This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Indonesia-EU Vision Group (2)'.



Ref. Ares(2019)1598515 - 10/03/2019


 
 
"This  report  has  been  prepared  by 
4.1(b)
 with the 
assistance of the European Commission. The 
content of this report is the sole responsibility 
of ADE and can in no way be taken to reflect 

the  views  of  the  European  Commission.”
 


link to page 7 link to page 7 link to page 7 link to page 17 link to page 17 link to page 25 link to page 25 link to page 25 link to page 43 link to page 43 link to page 51 link to page 51 link to page 63 link to page 63 link to page 67 link to page 67 link to page 67 link to page 71 link to page 71 link to page 89 link to page 93 link to page 103 link to page 105 link to page 105 link to page 113 link to page 121 link to page 121 TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
Table of Contents 
LIST OF DOCUMENTS 
DOCUMENT 1:  TRADE AND INVESTMENT BETWEEN EU – INDONESIA 
OPPORTUNITIES AND OBSTACLES AND INDONESIAN TRADE  
WITH THE EU: (IBM BELGIUM, JULY 2009) ........................................ 7 

DOCUMENT 2:  INDONESIAN TRADE ACCESS TO THE EU OPPORTUNITIES & 
CHALLENGES (TRANSTEC 2010) ......................................................... 17 
DOCUMENT 3:  TRADE SUSTAINABILITY IMPACT ASSESSMENT (TSIA) OF FTA 
BETWEEN THE EU AND ASEAN - FINAL REPORT (ECORYS 
RESEARCH, MAY  2009). .................................................................... 25 

DOCUMENT 4:  INDONESIA’S EXPECTED CHALLENGES IN PURSUING AN FTA  
WITH THE EU – IISD 2009 ................................................................ 43 
DOCUMENT 5:  LOOKING EAST: THE EUROPEAN UNION’S NEW FTA  
NEGOTIATIONS IN ASIA – ECIPE NOV. 2007 ..................................... 51 
DOCUMENT 6:  TRADE POLICY AT THE CROSSROADS: THE INDONESIAN STORY – 
UNCTAD 2005 ................................................................................. 63 
DOCUMENT 7:  COUNTRY NOTE ON TRADE AND INVESTMENT POLICY 
COORDINATION INDONESIA – INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT  
DIVISION, MOFA, UNESCAP, BANGKOK JULY 2007 ........................ 67 

DOCUMENT 8:  WORLD TRADE ORGANIZATION TRADE POLICY REVIEW  
INDONESIA 2007 ................................................................................. 71 
DOCUMENT 9:  THE GLOBALIZATION INDEX 2009 : INDONESIA ............................... 89 
DOCUMENT 10: THE GLOBAL COMPETITIVENESS REPORT 2009-2010 INDONESIA .... 93 
DOCUMENT 11: DOING BUSINESS REPORT 2010 INDONESIA ..................................... 103 
DOCUMENT 12: ECONOMIC ASSESSMENT OF INDONESIA OECD 2008, POLICY  
BRIEF ............................................................................................... 105 
DOCUMENT 13: FDI AND GROWTH IN EAST ASIA: LESSONS FOR INDONESIA –   
4.1(b)
, NBER AND CITY UNIVERSITY, NEW YORK, 4.1(b)

RIIE, ŐREBRO UNIVERSITY, STOCKHOLM, 2010 .............................. 113 
DOCUMENT 14: FOREIGN OWNERSHIP AND EMPLOYMENT GROWTH IN  
INDONESIA MANUFACTURING - 4.1(b)
 
 
, CITY 
UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK, 4.1(b)
, RIIE, ŐREBRO 
UNIVERSITY, STOCKHOLM, 2010 ....................................................... 121 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Table of Contents 


TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
Document 1: Trade and Investment between EU – 
Indonesia Opportunities and Obstacles 
and Indonesian Trade with the EU: (IBM 
Belgium, July 2009) 

Introduction to synopsis 
 
Indonesia is South East Asia’s largest economy and has the world’s 4th largest population. 
Indonesia-EU  trade  and  investment  relations  are  strong  and  growing.    This  study  and 
accompanying sector studies examined the reasons behind the relatively low level of EU 
trade  and  investment  towards  Indonesia,  identifying  drivers  and  constraints  to  expanded 
trade and investment.  
 
The study also looks at the potential and opportunities offered by the Indonesian market, 
not  only  from  the  perspective  of  EU  export  interests,  but  also  how  EU  goods,  services, 
technology  and  investment  could  contribute  to  Indonesia’s  economic  development  and 
enhance the competitiveness of its industry. 
 
There  study  says  there  are  substantial  opportunities  to  expand  EU-Indonesia  trade  and 
investment.  The  size  and  growth  on  the  Indonesian  market  are  attractive  to  foreign 
exporters  and  investors.  Leading  EU  exports  to  Indonesia  have  included  capital  goods, 
telecommunications equipment and different types of machinery and equipment. 
 
Given  fairly  encouraging  growth  rates  above  5  percent  in  Indonesia,  the  study  predicts 
increased demand for capital investment for infrastructure and enterprises. Infrastructure 
needs  in  telecommunications  and  the  roll-out  of  3G,  WIMAX  and  broadband  internet 
access all represent expanding opportunities.  
 
Investment  in  electricity  generation  is  expanding  including  for  large  coal-fired  power 
stations, geothermal energy and smaller back-up, community and SME generators. This is 
increasing demand for larger numbers of smaller power stations,  including for renewable 
energy (solar, wind, biomass, mini-hydro) and for bio-fuel for power generation. 
 
The  report  sees  ASEAN  development  positively.  It  says  increased  investment  by 
enterprises in capital equipment by enterprises is being stimulated by regional integration, 
which is expanding access to export markets and increasing competition in the domestic 
market.  As  Indonesia  integrates  into  regional  production  networks  both  domestic  and 
foreign enterprises will need to upgrade their capital equipment and enhance productivity 
to participate more actively in the dynamic growth of the region. 
 
European  manufacturers  are  exporting  a  broad  range  of  machinery  to  Indonesia. 
Machinery  and  equipment  for  manufacturing  and  packaging  food  products  and  textiles 
have currently good prospects. The niche markets for European exporters of premium or 
branded consumer products are likely to experience strong growth. 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 7 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
International Context and Indonesian Development 
 
During  the  global  economic  boom  of  2002-2007,  Indonesia  returned  to  macroeconomic 
stability and experienced renewed economic growth. In the light of the severe international 
economic downturn which began in 2008, Indonesia showed that it was better positioned 
to face global financial uncertainties, maintaining positive growth rates of about 5 percent.  
 
The report concludes that economic growth over the last 5 years has been good but not as 
high as that of China and India, due to relatively weak export growth, a declining world 
export market share, with FDI inflows lagging behind other ASEAN partner, [but the most 
recent FDI figures are encouraging with more than $20 billion of FDI incoming in 2010]. 
The Report confirms Indonesia does have favourable factors supporting economic growth. 
 
The  EU  is  an  important  trading  partner,  but  the  level  of  EU  trade  and  investment  in 
Indonesia has been proportionally less than for other ASEAN countries relative to the size 
of the economy, primarily due to the relatively smaller role of FDI in the economy.  
 
However the Report also confirms that there have been recent major increases in FDI into 
Indonesia, that the EU is the leading investment partners, and that the leading EU member 
states investing in Indonesia are the UK, the Netherlands, Germany and France. 
 
Indonesia faced macroeconomic policy challenges to maintain growth and macroeconomic 
stability  during  the  global  downturn  but  emerged  with  a  fairly  robust  performance 
including current account surplus. 
 
Projections  from  World  Bank  and  IMF  indicate  that  Indonesia,  like  a  number  of  key 
emerging  markets,  will  return  to  higher  growth  (above  the  5  percent  growth  it  sustained 
throughout the crisis) more quickly and grow more rapidly than developed countries. Yet 
Indonesian economic growth is projected to lag somewhat behind China and India. 
 
In  the  context  of  the  2009  global  recession,  Indonesia  introduced  temporary  import 
controls  on  a  range  of  products  which  could  impede  the  achievement  of  better  growth 
performance in the medium term. Indonesia is also increasingly using regulatory measures 
to boost local content in locally manufactured products. 
 
Indonesia  is  engaged  in  international  negotiations  in  the  Doha  Development  Agenda 
(DDA)  under  WTO.  It  is  also  involved  in  ASEAN  integration  for  trade  in  goods  and 
services and in the implementation of ASEAN Plus FTAs with China, South Korea and 
Japan. FTA negotiations have been completed with Australia and New Zealand by ASEAN 
and  are  underway  with  India.  The  14th  ASEAN  Summit  made  a  number  of  significant 
initiatives to deepen ASEAN integration for trade in goods, services and investment and to 
expand the ASEAN Plus initiatives. 
 
The report says that most of these FTAs focused primarily on trade in goods, with limited 
services components based on Indonesia’s services commitments in the WTO.   
 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 8 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
Although the ASEAN and ASEAN Plus commitments represent progress, the report sees 
further scope for liberalization of services and investment. 
 
Indonesia has retained non-tariff barriers on selected products, such as restrictions on rice 
and  sugar.  Some  sectors  such  as  automobiles  remain  highly  protected.  Indonesia  has 
introduced import licensing requirements for a long list of products including electronics, 
apparel,  food  and  beverage  products  and  iron  and  steel,  in  response  to  the  global 
downturn. There are also new technical regulations and mandatory standards, not always in 
line with international standards. 
 
The changes in the Investment Law and Investment regulations in 2007 were intended to 
increase  transparency  but  the  negative  list  introduced  some  confusion  and  increased 
restrictions in certain sectors. 
 
Indonesia has a low level of overall investment in the economy compared to other Asian 
economies,  and  the  inflow  of  FDI  lagged  during  the  2002-07  when  FDI  was  booming 
globally. Increased FDI would make a significant contribution to overall capital formation 
and would enhance economic growth. 
 
The Report says that the challenge for Indonesia is how to improve growth performance, 
and  to  expand  exports  of  goods  and  services.  Liberalisation  of  trade  in  services  would 
require changes to investment regulations and opening up more of the economy FDI. The 
Repport concludes that liberalisation of services and investment could make a significant 
contribution to economic growth in Indonesia. 
 
Future Prospects and Challenges 
 
Indonesia  has  good  economic  prospects  and  substantial  development  potential.  The 
Indonesian  economy  is  exhibiting  some  resilience  in  the  global  downturn  and  has  good 
medium-term  growth  potential.  It  says  that  several  factors  have  positive  influences  on 
Indonesia’s economic development potential. 
 
First,  in  the  next  decade  Indonesia  will  experience  a  demographic  dividend  due  to  the 
falling birth rate and declining dependency rate, while the labour force will expand due to 
the large cohort of adolescents in the population who are entering the labour force. There 
is  also  potential  for  increase  labour  force  participation  by  women.  These  demographic 
developments will expand the supply potential of the Indonesian economy. 
 
Second, Indonesia has been on a reform path to tackle the many issues that is hampering 
its economic and social development: infrastructure, business and investment climate, SME 
development,  corruption,  education,  etc.  Until  now,  many  of  these  reform  efforts  have 
only limited concrete results. In going forward, Indonesia would need to continue reform 
efforts in a more resolute manner and, in doing so, would also need to take a hard look at 
the economic nationalism that is taking stronger undertones. 
 
Third, the initiatives taken by Indonesia with ASEAN partners to deepen integration with 
ASEAN  and  to  negotiate  FTAs  with  ASEAN  Plus  partners  will  stimulate  growth  in  the 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 9 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
Indonesian  and  regional  economies.  Indonesia  will  integrate  into  regional  production 
networks and supply chains as a result of these trade policy initiatives. 
 
Fourth,  East  and  Southeast  Asia  are  likely  to  continue  to  be  a  dynamic  region  with 
relatively  fast  economic  growth.  The  dynamism  of  the  region  and  the  integration  of 
production networks will enhance economic potential in Indonesia. 
 
There is considerable potential to build on the substantial trade and investment relationship 
between  the  EU  and  Indonesia.  The  EU-Indonesia  trade  and  economic  relationship  is 
highly  complementary  with  EU  enterprises  focusing  on  trade  and  investment  in  areas 
where they have technological or design capacities which provides a source of comparative 
advantage for Indonesia industry and exports. However, the Report says that this potential 
is under-exploited, largely due to the obstacles and constraints identified. 
 
Yet if Indonesia were to undertake reforms to its business and investment climate and to 
deepen its integration process in the areas of trade in services and investment, the growth 
prospects of Indonesia would be enhanced significantly.  
 
The  study  shows  that  increasing  Indonesia’s  attractiveness  to  FDI  would  draw  in 
technology,  enhance  skills  development  and  expand  capital  formation  that  could  create 
many  employment  opportunities  for  a  young  and  expanding  labour  force.  The  overall 
conclusions  are  therefore  positive  and  that  the  three  sectors  identified: 
telecommunications,  consumer  goods  and  the  power  sector  offer  particularly  good 
opportunities for EU trade and investment. 
 
The following obstacles and constraints have been identified by the study. 
 
Tariffs 
 
Indonesia has relatively low applied MFN tariffs, but the applied tariffs are well below the 
bound  tariff  levels  in  the  WTO,  which  creates  potential  uncertainty  in  the  tariff  rates. 
Variability  in  customs  rates  and  in  the  classification  and  valuation  of  imports  can  be  a 
source of uncertainty for traders and create conditions conducive to corruption. In some 
industries the applied MFN tariffs have been increased in recent years. 
 
Lack of Trade Facilitation and Poor Customs Administration 
 
The Report prioritized the need to continue with customs reform to reduce the time and 
cost  of  clearing  customs,  to  limit  smuggling  and  corruption,  and  to  better  comply  with 
WTO requirements. Indonesia has been active in the APEC trade facilitation framework 
with the aim of reducing transaction costs and is also participating in the ASEAN Single 
Window scheme. Computerized documentation requirements and customs clearance have 
facilitated both imports and exports. Registration of importers has remains a requirement. 
 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 10 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
Sanitary and Phyto Sanitary (SPS) Measure, Technical Regulations and Standards 
 
Indonesia  is  increasingly  imposing  stricter  technical  regulations,  not  always  in  line  with 
international  standards.  A  number  measures  in  recent  years  such  as  meat  imports, 
registration and labelling requirements on processed food products, industrial standards for 
tyres, iron and steel have had negative impacts on EU exporters. Registration of imports of 
cosmetics  and  pharmaceuticals  are  burdensome  and  in  the  case  of  pharmaceuticals  can 
severely restrict imports.  
 
Import Licensing, State Trading and Related Non-Tariff Barriers 

 
Import  licenses  have  been  progressively  eliminated  since  the  1990s  from  affecting  1,192 
tariff  lines  down  to    141  products  by  2008  still  subject  to  import  licenses,  including 
alcoholic beverages, lubricants, textiles, explosives, and some dangerous chemicals.  
 
Imports via State Enterprise monopolies are still prevailing, including rice, salt and sugar. 
There are de facto quantitative restrictions on the import of meat and chicken products by 
delivering to the importers a “Letter of Recommendation (Surat Rekomendasi Importir)” 
without which they are not allowed to import. Dairy imports are regulated and can only be 
imported by companies appointed by the Government. SOEs continue to play a large role 
in the economy, accounting for 45% of GDP, and are dominant in many sectors. 
 
Some  temporary”  import  controls  were  introduced  by  Indonesia  on  a  wide  range  of 
products in response to the global slowdown in 2008. 
 
Government Procurement 

 
Government procurement lacks transparency in Indonesia, especially by regional and local 
governments. Incidents of corruption and collusion have been reported. 
 
Lack of Effective Protection of Intellectual Property Rights 
 
Despite clear improvements, the lack of effective protection for IPR is a major challenge 
for the business environment in Indonesia. The substantive legal framework for IPR needs 
to  be  elaborated  or  clarified  in  some  areas,  such  as  patent  protection  for  pharmaceutical 
products  not  manufactured  in  Indonesia,  as  well  as  data  exclusivity  protection  for 
pharmaceuticals  and  trade  mark  registration.  The  most  important  policy  challenge  is 
reinforcing the enforcement of IPR in many different areas including counterfeit goods and 
audio-visual products. 
 
Business Climate and Governance 
 
The need for transparency in government policy making, regulatory ambiguities created by 
decentralization,  and  a  tendency  to  discretionary  and  overlapping  administrative  controls 
which  can  often  be  associated  with  corruption  impede  the  business  environment  in 
Indonesia; Concerns about tax administration have also been identified.  
 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 11 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
Infrastructure Constraints 
 
The  Report  confirms  that  lack  of  infrastructure,  especially  in  the  energy, 
telecommunications and transport sectors, is a major constraint on economic development 
of  Indonesia.  Private  investment  could  contribute  more  to  addressing  infrastructure 
constraints.  Significant  improvements  in  the  investment  climate  would  facilitate  private 
public partnerships and improve the prospects for investment in infrastructure. 
 
Investment Restrictions and Treatment 
 
The new Investment Law of 2007 provides for protection against expropriation, improves 
transparency and provides recourse to international arbitration. However, a large number 
of  sectors  have  restrictions  on  foreign  ownership  and  control.  However  in  some  sectors 
the  restrictions  on  foreign  ownership  are  below  the  level  previously  existing.  Existing 
investments  are  also  protected.  The  new  law  was  intended  to  provide  transparency  and 
predictability for investment but some restrictions have caused confusion.  This has been 
recognized by Government and proposals made to address the main legal uncertainties. 
 
ASEAN Integration and FTAs 
 
During  the  last  ASEAN  Summit  a  number  of  arrangements  to  strengthen  and  deepen 
ASEAN  integration  in  trade  of  goods,  in  services  and  in  investments  were  approved,  as 
well as the intent of expanding ASEAN Plus FTAs. From the perspective of the Indonesia 
economy each of the ASEAN Plus FTAs bring advantages in the form of trade creation 
and potential losses in the form of trade diversion from lower cost third country suppliers.  
 
The  successful  conclusion  of  the  Doha  negotiations  and  lower  MFN  trade  barriers  will 
serve to reduce potential trade diversion. Other FTAs such as with India will also serve to 
reduce trade diversion and increase potential trade and economic gains for Indonesia.  
 
The implementation of ASEAN Plus FTAs with China, South Korea, Japan and recently 
with Australia and New Zealand, will eventually erode the relative competitive position of 
EU based exporters in the Indonesian market, unless negotiations are concluded for an EU 
ASEAN  FTA.  Even  low  MFN  tariffs  will  affect  negatively  the  market  position  of  EU 
based exporters since non-ASEAN exporters will have preferred access under other FTAs. 
 
Sectoral opportunities 

 
The  IBM  Report  includes  a  sectoral  section  with  several  chapters  each  on 
telecommunications, consumer goods and the power sector. 
 
The  telecommunications  sector  now  accounts  for  about  10  percent  of  EU  exports  to 
Indonesia and this sector has been booming for several years. There is a trade in telephone 
handsets  in  both  directions,  with  the  EU  exporting  more  high  end  mobile  phones  to 
Indonesia.  EU  exporters  are  relatively  strong  in  the  supply  of  GSM  and  3  G  Network 
equipment  while  European  firms  import  cheaper  Indonesian  hand  sets  to  help  supply 
global supply chains.  
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 12 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
The  Report  gives  details  on  the  evolution  of  the  ICT  sector  (Information  and 
Communications  Technology)  where  mobile  phones  are  increasingly  used  as  a  base  for 
internet  access.  This  is  rapidly  gaining  importance  and  likely  to  expand  significantly  in 
Indonesia as infrastructure and regulations are improved.  
 
In Indonesia, services are also rapidly moving from fixed lines to cellular services. Mobile 
phone subscribers rose from 32.8 million in 2004 to 92 million in 2007. Despite this there 
are  substantial  needs  for  new  investment  in  fixed  lines.  The  telecoms  sector  is  likely  to 
open  up  more  as  GATS  commitments  come  into  force  in  2010,  liberalizing  landline 
distributors. 
 
The sectoral report concludes that there are good opportunities for EU firms developing 
GSM  and  3G  telecom  systems  for  Indonesia;  even  through  the  increase  in  market 
penetration rates is slowing down. Widespread use of 3G and 4 G systems will make up for 
this. However one of the main commercial risks is competition from lower  cost CDMA 
technologies mostly from China. 
 
The  Report  concludes  that  telecommunications  is  a  sector  where  an  EU-FTA  (either 
ASEAN  or  bilateral  with  Indonesia)  could  and  should  advance  beyond  the  Doha 
Development Agenda within the WTO.  
 
The  Report  also  produced  a  series  of  chapters  on  the  consumer  goods  sector.  This  was 
done because the authors believed that there are niche markets available to EU firms in the 
areas of food and beverages, luxury products, cosmetics and retail distribution. 
 
This sector has accounted for between 8 and 10 percent of Indonesian imports between 
about 2002 and 2007 with a bit of a downturn during the global financial crisis, but with 
every prospect of an upturn and strong growth going forward. 
 
The main argument for prioritizing this sector is the size and growth in the market and the 
positive implications of Indonesian demographic data including the rise of a large middle 
class,  estimated  to  reach  45  million  people  by  2010.  The  consumer  goods  sector  is 
important  for  EU  SMEs  as  well  as  MNCs.  There  would  also  be  opportunities  for  EU 
SMEs to participate in joint ventures and invest in local manufacturing. 
 
Indonesia  imports  a  surprisingly  large  amount  of  fresh  food  for  a  country  with  a  large 
agricultural sector. The country only supplies 35 percent of its milk and dairy produce and 
imports  the  rest  from  four  countries  –  Australia,  New  Zealand,  Denmark  and  the 
Netherlands.  New  Zealand,  China,  Australia  and  the  USA  supply  most  of  the  imported 
food to Indonesia (more than half) while the EU is also an important supplier. 
 
There is a niche market for alcoholic beverages, especially for tourism. These are excluded 
from  preferential  trading  arrangements  like  the  ASEAN-Australia  New  Zealand  FTA. 
There is also a potential niche market for high end of the market automobiles but AFTA 
and ASEAN Plus FTAs may erode this market. 
 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 13 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
The  EU  already  supplies  between  25  and  30  percent  of  the  total  Indonesian  imports  of 
cosmetics and this is an area where EU exports to Indonesia can be increased (as well as 
Indonesian exports to the EU).  
 
The  report  spends  some  time  looking  at  market  prospects,  VAT  and  tax,  manufacturing 
opportunities, regulations, labelling and distribution networks for this sector. 
 
The  Report  provides  several  chapters  on  the  power  generation  sector  because  of  the 
evident increase in demand as the production of electricity rises in line with demand. The 
EU was one of the most important suppliers of power generation equipment to Indonesia 
up to 2006, according to the Report, supplying in that year 56 percent of such products. 
 
However  the  Report  admits  these  figures  could  be  faulty  due  to  dollar-euro  conversion 
rates and that the EU has been losing market share in this sector. In fact, the size of the 
sector is rapidly increasing and it may well be that the EU supply of goods into it is still 
decreasing, but it is also clear that there are now major opportunities in the sector. 
 
The EU countries performing best in this area are reportedly Finland and the Netherlands, 
followed by Germany, the United Kingdom and Italy. 
 
The IBM Report decided to include the power sector in the list of sectoral studies because 
power  demand  is  rapidly  increasing  and  several  EU  countries  have  established  a  track 
record showing that they can penetrate this market.  
 
Interestingly,  the  top  performance  of  Finland  is  based  on  supplying  small  and  medium 
power  stations  using  gas  and  biomass  and  a  variety  of  renewable  energy  fuels,  whereas 
Germany  and  the  UK,  and  to  a  lesser  extent  France,  have  traditionally  supplied  rather 
larger power units. 
 
The  Report  points  out  that  the  EU  is  a  major  provider  of  electricity  generating 
technologies  including  nuclear,  solar,  wind  and  other  renewable  energies.  The  Report 
identifies  some  potential  key  players,  in  the  form  of  the  major  EU  utility-conglomerates 
including EDF and Gdf-Suez in France, EON in Germany and ENEL in Italy. 
 
Italy has installed 52 geothermal plants and Indonesia is now expanding this sector. There 
is also geothermal technology in some other EU states (including Germany). The Report 
refers to opportunities in solar development, wind and biomass, as well as bio-fuel. 
 
The Report describes how smaller power stations under 10 MW can only be owned up to 
49 percent by foreign owners, but EU equipment can of course be sold to such plant and 
EU firms can participate as joint ventures. 
 
