapping all national labelling requirements for food products and developing 
a database listing all mandatory labelling rules at EU and national level; 
  a  similar  exercise  should  apply  to  non-food  products,  combined  with  an 
assessment of non-harmonised products. An overview of the situation could provide 
guidance for the Commission to create common rules on information requirements; 
  the Commission could use the results of the audit to  

undertake a study of consumers’ understanding of symbols used;  

consider  how  to  use  digital  technology  to  provide  information  in  new 
ways
; and 
                                                
16 http://ec.europa.eu/smart-regulation/guidelines/toc_guide_en.htm (17 June 2015) 
17 COM/2013/036 final 
9 of 12 


 
  the  Commission  and  Member  States  should  use  digital  technologies  to 
create  better  cooperation  and  communication  between  all  stakeholders. 
Market  surveillance  authorities  should  develop  strong  platforms  to  exchange 
information between them and other stakeholders improve trust and improve market 
surveillance; 
  this  should  include  strengthening  the  Information  and  Communication  System  on 
Market Surveillance (ICSMS) and the proposed European Market Surveillance Forum 
(EMSF) in the Product Safety Package. 
 
4. 
Giving  businesses  (especially  SMEs)  access  to 
information 
 
The best way to help businesses (and consumers) fully participate in the Single Market is by 
providing  them  with  access  to  all  of  the  essential  information  at  one  digital  information 
portal. For businesses, this would not only mean becoming active or establishing themselves 
(Points  of  Single  Contact),  but  it  would  also  be  about  product  compliance  (e.g.  different 
Product Contact Points, national  labelling and consumer information requirements), redress 
(SOLVIT),  taxes/VAT,  consumer  rights,  access  to  consumer  &  business  networks  (e.g.  CPC 
network,  Enterprise  Europe  Network),  notification  procedures,  finding  and  communicating 
with relevant authorities, etc. Especially SMEs could benefit from this. 
 
Experience of traders: 
  information is scattered across local and national administrations
  not  all  information  can  be  found  online,  and  where  information  is  present,  it  is  not 
always clear where to seek greater clarification; 
  it is at times uncertain which local requirements apply to products or services which 
traders provide; 
  businesses  are  unaware  of  the  many  online  governance  tools  that  can  help 
them. 
 
Recommendations: 
  the Commission should streamline online tools for businesses21 by creating a 
legal  framework  that  sets  the  minimum  performance  requirements  for  an  online 
business portal in every Member State regardless of their sector. This portal should 
provide  the  possibilities  of  finding  all  relevant  information  to  become  active  in  a 
Member  State,  acquiring  all  necessary  authorisations,  interacting  with  public 
authorities, finding redress etc.; 
  Member  States  and  the  Commission  should  improve  the  visibility  of  online 
tools for businesses on a national level
                                                
 
12 of 12