The  report  supplies  some  information  on  the  power  sector  including  prospects  for  the 
different  types  of  energy.  The  report  concludes  that  the  development  of  Independent 
Power  Producers  (IPPs)  will  be  more  important  as  PLN,  the  state  power  utility,  cannot 
raise all the capital to finance the needed power stations. 
 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 14 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
The Sectoral Report on power concludes that there needs to be progress on energy policy 
and  pricing  to  encourage  investment.  The  Report  raises  the  issue  of  tariffs  applicable  to 
electrical  generation  equipment  (averaging  5  percent)  while  boilers  and  condensers  have 
MFN tariffs of up to 10 percent. The Report concludes the ASEAN + FTAs will result in 
tariff advantages for Japan, Korea, China, India and later for Australia and New Zealand 
and that an ASEAN FTA or a bilateral FTA with Indonesia will be needed to redress this. 
The Report concludes that the power sector will present a major opportunity to EU firms. 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 15 


TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
Document 2:  Indonesian Trade Access to the EU 
Opportunities & Challenges (Transtec 
2010) 

This report proved to have strong and helpful analyses of key sectors which it identified as 
offering good trade prospects for Indonesia. Its strength appeared to be based on adequate 
consultations on the ground in Indonesia as well as good analysis. 
The  study  entitled  Indonesia’s  Trade  Access  to  the  European  Union:  Opportunities  and  Challenges 
aimed  to  examine  Indonesia’s  international  competitiveness  and  export  flows  to  the 
European  Union  (EU)  and  other  markets,  and  to  identify  and  prioritize  key  sectors  and 
industries that would benefit from support given by initiatives like the EU-funded Trade 
Support Programme II (TSP-II).  
It  therefore  identified  positive  sectors,  at  the  same  time  identifying  some  of  the 
cooperation instruments that would help Indonesia to accrue the  actual benefits of trade 
opportunities. This is in line with the thinking merging from early discussions in the Vision 
Group that cooperation instruments could be better integrated with trade opportunities. 
1.  The EU as an Important Market 
There are extensive market opportunities for countries like Indonesia in the European 
Union. As a single entity, the European Union is the world’s largest economic power, 
accounting for nearly 30 percent of total world output and outranking the total gross 
domestic product (GDP) of the United States, and of Japan and China combined. With 
the value of total trade equal to more than 40 percent of GDP, the European Union’s 
openness to trade is more than three times greater than that of either the United States 
or Japan. The total value of its imports last year was US$1.7 trillion, representing over 
18 percent of total world trade. The ASEAN countries supply 5 percent of those EU 
imports and Indonesia contributes 18 percent of that share.  
From  Indonesia’s  perspective,  there  are  two  important  differences  among  the  27 
member countries of the European Union. The first is the large variations in the size of 
member countries in terms of their domestic markets and importance of external trade 
to  their  economies;  the  second  is  the  considerable  variation  that  occurs  in consumer 
purchasing power across the countries. Under these conditions, Indonesian exporters 
have a wide range of market opportunities when looking for markets of different sizes, 
foreign trade and with consumer preferences for either high-end products or products 
that are more directed towards to mass markets.  
The European Union is also home for almost half of the world’s largest transnational 
corporations.  These  companies  depend  on  linkages  with  foreign-based  producers  in 
sectors that are of particular interest to Indonesia, for example, in chemicals, electrical 
equipment,  food  and  beverage,  motor  vehicles  and  pharmaceuticals.  By  integrating 
their  supplies  into  global  value  chains  of  these  trans-nationals,  local  Indonesian 
producers  are  increasingly  becoming  part  of  networks  of  cooperating  firms  that  are 
involved in the full cycle of activities that add value to the products that they supply to 
consumers, both in Europe and elsewhere. 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 17 



TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
2.  Indonesia's  Trade  Flows  with  the  European  Union  and  Other  Important 
Markets 
Notwithstanding  the  size  and  importance  of  the  European  Union,  the  share  of 
Indonesia’s exports that are destined for that market has declined substantially, from 18 
percent to 14 percent, over the last decade. This decline parallels similar reductions in 
the share of Indonesia’s exports directed at the United States and Japan. As a result, the 
absorption of Indonesia’s exports by these three markets has fallen from 55 percent in 
2000 to 40 percent in 2009.  
Most  of  the  decline  in  Indonesia’s  exports  to  these  developed  markets  has  been 
redirected  to  the  ASEAN  regional  market.  This  shift  has  increasingly  allowed  other 
ASEAN countries to use Indonesia’s natural resources in their unprocessed forms to 
move up their value chains and produce greater quantities of processed and high-tech 
products.  As  a  result,  the  fast-growing  East  Asian  economies  have  been  able  to 
concentrate  a  growing  proportion  of  their  exports  in  manufactures  and  high  value-
added  products,  while  Indonesia  has  remained  entrenched  in  the  production  of  raw 
materials and products having relatively small value-adding activities.  
Indonesia could reverse this pattern by focusing its production activities on processing 
activities and other activities that add value to products. It has a relatively high degree 
of trade compatibility with EU imports. There are also a large number of products in 
which  Indonesia  has  already  succeeded  in  increasing  its  market  shares  in  rapidly 
expanding markets in the European Union. Examples include electronic components, 
processed and prepared foods, and chemicals. In other products, however, Indonesia 
has not yet taken advantage of the fast growing EU markets for products like soaps and 
cosmetics, television parts, furniture, crustaceans, footwear and jewellery. Recognising 
these  opportunities  could  stimulate  the  Indonesian  private  sector,  with  Government 
support,  to  find  ways  to  overcome  existing  obstacles  and  develop  products  with 
potential for exports to fast-growing EU markets. 
3.  Selection of Focal Sub-Sectors and Industries for the Study  
In  order  to  provide  lessons  and  guidelines  for  developing  high-value  added  exports 
with  dynamic  growth  markets  in  the  European  Union,  the  present  study  focuses  on 
five  industries  or  sub-sectors  of  importance  to  Indonesia.  The  selection  process  has 
invoked  a  number  of  criteria  that  can  be  grouped  into  three  categories:  (i)  factors 
related  to  national  development  objective;  (ii)  factors  related  to  foreign  market 
determinants;  and  (iii)  factors  related  to  international  competitiveness  and  internal 
factors.  The  results  of  the  ranking  and  selection  procedure  the  following  focal 
industries: 
  Fisheries and Agri-Foods: These industries possess large opportunities for exporters to 
move  into  high  value-adding  downstream  activities.  Small  and  medium  size 
enterprises (SMEs) tend to predominate in food industry clusters, and networking 
activities  along  the  value  chain  provide  large  opportunities  for  knowledge  and 
technology transfers to local producers. There are also important gains to be made 
in poverty alleviation by generating employment. 
  Consumer  Electronics:  The  industry  has  considerable  potential  for  value  adding 
activities  in  the  economy.  There  are  extensive  opportunities  for  Export  Quality 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 18 



TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
Infrastructure (EQI) support directed at moving Indonesia from low to medium-
tech products with favourable market prospects in the new EU member states of 
Eastern  Europe  to  high-tech  components  in  the  high-income  Western  European 
economies.  Trade  compatibility  between  Indonesia’s  existing  exports  of  these 
products and EU imports is the highest of any sector. 
  Furniture: Development of this industry would offer large possibilities for SMEs and 
MSEs, employment generation, and poverty alleviation throughout Indonesia. The 
benefits from EQI activities could have a favourable environmental impact through 
improved  quality  management  and  control,  standardisation,  inspections  and 
certification.  Domestic  business  and  trade  associations  are  strong  and  could 
provide support to exporters intending to enter the EU market.  
  Natural  Cosmetics:  The  industry  has  the  highest  responsiveness  of  demand  for 
imports to economic growth in the European Union. It therefore has the best EU 
market  prospects  among all  sectors.  Downstream activities  involving  the  location 
of facilities for further processing are rapidly emerging in new manufacturing areas, 
where  large  research  and  development  (R&D)  inputs  are  also  needed. 
Requirements  for  EQI  improvements  are  therefore  large  in  most  Indonesian 
activities in this industry. 
4.  Focal Industries have a Huge Potential in the EU Market 
Demand for imports of the focal products is projected to grow by nearly 7 percent a 
year  over  the  medium  term.  This  forecast  is  based  on  our  econometric  models  that 
generated  market  estimates  based  on  key  assumptions  about  GDP  growth,  relative 
price changes for each of the traded products, and the exchange rate between the Euro 
and the US dollar. EU market outlook highlights are as follows: 
  Fisheries: The European Union is by far the world’s largest importer of fishery 
products,  and  its  strong  demand  for  fishery  imports  largely  reflects  its  high 
responsiveness to changes in consumer incomes. Based on our estimates, and 
expectations  about  the  medium-term  prospects  for  economic  growth  in  the 
European  Union,  fishery  imports  are  projected  to  grow  by  a  robust  annual 
average  of  8  percent.  Above-average  rates  are  expected  to  continue  in 
processed fishery imports, which have in the past expanded twice as fast as al  
other  types  of  fishery  imports.  The  fastest  growing  product-level  imports  are 
likely  to  be  fish  and  shellfish  in  their  frozen  form,  including  coalfish,  eels, 
albacore, scallops, trout, mackerel, sardines and crabmeat. Imports of fresh and 
chilled yellow-fin tuna are also expected to show strong growth. Indonesia is in 
a particularly favourable position in that it has the world’s largest catch of this 
species. 
  Agri-foods: The EU demand for agri-food imports has been strong, particularly 
in its response to changes in consumer incomes. Demand for agri-food imports 
is  projected  to  grow  by  3.5  percent  a  year  in  the  medium-term.  Among 
individual  product  categories,  fruit  and  vegetable  juices  are  expected  to 
continue as one of the largest processed agri-food imported into the European 
Union. It alone accounts for nearly one-fifth of all agri-food imports and it is 
expected to continue its robust growth, especially in tropical and exotic fruits 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 19 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
that are abundant in Indonesia. Other major imports showing strong demand 
prospects  are  prepared  vegetables  and  fruits,  and condiments  and  seasonings, 
where Indonesia has large varieties. 
  Consumer Electronics: The size of the consumer electronics markets is by far the 
largest  of  all  the  focal  sectors  covered  by  this  study.  Demand  is  highly 
responsive  to  income  changes,  but  year-to-year  variations  in  EU  imports  are 
high. The medium-term forecast is for a 2 percent growth in imports. The top 
EU  electronic  product  imports  are  fairly  evenly  distributed  among  the  mass 
market applications in home appliances, data processing uses, audio and video.  
  Furniture: The European Union is the largest market for furniture in the world. 
The  medium-term  outlook  is  for  a  2  percent  annual  growth  in  imports,  as 
foreign supplies become an increasingly larger proportion of the total furniture 
market in Europe. The top importing countries in the European Union are the 
United  Kingdom,  Germany,  France  and  the  Netherlands,  which  together 
account for two-thirds of all EU furniture imports. 
  Natural Cosmetics: The cosmetic market of the European Union is nearly as large 
as  the  combined  markets  of  the  United  States  and  Japan.  Common  growth 
patterns are occurring throughout the European Union in sun-care products. In 
addition,  the  aging  population  of  Europe  is  generating  growing  demand  for 
creams and skin care products. There is also a growing demand for natural and 
organic  products  across  all  age  groups.  Because  of  strong  and  rising 
consumption of cosmetic products in the European Union, cosmetic imports is 
projected  to  grow  by  5-6  percent  annually  in  2010-2012,  and  thereafter 
accelerate to 7 percent a year.  
5.  Market  Potential  of  Focal  Sectors  Needs  to  be  Counter-Balanced  with 
Compliance of Quality Requirements  
While the EU market offers enormous growth opportunities for Indonesian exporters, 
its  regulatory  environment  has  strict  controls  that  are  largely  aimed  at  protecting 
consumers  and  the  environment.  Requirements  covering  security,  technical,  sanitary, 
phyto-sanitary,  environmental  and  other  regulations  are  generally  harmonised  among 
EU member countries. General regulations cover food and feed safety, environmental 
protection,  marketing  standards,  product  safety,  technical  standardisation,  packaging 
and labelling. Industry and product-specific requirements are also detailed in this study. 
This information is readily available and transparent to Indonesian exporters interested 
in selling their products in the EU market. 
6.  Indonesia  is  Well  Positioned  to  Tackle  Enormous  Trade  Potential  with 
European Union 
Indonesia has numerous advantages in the EU market that could help to reverse the 
under-representation of the EU market in its export portfolio. It has low labour costs 
and ready access to an abundance of resources. Its export prices to the EU market are 
generally  competitive  in  local  currency  units,  notwithstanding  the  undervalued 
currencies of many competitors have undermined Indonesia’s price competitiveness in 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 20 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
some  products.  With  the  likely  re-alignment  of  currencies  in  the  coming  year, 
Indonesia’s stable currency will undoubtedly attract investors.  
In  the  EU  market,  Indonesia  is  a  beneficiary  of  trade  preferences  under  the 
Generalized  System  of  Preferences  (GSP),  which  grants  product  imports  into  the 
European  Union  either  duty-free  access  or  tariff  reductions.  At  present,  almost  40 
percent  of  Indonesia’s  13  billion  Euros  exports  to  the  EU  market  are  eligible  for 
preferential  treatment.  Yet  only  about  3  billion  Euros  of  those  products  are  actual y 
covered  under  the  scheme,  and  they  are  mainly  concentrated  in  the  areas  of 
telecommunications  instruments,  television  and  audio  equipment,  garments  and 
footwear. There is therefore considerable scope for greater use of the GSP facility by 
Indonesian exporters.  
Both  Government  and  business  associations  are  facilitating  private  sector  export 
growth, to the European Union and elsewhere. The Government’s trade policy goals 
and priorities are to (i) improve its business climate and regional competitiveness; (ii) 
attract greater foreign and domestic investment, especially in infrastructure and export 
sectors;  and  (iii)  generate  high-quality  job  growth  needed  for  sustained  economic 
development. To this end, the Government has been promoting bilateral, regional, and 
multilateral  trade,  with  the  aim  of  expanding  international  markets  in  the  European 
Union and in other markets.  
Business  associations  have  also  provided  extensive  support  to  the  private  sector. 
However, for many small and medium size enterprises (SMEs) there remains a lack of 
awareness  of  EU  market  access  requirements,  product  design  needed  for  European 
customers, and available government support programs. Information dissemination by 
both  Government  and  business  associations  is  therefore  an  important  means  of 
ensuring  that  SMEs  are  able  to  successfully  participate  in  value  chains  supplying  the 
EU market. 
7.  Most Challenges for Indonesia are in Supply-Side Aspects, Especially the EQI 
System 
Indonesia has suffered important losses in EU market shares in the last decade. Our 
estimates of the export relationships of these products from the focal industries suggest 
that those losses were largely due to non-price factors, including supply impediments 
from limitations in Export Quality Infrastructure (EQI). Export quality infrastructure is 
relevant  for  all  export  products  that  are  required  certain  quality  standards  by  the 
importers. For Indonesia’s exports to the EU market, EQI issues centre on the system 
used  to  meet  EU  import  standards  and  requirements,  certification  of  products  and 
management  systems,  competence  of  laboratories  related  to  export,  accreditation  of 
laboratories, metrology and inspection. 
o  In fisheries, negative non-price effects on Indonesia’s export competitiveness in 
the  EU  market  more  than  offset  improvements  in  the  relative  price  of  the 
products  themselves,  thereby  producing  an  overall  reduction  in  Indonesia’s 
share of EU imports from third countries. 
o  In agri-foods, our estimates show that non-price factors in the last decade have 
reduced  Indonesia’s  market  share  by  15  percent,  while  improvements  in  the 
industry’s  competitive  export  prices  helped  to  increase  market  shares  by  an 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 21 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
average of 6 percent. The net relative price gains were therefore not sufficient 
to  offset  the  negative  effects  from  EQI  and  other  supply-related  factors 
affecting the industry’s performance.  
o  In consumer electronics, our estimates suggest that there has been a large reduction 
in  the  earlier  negative  effects  from  non-price  factors  associated  with  supply 
impediments. The improvement in supply conditions is likely to be associated 
with  the  growing  influence  of  multinational  enterprises  in  the  country,  and 
improved EQI conditions in the components industry. 
o  In furniture, Indonesia’s market share losses in the European Union have been 
largely due to non-price factors associated with non-price impediments on the 
supply side, although price movements and exchange rate pass-through effects 
have  also  contributed  to  the  decline.  Our  estimates  suggest  these  non-price 
factors were responsible for about one-third Indonesia’s losses of shares in the 
EU furniture market during the past decade. 
o  In natural cosmetics, the industry experienced market share losses from non-price 
factors  associated  with  supply  impediments  like  EQI  limitations.  On  average, 
the negative effect from non-price factors outweighed positive gains from price 
factors,  causing  a  large  net  reduction  in  Indonesia’s  export  market  share  of 
natural cosmetics and their ingredients in the EU market. 
8.  Main EQI Issues in Focal Sectors  
There  are  some  common  EQI  issues  facing  Indonesian  industries  that  export  to  the 
EU  market,  but  in  general  the  issues  tend  to  be  industry-specific.  Testing  and 
accreditation difficulties are common, as are the inability of laboratories to perform all 
testing and analysis required by the European Union. As a result, accreditation by the 
large  number  of  certification  bodies  in  Indonesia  is  not  always  recognised 
internationally.  
o  For fisheries, quality and food safety improvements are needed in fish vessels, 
fishing  ports  and  at  landing  sites,  while  in  fish  farming  the  presence  of 
antibiotics in fishery products remains a major issue for Indonesia’s exports to 
the European Union. 
o  For food products, the major impediment to bringing processing operations to 
the country is associated with SPS requirements in the EU market.  
o  In consumer electronics, EQI issues range from product design to components 
purchases, assembly and packaging. 
o  In  furniture,  EQI  issues  relate  to  the  moisture  content  of  woods  to  prevent 
cracking,  standardisation  of  products,  quality  of  the  finished  products,  and 
safety testing.  
o  In natural cosmetics, the most important EQI issue is the ingredients used in 
products,  where  EU  rules  apply  maximum  concentration  rates  of  allowable 
ingredients. 
Apart  from  EQI  limitations,  major  cross-sectoral  obstacles  remain  in  area  like  poor 
infrastructure,  particularly  road,  electricity  and  logistics,  as  well  as  lack  of  marketing 
expertise and networking in extra-regional markets. SMEs confront great challenges in 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 22 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
meeting EU standards since they often lack information and face excessively high costs 
in providing those standards. 
9.  Tackling  These  Issues  Could  Result  in  an  Enormous  Increase  in  Export 
Revenues  
The  results  of  this  study  point  to  the  enormous  export  revenue  gains  that Indonesia 
could  achieve  if  it  were  to  overcome  EQI  and  supply-related  constraints  to  placing 
products in the EU market. Our estimates indicate that in the last decade the average 
gain  in  revenue  from  the  focal  industries  covered  in  this  study  would  have  been  28 
percent if those supply-constraints had been overcome. Industry-specific findings are 
impressive: 
  Fisheries:  To  the  extent  that  Indonesia  could  have  overcome  its  supply 
impediments  on  exports  and  maintained  the  same  share  of  the  EU  fishery 
market  that  it  reached  in  2000,  foreign  exchange  revenue  from  the  industry 
during the last decade would have been nearly 20 percent higher in 2009 than 
was actually achieved.  
  Agri-Foods:  If  Indonesia  were  to  have  overcome  its  supply  impediments  on 
exports and maintained its agri-foods market share at the beginning of the last 
decade,  foreign  exchange  revenue  from  the  industry  would  have  been  two-
thirds higher than actual revenue for the industry. 
  Consumer  Electronics:  Had  Indonesia  overcome  its  supply  impediments  on 
exports and maintained its share of the EU consumer electronics market that it 
reached at the beginning of the last decade, foreign exchange revenue from the 
industry  would  have  been  nearly  10  percent  higher  in  2009  than  was  actually 
achieved. 
  Furniture: Had the industry overcome supply-side impediments and maintained 
its  share  of  the  EU  furniture  market  in  the  middle  of  the  last  decade,  the 
industry  would  have  generated  an  additional  20  percent  of  foreign  exchange 
revenue in 2005-2009 than was actually achieved.  
  Natural Cosmetics: To the extent that Indonesia could have overcome its supply 
impediments  on  exports  and  maintained  its  cosmetics  market  share  at  the 
beginning  of  the  decade,  foreign  exchange  revenue  from  the  industry  would 
have been 40 percent higher in the first half of the decade and more than 10 
percent larger in the second half. 
10. Compliance with EU Quality Requirements  also Helps Indonesian Exports to 
Other Developed Markets 
Overcoming  EQI  and  other  supply-side  obstacles  will  require  considerable  effort  on 
the  part  of  the  industry.  However,  compliance  with  EU  quality  requirements  would 
help  Indonesian  exporters  not  only  gain  greater  access  to  the  EU  market,  but  also 
expand exports to other developed markets.  
The  benefits  to  the  industry  are  considerable,  as  are  the  economy-wide  effects  that 
would be produced from additional employment and expenditures on downstream and 
supporting  industries.  These  effects  are  particularly  important  for  small  and  medium 
size enterprises (SMEs), which tend to predominate in upstream activities and have the 
greatest difficulties in getting their products to foreign markets. 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 23 


TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
Document 3: Trade Sustainability Impact Assessment 
(TSIA) of FTA between the EU and ASEAN 
- Final Report (Ecorys Research, May 
2009). 

Introduction 
 
The Consultant Experts took the view that the importance of this Study was the  way in 
which it approached FTA issues with suggested key points and methodologies, rather than 
simply  a  theoretical  analysis  of  the  benefits  of  an  EU-ASEAN CEPA-FTA  which  is  not 
being  negotiated  at  present.  The  policy  implications  for  a  possible  bilateral  arrangement 
between  EU  and  Indonesia  are  however  of  interest  and  in  particular  the  "FTA  flanking 
measures" remain valid and relevant also for a bilateral context. 
 
It  is  noted  that  civil  society  is  not  yet  involved  in  a  systematic  way  in  the  trade  policy 
making process in most ASEAN countries. In the EU there is a strong tradition in terms of 
social dialogue and civil society consultation. However progress is being made in ASEAN 
and the amount of attention now being paid to trade agreements in the Indonesian press 
and in civil society forums confirms the need to take this into account. 
 
Overall Impact 
 
Overall the FTA is expected to have substantial positive impacts (GDP, income, trade and 
employment) for ASEAN and small but positive effects for the EU. An alternative bilateral 
arrangement would clearly focus on benefits for Indonesia and the EU rather than at the 
regional level, although the regional integration backdrop would remain important. 
 
National income effects from an EU-ASEAN FTA would be expected to amount to as much as 29.5 
billion  for  the  EU  and  between  725  million  (rest  of  ASEAN)  and  21.5  billion  (Singapore)  for 
ASEAN.  In  GDP  percentage  terms  the  most  substantial  increase  expected  from  the  Study  would  be 

achieved  by  Vietnam  (with  more  than  a  15%  increase  of  GDP  in  the  long  run,  and  from  the  most 
ambitious scenario). {
Add figures on Indonesia instead} 
 
In  an  EU-ASEAN  FTA  context  Indonesia  would  be  expected  to  gain  in  electronic 
equipment,  textiles  and  wearing  apparel  sectors,  while  motor  vehicles  and  parts,  gas 
production and businesses services would be expected to decline.[ But it may be noted that 
foreign investment in the automotive sector has increased in Indonesia since 2008]. 
 
The expected impacts on wage levels are also a reflection of demand for certain skills, thus 
Thailand, the Philippines and Singapore in particular would see an increasing demand for 
skilled labour, as their economies shifted towards higher value-added and skilled activities.  
 
The Transtec Study sees the same progression being possible in Indonesia. At sectoral level 
some real income decreases are expected in: 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 25 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
 
  the cereals and grains sector in parts of ASEAN in the short term, in the longer 
run, remaining producers may well find their real income increase as rationalization 
and investments in more efficient production systems yield higher returns; 
  in  the  TCF  sectors,.  EU  regions  dominated  by  clothing  and  particular  footwear 
manufacturing, as short term unemployment levels in these regions may increase 
 
Positive real income effects at sector level are expected for the TCF sectors in Indonesia 
(textiles 
The Study says that the extent to which investments within and from outside ASEAN will 
materialize depends on improvements to the investment and overall business climate.  
 
As the cost of doing business, and trade and investment restrictiveness are still quite high 
in some ASEAN countries and for some sectors, further reforms in this area are likely to 
lead to substantial benefits to intellectual property rights, protection and competition policy 
and services liberalisation. 
 
FDI  will  be  encouraged  further  if  intra-ASEAN  integration  and  harmonization  progress 
further. This will allow foreign investors to trade more easily within ASEAN, strengthening 
the region’s role as a production base. 
 
The  Study  concluded  that  in  respect  of  an  EU-ASEAN  FTA  Investment  would    not 
necessarily be expected to increase from outside ASEAN, in particular from EU investors, 
but  improvement  of  the  investment  conditions,  removal  of  NTBs  and  services 
liberalisation is also expected to increase investments from within ASEAN. 
 
Overall,  investments  in  the  EU  are  expected  to  increase  in  services  and  non-production 
related  activities  (e.g.  design  and  marketing  in  the  TCF  sectors),  while  investments  in 
ASEAN will mostly be in productive capacity, and advanced technologies and products.  
 
[The Indonesian context is somewhat different from the general ASEAN context in 2007, 
since there are signs of a boom in investment in infrastructure, power, manufacturing.] 
 
The Study concludes that reduction of trade and investment barriers in the motor vehicles 
and parts sector could be expected to have a substantial positive impact on FDI flows, in 
which case investment interest might come from the EU as well, despite comments above 
that most investment shifts might come from inside ASEAN.  
 
Similarly,  the  financial  services  potential  for  investment  will  improve  with  removal  of 
ownership  restrictions.  This  could  eventually  lead  to  greater  direct  involvement  of  EU 
financial services providers in the region. 
 
The Study noted that the expected impact from lowering FDI restrictiveness would be a 
reduction in trade costs for services, by 6.3% in insurance services, 5.5% in communication 
services and 4.9% in both transport and other business services.  
 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 26 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
In  terms  of  social  impacts,  the  FTA  is  expected  to  have  an  overall  positive  impact  on 
poverty alleviation, albeit at the disaggregate level, while some groups may see an increase 
in poverty rates in the short run due to negative net price and income effects in the case of 
liberalisation  beyond  simple  tariff  reductions.  In  terms  of  the  TSIA  philosophy  these 
downside effects should be identified and steps taken to adjust and mitigate the position.   
 
The  increased  employment  opportunities  in  the  TCF  sectors  in  the  Rest  of  ASEAN, 
Indonesia  and  Vietnam  is  expected  to  facilitate  the  structural  transformation  processes 
taking place in these countries as agricultural workers could, without substantial retraining,  
be absorbed into these sectors, thus also contributing to poverty reduction. 
 
In  cereals and grains (particularly rice) and the fisheries sectors in ASEAN, some short-
term  poverty  increases  may  occur  as  fisheries  communities  and  rural  areas  see  young 
people in particular move to urban areas to find employment in other sectors. This would 
require some adjustment measures in a bilateral or ASEAN context.  
 
The  expansion  of  the  financial  services  sector  may  contribute  to  poverty  reduction 
provided micro-credits will increase. Increased access to insurance will also provide social 
benefits.  
 
Improvements in health and education levels in ASEAN are expected from the overall 
increases in welfare, wages and household income. The higher health, safety and hygiene 
standards achieved by ASEAN producers as a result of compliance with SPS would benefit 
public health in ASEAN, and the same would be true for Indonesia in a bilateral context. 
 
Removal of investment barriers as a consequence of an FTA may open up some previously 
restricted  social  and  environmental  goods  services  sector  to  private  and  foreign 
investments, which could encourage efficiency gains and services improvements. 
 
Employment  of  both  skilled  and  unskilled  labour  would  increase  substantially  across 
ASEAN as a consequence of an FTA. A bilateral agreement would have similar aims. 
 
Due  to  efficiency  gains  and  productivity  increases,  employment  of  both  skilled  and 
unskilled  workers  is  expected  to  increase  less  than  increases  in  output.  Although  this 
implies higher wages per worker,  creating additional employment will continue to pose a 
major challenge for many ASEAN economies. 
 
As a consequence of FTA, private Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and international 
initiatives  will  contribute  to  further  addressing  of  labour  issues  in  the  region,  provided 
commitments  continue  to  be  strong  in  a  period  of  economic  downturn  and  national 
legislation and standards are adequately enforced. 
 
In  terms  of  equality,  expected  changes  in  wages  indicate  that  in  some  countries  high-
skilled  wages  will  increase  more  than  low-skilled  wages  leading  to  increasing  levels  of 
relative inequality. Regional disparities may also increase in ASEAN as a consequence of 
inter-sectoral shifts and wage effects in favour of urban areas. This issue might also apply 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 27 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
to Indonesia as a very large and diverse archipelago, with very different levels of economic 
development between different areas, notably between Java and Eastern Indonesia. 
 
The growth of the TCF sectors in ASEAN as a consequence of the FTA is expected to 
benefit female labour in particular, as the sectors tend to employ predominantly females. 
 
In  other,  higher  skilled  sectors  and  activities,  gender  inequalities  may  in  fact  increase 
slightly,  as  high-skilled  employment  opportunities  especially  in  specific  segments  of   
services sectors may exist, and these sectors tend to be relatively less open to females. The 
increased  opportunities  for  skilled  workers  in  the  services  and  other  sectors  in  ASEAN 
may benefit male workers relatively more than female workers. It would also be important 
to take note of this and address this issue in a bilateral context in the Indonesian case. 
 
As a consequence of overall increased economic activity and trade, environmental effects 
are  expected  to  be  negative,  with  increased  greenhouse  gasses  (GHG)  emission  and 
declining  levels  of  air  quality,  mainly  as  a  result  of  increased  air,  road  and  maritime 
transport, but also as a consequence of increased manufacturing output (emissions).  This 
could  prompt  an  EIA  component  to  any  bilateral  FTA,  including  recommendations  on 
how to deal with problems arising. 
 
The  FTA  encourages  further  adoption  of  improved  standards  and  cleaner  technologies 
(facilitated by FDI), and this may help mitigate negative environmental impacts. Ensuring 
the  FTA  does  not  impact  negatively  on  logging  practices  (taking  into  account  existing 
illegal, unsustainable logging and land clearance problems,) means issues need to be seen in 
an  integrated  way.  The  Study  recommends  to  include  enhanced  application  of  voluntary 
certification schemes and negotiation of FLEGT Voluntary Partnership Agreements. 
 
Relatively limited effects on sectors with significant impacts on land use intensification are 
envisaged as a result of the FTA. This can be closely monitored as effects that do occur 
may  have  serious  consequences  for  longer  term  sustainability.  The  special  study  on  bio-
fuels in the TSIA study and some of the sections in the Transtec Study address these issues.  
 
Biodiversity
  issues  are  important  in  the  fisheries  sectors  and  possible  negative  impacts 
could be encountered in this sector in Indonesia, as catches and by-catches increase and 
could add to overfishing.  
 
These issues arising from the fisheries sector are all the more important given that more 
Indonesian workers depend on fisheries than for any other country in ASEAN. By 2007 
some 7.3 million Indonesians depended on fisheries, compared with 5.3 million Thais, 3.4 
million Vietnamese and only 0.6 million Malaysians. 
 
Effects of the FTA on environmental quality and fresh and waste water relate mostly 
to increased economic activity, urbanization and consumption following an FTA. 
 
The impacts on environmental quality and fresh and waste water will differ per sector and 
will also depend on the extent to which investments in environmental goods and services 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 28 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
sectors  will  be enhanced (e.g.  Waste  Water  Treatment  Plant  –WWTP-  and water  supply, 
recycling, waste management). 
 
As  the  EU  has  substantial  expertise  in  this  area  and  is  a  world  leader  in  environmental 
technologies,  more  investments  in  such  sectors  may  allow  for  promoting  trade  and 
investment  in  innovative  technologies  and  best  practice  implementation  in  the 
environmental goods sectors in ASEAN, improving environmental quality. 
 
At sector level the main potential impacts of the FTA in terms of environmental quality, 
fresh and waste water will likely stem from fisheries (aquaculture) and TCF sectors. 
 
Policy Context and Approach 
 
The FTA is clearly part of a more general process of enhanced cooperation and dialogue 
between the two regions, that is increasingly built on mutual interests and reciprocity and as 
such has graduated from a purely assistance based form of cooperation. 
 
The TSIA Study encourages, through its comprehensive nature, an innovative approach to 
a potential bilateral CEPA, including and in support of FTA provisions. 
 
The  mainstreaming  of  trade  into  these  overall  assistance  programmes  and  cooperation 
agreements  will  enhance  policy  coherence  and  encourage  further  economic  integration 
between the two regions and sustainable development in ASEAN. 
 
The FTA and flanking measures should encourage convergence and cooperation through 
incentives  and  positive  ongoing  initiatives.  In  recent  years  many  ASEAN  countries 
(including Indonesia) and ASEAN as a whole have taken positive steps in lowering trade 
and investment barriers, adopting international agreements and conventions and addressing 
social and environmental issues through policy and legal reforms.  
 
The bilateral implication is that capacity building and strengthened capacities to implement 
a CEPA-FTA agreement would be needed, as recommended by a TSIA approach. 
  
Overall Policy Measures 

 
FTA and Flanking Measures 

 
Phasing  of  Tariff  Reductions  -  The  larger  the  envisaged  tariff  reduction  in  goods,  tariff 
equivalent  reduction  in  services,  or  NTB  reduction,  the  more  pronounced  the  specific 
short-term  effects  may  be.  For  those  sectors  where  potential  short  run  negative  impacts 
have been identified as a consequence of opening up, or where issues with relation to e.g. 
food security exist, the parties may consider a phased reduction of tariffs at a slower rate 
than what is foreseen in general, to allow for longer adjustment periods including through 
appropriate  policy  and  legislative  reforms  and/or  the  building  up  of  competitiveness.  A 
condition to such a phased approach is that initiatives are undertaken to facilitate structural 
adjustments, a proper monitoring system could keep track of progress in this respect. 
 

Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 29 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
Inclusion  of  a  Sustainable  Development  Chapter  (SD)  -  The  FTA  should  include  a  Sustainable 
Development  Chapter  that  includes  agreements  and  commitments  on  cooperation  and 
progress towards specific social and environmental objectives. 
Set  up  of  Monitoring  and  Evaluation  System  -  Continuous  monitoring  of  implementation  and 
enforcement of the FTA as well as periodic evaluations, which involve local stakeholders, 
so as to allow for awareness raising and capacity building among these stakeholders, should 
analyse  the  impact  of  the  FTA  between  the  EU  and  ASEAN.  The  aim  should  be  to 
understand  why,  how  and  where  sustainability  impacts  occur,  and  what  can  be  done  to 
ameliorate  the  sustainability  impacts.  The  aim  of  monitoring  and  evaluation  is  thus  both 
continuing  analysis  and  policy  prescription  and  should  cover  both  the  trade  policy  itself 
and the mitigating measures.  
 
Continue  to  improve  business  and  investment  climate  -  
Further  improving  the  business  and 
investment climate, including infrastructure development in ASEAN, reduction of red tape 
and other investment barriers and generally reducing the cost of doing business, is needed 
to  achieve  the  longer  term  effects  envisaged.  Similarly  continuing  the  progress  towards 
removal of NTBs to trade and investments within ASEAN will enhance the attractiveness 
of the region as an investment location. 
 
Encourage convergence and information exchange and provide assistance on technical trade issues such as 
SPS  and  RoO  -  
Understanding  and  complying  with  rules  and  standards  set  within  the 
national markets for public health and safety reasons or to avoid trade deflection is crucial 
for  both  parties  to  be  able  to  actually  benefit  form  the  preferential  access  that  the  FTA 
would provide. 
 
Measures  to  encourage  understanding  and  compliance  could  include  closer  regulatory 
cooperation initiatives, TA programmes in standard setting, implementation and exchange 
of  scientific  testing  methodologies,  upgrading  of  laboratories,  revising  and  alignment  of 
SPS and other control systems (certification) and capacity building for relevant institutions. 
 
Particularly in the agricultural sector, fisheries and food processing, SPS compliance issues 
have  proven,  at  times,  difficult.  In  addition,  understanding  RoO  is  important  for 
preferential access in particularly the food processing, automotives and TCF sectors. 
 
In addition, providing efficient information to the private sector on the implications and 
requirements of the FTA, particularly in relation to technical issues needs to be part of the 
FTA implementation process. 
 
Information dissemination and exchange on the FTA (set up FTA Enquiry Points) - To enhance the 
understanding  and  support  for  the  FTA  and  ensure  economic  actors  are  able  to  use  the 
preferences  accorded  by  it,  active  information  dissemination  and  exchange  on  the  exact 
agreement and what it means de facto for producers, especially for SME in EU and ASEAN, 
and sectors affected, should be an integral part of the FTA and its implementation. For this 
purpose the parties should consider the setting up of FTA Enquiry Points that may assist 
ASEAN  producers  in  accessing  EU  markets,  understanding  RoO,  complying  with  EU 
standard, provide information on investment conditions, etc. 
 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 30 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
Such centres and information exchange in general should also encourage improvement of 
compliance with SPS standards and concrete steps towards successful implementation and 
monitoring  of  commitments  undertaken  in  the  area  of  SPS  beyond  legal  mutual 
recognition). 
 
Promote trade and investment in innovative technologies - 
The objective of trade and investment in 
innovative technologies as a mitigating action is to provide the technical means to reduce 
various forms of pollution, health and safety threats on the work-floor and increase overall 
quality standards.  
 
In  addition,  new  technologies  improve  productivity  levels  and  thus  raise  factor  income. 
This  could  be  encouraged  through  incentives  for  investments  in  and  adoption  of  clean 
technologies, plant modernisation and health and safety measures. 
 
The  sectors  where  such  an  action  could  prove  useful  include  fisheries  and  agriculture, 
textiles, clothing & footwear, food processing, chemicals, and automotives. Care will have 
to be taken to avoid giving unfair advantages to certain plants that are assisted with trade 
and investment in innovative technologies and to avoid market distortions. 
 
At the level of the economy as a whole, a clear innovation and technology transfer strategy 
and the integration of external and domestics sectors is crucial to ensure a spreading of the 
gains from trade and investment liberalisation through an FTA. 
 
Involvement  of  key  stakeholders  -  
Broad  based  involvement  of  the  private  sector  and  civil 
society  in  trade  policy  making  and  implementation  is  important  for  ensuring  the 
agreements made truly reflect the interests of a society and takes into account sustainable 
development issues beyond narrow economic interest. 
 
Through  various  existing  forums  and  programmes,  as  well  as  through  mechanisms  that 
could  be  set-up  as  part  of  the  FTA  implementation  process,  the  FTA  could  promote 
further involvement of civil society in the trade policy making process and in sustainable 
development issues related to implementation. In addition, incentives could be provided to 
encourage  dialogue  and  partnership  between  public  and  private  sector  stakeholders,  e.g. 
CSR initiatives. 
 
Within  ASEAN  initiatives  towards  greater  involvement  of  civil  society  –  e.g.  through 
tripartite  dialogue  between  employer  federations,  labour  unions  and  the  government,  the   
ASEAN  Secretariat  and  various  national  forums  that  are  being  developed  –  should  be 
further encouraged and integrated into the overall policy making process. 
 
Continue  process  of  policy  and  legislative  reforms  -  
To  address  specific  geographically  disparate 
effects and potential social exclusion effect of FTA, adjustment strategies should be aimed 
not just at national or sectoral levels, but may also need a regional policy focus.  
 
One example of potential negative impacts is the reduction in tariff levels that will have a 
direct impact on government revenues. In many ASEAN countries the tax base is narrow, 
implying  tariff  incomes  present  an  important  source  of  revenues.  To  avoid  over   
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 31 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
dependence  on  excise  tax  and  VAT,  broadening  the  tax  base  (e.g.  through  income  tax) 
could compensate for this loss in revenues, while it would in turn provide steady income 
base for the development of social polices, particularly social protection systems needed to 
cope with the short term adjustments due to FTA impacts on the production structures in 
ASEAN. 
 
Further  regional  integration  in  ASEAN  (ASEAN  Customs  Vision)  and  addressing  NTB  within 
ASEAN  -  This  will  enhance  further  the  positive  impacts  of  the  FTA  in  terms  of  easier 
flows of goods, services and investments within and between the two regions. This in turn 
will enable foreign investors to use the region as a production or distribution base (regional 
production networks) and achieve economies of scale.  
 
Addressing concerns of ‘losers’ and dealing with resistance - 
There are two types of losers that can be 
indentified: on the one hand people working in those sectors or regions that are expected 
to experience declines, on the other hand people and organisations with vested interest that 
will  likely  resist  changes  that  jeopardize  their  positions  and  income.  The  latter  could  be 
politically connected business tycoons heading monopolies, but also includes civil servants 
in e.g. customs who may see a loss of income from reduced opportunities to ‘charge extra’ 
for their services, due to improvements (automation) in customs procedures. 
 
This resistance tends to be stronger than the support from those who benefit economically, 
mostly  because  these  groups  (e.g.  consumers)  are  more  dispersed  and  less  organised. 
Resistance also comes from those in society that do not understand the implications of the 
FTA, thus eliminating the possibility of a fact-based and argued discussion on its risks and 
merits.  Information  dissemination  and  exchange  on  the  FTA  agreement  and  its 
implications is crucial, especially for SMEs and consumers. 
 
It is important to address the concerns of people benefiting from the status quo for loss of 
their position, by considering ways to compensate for loss of income of some (e.g. customs 
officers) and by further improvement of competition policy and the rule of law to address 
and avoid abuse of dominant positions and corruption. 
 
Cooperation  with  international  organisations  and  initiatives  -  
Where  possible,  the  FTA  parties 
should  cooperate  with  and  international  organisations  such  as  ILO,  UNEP,  MEA 
Secretariats,  WTO,  as  a  means  to  address  specific  sustainability  issues,  establish  closer 
convergence and find common ground between the two regions. The UN Partnership for 
Sustainable Development is a positive example in this respect. Already all EU and ASEAN 
countries  are  a  signatory  to  this  voluntary  partnership  organisation.  Almost  all  ASEAN 
countries, with the exception of Laos, have developed or are in the process of developing 
national sustainable development plans. These should be further supported and developed. 
 
Policy Measures related to the Economic Pillar 
 
Whereas overall, both the EU and ASEAN are expected to benefit economically, the FTA 
will trigger or reinforce existing structural adjustment processes, which, at least in the short 
run,  might  cause  some  negative  externalities.  Economic  policies  can  help  minimize  such 
negative  externalities  as  well  as  help  spin-off  long  term  sustained  economic  growth.  In 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 32 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
other  words  they  may  support  the  transitions  from  short  to  long  run  and  accelerate  the 
adjustment process. 
Such a strategy should include improvement of the business and investment climate, SME 
development,  integration  of  domestic  and  external  sectors,  encouragement  of  a  level 
playing field and fair competition, and adjustment and compliance with technical issues. 
 
Labour  and  social  policies  should  be  implemented  in  tandem,  as  these  have  been 
demonstrated to also contribute to productivity improvements (greater factor returns) and 
overall competitiveness.  
 
FTA and Flanking Measures 

 
Business climate improvement - 
An important constraint to investments, SME development and 
business  development  in  general  in  ASEAN  lies  in  the  relatively  high  costs  of  doing 
business in several ASEAN countries. Lowering these costs will have positive impact not 
just on foreign activities, but also on domestic investments and entrepreneurship. 
 
A key finding of the study has been that improvement of investment conditions through 
the addressing of a number of NTB greatly enhances longer term spin-off effects of the 
FTA, particularly for the services sectors, where most restrictions are still currently in place. 
But it also relates to a number of other cross-cutting areas such as IPR, competition policy 
and Rules of Origin considerations. Measures that can help this aim may include reduction 
of  foreign  ownership  restrictions  (e.g.  in  the  financial  services  sector  in  ASEAN), 
competition  policy  and  strengthening  of  market  forces  (e.g.  phasing  out  state  aid)  and 
better regulation / convergence of regulation. 
 
Measures  that  can  contribute  to  an  improved  investment  climate  include  promoting  the 
‘practical’ attractiveness of doing business, by lowering general costs of doing business and 
all  the  areas  this  may  cover  (e.g.  reduction  of  red  tape,  removal  of  logistical  restriction, 
improving transparency and the rule of law, reducing the cost and time for registration / 
setting up of a business, providing investment incentives). 
 
Improvement of the business climate is already a high priority for most ASEAN member 
states  as  recent  initiatives  (e.g.  Investment  Law  in  Indonesia)  have  proven. 
Implementation  and  enforcement  are  now  keys  in  ensuring  the  effectiveness  of  these 
initiatives. 
 
Address Competition Policy issues - 
Anti-competitive behaviour by special interest groups and 
monopolies  effectively  close  off  entire  sectors,  not  just  to  foreign  investors,  but  to  large 
parts  of  the  domestic  market  as  well,  excluding  investments  and  SME  development  and 
leading  to  higher  prices  and  less  variety  for  consumers.  Resistance  against  reform  of 
competition policy may be strong, but there is increasing recognition in ASEAN countries 
of  the  importance  of  having  a  competition  policy  and  laws.  Again,  implementation  and 
enforcement are still an issue and remain dependent on political will, capacity constraints 
and governance issues. 
 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 33 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
This policy measure can to some extent be taken u up in the FTA proper, but also links 
closely  to  the  overall  policy  measure  of  addressing  concerns  of  loser  and  resistance  to 
change as well as to the raising of awareness on benefits of the  agreement conditional to 
the existence of a level playing field. 
 
Stimulate entrepreneurship and competitiveness of the SME sector and integration of external and domestic 
sectors  -  
SME  are  likely  to  be  affected  by  ongoing  economic  liberalisation  and  structural 
reform of the economy. On the one hand, especially in the short run, some less efficient 
SME  might  face  difficulties  to  operate  in  an  increasingly  competitive  environment, 
favouring more efficient companies and driving less efficient ones out of the market. On 
the  other  hand,  ongoing  economic  dynamic  progress,  improvement  of  the  investment 
climate and the breaking up of monopolies / cartels through competition policy can create 
many  new  opportunities  for  SME  and  spur  innovation  and  investment.  This  can  create 
positive effects, e.g. for flexible companies in services sectors. Measures to enhance these 
positive chances for SME (and mitigate the negative ones) may include increase in business 
education (e.g. generally in entrepreneurship or specifically in content-wise knowledge) and 
retraining  (facilitating  displacement  across  sectors).  Also,  export  promotion  programmes 
for SME can be beneficial. 
 
Economic  policy  should  encourage  integration  of  domestic  and  external  sectors  and 
development of linkages within the economy. As the example of the Philippines illustrates, 
an  export-oriented  strategy  aimed  at  attracting  FDI  and  promoting  exports  by  creating 
‘enclaves’  of  foreign  investors  and  exporters  with  limited  linkages  to  the  domestic 
economies,  does  little  to  include  SME  and  the  wider  population  in  sharing  the  benefits 
from  increased  exports  and  growth.  These  links  are  crucial  for  poverty  alleviation  and 
encourage  trade  and  investment  in  innovative  technologies  and  a  general  upgrading  of 
production and services. Industrial policy should thus focus on the so-called high road to 
development. 
 
Promote trade and investment in innovative technologies and develop innovation and technology strategies - 
Trade  and  investment  in  innovative  technologies  –  and  more  broadly  speaking 
technological change – will greatly enhance the positive welfare effects of an FTA. In this 
respect both IPR protection as part of the FTA and a clear technology transfer strategy as a 
flanking measure are crucial measures. The link between protection of IPR and economic 
growth  of  developing  countries  has  been  studied  extensively  and  the  results  suggest  that 
developing  countries  can  potentially  benefit  strongly,  especially  in  the  longer  run  from 
better  IPR  protection,  as  it  induces  local  technology  diffusion  and  increases  local 
innovation.  The  extent  to  which  this  effect  will  materialise  depends  not  just  on  IPR 
protection, but also on the existence of an IP and technology transfer strategy and system 
and the starting level of innovative capacity of each country. 
 
Policy Measures related to the Social Pillar 
 
Many  of  the  social  impacts  are  closely  related  to  the  expected  acceleration  of  ongoing 
structural  adjustment  processes  in  the  economy  described  above.  Social  and  regional 
policies can help address issues related to reallocation of labour across regions and sectors, 
other potential inequality effects and changes in educational requirements. 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 34 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 35 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
FTA and Flanking Measures 
 
Sustainable  Development  Chapter  -  It  is  likely  that  the  FTA  will  include  a  sustainable 
development chapter. This chapter could include the following social issues: 
 
  References to the requirement that both parties commit themselves to the effective 
implementation  of  core  ILO  labour  standards  and  other  basic  decent  work 
components. 
  A requirement for both parties to submit regular reports on general progress. 
  Engagement to respect the OECD Guidelines on Multinational Enterprises and the 
ILO Tripartite Declaration on Multinational Enterprises and Social Policy, and not 
to lower labour standards in order to attract foreign investment. A system  where 
complaints about social problems should be subject to consideration by genuinely 
independent  and  well-qualified  experts;  possibility  to  establish  a  Trade  and 
Sustainable  Development  Forum  providing  for  consultation  with  civil  society, 
including  workers’  organisations,  employers’  organisations  and  NGOs,  with  a 
clearly defined, appropriate balance between those three groups of members. 
 
Encourage  convergence  and  provide  information  /  assistance  on  technical  trade  issues  such  as  SPS  and 
RoO  -  
Enhancement  of  approximation,  implementation  and  monitoring  of  EU  SPS 
standards may not only ensure protection of consumers in the EU, but could also have a 
positive  impact  on  health  and  safety  issues  in  ASEAN,  as  the  generally  higher  health, 
safety, hygiene and quality standards of the EU are increasingly adopted. It must be noted 
that  agreed  harmonisation  of  SPS  measures  alone  is  not  sufficient.  A  well  functioning 
monitoring and control system on health and safety impacts is required to avoid long term 
negative impacts or adverse trade effects. 
 
Improving the flexibility of EU and ASEAN labour markets and aid short-term adjustment needs - 
The 
more  flexible  the  EU  and  ASEAN  labour  markets,  the  lower  the  short-run  adjustment 
costs  are  expected  to  be.  Preventative,  mitigating  and  enhancing  measures  could  include 
skills  retraining  in  the  short  run  and  improving  /  increasing  access  to  training  and 
education  system  in  the  medium  and  longer  run,  as  well  as  international  cooperation  on 
training  and  education  (vocational,  business  and  tertiary).  Such  cooperation  may  include 
cooperation  between  ASEAN  and  EU  education  institutions  and  training  centres, 
promotion  of  educational  exchanges  –  also  leading  to  longer  run  achievement  of  similar 
levels of qualifications and cultural exchanges – increased emphasis on professional training 
and  education  (addition  of  curricula  on  entrepreneurship  in  higher  education,  vocational 
and  professional  training  schools,  business  administration,  etc.)  to  encourage 
entrepreneurship and facilitate modernisation of different sectors. 
 
Already  there  is  a  strong  focus  in  many ASEAN countries  and  in  the EU on  education. 
The  challenge  is  to  make  this  as  responsive  and  flexible  to  changing  labour  market 
demands and requirements. 
 
Analysis  and  monitoring  of  social  protection  systems  -  
By  making  an  assessment  of  the  current 
social protection systems in place in the different countries party to the agreement and the 
extent to which they can cope with substantial structural adjustments in specific sectors and 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 36 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
areas  in  ASEAN  and  particular  regions  within  the  EU,  will  allow  for  the  flagging  of 
potential  marginalisation  of  certain  groups  and  the  development  of  a  monitoring  and 
evaluation  system  that  could  identify  needs  for  specific  policy  interventions  at  short  and 
long term. Again, existing initiatives and policies in this area should be taken into account. 
 
Develop adjustment strategies through regional and social policy  - 
FTA impacts may be distributed 
unevenly across regions due to geographic concentration of certain affected sectors and/or 
general rural-urban migration. It is therefore important to develop adjustment policies and 
activities  at  the  level  of  regions  or  even  communities  suffering  from  agricultural  or 
industrial  decline  and  migration.  In  the  EU  this  is  already  possible  through  EU 
globalisation fund and structural funds. For the EU such regional impacts are expected to 
occur  in  the  footwear  and  clothing  industries,  while  in  ASEAN  particularly  certain  rural 
areas and communities (e.g. fishing villages) may be negatively affected in the short run and 
should be assisted with adjustment to the new equilibrium. 
 
Social policy measures also are needed to ensure and strengthen the pro-poor effects and 
pro-gender equality effects of the FTA. Such measures could include technical assistance 
support with respect to SPS measures and productivity enhancement in rural and fisheries 
communities in ASEAN, coupled with policies aimed at deeper penetration of the banking 
sector into ASEAN rural areas (possible if regulatory burdens are reduced), micro-finance 
and micro-insurance development, as well as special attention for education and re-training 
for low-skilled female workers especially in services sectors. 
 
Such social policies should be closely linked to economic policies supporting SMEs and the 
business  environment,  as  development  of  the  private  sector  remains  the  single  most 
important driver of employment and poverty reduction. 
 
Further  develop  tri-partite  dialogue  and  encourage  CSR  agreements  between  employers  and  Unions  - 
Support ongoing initiatives and programmes to include private sector and civil society in 
FTA  implementation  and  monitoring,  so  as  to  promote  social  and  civil  society  dialogue, 
CSR and ultimately productivity. 
 
Cooperate  with  international  organisations  and  build  on  ongoing  initiatives  with  regard  to  decent  work 

agenda - The study identified several ongoing and promising initiatives with regard to social 
dialogue and the decent work agenda. As many of the social and employment issues relate 
to  a  wider  policy  agenda  (beyond  the  impacts  of  the  FTA  per  se)  cooperating  and 
participating  in  existing  initiatives  of  international  organisations  and  support  of  private 
sector  initiatives,  such  as  CSR  and  corporate  codes  of  conduct,  agreements  between 
employer  federations  and  unions)  is  likely  to  be  more  effective  in  addressing  wider 
sustainability issues than individual interventions in the narrow context of the FTA. 
 
In  this  respect  the  EU  may  bring  positive  examples  and  experiences  with  regard  to 
employment creation and improvement of labour conditions from EU accession countries, 
including  successful  adoption  and  implementation  of  labour  standards,  monitoring  and 
evaluation of decent work indicators and capacity building, especially with respect to SME. 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 37 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
Policy Measures related to the Environmental Pillar 
 
The  study  identified  moderate  effects  of  the  FTA  on  environmental  sustainability  in  the 
EU and ASEAN, although many of the impacted issues are existing issues related to the 
generally  vulnerable  environmental  situation  in  ASEAN  and  pressures.  Considering  the 
ongoing  nature  of  the  pressures  on  natural  resources  in  ASEAN  stemming  from 
population and economic growth trends and resource depletion, it is hard to attribute these 
impacts directly to the FTA, but the FTA could enhance or accelerate ongoing trends. At 
the  same  time,  it  could  be  used  to  help  solve  certain  environmental  problems,  thus 
contributing in a positive way. As such, policy makers and civil society alike should look at 
the  broader  environmental  agenda  and  issues  of  ASEAN  and  consider  the  leveraging 
opportunities that an FTA may provide in terms of addressing these. 
 
Environmentally related policy measures can help prevent or mitigate some of the potential 
negative effects associated with the FTA resulting from the economic growth and may help 
create incentives for future environmental sustainable development. 
 
FTA and Flanking Measures 
 
Sustainable  Development  Chapter  -  It  is  likely  that  the  FTA  will  include  a  sustainable 
development chapter on the following environmental issues: 
 
  Commitment  to  multilateral  /  international  environmental  agreements  and  their 
effective implementation 
  Commitment  in  terms  of  upholding  domestic  legislation  and  ensuring  adequate 
enforcement 
  Provisions to facilitate and promote trade in environmental friendly products and 
services 
  Commitments related to specific concerns such as deforestation, biodiversity loss 
and fisheries resources 
  Mechanisms  to  monitor  implementation  and  impacts  of  the  FTA  including 
through, for instance, creation of a system of standards for objective measurement 
of pollution. 
 
Incorporation  of  relevant  environmental  considerations  and  provisions  in  other  chapters  of  the  FTA  - 
Relevant  environmental  considerations  and  provisions  may  be  mainstreamed  into  other 
chapters of the FTA, for instance in relation to services, fisheries and agriculture. 
 
Generally speaking, the Environmental Goods and Services (EGS) negotiations within the 
WTO are still facing some difficulties in terms of agreeing on the approach to liberalisation. 
The  WTO  framework  relates  to  specific  goods  and  services  considered  to  contribute  to 
environmental protection, abatement, and pollution control and resources management. 
 
However, specific issues at sector level may not be included in this framework and should 
be  addressed  separately.  Thus  in  relation  to  fisheries  reference  should  be  made  to  the 
signing  and  implementation  of  the  UN  Fish  Stocks  Agreement  and  to  membership  of 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 38 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
Regional Fisheries Management Organisations operating in the ASEAN, that have the legal 
responsibility and authority to manage the catches and fishing in the areas. 
 
Linking  National  Interpretations  of  the  Roundtable  on  Sustainable  Palm  Oil  (RSPO)  to  FTA 
Negotiations  -  
Given  the  importance  of  palm  oil  production  in  the  region  including  for 
export  purposes  and  the  environmental  concerns  surrounding  it,  the  role  of  the 
Roundtable  on  Sustainable  Palm  Oil  (RSPO)  and  its  proper  implementation  and 
monitoring is essential. 
 
Having a set national interpretation of the recommendations issued by the RSPO that is 
subscribed  to  by  all  national  RSPO  parties  is  a  first  step  in  ensuring  that  environmental 
degradation caused by higher palm-oil production is adequately monitored and mitigated. 
Such an effort is currently being undertaken in Malaysia. A crucial point is establishing a 
systematic link between the national interpretation of the RSPO standards in Malaysia and 
the terms of the FTA between ASEAN and the EU. Indeed, making the EU ASEAN FTA 
contingent in some measure upon compliance with the national interpretation of the RSPO 
may bolster the visibility of sustainability issues in Malaysia in the oil palm sector. 
 
Enhancement  of  environmental  impact  assessment  and  monitoring  programs  -  
In  order  to  identify 
potential  and  ongoing  environmental  impacts  so  as  to  be  able  to  devise  appropriate 
preventive mitigating policies, strengthening or creating a system of standards for objective 
measurement  and  reporting  of  environmental  variables  (e.g.  pollution,  GHG  emissions, 
deforestation rates, biodiversity loss etc) should be put in place, with reference to voluntary 
Environmental Management Systems. Besides providing a baseline for policy interventions, 
these measures will also promote environmental concerns in impact assessments and create 
awareness and disseminate information. 
 
Create incentives for environmentally friendly production 
The  study  demonstrated  that  increases  in  production  and  growth  are  likely  to  have  a 
negative  impact  on  various  aspects  of  the  environment.  However,  the  FTA  may  directly 
and indirectly provide to encourage cleaner production. The World Bank (2008) states that 
“most countries that are more open to trade adopt cleaner technologies more quickly.”  
 
In  order  to  mitigate  possible  negative  impacts  and  facilitate  or  accelerate  the  process  of 
cleaner  technologies  adoption,  policy  options  include  creating  incentives  for 
environmentally friendly production in the form of tax incentives, but also by identifying 
and  removing  specific  NTB  for  trade  and  investment  in  such  technologies,  through 
approximation of legislation within ASEAN and the EU. This is closely linked to the issue 
of promoting trade and investments in innovative technologies. 
 
Link FLEGT/VPA process to FTA negotiations and implementation  - The study illustrated the 
potentially  positive  impacts  on  illegal  logging  and  timber  trade  of  the  FLEGT/VPA 
initiative  and  the  proposed  Due  Diligence Regulation  (DDR)  for  putting  wood  products 
onto  the  market  in  the  EU.  The  FTA  should  clearly  link  to  this  initiative,  as  it  relates 
closely to trade issues and has a strong regional dimension as well.  
 
Measures to consider include: 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 39 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
  Investigating  the  possibility  of  granting  tariff  reductions  for  timber  and  timber 
products  made  of  verified  legal  timber  such  as  that  derived  from  FLEGT 
Voluntary Partnership Agreements. 
  Inclusion  of  FLEGT  and,  where  applicable,  the  use  of  VPA  or  other  legality 
verification  mechanisms,  in  the  Sustainable  Development  Chapter  of  the 
EUASEAN FTA. Although the VPA concerns bilateral negotiations, leveraging of 
the regional dimension of the FTA may provide for incentives to start and further 
encourage the FLEGT/VPA process in all ASEAN countries. 
  A chapter on procurement that includes clauses for green procurement both in the 
EU and ASEAN. This would require the development of agreed criteria of legality 
of the goods covered in such clauses. As such criteria are being developed under 
the FLEGT/VPA with several countries already, within the context of government 
procurement  within  the  FTA,  a  broad  framework  could  be  developed,  based  as 
much as possible on the FLEGT criteria.  
  Further  trade  facilitation  improvement,  such  as  the  development  of  electronic 
timber  tracking  systems;  export  licensing  and  customs  clearance  systems;  the 
training  of  customs  and  enforcement  officers  to  identify  illegal  wood  and  wood 
products  and  enforce  trade  related  legislation;  support  to  the  harmonisation  of 
customs  systems  within  ASEAN  so  as  to  prevent  deflection  of  illegal  wood  and 
wood products to third markets. 
  Incentives  for  investments  in  legal  and  sustainable  forestry,  e.g.  eco-labelling, 
products and processes and productivity improvements for legal timber and timber 
products, e.g. through technology and knowledge transfer. 
 
Facilitate  trade  and  investment  in  innovative  technologies  -  
Trade  and  investment  in  innovative 
technologies and technological development does not only promote greater factor returns 
and improved health and safety standards in the workplace, it also has potentially positive 
environmental  impacts.  One  way  to  facilitate  the  uptake  of  environmentally  friendly 
technologies could be the provision of tax incentives for such investments, in ASEAN in 
particular.  Improvement  of  IPR  protection  could  also  encourage  investments  from  EU 
environmental technology producers and providers in ASEAN. Further removal of intra-
ASEAN NTB is also likely to facilitate investments and trade in environmental technology, 
as  many  of  the  companies  producing  these  depend  on  economies  of  scale  for 
competitiveness and thus would be encouraged by a larger market and production region. 
 
Encourage  participation  of  civil  society  -  
Overall,  in  both  the  EU  and  ASEAN,  environmental 
civil society organisations are very actively involved in sustainability issues and participate 
in e.g. the FLEGT process and bio-fuels discussions. Their contributions to research and 
analysis in these areas are also notable.  
 
Cooperate  and  coordinate  with  ongoing  environmental  initiatives  and  programmes  -  
EU  and  ASEAN 
flanking  measures  should  expand  and  cooperate  in  the  context  of  international,  regional 
and national policy initiatives in ASEAN, including the existing bilateral cooperation and 
assistance  programmes  between  the  EU  and  ASEAN    but  also    support  for  the 
implementation of international agreements and programmes in ASEAN,  for instance in 
relation to fisheries (United Nations Fish Stocks Agreement), support and cooperation to 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 40 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
the  ASEAN  Environment  programmes  and  Sustainable  Development  Strategies  in 
ASEAN countries. 
 
Promote integrated approach to environmental impact issues - 
Although the broader environmental 
sustainability agenda of ASEAN cannot be addressed by an FTA, the ongoing dialogue and 
cooperation between the two regions of which the FTA is a part, could promote further 
integration of environmental issues into the policy making and cooperation process  This 
includes: 
 
  Capacity  building  initiatives  for  green  products  and  production  processes  in  key 
sectors such as electronics, textiles and footwear. 
  Encourage further understanding and incorporation of the links between social and 
environmental issues into negotiation and policy making processes. 
  Strengthening  property  rights  is  policy  measure  that  promotes  sustainable 
development  and  introduces  incentives  for  maintenance,  land  protection  and 
adequate use. 
  Monitoring  land  use  change  and  implementing  regulatory  structures  for mapping 
and establishing high conservation value areas. This has proven to be an important 
policy tool for reducing loss of biodiversity and illegal logging in particular. 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 41 


TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
Document 4:  Indonesia’s Expected Challenges in 
Pursuing an FTA with the EU – IISD 2009 
Introduction 
 
Indonesia  and  the  EU  took  a  major  step  recently  to  cement  their  economic  relationship 
through the signing of a Partnership and Cooperation Agreement (PCA). The agreement, 
which  was  signed  following  the  meeting  between  senior  officials  from  both  sides  in 
Jogjakarta, on 14th July 2009, covers diverse areas of cooperation, such as trade, investment, 
human rights, climate change, migration, as well as efforts to address organised crime and 
communicable diseases.  
 
As  the  PCA  with  Indonesia  is  the  first  such  agreement  to  be  signed  by  the  EU  with  an 
Asian country, it reinforces Indonesia’s diplomatic standing in the eyes of European policy-
makers. The EU had recently concluded a Free Trade Agreement (FTA) with South Korea. 
However, it should be noted that FTA and PCA are somewhat different. While the former 
includes primarily trade and investment issues, the latter covers more comprehensive areas 
of cooperation, and can serve as the umbrella agreement for the former. It is not, however, 
necessary  that  the  signing  of  a  PCA  precedes  the signing  of  an  FTA.  Depending  on  the 
interests of its partners, the EU often considers signing an FTA prior to the signing of a 
PCA. 
 
The signing of the PCA was also made possible following the recent decision by the EU to 
lift  the  2007  ban  on  the  four  Indonesian  airlines,  including  its  national  carrier  Garuda 
Indonesia, from flying to Europe on safety grounds, a move that caused some resentment 
in Jakarta.  With the lifting of the ban and the signing of the PCA, the trade relationship 
between Indonesia and the EU, which is valued at US$ 28.4 billion a year, is expected to 
expand in the coming years. 
 
Despite  this  encouraging progress  in  political  relations  between  Jakarta and Brussels,  the 
signing of the PCA is likely to present considerable challenges, particularly for Indonesia. 
Among  other  things,  the  agreement  will  pave  the  way  for  the  negotiations  on  the  long-
awaited Free Trade Agreement (FTA), under the wider framework of the ASEAN-EU Free 
Trade Agreement (AEUFTA), to resume in the near future.  
 
The  discussion  over  the  establishment  of  the  AEUFTA  have  been  suspended  following, 
inter  alia,  the  disagreement  between  the  two  sides  over  the  political  deadlock  and  human 
rights  issues  in  Myanmar  as  well  as  the  aforementioned  ban  imposed  upon  Indonesian 
airlines.  Since  then,  Brussels  has  decided  to  pursue  negotiations  with  individual  ASEAN 
member countries with the hope of accelerating the signing of the PCAs and FTAs with 
them.  
 
Despite  the  airlines  ban,  Indonesia  appeared  to  be  the  most  enthusiastic  among  the 
ASEAN countries in wanting to conclude the PCA agreement with the EU. 
 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 43 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
The  discussions  on  the  AEUFTA  and  the  subsequent  Indonesia-EU  FTA  (IEUFTA) 
began to emerge in 2005, at a time when global trade talks under the auspices of the World 
Trade Organization (WTO) came to be significantly challenged not only by the differences 
emerging  amongst  its  member  countries,  but  also  by  the  rise  of  Bilateral  Free  Trade 
Agreements (BFTAs), concluded either between countries, between regional groupings, or 
between a regional grouping and a country. Frustrated by the deadlock in the multilateral-
level  negotiations,  both  the  EU  and  ASEAN  (and  its  individual  member  countries, 
including  Indonesia)  have  in  recent  years  taken  a  pro-active  stance  in  pursuing  a  BFTA 
policy strategy. 
 
For the EU in particular, its ability to secure market access to the ASEAN region, including 
that  of  Indonesia,  has  become  even  more  critical  in  light  of  the  economic  slowdown 
resulting from the recent global financial crisis. 
 
However,  given  the  economic  imbalance  between  the  EU  and  Indonesia,  economic 
relations between the two sides remain in favour of the EU. Today, the EU, as a regional 
bloc,  has  become  an  entity  capable  of  exercising  influence  beyond  that  of  other  global 
economic superpowers.  
 
The  EU  rules  on  labelling,  content,  manufacture,  design  and  safety,  for  example,  have 
become  the  rules  that  most  global  manufacturers  follow.  Within  the  EU  there  are  many 
large  multinational  corporations  (MNCs)  with  a  global  reach,  many  of  which  are  already 
doing  business  in  the  Indonesian  market.  Indonesia  and  its  ASEAN  neighbours,  on  the 
other hand, have not yet evolved into a strong economic entity capable of competing with 
the EU at the global level.  
 
Furthermore,  Indonesia  is  still  struggling  to  put  into  force  domestic  economic  reforms, 
which are keys to stimulate the country’s socio-economic development. It is thus likely that 
the adjustment costs to be paid by the Indonesian and the other Southeast Asian economic 
actors  would  be  high,  should  an  IEUFTA  and  AEUFTA  be  finally  agreed  upon  and 
concluded.  
 
In order to redress this imbalance, the proposed IEUFTA and the subsequent AEUFTA, 
must take into account the development interests of both Indonesia and ASEAN. 
 
Key Issues in the EU-Indonesia FTA 

 
There  can  be  little  doubt  that  the  proposed  Indonesia-EU  FTA  (IEUFTA)  is  likely  to 
deepen  the  existing  asymmetry  in  the  economic  relations  between  the  two  sides, 
particularly if short-term adjustment costs to be incurred by Indonesia are not addressed in 
the forthcoming FTA negotiations.  
 
From an EU perspective, the agenda items central to the FTA negotiations will likely focus 
on  elements  such  as  the  incorporation  of  a  strict  IPR  regime,  the  promotion  of  service 
sector liberalization and so on. However these would be not only extremely difficult, but 
also costly to implement for Indonesia. The following are some of the main concerns to be 
expected in both the future negotiations and implementation of the FTA. 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 44 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
1. Policy Space 
 
Policy space matters for Indonesia because it allows the GOI the sovereignty to determine 
the  appropriate  trade,  investment  and  industrial  policies  that  could  help  its  own 
development amid the pursuit of economic liberalization.  
 
In the multilateral setting, Indonesian trade policy-makers often argue for a list of sensitive 
products  that  should  be  excluded  from  liberalization  initiatives  (known  as  the  Special 
Products or SP) and the Special Safeguard Mechanism (SSM) that allows the government 
to impose contingency restrictions on imports to deal with special circumstances, such as a 
sudden surge of imports.  
 
These are seen as the components of policy space that Indonesia requires to cope with the 
adjustment costs generated from trade liberalization. The EU and other major developed 
countries, in contrary, consider these initiatives as a form of protectionist policy aimed at 
limiting  their  market  access  to  the  developing  economies.  However,  given  the  different 
levels  of  development  between  the  involved  parties  in  this  FTA,  Indonesia  feels  that  it 
should  be  it  accorded  with  the  necessary  concessions  crucial  to  limiting  the  negative 
impacts of this trade liberalization. 
 
2. Diverging Views on How to Achieve Economic Development 
 
In  relation  to  the  issue  of  policy  space  above,  development  will  likely  prove  another 
contentious issue under the IEUFTA. Although it would be important for the IEUFTA to 
prioritise the developmental objectives of Indonesia, the weaker side, EU and GOI seem to 
have  different  views  on  how  economic  development  could  be  achieved  through  this  trade 
agreement.  
 
Past FTA negotiations between the EU and its Southern partners have shed light on the 
key elements deemed crucial by the EU to promoting sustainable economic development. 
 
The  EU  favours  extending  technical  assistance  to  its  partners,  places  more  emphasis  on 
regional  integration,  and  grants  more  flexible  timeframes  for  the  implementation  of  an 
FTA.  
 
Indonesia,  on  the  other  hand,  sees  the  achievement  of  economic  development  under  the 
IEUFTA  to  include  the  freedom  to  use  the  above  mentioned  Special  Products  (SP)  and 
Special  Safeguard  Mechanism  (SSM),  market  access  facilitation,  allowing  subsidies  for 
small-scale production, and providing a firm commitment to investing in the country (as 
opposed to the mere potential of attracting investors). 
 
3. The General System of Preferences (GSP) Scheme 
 
The GSP scheme plays a significant part in the EU’s external trade policy. The EU’s GSP 
scheme  offers  either  lower  tariffs  or  completely  duty-free  access  for  imports  from 
developing countries to the EU.  
 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 45 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
Although most ASEAN countries are beneficiaries of the EU’s GSP scheme, the relative 
economic  growth  of  the  region  has  redefined  the  suitability  of  many  ASEAN  member 
countries to be accorded such status.  
 
Indonesia  is  considered  under  the  terms  of  the  new  EU-ASEAN  GSP  scheme  that  was 
adopted in June 2005, as now ‘graduated from the EU’s GSP scheme’.  
 
Thus  since  then,  a  number  of  Indonesian  products,  such  as  animal  and  vegetable  fats, 
wood products, basket ware and so on, no longer enjoy GSP privileges. Given the limited 
ability of Indonesian economic actors, particularly small and medium-sized ones, to carry 
out  operation  beyond  national  borders,  EU  GSP  policy  vis-à-vis  Indonesia  should  be 
reassessed. 
 
4. Market access and subsidies 
 
Market  access  and  subsidies  will  also  play  key  role  in  determining  the  conclusion  of  the 
IEUFTA.  
 
For most producers and manufacturers in Indonesia, the EU’s current policies concerning 
these two issues are contradictory. While low tariff rates for non-manufactured agricultural 
products may give the impression that the EU encourages the export of ASEAN produce 
to its markets, the stringent sanitary and phytosanitary (SPS) measures imposed at the EU 
borders can severely impede ASEAN exporters in further penetrating the EU market.  
 
The EU, for example, has refused entry of Indonesian shrimp and other seafood products 
on the basis of health and sanitary reasons.  The  Union is concerned with the antibiotics 
used in Indonesian shrimp farming, also known as chloramphenicol, and requires Indonesian 
shrimp  and  other  seafood  products  to  go  through  the  Rapid  Alert  System,  which  is 
normally  used  to  inspect  residual  bacteria.  Indonesian  shrimp  and  seafood  exporters, 
however,  raised  their  objection  to  this  regulation,  pointing  out  that  the  substance  is 
naturally produced in the soil and plankton which is eventually fed to the shrimps. A zero 
content of chloramphenicol in shrimp is, therefore, impossible.  
 
 At  this  point  in  the  distribution  chain,  ASEAN  producers  find  themselves  in  the 
disadvantageous  situation  of  having  already  incurred  transportation  costs  without 
eventually  being  able  to  sell  their  goods.  Furthermore,  assuming  these  produce  do  pass 
these EU’s WTO-Plus SPS standards, which primarily refer to the arrangements in bilateral 
or  regional  trade  arrangements,  whose  scope  goes  beyond  those  achieved  at  the  WTO 
level. 
 
ASEAN exporters are forced to compete with heavily subsidised domestic goods. 
 
As  regards  to  the  manufactured  products,  these  are  usually  hit  by  high  tariff  rates,  a 
significant handicap which can often price any ASEAN product out of the EU market.  
 
Indonesian manufacturers often speak of two key problems confronting them in relation to 
the  EU:  tariff  peaks  and  tariff  escalation.  The  EU  maintains  a  number  of  high  tariffs  in 
limited  positions  of  Common  Commodity  Nomenclature  (CCN),  and  these  cover 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 46 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
products, such as textiles, rubber, furniture, agriculture and food, all of which are relevant 
to Indonesia.  
 
As far as tariff escalation is concerned, this means the EU imposes zero or very low tariff 
rates for unprocessed products, but very high tariffs on processed products. This has acted 
as a barrier to the development of some industrial sectors. Confronted with high tariffs for 
processed products and low tariffs for unprocessed ones, it is easy to imagine a developing 
country  abandoning  plans  for  industrialization  and  opting  instead  for  agricultural 
production. 
 
In  relation  to  this,  Indonesia  and  EU  need  to  clarify  whether  the  IEUFTA  aims  to  encourage 
Indonesia  to  remain  as  a  low-level  producer  (e.g.  exporting  raw  materials  and  agricultural  products)  or 
whether it aims to encourage the development of manufacturing industries in the Southeast Asian region. If 

the issue of tariff peaks remains unresolved, for example, one could forgive GOI for thinking that perhaps it 
is the trade policy of the EU to keep its partner as farmers and fishermen, rather than manufacturers

 
Furthermore,  the  issue  of  subsidies  needs  to  be  addressed  in  the  IEUFTA.  Whilst  the 
continuous  use  of  large  agricultural  subsidies  in  the  EU  remains  a  matter  of  concern 
amongst Indonesian agricultural exporters, the use of domestic subsidies for small-scale or 
grassroots  producers  might  still  be  a  useful  tool  to  ensure  the  welfare  of  Indonesian 
farmers. 
 
5. Foreign Direct Investment 
 
With  regard  to  foreign  investment,  the  IEUFTA  must  do  more  than  just  create  the  mere 
potential for foreign investment. Most mainstream studies, such as Kettunen (2004) and one 
that was commissioned by the European Commission, promise that an FTA between the 
EU and ASEAN would increase the flows of European investment into ASEAN, including 
Indonesia.  
 
However, there are non-economic factors, such as security, that may influence the flows of 
foreign  investment  into  Southeast  Asia.  The  IEUFTA,  therefore,  must  secure  a concrete 
commitment  from  both  EU  and  Indonesia  to  invest  in  the  two  regions.  Whilst  foreign 
investment  is  acknowledged  to  be  the  prime  mover  of  the  development  process,  this 
promise  remains  a  pipedream  if  no  real  capital  investment  flows  into  the  regions, 
particularly into ASEAN.  
 
Any conditions laid out by the EU which aim to liberalize foreign investment laws in the 
region  must  be  met  by  a  concomitant  concrete  undertaking  that  significant  foreign 
investment  ensues  in  the  form  of  long-term  capital  flows  from  major  European 
manufacturers.  The  EU,  for  instance,  could  assist  and  facilitate  the  promotion  of 
Indonesian market opportunities to European investors and develop appropriate measures 
with  Jakarta  to  determine  how  the  ‘right  types’  of  investment  could  be  expanded  in 
Indonesia. 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 47 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
6. Extensive Liberalization at the Expense of the Poor and Marginalised 
 
As  with  most  BFTAs,  the  proposed  IEUFTA  and  the  AEUFTA  need  to  be  examined 
critically.  
 
The EU, as mentioned earlier, favours the so-called new age FTAs, with commitments that 
go beyond those achieved at the multilateral level (or WTO-plus). The EU-led FTAs are 
normally comprehensive agreements, embracing not only the conventional trade in goods, 
but also areas such as service sector liberalization, investment, Intellectual Property Rights 
(IPRs), competition policy, public procurement (as opposed to the relatively more limited 
government procurement), and other issues.  
 
As with many other developed countries, the members of the EU are growing increasingly 
frustrated at the slow progress of global trade talks. With its vast experience of carrying out 
an enlargement process in the Eastern European region, the EU is keen to strike up integration 
initiatives with countries or regional groupings in the Southern hemisphere for the purpose 
of penetrating new markets. 
 
However, it has been generally observed that North-South BFTAs tend to generate more 
benefits for developed countries, and this could prove to be an issue of importance in the 
IEUFTA negotiations. 
 
The incorporation of Trade-Related Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPs)-plus arrangement 
under the IEUFTA, for example, could further benefit large European pharmaceutical and 
agro-industrial  companies  at  the  expense  of  the  Indonesian  poor.  According  to  one 
estimate, yearly profits of US$ 32 billion have already been generated from drugs discovered 
by  these  companies  as  a  result  of  their  prior  use  in  indigenous  medicine.  This  is  not  to 
mention  the  loss  of  access  and  control  that  would  be  experienced  by  local  farmers  in 
Indonesia, such as access and control over seeds, etc., should a TRIPs Plus arrangement 
become a key component in IEUFTA negotiations. 
 
7. The Participation of Civil Society and the Marginalised Sectors in the Process of  
  FTA Negotiations 

 
The  importance  of  civil  society  and  marginalised  sectors  in  the  IEUFTA  policy-making 
process cannot be over-emphasised.  
 
Civil  society  and  marginalised  sectors  provide  crucial  and  valuable  alternative  inputs  to 
policy-makers seeking a mutually beneficial trade agreement. Although Indonesia counts as 
one of the largest democracies in the world, democratic governance in trade policy-making 
can  still  be  improved,  and  the  EU  should  in  this  respect  use  its  leverage,  as  a  leading 
democratic  entity,  to  influence  Indonesia  so  that  the  IEUFTA  reflects  the  opinions  and 
aspirations of not only large economic actors, but also of civil society. However, it has been 
observed  that  while  big  democracies  such  as  the  US  and  the  EU  promote  global 
democracy,  their  own  attitude  towards  public  participation  in  trade  decision-making 
processes has often been undemocratic. Trade negotiations, which are likely to affect many 
sectors of society, must be kept open, transparent and accountable to public scrutiny. It is 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 48 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
better  to  have  lengthy  consultations  at  national  and  regional  levels  than  to  ignore  the 
possible  impacts  of  trade  on  key  development  factors  such  as  the  society  and  the 
environment. 
 
Policy Recommendations 

 
The IUEFTA is likely to deepen the asymmetrical economic relations between Indonesia 
and  the  EU,  particularly  if  the  development  objectives  of  the  former  are  ignored  in  the 
forthcoming negotiations and implementation of this trade agreement. Precisely because of 
this, a number of factors need to be incorporated in the final text of the IEUFTA. These 
include taking into account and striking a balance between Indonesia’s interpretation of the 
ways in which the IEUFTA should contribute to the development of Indonesia and EU’s 
own interpretation of economic development. 
 
1.  Overall,  Indonesia  can  certainly  benefit  from  this  trade  agreement  if  the  EU  is 
willing to: allow the use of SP / SSM  
2.  Expand its existing GSP scheme 
3.  Improve market access facilitation for ASEAN’s exports to the EU 
4.  Allow the use of subsidies for low-level agricultural producers 
5.  Provide concrete commitments for long-term capital investment into Indonesia 
6.  Agree to the use of flexible timeframes for the conclusion and implementation of 
IEUFTA  
7.  Ensure  the  participation  of  civil  society  groups  in  the  IEUFTA  policy-making 
processes. The use of SPs and SSM, in particular, must be justified in the IEUFTA 
as  they  can  act  as  guarantees  to  ensure  the  sustainability  of  items  or  products 
deemed sensitive by Indonesian economic actors. 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 49 


TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
Document 5: Looking East: The European Union’s New 
FTA Negotiations in Asia – ECIPE Nov. 
2007 

Introduction 
 
In late 2006, the European Commission’s Global Europe Communication announced a new 
EU  policy  on  free  trade  agreements  (FTAs).  The  core  of  this  new  chapter  in  EU  trade 
policy was planned FTAs with three Asian partners, India, ASEAN and South Korea. The 
Commission secured a mandate for new negotiations from the EU Council in April 2007 
and negotiations have already started. 
 
The  EU  is  not  of  course  new  to  FTAs.  Indeed,  the  EU  has  more  Preferential  Trade 
Agreements (PTAs) on the books than any other leading power. But it did put new FTAs 
in  deep-freeze  from  the  late  1990s,  giving  priority  instead  to  the  WTO  and  the  Doha 
round.  Others,  meanwhile,  launched  themselves  into  FTAs.  Before  the  EU’s  change  of 
heart, it was the only leading power not to be engaged in FTAs in Asia. 
 
What do the new EU-Asia FTA negotiations mean  – for the EU, for its Asian partners, 
and for the international trading system?  
 
The study addresses this question in four parts. 1. The state of EU-Asia trade relations. 2.  
The  new  negotiations  in  the  context  of  overall  EU  FTA  policy,  also  making  some 
comparisons with the US approach to FTAs. 3. The ex ante state-of-play of FTAs in Asia, 
i.e.  FTAs  negotiated  or  underway  in  the  region  not  involving  the  EU.  4.  Assessment  of 
prospects  for  EU  negotiations  with  India,  ASEAN  and  Korea.  It  also  assesses  the 
institutional framework for EU-China trade relations. 
 
EU-Asia FTAs in EU Trade Policy Context 
 
In Global Europe, the Commission stresses commercial criteria for its new FTAs. These are 
all about “stronger engagement with major emerging economies and regions; and a sharper 
focus  on  barriers  to  trade  behind  the  border.”  FTAs  should  strengthen  EU 
competitiveness. 
 
The  commitment  to  the  WTO  and  a  successful  Doha  round  is  restated,  but  renewed 
priority  is  given  to  bilateral  and  region-to-region  negotiations  to  achieve  market-access 
objectives. 
 
In terms of content, Global Europe’s stated aim is to have strong, comprehensive, “WTO-
plus”  FTAs.  Tariffs  and  quantitative  restrictions  should  be  eliminated.  Presumably,  this 
should apply to at least 90-95 per cent of tariff lines and trade volumes in order to comply 
safely with the “substantially-all-trade” criterion in Article XXIV GATT. There should be 
“far-reaching”  liberalization  of  services  and  investment.  Services  provisions  should 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 51 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
presumably  be  compatible  with  the  “substantial  sectoral-coverage”  criterion  in  Article  V 
GATS. A model EU investment agreement, developed in coordination with EU member-
states,  is  envisaged.  There  should  be  provisions  going  beyond  WTO  disciplines  on 
competition,  government  procurement,  intellectual  property  rights  (IPR)  and  trade 
facilitation. There should also be provisions on labour and environmental standards. 
Rules  of  origin  (ROO)  should  be  simplified.  More  generally,  there  should  be  strong 
regulatory  disciplines  and  regulatory  cooperation,  especially  to  tackle  non-tariff  barriers. 
This  should  involve  improved  transparency  obligations,  mutual  recognition  agreements, 
conformity with international standards, regulatory dialogues and technical assistance. 
 
With the economic criteria of “market potential (economic size and growth) and the level 
of protection against EU export interests (tariffs and non-tariff barriers)” in mind, the EU 
has selected India, ASEAN and Korea as partners for new FTAs, but not yet China, which 
“meets many of these criteria, but requires special attention because of the opportunities 
and  risks  it  presents.”  Finally,  Global  Europe  announces  a  review  of  EU  trade  defence 
instruments (anti-dumping duties, safeguards and countervailing duties). But the EU also 
wants  “to  make  sure  that  others  apply  high  standards  in  their  use  of  trade  defence 
instruments and international rules are fully respected.” 
 
In contrast, the EU-Asian FTAs are intended to go wider and deeper, and contain more 
reciprocal, i.e. roughly equivalent, concessions.  
 
The benchmarks for such FTAs would be the following:  
 
  comprehensive coverage of trade in goods, with zero tariffs and quotas on at least 
95  per  cent  of  trade  volumes  (and  without  wholesale  exemptions  for  “sensitive” 
agricultural products);  
  strong  coverage  of  services  and  investment,  underpinned  by  solid  disciplines  on 
domestic regulation;  
  reasonably  strong  coverage  of  competition  rules,  government  procurement  and 
trade  facilitation;  improved  transparency  obligations  and  better  regulatory 
cooperation, especially on non-tariff barriers;  
  avoidance  of  specific  WTO-plus  obligations  on  labour  and  environmental 
standards (which could harm developing-country trade prospects); and  
  a  serious  effort  to  simplify  ROO  requirements.  WTO-plus  obligations  on  IPR 
could  also  be  more  of  a  burden  than  a  benefit  to  low-income,  less-advanced 
developing countries. 
 
It  would  be  better  to  stick  to  the  implementation  of  the  WTO’s  TRIPS  obligations  and 
adoption of associated international standards. 
Going beyond Global Europe, there are several features of EU existing trade policy, and of 
EU  regulation  generally,  that  raise  doubts  about  the  EU’s  willingness  and  ability  to 
conclude economically sensible FTAs. 
 
First
, the EU seeks increasingly to export its regulatory practices, and FTAs are a tempting 
vehicle. International organisations and multilateral, regional and bilateral agreements are all 
used  to  promote  the  adoption  of  EU  standards  on  product  safety,  the  environment, 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 52 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
corporate  governance  and  a  host  of  other  issues.    The  EU  always  links  its  “non-trade” 
goals  to  its  trade  agreements,  preferably  by  having  non-trade  provisions  in  such 
agreements.  Global  Europe,  under  the  heading  of  “social  justice”,  seeks  to  “promote  our 
values,  including  social  and  environmental  standards  and  cultural  diversity  around  the 
world”,  hence,  the  commitment  to  include  core  labour  and  environmental  standards  in 
FTAs. The EU is also increasingly interested in linking trade policy to climate change. New 
FTAs  will  likely  contain  trade-and-sustainable-development  chapters,  which  could  house 
climate-change  provisions  in  the  future.  Fairly  general,  declaratory  language  on  climate 
change, democracy, human rights and other EU pet issues could well be inserted into FTAs 
and  linked  to  other  non-trade  bilateral  agreements.  These  could  conceivably  limit 
negotiating  partners’  freedom  of  action  down  the  line  by  tying  them  to  EU-specific 
standards. 
 
The  EU’s  approach  to  the  regulation  of  risk  in  international  trade  is  another  issue  that 
could be exported via FTAs. WTO itself has a science-based approach to risk assessment 
of  product  standards  in  international  trade  (covered  by  the  WTO’s  SPS  and  TBT 
agreements). The EU has a broader approach that takes non-scientific considerations into 
account,  particularly  in  its  interpretation  of  the  “precautionary  principle”,  which  can  be 
used to restrict trade on public health-and-safety grounds. This allows for wider regulatory 
discretion than in science-based risk assessments and can be more exposed to protectionist 
abuse.  
 
Promotion of regional integration elsewhere  – obviously using the EU as the model  – is 
another  vehicle  for  regulatory  export,  hence  the  EU’s  preference  for  region-to-region 
negotiations  wherever  possible,  e.g.  with  the  ACP  countries,  Mercosur,  Central  America, 
the Andean Community, and now ASEAN. 
 
Second,  the  EU  is  more  serious  about  commercially-relevant  FTAs  than  most  other 
players. The EU uses GATS-type positive listing for services and investment, it does not 
use  investor  state  dispute  settlement,  it  has  weaker  constraints  on  domestic  regulatory 
discretion,  and  it  has  fairly  general,  non-binding,  barely  WTO-plus  provisions  on 
competition, government procurement and trade facilitation. 
 
This could allow the EU and its negotiating partners, in a spirit of mutual defensiveness, to 
carve  out  sensitive  services  sectors  (such  as  health  care,  education,  the  utilities  and 
audiovisual services) and get away with weak regulatory disciplines in other areas. 
 
The EU approach to IPR, as well as to labour and environmental standards in its FTAs, is 
to  have  general  language  to  secure  acceptance  of  international  standards,  rather  than 
specific WTO-plus obligations. Geographical Indicators (GIs) is the one exceptional area 
of IPR where the EU will likely try to secure TRIPS-plus obligations. 
 
The EU (like USA) concedes very little on the movement of temporary workers (covered 
by GATS Model Four), except for limited provisions on business personnel. Neither allows 
FTAs to impose disciplines on antidumping procedures or agricultural subsidies. Neither 
has been successful in concluding mutual recognition agreements in FTAs. And both have 
added considerably to the “spaghetti-bowl” complexity of ROOs. 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 53 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
To sum up what Asian partners can expect from the EU, using US FTAs for comparison: 
1. Tariffs and quotas will be eliminated on 90 per cent or more of goods trade, but that will 
still allow for carve-outs for swathes of agricultural trade. 2. The EU approach to market 
access  and  rule  discipline  in  services,  investment,  government  procurement,  competition 
and trade facilitation will not be as strong as in US FTAs. The EU is likely to concede very 
little  on  Mode  Four,  and  is  unlikely  to  relax  its  tough  SPS  and  TBT  measures  for  FTA 
partners. There will be little on anti-dumping and agricultural subsidies. 
 
Finally,  negotiating  partners  should  be  alert  to  EU  stratagems  to  sneak  in  non-trade 
provisions on climate change, human rights and other issues into FTAs. 
 
Third
, why has the EU decided to negotiate FTAs with India, ASEAN and Korea but not 
with  Japan  and  China?  The  latter  two  comprise  55  per  cent  of  the  EU’s  potential  Asian 
market. An FTA with Korea could be considered a steppingstone to one with Japan. But 
excluding China from the FTA calculus is even less convincing, and diminishes the EU’s 
“economic criteria” for new FTAs. Fear of Chinese competition is clearly the main reason 
why China is not on the list. 
 
There are the dangers of efficiency losses from trade diversion, i.e. sourcing imports from 
high-cost countries in a preferential agreement and not from low-cost countries outside the 
agreement. This could be a problem when FTA partners have relatively high MFN tariffs 
and high regulatory barriers in goods, services and investment.  
 
To  sum  up,  the  EU  is  more  serious  about  commercially-relevant  FTAs  than  most  other 
players,  i.e.  Brazil,  India,  South  Africa,  ASEAN,  Japan  and  China.  But  its  “economic 
criteria”  for  new  FTAs  are  compromised  by  1.  Non-trade  goals  and  onerous  regulations 
the  EU  tries  to  export  via  FTAs.  2.  Weaker  stance  on  market  access  and  related  rules 
compared  with  the  USA.  3.  Absence  of  Japan  and  China  from  its  FTA  wish-list;  4. 
Potential  trade-diversion  effects.  4.  General  mercantilist  outlook  that  neglects  unilateral 
liberalisation and internal-market reforms. The last two features are of course not confined 
to the EU. 
 
FTAs in Asia 
 
Unlike  other  regions,  East  Asia  used  to  rely  on  non-discriminatory  unilateral  and 
multilateral liberalization rather than discriminatory FTAs. Now it is playing catch-up, with 
FTA  initiatives  spreading  like  wildfire  in  the  past  six  years.  The  major  Asian  powers  – 
China, India and Japan – are involved, as are Korea, Australia, New Zealand, Hong Kong, 
the Southeast-Asian countries, as well as other South-Asian countries. There are about 20 
FTAs in force and 60 more in the pipeline in China, India and Southeast Asia.  
 
China 
is the driving force for FTAs in Asia. It is considering or negotiating FTAs in East 
and  South  Asia,  the  Middle  East,  Latin  America,  Africa,  and  with  Australia  and  New 
Zealand. By 2006, it had 9 FTAs on the books and was considering negotiations with up to 
30 other countries. 
 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 54 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
The China-ASEAN set of negotiations, more than any other FTA initiative, is the one to 
watch in the region. The aim is to have an FTA in place by 2010. It would be the largest 
FTA ever negotiated, covering 11 diverse economies with a population of 1.7 billion and a 
GDP of US$2 trillion. There has been reasonable progress in eliminating tariffs on trade in 
goods. Duties on 95 per cent of tariff lines will disappear by 2010; many remaining tariffs 
will go by 2012; and other tariffs will be reduced or be capped thereafter.  
 
However,  little  progress  to  date  has  been  made  on  non-tariff  barriers  in  goods,  services 
(where a relatively weak agreement has been reached), investment and other issues. China 
also has relatively strong WTO-plus FTAs with Hong Kong and Macau (both admittedly 
special cases); a comprehensive FTA on goods with Chile; and is negotiating FTAs with 
Australia, New Zealand and Singapore. 
 
It  is  also  thinking  of  negotiating  rather  weak  FTAs  elsewhere  in  the  developing  world.  
These  are  shallow,  mostly  preferential  tariff  reductions  on  a  limited  range  of  products. 
Even the China-ASEAN FTA is unlikely to create much extra trade and investment if it 
does not go substantially beyond tariff elimination in goods. Trading interests are placed in 
the context of foreign-policy “soft power”, i.e. diplomacy and relationship building.  
 
Turning to Southeast Asia, Singapore blazed the FTA trail, with Thailand next to follow, 
and  now  Malaysia,  Indonesia,  the  Philippines  and Vietnam  trying  to  catch up.  Singapore 
has agreements in force with Australia, New Zealand, Japan, USA, Korea, India and a host 
of  other  minor  trading  partners.  Thailand  has  agreements  in  force  with  Australia,  New 
Zealand, Bahrain, Japan, China and India. It was in negotiations with the USA and others, 
before  the  Thai  political  crisis  and  the  subsequent  military  coup  put  all  negotiations  on 
hold.  Malaysia  has  an  agreement  with  Japan,  and  is  negotiating  with  the  USA,  Australia, 
New  Zealand,  India,  Pakistan,  Korea  and  Chile.  The  Philippines  has  a  new  FTA  with 
Japan; Indonesia is negotiating with Japan; and both are looking to start negotiations with 
others. Vietnam has a bilateral trade agreement with the USA, is negotiating with Japan and 
considering  other  negotiations.  In  addition,  ASEAN  collectively  has  negotiations  with 
China, India, Japan, Australia-New Zealand CER and Korea. 
 
Of  the  ASEAN  countries,  only  Singapore  has  reasonably  strong  FTAs,  with 
comprehensive coverage and strong rules for goods, services, investment and other issues. 
But  Singapore,  with  its  free-port  economy,  centralised  city-state  politics,  efficient 
administration and world-class regulatory standards, is a misleading indicator for the region.  
 
Many  product  areas,  especially  in  agriculture,  are  likely  to  be  excluded  from  goods 
liberalisation. Regulatory barriers are unlikely to be tackled with disciplines that go much 
deeper than existing WTO commitments. 
 
Services commitments are unlikely to advance much beyond the WTO’s GATS agreement, 
let  alone  deliver  meaningful  net  liberalisation  or  regulatory  cooperation  (e.g.  on  mutual 
recognition of standards and professional qualifications). Provisions on investment and the 
temporary  movement  of  workers  are  also  likely  to  be  weak,  with  perhaps  even  weaker 
commitments on government procurement, competition rules and customs administration. 
 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 55 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
More important than all the above considerations, it is that agreements in force and those 
being negotiated are creating a “noodle bowl” of complex and restrictive rules of origin. A 
mess  of  differing  general  and  product-specific  ROO  criteria  is  emerging.  These  differ 
between bilateral FTAs. Collective ASEAN FTAs with third countries will compound the 
problem, if they end up with yet another layer of differing ROO criteria. If this is indeed 
what emerges, administrative and other compliance costs could be too onerous for most 
exporters in the region. Many will find it cheaper to pay the MFN-tariff duty. 
 
India 
is also newly active with FTAs, in its South-Asian backyard and in other developing-
country  regions,  but  severe  political  problems  in  the  region  (the  Indo-Pakistani  conflict 
over Kashmir, and the fact that India is completely surrounded by weak, failing or failed 
states) will make progress very difficult. 
 
India’s approach to FTAs outside South Asia is mostly about foreign policy and is “trade 
light”,  with  little  economic  sense  or  strategy.  An  FTA  with  ASEAN  is  planned  for 
completion by 2011; and bilateral FTAs are also in place with Thailand and Singapore.  
 
In addition, India is part of the BIMSTEC group (the other members being Bangladesh, Sri 
Lanka, Nepal, Bhutan, Thailand and Myanmar) that plans an FTA by 2017.  
 
Japan  
was  the  last  major  trading  nation  to  hold  out  against  discriminatory  trade 
agreements,  preferring  the  non-discriminatory  WTO  track  instead.  Japan’s  biggest  FTA 
initiative is the Japan-ASEAN Economic Partnership Agreement, which is supposed to be 
completed  by  2012.  It  is  comprehensive  on  paper,  covering  goods,  services,  investment, 
trade facilitation and several areas for economic cooperation. However, progress has been 
slow, much slower than in the China-ASEAN FTA. This is due to Japanese reluctance to 
reduce and then phase out agricultural tariffs, and to its insistence on restrictive and often 
product-specific rules of origin, especially for agricultural and manufactured products.  
 
Another  complicating  factor  is  that  Japan  has  given  greater  priority  to  bilateral  FTA 
negotiations  with  individual  ASEAN  countries.  Such  bilateralism,  especially  with  its 
noodle-bowl profusion of rules of origin, is going to make it very hard to achieve a clean, 
comprehensive Japan-ASEAN FTA. 
 
Japan  has  several  other  FTA  initiatives  in  train.  It  calls  its  FTAs  “economic  partnership 
agreements” (EPA), to indicate  that they go beyond traditional FTAs in goods and have 
comprehensive coverage of trade and investment-related issues in goods and services.  
 
South Korea, 
like Japan, it is defensive on agriculture. Unlike Japan, it seems to be more 
serious  on  other  negotiating  issues.  It  has  made  more  progress  than  Japan  in  FTA 
negotiations with ASEAN. 
 
In Southeast Asia, the ASEAN Free Trade Area (AFTA) has an accelerated timetable for 
intra-ASEAN tariff elimination, but has seen little progress on “AFTA-plus” items such as 
services,  investment,  non-tariff  barriers,  and  mutual  recognition  and  harmonisation  of 
standards. An ASEAN Economic Community, a single market for goods, services, capital 
and the movement of skilled labour, is supposed to be achieved by 2015. So far, however, 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 56 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
ASEAN Vision Statements and other blueprints have largely failed to remove barriers to 
commerce in Southeast Asia. They seem rather distant from commercial ground realities. 
 
An ASEAN Plus Three (APT) FTA (the “three” being Japan, South Korea and China) 
has been touted, as has an East-Asian FTA that might include Australia and New Zealand. 
There is talk of a pan-Asian FTA that would include India or SAFTA. Visions of an East 
Asian Economic Community and even an Asian Economic Community have appeared on 
the horizon. So far this talk is loose and empty – nothing more. 
 
Regional  players  are  speeding  ahead  with  quick  and  weak  bilateral  FTAs,  while  little 
progress is being made with the larger ASEAN FTAs (beyond tariff elimination in goods 
trade).  Such  FTA  activity  distracts  attention  from  further  unilateral  liberalisation  and 
domestic  reforms.  That  will  probably  hinder,  not  help,  the  cause  of  regional  economic 
integration. 
 
EU-Asia FTAs 

 
EU-China Trade Relations - The Institutional Framework 
 
China is now the EU’s largest trading partner in Asia and its second largest trading partner 
in the world. European multinational enterprises have big investments in China, much of it 
linked  to  trade:  their  China  operations  import  machinery  and  other  inputs  from  Europe 
and elsewhere, and export final goods back to Europe and the wider world. The EU says 
that “China is the single  most important challenge for EU trade policy”.  Yet the EU is 
avoiding  an  FTA  with  China,  while  it  prioritises  negotiations  with  less  important  Asian 
trading partners. 
 
As things stand, a serious EU-China FTA is not achievable for either side. China is unlikely 
to get what it wants from the EU through an FTA: recognition of market-economy status; 
stronger disciplines on EU anti-dumping and safeguard measures; removal of peak tariffs 
on garments, leather goods and other manufactured exports; reduction of EU agricultural 
subsidies and tariffs to open markets for its expanding agricultural exports; and less trade-
restrictive EU SPS and TBT measures.  
 
All these measures restrict China’s labour intensive goods exports. FTA negotiations would 
put extra pressure on  the EU to reduce or  remove many of these barriers, which would 
expose inefficient EU producers to even greater Chinese competition. That is why the EU 
does not want an FTA with China. 
 
What would EU exporters and investors gain from an FTA with China? China has already 
made very strong WTO commitments on tariffs and non-tariff barriers to goods trade, and 
on services liberalisation. But that still leaves significant gaps. A comprehensive, WTO-plus 
EU-China  FTA  would  take  over  90  per  cent  of  Chinese  tariffs  down  to  zero  (from  a 
nominal  MFN  average  of  9  per  cent);  deliver  GATS-plus  commitments  on  services 
liberalisation; remove foreign-ownership restrictions and secure better legal protection for 
EU  investors;  impose  greater  disciplines  and  transparency  on  all  manner  of  domestic 
regulation  (e.g.  on  administering  subsidies,  licenses,  safety  standards,  IPR  and  customs 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 57 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
procedures); gain WTO-plus commitments on government procurement, competition rules 
and  trade  facilitation;  and  extract  commitments  on  core  labour  and  environmental 
standards. But, since the EU is unlikely to concede anything major to China, it is unlikely to 
get the above concessions from China. Furthermore, Chinese liberalising reforms do not 
have the strong tailwind they had in the run-up to WTO accession: the politics of further 
liberalisation in China is proving more difficult. 
 
Given these realities, now is not the time to launch an EU-China FTA initiative. But now is 
the time to strengthen and strongly institutionalise bilateral trade cooperation. Present and 
envisaged arrangements are too soft. They should be hardened – without jumping onto the 
FTA bandwagon. 
 
The EU and China agreed to a “strategic partnership” in 2003. In 2007, both sides agreed 
to  start  negotiations  on  a  new  Partnership  and  Cooperation  Agreement  (PCA).  The  EU 
intends the PCA to cover political and economic issues, including its non-trade objectives 
on democracy, human rights, the rule of law, sustainable development, climate change, and 
labour  and  environmental  standards.  Its  trade-and-investment  priorities  for  the  PCA 
include: better enforcement of IPR; mutual recognition of geographical indicators; WTO-
plus  commitments  on  access  for  EU  investors;  and  stronger  regulatory  cooperation  on 
health-and-safety standards. 
 
The  EU  envisages  some  institutional  changes,  such  as  an  annual  heads-of-government 
summit, stronger exchanges and dialogues at ministerial, senior-official and technical levels, 
and an independent EU-China Forum for non-governmental representatives. 
 
The EU-Korea FTA 
 
Korea is by far the EU’s best FTA prospect in Asia– for two reasons. First, Korea, next to 
Singapore, is the most credible FTA player in Asia. It has very high levels of agricultural 
protection  and  correspondingly  defensive  negotiating  positions.  But  it  has  been  more 
serious  and  forthcoming  than  Japan,  China,  ASEAN  countries  and  India  on  non-
agricultural issues in FTA negotiations. 
 
Korea  successfully  concluded  FTA  negotiations  with  the  toughest  demandeur  around,  the 
USA, while US FTA negotiations with Thailand and Malaysia got stuck. 
 
EU-Korea negotiations were recently successfully completed, with a relatively strong result, 
WTO-plus FTA, though with significant gaps. This FTA will deliver appreciable gains for 
Korea, but the net effect on the EU would be rather modest.  
 
The EU-ASEAN FTA 

 
EU-ASEAN trade is lower than EU bilateral trade with China and Japan, but it is higher 
than EU bilateral trade with Korea and India. EU FDI stock in ASEAN is higher than it is 
elsewhere  in  Asia  except  Japan.  EU-ASEAN  trade  is  overwhelmingly  with  Singapore, 
Malaysia and Thailand. EU FDI goes mostly to these three countries, and the bulk of it to 
Singapore. 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 58 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
Relatively big numbers for EU trade and FDI with ASEAN should not be taken at face 
value: ASEAN is neither a country nor an integrated economic region. 
 
ASEAN  countries  vary  widely  in  historical  legacies,  political  systems,  levels  of  economic 
development  and  institutional  capacity.  Singapore  has  high  Western-style  per-capita 
income; Malaysia is one of the wealthiest developing countries; Thailand is in the middle-
income developing-country bracket; the Philippines and Indonesia have much lower, and 
Vietnam even lower, real incomes; and Cambodia, Laos and Myanmar are least developed 
countries. Tiny Brunei is rich solely due to oil revenues. Trade barriers between ASEAN 
countries, especially non-tariff and regulatory measures, are quite high. Regional economic 
integration exists more in ASEAN blueprints and “visions” than it does on the ground – a 
world away from the EU. 
 
An  EU-commissioned  study  on  the  potential  impact  of  an  EU-ASEAN  FTA  comes  up 
with the following numbers.  
 
An  ambitious  FTA  (with  zero  tariffs  on  all  goods  trade  and  a  50  per-cent  reduction  in 
barriers to services trade) would increase EU GDP by 0.1 per cent and ASEAN GDP by 
2.2 per cent.  
 
A  less  ambitious  FTA  (with  carve-outs  for  sensitive  agricultural  products)  would  hardly 
change these figures.  
 
A third scenario (taking into account other existing FTAs) would increase the ASEAN gain 
to 2.6 per cent of GDP. A much more modest FTA (limited to goods liberalization) would 
increase EU GDP by 0.03 per cent and ASEAN GDP by 0.5 per cent. 
 
Hence a substantial FTA would deliver appreciable gains for ASEAN but have a modest 
effect on the EU. 
 
70% of the gains would accrue from services liberalization. Limited services liberalization 
would  drastically  reduce  ASEAN  gains,  and  reduce  EU  gains  to  virtually  nil.  These 
forecasts are similar to those for the EU-Korea FTA. The CGE model used covers non-
tariff and regulatory measures only superficially, and is silent on rules of origin. 
 
The EU and ASEAN have a Cooperation Agreement that dates back to 1980. Since 2004, 
they have the Trans Regional EU-ASEAN Trade Initiative (TREATI), which is now the 
framework  for  region-to-region  regulatory  cooperation  on  trade,  investment  and  trade-
facilitation issues.  
 
The EU is also negotiating Partnership and Cooperation Agreements, covering a host of 
political and economic issues, with Singapore and Thailand, and will start PCA negotiations 
with  Malaysia,  Indonesia,  the  Philippines  and  Brunei.  There  are  plans  for  a  PCA  with 
Vietnam  as  well.  More  broadly,  the  Asia-Europe  Meeting  (ASEM)  is  an  annual  summit 
involving the EU Commission, the EU member-states and the ten ASEAN members. It 
has  an  “economic  pillar”  for  meetings  of  economic  and  finance  ministers  and  senior 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 59 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
officials, as well as an Asia-Europe Business Forum. The EU has also expressed its wish to 
accede to the ASEAN Treaty of Amity and Cooperation. 
 
The EU’s mandate is to negotiate a collective FTA with the ASEAN members with which 
it  has  started  or  plans  to  start  PCA  negotiations.  This  leaves  out  Cambodia,  Laos  and 
Myanmar. The EU gives Cambodia and Laos duty-free access to its market already as part 
of its Everything but Arms package for LDCs. It will not include Myanmar on principle, 
given its human-rights record and the existence of EU sanctions on Myanmar.  
 
Some  ASEAN  leaders,  on  the  other  hand,  insist  that  the  FTA  must  include  all  ASEAN 
members, in line with other ASEAN FTAs with third countries. These issues remain to be 
resolved. But compromise is likely: these should not be big negotiating road-blocks. 
 
As for negotiating content, the EU wants a ten-year transition period for tariff elimination 
and  commitments  in  services  and  investment,  perhaps  with  longer  transition  periods  for 
some sensitive agricultural products. 
 
It  is  willing  to  give  Special  and  Differential  Treatment  (SDT)  to  less-developed  ASEAN 
countries in the form of longer transition periods. Interestingly, this differs from the EU’s 
approach to the negotiations with Korea and India, for whom no SDT is envisaged. The 
EU’s  draft  mandate  for  the  ASEAN  FTA  negotiations  contains  softer  language  on 
government  procurement  and  competition  rules  than  in  the  draft  mandate  for  the 
negotiations with Korea. With ASEAN, the EU wants compatibility with the WTO’s GPA 
and  regulatory  cooperation  on  competition  issues;  there  is  no  mention  of  GPA-plus 
market-access  commitments,  nor  of  binding  commitments  on  competition  enforcement. 
Finally, the EU aims to complete negotiations by mid 2009. 
 
The bottom line is that an EU-ASEAN FTA only makes economic sense if it goes deep 
into non-tariff and regulatory barriers in ASEAN countries other than Singapore. This is 
highly unlikely. 
 
First
,  the  record  of  existing  ASEAN  FTAs  –  AFTA,  FTAs  between  individual  ASEAN 
countries and third countries, collective ASEAN FTAs with third countries  – shows that 
they hardly go beyond tariff elimination on 90% or more of goods trade. Singapore’s FTAs 
are exceptional. The USA is the only player that has attempted strong FTAs with ASEAN 
countries. It succeeded with Singapore, but has failed so far with Thailand and Malaysia, 
and considers Indonesia and the Philippines unlikely prospects. 
 
Second,  given  intra-ASEAN  differences  and  the  lack  of  adequate  common  negotiating 
machinery, the EU will find it exceedingly difficult to negotiate with ASEAN collectively. 
ASEAN is big on summits, other meetings, Visions, Charters and sundry blueprints. Much 
of this is hot air. When it comes to concrete measures,  ASEAN decision-making is very 
unwieldy  and  dilatory,  and  eventually-  agreed  positions  tend  to  be  low  common 
denominators. 
 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 60 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
The easy way out for the EU and its ASEAN counterparts is to negotiate a relatively trade-
light  FTA  that  does  not  seriously  tackle  non-tariff  and  regulatory  barriers,  akin  to  other 
ASEAN FTAs. That would be politically symbolic but commercially nonsensical. 
If  this  is  indeed  what  transpires  with  ASEAN,  the  EU  should  change  strategy,  and  the 
sooner the better. What should it do? 
 
  The  EU  should  give  up  on  negotiating  with  ASEAN  collectively  (meaning 
ASEAN-10  or  ASEAN-minus-3).  Rather  it  should  aim  for  a  stronger  TREATI 
framework for regulatory cooperation with ASEAN. This should be complemented 
with stronger trade-and-investment regulatory cooperation with individual ASEAN 
countries, perhaps within a PCA framework.  
  The EU should go  full speed ahead with an FTA with Singapore. This could be 
done in quick time and be relatively strong and clean. It would be at least as wide 
and deep as the US-Singapore FTA. Ideally, it would remedy some of the latter’s 
faults, notably on complicated, product-specific rules of origin. 
  The  EU  should  not  go  full  speed  ahead  with  bilateral  FTAs  with  other  ASEAN 
countries.  Serious  FTAs  with  them  are  presently  not  deliverable.  Malaysia  and 
Thailand  are  the  strongest  candidates  after  Singapore.  But  Malaysia’s  vested 
interests  are  intimately  bound  up  with  its  Bumiputra  policies  (that  discriminate  in 
favour of the Malay majority). This precludes sufficient opening of services markets 
and government procurement. Thailand has gone backwards after the military coup 
in 2006: economic-nationalist rhetoric has increased; anti-market NGOs are more 
influential;  protectionist  interests  are  more  powerful;  government  is  more 
incompetent; and economic illiteracy is all-pervasive. 
  Indonesia,  the  Philippines  and  other  ASEAN  countries  present  even  greater 
obstacles. 
 
Conclusion 

 
The EU says its new FTAs with Asian countries will be governed by commercial criteria, 
and that it is aiming for strong, comprehensive, WTO-plus FTAs. But, for the most part, 
this is unlikely to materialize.  
 
The EU is not as ambitious on market access and rules as the USA in FTA negotiations. It 
has entrenched protectionist interests in agriculture as well as in some industrial-goods and 
services sectors. Its commercial criteria are severely compromised by its zeal to export the 
“EU  regulatory  model”.  This  includes  a  range  of  non-trade  objectives  it  sneaks  into 
bilateral  and  regional  trade  agreements.  Its  two  major  Asian  trading  partners,  China  and 
Japan, are not on its FTA wish-list. 
 
Over in Asia, the emerging patchwork of FTAs leaves much to be desired. Some FTAs are 
preferential-tariff agreements on a limited range of goods. Even the better ones are trade-
light and barely WTO-plus: they cover tariff elimination on most goods trade, but do not 
seriously  tackle  non-tariff  and  regulatory  barriers.  They  are  unlikely  to  contribute  to 
regional  and  global  economic  integration,  but  will  cause  extra  complications  through 
profusion  of  complicated  and  discriminatory  deals.  This  is  undermining  comparatively 
simple, transparent, predictable and non-discriminatory multilateral trade rules.  
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 61 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
 
Finally, the mercantilist outlook of all major FTA players, including the EU and its Asian 
partners,  leads  them  to  neglect  unilateral  liberalization  and  domestic  structural  reforms. 
The  latter  are  far  more  important  to  building  up  firm-level  competitiveness  than  crow-
baring open export markets through FTA negotiations. As for the new FTA negotiations, 
the EU’s best prospect is a relatively strong, WTO-plus FTA with Korea, building on the 
recently concluded US-Korea FTA.  
 
But it will probably leave significant gaps, notably in agriculture and some services sectors. 
The  EU  has  little  hope  of  concluding  a  serious  FTA  with  ASEAN  collectively  (or  even 
with ASEAN minus Cambodia, Laos and Myanmar).  
 
Rather it should focus on stronger EU-ASEAN trade-related regulatory-cooperation, and a 
strong,  WTO-plus  FTA  with  Singapore.  Strong  FTAs  with  other  ASEAN  countries  are 
unlikely.
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 62 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
Document 6: Trade Policy at the Crossroads: The 
Indonesian Story – UNCTAD 2005 
Following  the  recent  crises  and  the  subsequent  slowdown  in  the  world  economy,  many 
countries  in  the  developed  and  developing  world  are  at  the  crossroads  in  their  trade 
strategy,  uncertain  whether  to  advance  with  trade  reforms,  to  stand  still  or  increase 
protection.  
 
In this context, the purpose of this paper is to stimulate public policy debate on a future 
trade  policy  for  Indonesia.  This  study  offers  an  insight  into  the  scope  of  the  potential 
impacts  of  alternative  trade  policy  scenarios,  and  helps  assess  the  effects  of  Indonesia 
pursuing alternative trade policy paths.  
 
Indonesia  provides  an  interesting  case  study  of  the  potential  benefits  and  costs  of 
alternative trade strategies that are under consideration in many developing countries. The 
ASEAN region has recently announced a deepening of its commitments and is considering 
widening  the  agreement  to  include  countries  such  as  China,  Japan  and  the  Republic  of 
Korea. A bilateral agreement with the United States is also a possibility.  
 
Against  this  background,  Indonesia’s  options  on  trade  policy  range  from  increasing 
protection to actively pursuing bilateral, regional and multilateral initiatives. 
 
The  results  of  a  general  equilibrium  analysis  point  to  several  interesting  implications  for 
policy  makers.  They  show  that  increasing  protection  results  in  economic  losses  while  a 
stand still and more liberalization produce economic gains. 
 
Multilateral trade liberalization is a two-edged sword for many countries. The opening up 
of markets provides a welcome opportunity for the development of exports. On the other 
hand, it also brings increased competition, not only in export markets but also in domestic 
markets.  To  take  advantage  of  market  opportunities,  resources  need  to  flow  from 
inefficient sectors to those where productivity is greater. 
 
In  the  long  run,  developing  countries  have  little  choice  but  to  continue  down  the 
liberalization  road  as  the  world  becomes  increasingly  integrated.  Liberalization  is 
recognized  as  a  desirable  objective  of  economic  policy  for  all  economies  and  WTO 
members have committed themselves to moving towards this objective.  
 
While  openness  is  the  end  goal,  the  real  question  is  how  to  get  there,  with  the  loudest 
voices  –  and  many  vested  interests  –  calling  for  a  standstill  in  current  liberalization  or  an 
increase in protection. The various trade strategy options include increasing protection in 
selected industries. 
 
While a competitive exchange rate, fiscal discipline, trade liberalization, a sound investment 
climate and secure property rights are considered necessary, they are no longer considered 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 63 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
sufficient.  Other  variables  include  good  governance,  low  levels  of  corruption,  flexible 
labour markets, inflation’s targeting and social safety nets.  
 
The slow progress in multilateral negotiations has inevitably led to a reinforcement of the 
trend since the 1990s towards the formation of regional trade and integration agreements. 
Bilateral  and  regional  agreements  seem  to  afford  opportunities  for  faster,  deeper 
liberalization with selected trading partners. It is much easier to get agreement with a few 
rather  than  many  countries.  The  most  obvious  example  of  a  successful  agreement  is  the 
European Union. 
 
Developing countries are queuing up to obtain access to developed country markets, both 
in  Europe  and  the  Americas.  The  difficulties  with  these  agreements  are  the  unequal 
bargaining  power  between  the  members,  particularly  for  hub-and-spoke  arrangements 
where  one  large  economy  essentially  has  bilateral  arrangements  with  several  smaller 
countries.  
 
The danger is that the larger power excludes products of particular interest to its partners 
or exacts other policy changes that may be premature or costly for the smaller, developing 
partner. The Australia-US Free Trade Agreement is an example where sugar was excluded. 
The EU has mostly excluded agriculture from its  network of agreements with the Euro-
Mediterranean and Central and Eastern European countries. 
 
Indonesia  provides  a  useful  case  study  of  a  country  at  the  crossroads.  It  has  undertaken 
substantial reforms, especially following the 1997 Asian financial crisis, but is yet to see the 
expected benefits. As a result, there is indecision about the way forward in its trade policy.  
 
The  paper  examines  the  options  for  Indonesia  and  attempts  to  draw  implications  for 
developing  countries  more  generally.  An  overview  is  provided  of  the  evolution  of 
Indonesia’s trade regime since the 1960s, while the structure of the Indonesian economy in 
relation to existing trade flows and protection levels is also examined. The sectors enjoying 
or  facing  the  largest  protection  rates  and  hence  likely  to  be  most  affected  by  pending 
changes are agriculture, textiles and motor vehicles.  
 
It  discusses  timing  and  sequencing  issues  for  Indonesia  in  progressing  with  further 
liberalization and finally draws implications for policies that may also be of value to other 
countries facing a similar trade policy dilemma. 
 
Indonesia still has room  to move in its trade policy, but important questions arise about 
how to proceed – more liberalization or not and wider or deeper. However, as for other 
countries, there are some limitations on the options available to Indonesia: the scope for 
further  trade  reforms  must  be  considered  in  the  context  of  existing  trade  commitments, 
some of which are legally binding.  
 
Indonesia’s case depends on its commitments under ASEAN, APEC and the WTO. It can 
obviously accelerate liberalization at a faster pace without negative implications, but is likely 
to be more limited if it chooses to standstill or go back.  
 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 64 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
The scope under ASEAN, which covers about 20 per cent of Indonesia’s trade, is limited 
as  compared  with  other  agreements.  Indonesia  has  already  locked  into  binding  tariff 
reductions, with few exceptions, as part of AFTA. ASEAN has expressed its intention of 
achieving  zero  tariffs  on  all  trade  between  founding  members  by  2015.  There  is  more 
flexibility  under  APEC  and  the  WTO.  Indonesia  has  a  number  of  non-binding 
commitments  under  APEC,  which  is  seeking  to  achieve  free  and  open  trade  and 
investment by 2020 for developing economies. 
 
Under the WTO, Indonesia is progressively liberalizing, but for some products where the 
bound  rates  are  significantly  higher  than  the  applied  rates  there  is  significant  scope  to 
increase the applied rates. 
 
Much needs to be done for Indonesia to become internationally competitive and to be in a 
position  to  maximize  the  benefits  from  further  trade  liberalization.  With  so  much  to  be 
done  and  Indonesia  still  recovering  from  an  historic  multi-dimensional  crisis,  a  gradual 
rather  than  a  “big  bang”  approach  to  further  liberalization  may  be  the  most  successful. 
Adjustment costs, especially in terms of unemployment, are likely to be reduced if reforms 
are phased in.  
 
For  such  an  approach  to  be  sustainable  and  creditable,  a  clear  agenda  and  timetable  for 
further liberalization need to set and adhered in order to send a clear signal that protection 
will be reduced and removed as industries affected by the changes will more likely respond 
to  the  changed  set  of  incentives  instead  of  undertaking  inefficient  lobbying  to  maintain 
protection. 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 65 


TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
Document 7: Country Note on Trade and Investment 
Policy Coordination Indonesia – Industrial 
Development Division, MOFA, UNESCAP, 
Bangkok July 2007 

Introduction  
 
Indonesia has experienced its transition to a democratic and decentralized country, and the 
current Government led by President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono has continued its efforts 
to increase a broad-based political and economic program aimed at sustainable economic 
development.  
 
In the beginning of his administration, President has set a goal of creating a more efficient 
economy through opening up market and liberalizing trade, protecting intellectual property 
rights,  strengthening  the  rule  of  law  and  transparency,  improving  business  climate  and 
encouraging competition. In order to meet this goal, the Government has reviewed all rules 
and regulations related to imports and exports and business licensing. The intention of this 
review  is  to  identify  and  rectify  onerous  bureaucracy  and  poorly  conceived  trade  and 
investment policies. 
  
In the context of the government's focus on improving Indonesia's business climate and 
competitiveness,  two  inter-agency  teams  were  created  with  the  overall  aim  of  improving 
coordination of governmental strategies and positions in trade dialogues and negotiations 
and  facilitating  the  development  of  strategic  sectors.  A  presidential  decree revitalized  the 
National Team for Increasing Exports and Investment (originally established in 2003, with 
the President as Chair.  
 
In  October  2005,  a  further  presidential  decree  established  an  interagency  Indonesian 
National Trade Negotiation Team, with the Coordinating Minister for the Economy and 
the Minister of Trade as its chair and deputy chair respectively. In addition, the President 
has  also  assigned  the  Minister  of  Trade  to  coordinate  the  formulation  of  investment 
policies.  
 
In regard to decentralization, the reform process emerged in a crisis situation because the 
significant  shift  in  resources  and  responsibilities  from  the  central  and  provincial  to  the 
district governments (440 local governments) occurred quite rapidly.  
 
Trade Aspect 
 
Consistent  with  broad-based  approach  to  modernizing  the  economy,  the  Government  is 
also  progressing  on  trade  policy.  Tariffs,  the  main  trade  policy  instrument,  are  in  the 
process  of  being  lowered  and  made  more  uniform  in  line  with  the  ASEAN  Tariff 
Harmonization Program. As a consequence of these changes and the deeper integration in 
the regional and the world, the overall import weighted applied MFN rate has come down 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 67 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
to  a  moderate  8.3  per  cent  in  2006,  demonstrating  the  openness  of  the  Indonesian 
economy.  Moreover,  non-tariff  measures  are  continuing  to  be  reduced  and  eliminated. 
Agriculture,  critical  to  the  livelihood  of  a  large  part  of  the  Indonesian  population,  has 
started  to  benefit  from  a  revitalization  program  providing  support  for  infrastructure, 
financial services and institutional reform. Industrial policy is oriented to fostering cluster 
groups, with selective use of incentives to support the development of Indonesia's regions 
and deepen and diversity industrial production in the face of stiff international competition 
and a fast changing business environment.  
 
In international trade relations, the Government has begun to follow a triple track strategy 
on the international trade negotiations: multilateral, under WTO auspices; regional, centred 
on ASEAN and ASEAN+3 agreements; and for the first time, Indonesia is also pursuing a 
bilateral trade agreement with Japan, with other possible bilateral agreements under study. 
In addition to WTO negotiations, Indonesia has been working together with other WTO 
members to achieve a balanced outcome, consistent with the development objectives that 
are central to the Doha Declaration.  
 
In  the  bilateral  level,  Indonesia  has  finalised  negotiations  with  Japan  since  mid  2005  to 
establish an Economic Partnership Agreement that covers goods, rules of origin, customs 
procedures, investment, services, movement of natural persons, competition policy, energy 
and mineral resources and cooperation. Indonesia is also in the process of negotiating FTA 
with Pakistan, and exploring the possibility with India and Iran.  
 
For  the  last  three  years,  Indonesia's  trade  balance  has  fluctuated,  but  registered  a  trade 
surplus of over US$ 3 billion in 2006. Export grew at the robust rate of some 18 per cent in 
the  period  2003-2006,  reaching  record  levels.  Much  of  this  can  be  attributed  to  strong 
commodity prices, in particular oil and gas, but also rubber, palm oil, coal and metal ores, 
as well as the healthy growth of the world economy.  
 
Oil and gas exports reached some US$ 2.2 billion in 2006, an increase of 17.6 per cent over 
the previous year. In 2005 the increase was partially associated with the world price increase 
of  crude  oil,  which  also  impact  on  an  increase  in  the  value  oil  and  gas  imports  since 
Indonesia  becomes  a  net  importer  of  such  products.  Meanwhile,  non-oil  &gas  exports 
reached US$ 79.5 billion, nearly 20 per cent higher than in 2005. And for the year 2007, the 
government target for non-oil export growth is 14.5 per cent. Reaching this target requires 
special  effort,  in  particular  on  trade-related  infrastructure,  but  much  depends  on  the 
external environment such as economic growth of major markets and commodities prices. 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 68 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
Investment Aspect  
 
Besides  the  public  investment  done  by  the  Government,  the  private  sector  investment, 
including foreign direct investment, is important for the modernization and efficiency of 
the economy. Therefore, investment policy has been an important component of the policy 
changes that have been introduced by the Government.  
 
The investment reforms, intended to improve the country’s investment climate, cover three 
policy reform packages launched in the first half of 2006. The investment policy package 
(February 2006) covers the following areas: i) general investment policies; ii) customs; iii) 
taxation; iv) labour market; and v) small & medium size enterprises.  
 
The Infrastructure Development Package (March 2006) provides the policy framework for 
public  private  partnership  and  the  risk  sharing  to  enable  acceleration  of  the  building  of 
infrastructure  with  private  participation.  And  the  Financial  Sector  Reform  Package  (July 
2006) aims at improving coordination between the government and the central bank (Bank 
of Indonesia), and continuing steps to strengthen the banking industry, non bank financial 
institutions and the capital market. 
  
A number of areas in each of these reform packages have been completed such as the risk 
sharing  framework  for  infrastructure;  the  revised  Customs  Law;  most  recently  the 
Investment Law, which was passed in Parliament on March 2007. At the same time there is 
an  ongoing  program  of  deregulation,  administrative  and  bureaucratic  reforms  aimed  at 
increasing the efficiency and good governance of the public service. 
  
The  government  has also  revised  the  Investment  Negative  List  with  a  view  to  providing 
increased legal certainty. The negative list comprises of a number of areas that are closed 
for foreign investment and some areas, which are open to foreign investment, subject to 
certain  conditions.  The  negative  list  is  relatively  short,  comprising  only  1  per  cent  of  all 
economic activity, or precisely covering 25 industrial sectors. Inclusion of certain activities 
in  the  closed  list  is  based  on  the  criteria,  such  as  health,  safety,  defence  and  security, 
environment, culture and national interest. The negative list is also to provide a more solid 
legal  base,  as  well  as  greater  clarity,  transparency  and  simplicity  for  investors  and  clearer 
guidelines for sector inside the list. 
 
Conclusion  
 
The coordination is a very intricate problem for a government in implementing an efficient 
bureaucracy. And the GOI is very aware of this problem. In addressing this problem, in the 
beginning  of  his  administration  President  Susilo  Bambang  Yudhoyono  has  created  two 
inter-agency teams as mentioned above.  
 
This strategic step has been followed by the encouraging progress. The Government has 
succeeded to finalize the new investment law and the investment negative list, as well as to 
introduce the new policy reform packages. It has also completed its negotiations with Japan 
on the Economic Partnership Agreement. And equally important, the trade and investment 
activities  have  improved  positively.  This  has  signalled  that  the  process  is  in  the  right 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 69 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
direction.  Although  there  have  some  progress  showing  that  the  coordination  has 
functioned, the Government realizes that the coordination problem is not an easy task. The 
challenge  is  still  very  huge,  in  particular  due  to  the  decentralization  process.  Indeed,  the 
coordination is an ideal which the Government hopes to achieve, but with this process of 
coordination  in  the  right  direction,  gradually  and  surely,  it  will  lead  to  the  creation  of  a 
better  trade  and  investment  environment.  In  the  international  relations,  Indonesia  is  a 
member of MIGA (multilateral investment guarantee agency), and has signed 61 Bilateral 
Investment  Treaties/Investment  Guarantee  Agreements.  However,  current  tendency 
Economic  Partnership  Agreement  covers  broader  sectors  including  investment,  services, 
labour, cooperation, capacity building, etc. In the last three years domestic investment has 
risen sharply, doubling between 2002 and 2005 (from Rp.26 trillion to Rp.56.6 trillion). In 
2006, the realization of domestic investment until November amounted to Rp.153.9 trillion 
and the realization of foreign   investment amounted to Rp.42.8 trillion (with Indonesia’s 
currency  assumption  Rp.9.100  for  1  US$).  This  has  been  concentrated  in  the  food, 
chemicals  and  pharmaceutical  industries  as  well  as  in  electricity,  gas  and  water  supplies. 
Foreign direct investment tends to fluctuate considerably from year to year but has shown 
a  moderate  overall  positive  trend  since  2003,  reaching  US$  8.9  billion  in  2005.  FDI  is 
concentrated  mainly  in  the  large  plantation,  chemicals,  automotive  and  pharmaceutical 
sectors, but there are significant levels also in transportation, warehousing, communications 
and construction. 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 70 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
Document 8: World Trade Organization Trade Policy 
Review Indonesia 2007 
Introduction 
Since  2003,  Indonesia  has  continued  a  broad-based  political  and  economic  reform 
programme  aimed  at  sustainable  development  and  the  alleviation  of  poverty.  Under  this 
programme,  Indonesia  achieved  a  sustained  overall  economic  growth,  a  much  lower 
inflation  rate,  falling  debt  and  growing  reserves.  Indonesia  is  now  able  to  pay  increasing 
attention to addressing social problems. 
In the last 10 years, Indonesia has undergone important democratic change, also devolving 
increased  authority  and  responsibilities  to  the  regions,  aiming  to  help  improve  welfare 
across the country.  It has made a major effort to address the issue of corruption, including 
in  tax  administration,  customs  and  public  procurement,  by  greater  transparency  and 
auditing  in  relation  to  both  process  and  decision-making.    It  has  sought  to  improve 
competition  within  the  Indonesian  economy,  and  hence  also  the  competitiveness  of 
business,  through  a  new  Investment  Law.  The  law  and  its  accompanying  implementing 
regulations should further help to improve the climate for investment. 
The Government has made some important advances in the implementation of protection 
of intellectual property rights.   
Consistent with its broad approach to modernising the economy, the GOI is progressing 
on trade policy.  Tariffs are in the process of being lowered and made more uniform in line 
with the ASEAN Tariff Harmonization Program.  Non-tariff measures are continuing to 
be  reduced  and  eliminated.  Agriculture,  critical  to  the  livelihood  of  a  large  part  of  the 
Indonesian  population,  has  started  to  benefit  from  a  revitalization  programme  providing 
support  for  infrastructure,  financial  services,  research  and  development  and  institutional 
reform.  
Industrial policy is oriented to fostering cluster groups, with selective use of incentives to 
support  the  development  of  Indonesia’s  regions  and  deepen  and  diversify  industrial 
production  in  the  face  of  stiff  international  competition  and  a  fast-changing  business 
environment.  Indonesia is seeking to develop a modern services sector that it regards as 
important  through  inter-sectoral  linkages  for  the  country’s  efforts  to  improve 
competitiveness in traditional and non-traditional exports. 
In  international  trade  relations,  Indonesia  is  an  active  participant  in  the  current  WTO 
negotiations  in  order  to  achieve  a  balanced  outcome,  consistent  with  the  development 
objectives  that  are  central  to  the  Doha  Declaration.    Indonesia’s  main  concerns  are  to 
obtain improved access for its key agricultural and manufactured exports, while ensuring 
obtaining  guarantees  for  its  most  sensitive  sectors  objectives  and  some  flexibility  to 
develop its industrial sector.  
The  Government  is  working  to  ensure  that  the  benefits  of  the  reforms  -  political, 
institutional, legal, social and economic reforms – are available to all the Indonesian people 
in a safe, just, democratic and prosperous Indonesia.   
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 71 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
However,  there  are  some  constraints,  internal  and  external,  that  need  to  be  addressed.  
Implementation of many reforms already approved is underway but will take time.  In a 
democracy,  progress  cannot  be  achieved  overnight  in  implementing  the  comprehensive 
reform package set out by the President.  Much also depends on economic conditions in 
world markets, affecting commodity prices and the flow of earnings to help to develop and 
modernize the economy.   
Main Economic and Policy Developments 
 
Since the previous Trade Policy Review of Indonesia, the Government carried out its own 
economic reform package.  
The  economic  reforms  have  been  implemented  within  the  overall  framework  of  the 
Agenda  for  National  Development  2004-09, which  had  3  main goals,  namely  a Safe  and 
Peaceful  Indonesia,  a  Just  and  Democratic  Indonesia,  a  Prosperous  Indonesia.    With 
regards  to  the  agenda  for  enhancing  the  prosperity  of  the  people,  the  main  target  is  to 
reduce  total  number  of  the  poor  population  and  lower  unemployment.  To  attain  these 
targets,  the  GOI  created  a  "cut-through"  strategy  to  accelerate  economic  growth  (pro-
growth); to create employment (pro-job) and reduce poverty (pro-poor); and to revitalize 
the agricultural sector. 
In  order  to  accelerate  economic  growth,  in  2005  the  Government  announced  several 
refinements of policy to impart great dynamism to the economy and to cope with external 
pressures,  such  as  the  oil  price  rises  and  the  increase  of  interest  rates.    The  specific 
measures taken covered: i)  adjustment of the fuel price for the industry and mining sector 
with  the  market  price,  ii)  economizing  the  use  of  fuels  in  government  activities,  iii)  the 
adjustment  of  overall  fuel  prices;  and  iv)  the  accelerated  reduction  of  fuel  usage  by 
electricity power plants.  Cuts were also made in fuel subsidies, but these were offset by the 
unconditional cash transfer programme (UCT) to reduce the impact of the changes on the 
poor.    Fiscal  incentives  were  introduced  to  help  industry,  including  by  strengthening 
competitiveness, improving the business climate and compensating workers. The incentives 
package involved changing the value-added tax status of primary products to non-taxable 
products, and the waiver of customs duties for several industrial inputs.   
These  adjustments,  together  with  interest  rate  increases,  were  intended  to  put  fiscal  and 
monetary policy on a solid footing.  This was partly offset by export growth that reached 
17.6% and by the growth rate of the economy to around 5.5%, and 6.3% in 2007, which 
contributed  to  growth  in  employment  opportunities  and  poverty  alleviation.    Inflation, 
which had surged to 17% in 2005, was curtailed to 6.6% by the end of 2006.  
Financial Sector Restructuring 
Financial  sector  reforms  are  aimed  at  overcoming  the  problem  of  access  to  capital  and 
finance needed as working capital and for growth.   
The Government addressed weaknesses in the financial market by diversifying the sources 
of funding available to the real sector, both from financial institutions and capital markets. 
The Government took steps to strengthen financial sector stability to re-build public and 
market confidence in the Indonesian financial sector, decreasing the risk of any recurrence 
of  the  financial  crisis.  It  also  promoted  competition  between  banks,  other  financial 
institutions and the capital market to improve the overall efficiency of the financial sector, 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 72 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
in  order  to  drive  down  current  inflated  margins,  and  hence  the  cost  of  finance.  The 
financial sector package, aimed at assisting in this process, is targeted mainly at regulatory 
and institutional reforms, directed at increasing access to finance and lowering the cost of 
finance.  
Investment 
While the Government plays a key role in the provision of public services, including health, 
education,  infrastructure,  etc.,  private  sector  investment,  including  inward  foreign  direct 
investment, is important for the modernisation and greater efficiency of the economy.  
Therefore, investment policy has been an important component of the policy changes that 
were  introduced  in  2005.    These  reforms,  intended  to  improve  the  country’s  investment 
climate cover are contained in three policy reform packages in 2006.  The Investment Policy 
Package covered the following areas: i) general investment policies; ii) customs; iii) taxation; 
iv) the labour market; v) SME. The  Infrastructure Development Package    provided the policy 
framework for public private partnership and the risk sharing to enable acceleration of the 
building  of  infrastructure  with  private  sector  participation.  The  Financial  Sector  Reform 
Package aims at improving coordination between the Government and Bank Indonesia, and 
to continue reform steps to strengthen the banking industry, non-bank financial institutions 
and the capital market.  
A number of areas in each of these reform packages, such as the risk sharing framework 
for infrastructure, the revised Customs Law, and the Investment Law was completed.  At 
the same time a programme of deregulation, administrative and bureaucratic reforms aimed 
at increasing the efficiency and good governance of the public service was launched.  
In  the  last  three  years  domestic  investment  has  risen  sharply,  concentrated  in  the  food, 
chemicals  and  pharmaceuticals  industries  as  well  as  in  electricity,  gas  and  water  supplies. 
Foreign direct investment tends to fluctuate considerably from year to year but has shown 
a  moderate  overall  positive  secular  trend  since  2003.  FDI  is  concentrated  mainly  in  the 
large  plantations,  chemicals,  automotive,  and  pharmaceutical  sectors,  but  there  are 
significant levels also in transportation, warehousing, communications and construction.   
Infrastructure 
Apart  from  the  general  objective  of  improving  the  investment  climate,  the  reforms  also 
targeted  the  challenges  in  improving  infrastructure.  GOI  recognized  that  investment  in 
infrastructure  is  necessary  to  improve  the  overall  investment  climate  and  to  support 
economic growth, focussing on establishing an effective framework for policy, regulation 
and  new  institutions,  sector  specific  reforms,  facilitating  the  involvement  of  local 
government  in  the  provision  of  infrastructure,  and  improved  project  preparation.    It  has 
also improved government procurement procedures to ensure value for money in public 
works and the elimination of corruption.    
Despite improved public finances, the Government does not have the economic capacity 
to  finance  all  necessary  infrastructure  development.  It  is  estimated  that  around  60%  of 
funding needed for infrastructure building will need to come from the private sector. To 
deal  with  this  budget  constraint,  Government  has  adopted  strategies  such  as  promoting 
Public  Private  Partnerships  (PPP).    Under  this  strategy,  a  risk  sharing  framework  was 
designed with the private sector, and funding allocated in the 2006 budget for the initial 
capital  for  an  infrastructure  fund  expected  to  be  supplemented  by  other  investors  to 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 73 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
increase the pool of funds accessible for infrastructure development by the private sector. 
This  strategy  enabled  Government  to  focus  its  efforts  to  improve  infrastructure 
development in lagging areas of the economy such as Eastern Indonesia.  
Decentralisation and Special Economic Zones  
The decentralisation process that started in 2001 is intended to extend economic progress 
to  Indonesia’s  diverse  regions  where  living  standards  range  from  levels  comparable  to 
those of the developed world to other areas that have very low incomes. 
 
The  Government  took  action  to  create  a  number  of  Special  Economic  Zones,  aimed  at 
creating  the  best  practices  in  terms  of  policies,  institutions  and  investor  service  in 
geographically  defined  zones,  areas  with  existing  clusters  of  industries  or  infrastructure 
where  it  is  possible  to  create  best  practices  in  term  of  policy,  in  local  government  and 
quality  of  institutions.  A  single  zone  authority  responsible  for  regulatory  framework, 
licensing  and  dealing  with  investors  was  created  to  work  closely  with  local  government 
within the overall framework set by the central government.  
Institutional Framework 
Since 1998, Indonesia, which is a republic with a presidential system, has undertaken major 
reform  of  its  political  and  governmental  structures,  with  four  amendments  of  the 
constitution in this period.  
As a unitary state, a political power was highly concentrated at the national government. 
Through  the  decentralization  process,  however,  the  central  government  has  devolved 
significant powers to regional government with a view to extend the regional government 
power and responsibility in fostering social and economic development. Between 2004 and 
2009,  all  480  provincial  governors,  heads  of  districts  and  mayors  will  be  directly  elected. 
This is intended to improve the political and economic accountability of the local public 
officials to their constituents. 
One  of  implications  of  those  democratic  reforms  is  on  the  policy  formulation  process. 
Since a policy needs to be debated in order to achieve consensus across the country, policy 
formulation process may take a longer time. Nevertheless, the process has created a greater 
sense of ownership of all stakeholders on the importance of a policy. 
Institutional and Legal Reform 
Indonesia has taken a number of steps to modernize its economy and the functions of the 
state.    Among  the  more  important  measures  being  implemented  are  those  intended  to 
improve the fairness, efficiency and transparency of its institutions and procedures. These 
include  stringent  measures  to  deal  with  corruption,  new  public  procurement  procedures, 
customs procedures, tax administration, investment procedures, manpower, transports.    
A central element is the determination of the Government to stamp out corruption.  To this 
end, the Corruption Eradication Commission (KPK), established under Law 30/ 2002, has 
extensive powers to deal with corruption.  
In  its  efforts  to  create  economic  stability  and  a  conducive  investment  climate,  GOI   
recognizes that development and enforcement of the protection of IPR would encourage 
creativity and innovation. Therefore, the GOI created a special task force on Intellectual 
Property.  Several  significant  efforts  have  been  taken  since  the  decree  was  issued.  This 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 74 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
concerted effort resulted in the downgrading from Priority Watch List status to Watch List 
status imposed on Indonesia by USTR on IPR-related issues in early 2007.  
In  relation  to  government  procurement,  the  GOI  introduced  new  procedures  to  improve  the 
transparency  and  efficiency  of  procedures  and  to  foster  competition  in  bidding  for 
Government contract.  The procedures relate to transparency, efficiency and effectiveness, 
fairness and accountability, including by simplifying bid procedures and acquirements and 
encouraging post qualification method for open tender. The President Decree obliged all 
government  agencies  to  declare  Government  project  plans  and  announce  the  tender 
invitations. Widespread procurement public notices are expected to increase the number of 
procurement  participants,  to  enhance  the  quality  of  procurement  process  and  to  achieve 
more  accountability  and  reliability  of  the  process  and  simultaneously  obtain  government 
expenditure savings, as a result of more options to gain the best tender.   
The  Government  developed  an  Electronic  Government  Procurement  System  (E-GP)  to 
enhance  transparency,  accountability,  and  efficiency  in  the  procurement  system,  and  by 
reducing  opportunities  for  corruption.  In  the  future,  the  E-GP  will  be  progressively 
implemented nation-wide.  
The  Government  is  modernizing  customs  administration,  to  facilitate  trade.  Under  this 
programme  the  time  for  customs  clearance  has  been  greatly  reduced.    The  customs 
administration has accelerated the restitution of duties on imported goods that are used in 
exports  and  established  a  priority  channel  for  producer-importers  as  well  as  qualified 
general importers. The GOI intends to improve its business environment and strengthen 
business  competition  by  enhancing  trade  facilitation.    This  includes  improving  the 
transparency  and  efficiency  of  export,  import  and  customs  procedures  by  establishing  a 
National Single Window. On Line Certificate of Origin facility was also launched in January 
2006  as  an  integral  part of  the  National  Single  Window  aimed at  linking  to  the  ASEAN 
Single Window (ASW) network. 
In 2002, the Directorate General of Taxes (DGT) launched a modernization programme 
for tax administration.  The essence of this programme is to implement the spirit of good 
governance  through  the  application  of  a  transparent  and  accountable  tax  administration 
system by utilizing the reliable and the modern information technology.   
Concerning income tax, a draft law proposes, inter alia, the reduction of income tax rate for 
individual and corporate taxpayers. A Minister of Finance Regulation raised the amount of 
exempt  income as  deduction  of  net  taxable  income  for  calculation  of  Individual  Income 
Tax as well as Withholding Income Tax. 
The investment reform package cover key issues such as general policies, customs, tax rates, 
structure and administration, labour market reform and programmes to assist SME.  
Competition policy is an important part of the Government reforms, intended to improve the 
functioning  of  the  Indonesian  economy.    In  recent  years  there  has  been  considerable 
progress  in  deregulating  international  trade  policy  in  Indonesia,  with  the  reduction  of 
import  tariffs,  licensing  and  export  restraints.    This  should  help  provide  competitive 
environment for local firms in both import and export markets.   
Standards - The National Standardization Agency of Indonesia (BSN) has the responsibility 
for  developing  and  promoting  National  Standardization  in  Indonesia,  including  through 
standards  development,  conformity  assessment,  and  standard  implementation.    In  recent 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 75 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
years there has been a restructuring of the institutional framework and procedures to foster 
openness,  transparency,  consensus,  impartiality,  coherence,  and  effectiveness,  taking 
account  of  the  development  dimension  and  of  international  rules.  The  objective  is  to 
strengthen national competitiveness and improve the transparency and efficiency of trade 
transactions while assuring protection to consumer safety, public health, environment and 
security.  Considering  the  importance  of  standards  for  trade  facilitation,  Indonesia  has 
joined  international  standard  forums  such  as  International  Organization  for 
Standardization  (ISO),  International  Electro-technical  Commission  (IEC),  Codex 
Alimentarius Commission (CAC), and International Telecommunication Union (ITU).   
In the context of WTO, BSN acts as a Notification Body and Enquiry Point for Indonesia. 
In  the  field  of  conformity  assessment,  Indonesia  is  continually  improving  its  technical 
capabilities.  
International  Trade  Relations  -  Indonesia’s  trade  relations  are  principally  governed  by  its 
membership of the WTO. In addition, Indonesia is also engaged in regional cooperation 
such  as  ASEAN,  APEC,  ASEM,  Developing  8,  as  well  as  in  bilateral  cooperation. 
Indonesia  considers  that  the  above  cooperation  is  consistent  with  Multilateral  Trading 
System  of  WTO  including  the  enabling  clause  and  GATS  which  allow  deepen  its 
integration  more  rapidly  with  neighbouring  countries.  The  economic  integration  of 
ASEAN region has been an important factor in the greater peace, stability and prosperity 
of the region.  In this sense, Indonesia considers that its regional agreements are building 
blocks for longer term multilateral liberalisation. 
Multilateral Cooperation 
a. WTO and Doha Declaration 
Indonesia has been an active participant in the WTO Doha Work Programme, in its own 
right and as a member of the G20 and the G33.  The Doha Declaration put development 
at  the  centre  of  the  current  negotiations,  but  the  delivery  of  the  development  promise 
depends  to  a  large  degree  on  faithful  implementation  of  the  Doha  text.    Indonesia 
considers that the essential technical work has been completed, but that political will and 
flexibility are urgently needed to move the negotiations toward a successful conclusion.   
For  Indonesia,  the  negotiations  on  agriculture  and  non-agricultural  market  access  are 
critical.  In agriculture, there is a need to concretise the solution to the problems faced by 
poor  farmer  in  the  developing  countries  through  the  Special  Products  (SPs)  and  Special 
Safeguard Mechanism (SSM) modalities. Regarding special products, there is a need to have 
verifiable indicators that can also be prioritized. Regarding the SSM, there is a need to be 
flexible  in  developing  solutions  based  on  the  import  volume  and  product  price  criteria 
(volume  and  price  triggers).  However,  the  key  to  a  successful  conclusion  to  the 
negotiations  is  agreement  between  the  developed  countries  on  reductions  in  tariffs  and 
domestic support, as well as elimination of export subsidies and similar measures.  
In  Non-Agricultural  Market  Access  (NAMA),  Indonesia  supports  the  reduction  and 
elimination of tariff peaks, high tariffs and tariff escalation, especially on products of export 
interest  to  the  developing  countries,  as  well  as  less  than  full  reciprocity  by  developing 
countries.  Nevertheless,  Indonesia  stands  ready  to  make  commitments  to  reduce 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 76 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
substantially  its  bound  rates  in  the  context  of  a  balanced  outcome  of  the  overall 
negotiations,  taking  account  of  the  Single  Undertaking.    However,  Indonesia  is  also 
concerned  to  retain  a  degree  of  flexibility  to  develop  its  industrial  sector  that  is  so 
important for jobs (and hence poverty alleviation), especially in the light of the experience 
of the crisis of 1997/98 and the subsequent austerity programme.  Indonesia believes that 
its  moderate  tariffs  can  help  the  development  of  outward-oriented  industrial  production 
that could become internationally competitive in the longer term.   
In services, Indonesia emphasizes that agreement on this issue should not erode developing 
countries’ flexibilities that were so carefully negotiated in the Uruguay Round. Negotiation 
in services must allow developing countries to liberalize sectors at the pace that correlate 
with  their  levels  of  development.  In  this  context,  sequencing  and  on-going  requisite 
changes in domestic institutions and regulations are important in the services liberalization 
process.  In the spirit of constructive engagement, Indonesia has made offers in 9 sectors: 
business  services,  communications,  health  and  social  services,  transport,  tourism  and 
related services and energy services.    
The protection of intellectual property rights is crucial for an environment that is conducive to 
innovation.  However, it is important that this be seen in the context of the greater need to 
protect  welfare,  as  in  the  case  of  access  to  affordable  drugs  and  technologies,  as  well  as 
providing  some  protection  to  traditional  knowledge.    There  is  a  need  in  the  WTO  to 
resolve the issues of the relationship of the TRIPS to the Convention on Biodiversity and 
the extension of Geographical Indications to products other than Wines and Spirits. The 
objective of Indonesia on TRIPS is to work progressively towards full implementation of 
the  TRIPS  Agreement,  and  it  has  already  taken  a  number  of  measures  in  this  respect, 
among  others  the  revision  of  related  laws  and  regulations  on  IPR,  institutional 
development of intellectual property related agencies as well as law enforcement.   
On  the  issue  of  TRIPS  and  Public  Health,  Indonesia  and  other  developing  countries  had 
made an effort to struggle for the opening of market access for the developing countries in 
acquiring cheap patented medicines in protecting the public health. The Doha Round had 
opened a way for developing countries to negotiate exemptions towards imported license 
on medicine goods/products.  
The  different  needs  and  capacities  of  developing  countries  have  been  recognised  in  the 
GATT and WTO since 1955 as the basis for special and differential treatment. Addressing these 
development needs and capacities was rightly central to the Doha Ministerial Declaration, 
and Indonesia looks forward to full implementation of the promises of Doha in the post-
Doha  Work  Programme  of  the  WTO.  Indonesia  wishes  to  see  Special  &  Differential 
Treatment being more precise, effective and operational.  Equally important are the various 
issues related to implementation of the results of the Uruguay Round, where deadlines have 
repeatedly been missed and problems have only partially been resolved.   
Trade Facilitation.  Indonesia supports the negotiations to facilitate trade.  In this respect, it 
would be useful to have further clarification of GATT Articles V (Freedom of Transit), VII 
(Valuation  for  Customs  Purposes),  and  X  (Publication  and  Administration  of  Trade 
Regulations).    Indonesia  considers  that  a  successful  outcome  may  need  to  be  supported 
with  the  provision  of  technical  assistance  and  capacity  building  for  the  developing 
countries. 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 77 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
Trade  and  Environment.    Indonesia  supports  the  negotiation  to  enhance  mutual 
supportiveness  between  trade  and  environment.    Indonesia  is  of  the  view  that  trade 
liberalization needs to be positive for trade, environment, and development.  
Indonesia made 58 notifications in various areas, and has outstanding obligations to submit 
36 notifications. However, because of the complexity of notification requirements, a lack of 
human capacity and the periodical staffing changes (tour-of-duty) of responsible officials, 
fulfilment of the notification obligation has not progressed well yet. In order to resolve this 
problem,  Indonesia  is  trying  to  enhance  the  staff  capacity  and  to  improve  coordination 
between domestic agencies in order to complete its outstanding notifications. 
The  GOI  has  adopted  trade  remedy  policy  in  the  form  of  anti-dumping,  subsidy  and 
countervailing duties, as well as safeguarding domestic industry against surges in the import 
of goods. 
 
The GOI has taken serious steps to respond to allegations of dumping raised by foreign 
government  against  Indonesia  exports.  During  the  period  under  review,  there  were  61 
dumping  allegations  on  Indonesian  products,  where  more  than  half  (34  cases)  of  them 
imposed anti-dumping duties. 
On  safeguard  measures,  the  Authority  which  conducts  global  safeguard  investigations  is 
KPPI (Indonesian Committee on Safeguards). 
b. South-South Cooperation  
Indonesia is currently participating in talks to expand the Global System of Trade 
Preferences (GSTP) which it regards as a valuable instrument for the expansion of 
South-South  cooperation.    Indonesia  considers  that  South-South  cooperation  in 
trade in goods and services, as well as in investment, technology and other areas, 
can bring important benefits to developing countries. 
As a member of Developing 8, Indonesia has signed the Preferential Trade Agreement (PTA) 
which aimed to expand trade among their members by reducing tariff on goods and other 
trade restrictions. 
Indonesia  has  actively  participated  in  the  Organization  of  Islamic  Conference 
(OIC) and has signed the protocol on the Preferential Tariff Scheme for TPS-OIC 
(PRETAS).   
c. Regional Cooperation 
With  regard  to  ASEAN  Economic  Integration,  12  priority  integration  sectors  were 
identified  for  accelerated  economic  integration  (Agro  based,  wood  based,  Textile  and 
Apparel,  Automotive,  Electronic,  Healthcare,  e-ASEAN,  Tourism,  Rubber  based,  Air 
Travel,  Fisheries  and  Logistic  Services).  Steps  towards  policy  integration  include  the 
‘horizontal’ areas (e.g., customs, including the ASEAN Single Window); standards; rules of 
origin; non-tariff measures; and the liberalization of trade in services. Indonesia is country 
coordinator for the wood based and automotive sectors. 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 78 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
At the 12th ASEAN Summit, the Leaders affirmed their strong commitment to accelerate 
the establishment of an ASEAN Community by 2015 as envisioned in the ASEAN Vision 
2020 and the ASEAN Concord II and signed the Cebu Declaration on the Establishment 
of  ASEAN  Community  by  2015.  In  particular,  the  Leaders  agreed  to  hasten  the 
establishment  of  the  ASEAN  Economic  Community  by  2015  and  to  transform  ASEAN 
into a region with free movement of goods, services, investment, skilled labour, and freer 
flow of capital.  Each priority integration sector has a roadmap, which combines specific 
initiatives  of  the  sector  and  the  broad  initiatives  that  cut  across  all  sectors  such  as  trade 
facilitation measures. 
ASEAN is seeking to establish RTA with partners such as China, Japan, Korea, Australia, 
New Zealand, and India. At the ASEAN Summit in 2002, ASEAN members and China 
signed a framework agreement to begin negotiations in 2003 to create the world’s largest 
FTA  with  a  combined  market  of  1.7  billion  people.  In  2004,  the  ASEAN  and  Chinese 
Economic  Ministers  signed  the  Trade  in  Goods  Agreement  and  Dispute  Settlement 
Mechanism  Agreement  under  ASEAN-China  FTA  (ACFTA).  The  gradual  tariff 
elimination for products in Normal Track started in 2005 and will end in 2015. Finally, in 
January 2007, the ASEAN Economic Ministers and the Chinese Foreign Affairs Minister 
signed a Services Agreement.  
The Framework Agreement between ASEAN and South Korea was signed by the Leaders 
on December 2006. At the same time, the ASEAN and Korea Economic Ministers signed 
the  Dispute  Settlement  Mechanism  Agreement  of  ASEAN-Korea  FTA  (AKFTA),  and 
afterward,  on  August  2007,  the  Trade  in  Goods  Agreement  was  also  signed.  The 
implementation  of  goods  agreement  started  on  June  2007  upon  completion  of  domestic 
ratification  from  each  party.  The  FTA  negotiations  CER  (Australia  and  New  Zealand), 
Japan  and  India  were  concluded  at  the  end  of  2007.  Furthermore,  ASEAN  and  the  EU 
have launched ASEAN-EU FTA negotiations.  
Other  than  FTA  negotiations,  ASEAN  is  also  involved  in  cooperation  under  Trade  and 
Investment  Framework  Arrangement  (TIFA)  with  United  States,  Trade  and  Investment 
Framework (TIF) with Australia, and in the process of establishing ASEAN-Canada Trade 
and  Investment  Cooperation  Arrangement  (TICA).  Indonesia  plays  an  important  role  as 
the country coordinator for ASEAN countries in dealing with ASEAN consultations with 
United States and Canada. 
Indonesia is committed to implementing APEC’s voluntary target of open and free trade, as well as services 
and investment for developing country members by 2020, as set out in the Bogor Declaration of 
1994. APEC economies are to achieve their targets on a voluntary and non-binding basis 

("concerted unilateral liberalization").  
In order to develop a high-quality RTA/FTA, Indonesia contributed in designing Model Measures of the 
minimum requirement for RTA/FTA on non-binding basis. Based on the Individual Action 
Plan (IAP) peer review process of 2005, it was noted that Indonesia was already over half 

way to achieving the Bogor Goals.  
As a member of the Asian-Europe Meeting (ASEM), Indonesia take part in implementing 
the Leaders’ vision of deepening the partnership to face future challenges, broadening the 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 79 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
perspective through marking out focussed areas for action, and reinforcing the institutional 
mechanism by forging a stronger partnership as outlined in the Helsinki Declaration. 
d. Bilateral Cooperation  
In line with its policy of establishing closer economic relations with countries in the Asian 
region,  Indonesia  has  been  negotiating  with  Japan since  mid  2005  to establish  a  bilateral 
Economic Partnership Agreement that covers goods, rules of origin, customs procedures, 
investment,  services,  movement  of  persons,  competition  policy,  energy  and  mineral 
resources  and  cooperation.  Indonesia  is  also  in  the  process  of  negotiating  Preferential 
Trade Agreement with Pakistan, and exploring the possibility to negotiate PTA/FTA with 
India and Iran.  
Talks and consultation on a range of trade and investment issues are also being held with 
major developed countries i.e. EU, United States and Australia.  
e. Investment Treaties 
Indonesia has signed 61 Bilateral Investment Treaties/Investment Guarantee Agreements. 
However,  current  tendency  of  negotiating  Economic  Partnership  Agreements  covers 
broader  sectors  including  investment,  services,  labour,  cooperation,  capacity  building, 
among others. 
f. Others 
Indonesia  is  determined  to  make  best  use  of  opportunities  under  the  GSP.   It  considers 
that such preferences are a useful means of helping to diversify and expand its industrial 
sector  and  as  such  contribute  to  the  overall  economic  developments  of  Indonesia, 
including job creation and the alleviation of poverty.  
Considering the importance of human resources and infrastructure development, Indonesia 
is  continuously  assessing  its  needs  and  priorities  to  request  to  the  donor  countries  for 
Technical Assistance and Capacity Building. In this regard, Indonesia appreciates to several 
donor  countries  and  agencies,  namely  the  European  Union,  JICA,  USAID,  AUSAID, 
KOICA, Switzerland, Sweden, WTO Secretariat, JETRO, New Zealand, India, China. 
Trade and Related Policies 
Overview of Policy and Development 
Indonesia’s  trade  and  related  policies  are  part  of  its  overall  social  and  economic 
development strategy, and not goals in themselves. While trade and related polices should 
contribute to the improved efficiency and overall growth of the economy that will increase 
the availability of resources for social purposes, policies - and their implementation - need 
to take account of short- to medium-term social consequences of change, particularly in the 
light of persistent unemployment and poverty, especially in some regions.   
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 80 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
Because  of  the  diversity  of  the  levels  of  development  across  the  archipelago,  Indonesia 
considers  that  social  justice  requires  the  greater  effort  to  spread  the  benefits  of  its 
economic achievements to all of its peoples, as in the decentralisation programme of recent 
years.   
Indonesia is also of the view that the longer term development of the economy needs to be 
consistent  with  Indonesia’s  underlying  comparative  advantage.    However,  policy 
interventions  may  be  needed  to  realize  these  goals  in  the  presence  of  externalities 
associated  with  certain  economic  activities  and  in  the  light  of  important  distortions  on 
world  markets,  including  barriers  to  exports.    The  pace  of  policy  implementation  also 
depends  on  the  success  in  building  supply  capacities  and  social  indicators.    While 
Indonesia’s own polices are obviously key, assistance from trading partners and donors can 
also be of considerable assistance.   
With  regard  to  the  structure  of  the  Indonesian  economy,  services  make  the  largest 
contribution to GDP, around 40% in recent years.  Manufacturing is second at some 28%, 
while the share of agriculture has fallen form 15.5% in 2002 to 12.9% in 2006, and mining 
and quarrying has grown for 8.8% to 10.6% in the same period.  Construction has grown 
slightly to 7.5%, while the electricity, gas and water sector has remained stable at around 
1%.  Clearly, services and industry are now major employers, particularly in the urban areas, 
and  any  sectoral  policy  changes  need  to  take  account  of  the  potential  impact  on 
employment.   However, the agricultural sector is also critical for the poorest regions of the 
country.  The sector has an important role in the provision of rice, the most basic food of 
the  nation,  but  it  also  has  a  large  element  of  subsistence  farming,  and,  overall,  the 
agricultural sector is a net consumer of rice. 
Indonesia  has  considerable  natural  resources,  renewable,  such  as  its  extensive  tropical 
forests, fishing, etc., and non-renewable, such as oil and gas, and minerals.   Managing these 
resources prudently for sustainable development is a major challenge for any government, 
and more so for Indonesia because of its many islands. To this end, various programmes 
are being implemented and being improved, including for example the management of its 
forestry and fishing resources.   
Trade Developments and Policy Developments 
Tariff policy  
To  fulfil  its  commitments  in  the  Uruguay  Round,  Indonesia  implemented  significant 
changes in its bound MFN tariffs over the period 1996-2003. In addition, it has begun to 
implement  further  changes  in  its  applied  MFN  rates  under  the  ASEAN  Tariff 
Harmonization  Program  for  the  period  of  2005  to  2010,  as  well  as  reductions  in  AFTA 
preferential  rates,  consistent  with  its  views  on  the  importance  of  integration  within  the 
Asian region. 
To  accommodate  national  economic  interests,  however,  some  products  have  been 
excluded from the general schedule of tariff reduction programme.  These are mainly in the 
agricultural, chemicals, plastics, metals, alcoholic beverages and automotive sectors, as well 
as products related to moral and security items.  
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 81 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
The  implementation  of  the  tariff  reduction  programme  has  changed  Indonesian  tariff 
structure significantly. By the end of the programme (2003), the average rates had fallen to 
7.2%, while rates lying in the 0-10% range increased to 83.4% of lines. 
In 2004, one year after the tariff reduction programme ended, Indonesia adopted the new 
tariff classification under “ASEAN Harmonized Tariff Nomenclature” (AHTN) as part of 
Indonesian  commitment  under  AFTA.  The  purpose  of  the  programme  is  a  gradual 
lowering  and  harmonisation  of  rates,  intended  to  reduce  inter-sectoral  distortions,  while 
preserving a moderate overall level of assistance to the productive sector on an MFN basis.  
The programme beyond 2010 has not been finalised yet. 
With the new classification, the total tariff lines increased drastically from 7,540 in 2003 to 
11,163 in 2004.  As a consequence of the technical classification changes,  tariff rates also 
changed,  and  the average  tariff  increased  to  9.9%,  with  rates  between  0 and  10  per  cent 
covering 8,387 tariff lines (75% of the total tariff lines). 
As  a  continuation  of  the  tariff  reduction  programme,  Indonesia  introduced  the  Tariff 
Harmonization  Programme  for  the  period  of  2005-2010.  Under  the  programme,  the 
average  tariff  reached  9.5%  in  2006,  with  rates  in  the  0-10%  range  covering  8,365  tariff 
lines or 74.9% of the total.  
Currently, Indonesia does not utilize tariff quotas. 
Tariff Exemptions or Concessions and Duty Drawbacks 
To  increase  the  efficiency  and  the  competitiveness  of  domestic  industries,  Indonesia 
provides  certain  tariff  exemptions  or  concessions,  in  accordance  with  Indonesia  Custom 
Law (Law 10/1995). The importation of raw materials, components, or machineries that 
are  used  by  a  certain  industrial  sectors  can  be  exempted  from  import  duties.  Some  of 
industries  granted  tariff  exemptions  or  concessions  include  aircraft  maintenance,  public 
transportation, energy and telecommunications. 
In addition, Indonesia is also implementing the Duty Drawback System on the re-export of 
imported inputs.   
Non Tariff Measures   
In order to improve the functioning of the economy in line with its dynamic comparative 
advantage  and  make  it  more  responsive  to  long-term  international  price  movements, 
Indonesia is progressively eliminating non-tariff measures, in particular the use of import 
licences  which  is  currently  limited  to  dangerous  materials;  explosives;  ozone-depleting 
substances;  alcoholic  beverages;  salt;  propylene  copolymers;  lubricant;  clove;  textiles  and 
textile  products;  nitrocellulose;  machines  and  machinery;  optical  discs;  and  rough 
diamonds. 
The most important measures still in place are: i) the regulation on the timing of the import 
of rice and sugar: ii) verification and other requirements for the export of tin and granite; 
and ii) the ban on the export of logs and sand.   
The rice import regulation is intended to provide support for poor farmers in the face of 
distorted  world  prices  as  a  result  of  subsidies  by  some  rice-exporting  countries,  but  it  is 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 82 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
periodically  relaxed  at  times  of  shortage,  that  is  during  non  harvest  periods,  to  stabilise 
prices.   
The  ban  on  the  export  of  logs  is  used  to  support  Indonesia’s  forestry  and  wildlife 
conservation policy while a broader forest management programme is being put in place.  
Because  of  the  many  islands  and  the  rugged  terrain,  it  is  difficult  and  requires  extensive 
resources  to  implement  the  forest  management  programme,  which  is  also  targeted  at 
mining  and  to  support  forest  or  near-forest  dwellers.    The  government  is  planning  a 
compensation  tax  to  be  paid  by  mining  and  logging  companies  to  compensate  for 
environmental damage and finance re-forestation programme, to be implemented by local 
communities. Given the porous sea and land border, the export ban allows the immediate 
identification of illegal logs leaving the country.  Cooperation is also being provided by a 
number of neighbouring countries as well as European countries in controlling the import 
of logs from Indonesia.  
Incentives 
Concerning central and local authorization of investments, to anticipate challenges that will 
be  faced  by  Indonesia  such  as  global  competition  and  as  mandated  in  Law  No.  32 
regarding  Local  Government,  the  Government  issued  a  Government  Regulation  Bill 
(GRB)  concerning  the  Guidance  for  Granting  Incentives  and  Investment  Facilitation  in 
Local Area.  
Sectoral Policies 
Agriculture 
Agriculture plays an important role in the Indonesian economy, providing employment for 
over 38 million people.  There is also an important linkage to poverty, since the majority of 
Indonesia’s poor live in rural communities and hence highly dependent on the agricultural 
sector 
To  further  develop  the  sector,  the  Government  launched  the  agricultural  revitalization 
programme  in  2005.    Under  the  programme,  the  Government  provides  subsidies  to 
increase production on food crops such as on fertilizers and hybrid seeds. Subsidized credit 
to smallholder farmers (“food security credit”) is intended to motivate smallholder farmer 
to  have  more  access  to  commercial  banks,  sharing  risk  between  the  Government,  the 
commercial banks and the farmers. 
Fisheries  
Indonesia’s  Marine  and  Fisheries  development  plays  an  important  role  in  providing 
employment,  food  sources,  poverty  alleviation  and  development,  especially  for  the  outer 
islands. The Fisheries Law aims at a new direction  for fisheries management  intended to 
improve  of  living  condition  of  small-scale  fishermen  and  fish  farmers;  to  increase 
government  revenues  and  foreign  exchange  earnings;  to  spur  the  expansion  of  job 
opportunities;  to  increase  the  supply  and  consumption  of  fish  which  is  rich  in  protein 
sources;  to  optimize  the  management  of  fishery  resources;  to  increase  the  productivity, 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 83 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
quality, added  value and competitiveness;  to  increase  the  supply  of  raw  materials  for  the 
fish processing industry; to achieve optimal utilization of fisheries resources, areas for fish 
culture and fish resources environment; and to ensure the conservation of fishery resources 
areas for fish culture and spatial management.   
In  order  to  improve  fisheries  management,  the  Government  issued  Government  Decree 
number 17/2006 on Fisheries Management. The Government Decree applied new scheme 
of fisheries management which eliminates foreign vessels from operating in the Indonesian 
Economic Exclusive Zone.  
However,  productivity  in  the  sea-fishing  industry has  remained  low  while over-fishing  in 
some  areas  has  threatened  to  deplete  fish  stocks.  Illegal  fishing,  by  both  foreign  and 
domestic operators, also has been a serious problem and causing environmental damage. In 
order to conserve fish stocks, the Minister of Marine Affairs and Fisheries has published a 
Ministerial  Decree  regarding  the  establishment  of  a  coordination  team  on  illegal  fishing 
measures and fisheries processing industry revitalization. 
Oil, gas and minerals   
While Indonesia has important reserves of fossil fuels, it is still a net importer of crude oil, 
which had a negative effect on trade and on inflation.  However, Indonesia is the world’s 
leading  exporter  of  liquefied  natural  gas,  and  the  country  has  potential  for  further 
development of hydro-electric and geothermal energy (as well as coal), and other “green” 
sources of energy such as bio-fuels, solar power.  Domestically, the lack of infrastructure 
has limited the use of alternative energy resources, and investment in the sector is needed.  
The increase in oil prices, if maintained, makes exploitation of these alternative sources of 
energy more viable, as well as being attractive from an environmental perspective. 
Except for tin, commercial mining is relatively unimportant in Indonesia, although there is 
some  potential  for  the  production  of  coal,  metallic  and  non-metallic  minerals,  and 
investment  has  been  growing  in  this  sector.    Along  with  logging,  mining has  become an 
environmental issue that is now being subject to greater scrutiny and new regulations are 
being promulgated to address this issue. 
Manufacturing 
Since the industrial process was derailed by the crisis, the focus has shifted to ensuring the 
survival of the industry. Under the Industrial Revitalization Programme, the Government 
has used several measures to promote international competitiveness, such as the promotion 
of cluster groups and value-chain alliances that have recently started to be used to gain and 
sustain industrial competitiveness.  The programme operates within the general context of 
the political, macroeconomic, institutional and legal reforms that are intended to improve 
the  business  environment.  They  are  also  being  implemented  within  the  context  of 
moderate,  harmonized  tariffs  and  the  progressive  elimination  of  non-tariff  measures.  
Incentives are principally used in relation to regional developments. 
The focus is on strengthening and developing core clusters in the following areas: food and 
beverages, fishing, textiles and textile products, footwear, palm oil, timber (including rattan 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 84 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
and  bamboo),  rubber  and  rubber  products,  pulp  and  paper,  electrical  engineering,  petro-
chemical engineering.   
The strategy involves strengthening linkages at all value chain levels in a cluster of related 
industries, improving value added along the value chain, improving resources employed by 
the industry, and developing small and medium-size industries 
Services 
Services account for around 40% of GDP, but exports of services only account for 7% of 
total exports of goods and services, a net deficit of around $20 billion. This performance is 
less than satisfactory, and Indonesia recognizes that having access to efficient services  is 
important to the good functioning of a modern economy, including as an important input 
into the production and trade of traditional exports of goods. Access to basic services is 
also important for human development.  In this respect, the WTO framework on services 
should  not  erode  the  flexibilities  that  are  characteristic  of  the  GATS  and  should  allow 
developing countries to open up their services sectors at a pace that is consistent with their 
level of development.   
Indonesia does not at the moment provide any special incentive for the development of 
trade-related services.   
Supervision of services monopolies is intended to ensure security, efficiency and quality of 
services at a fair price, which also provides for maintenance and a reasonable return to the 
service supplier. 
Development of an efficient financial services sector is important as a source of finance for 
SME,  which  do  not  have  easy  access  to  international  sources.  Regulation  of  financial 
services is intended to ensure proper prudential supervision, security for account holders, 
and to help promote the real sector of the economy.  
Other  services  that  are  particularly  important  for  Indonesia  are  transport  and 
communications  –  given  the  geographic  diversity  of  the  country  –and  tourist-related 
services  which  have  started  to  recover  after  recent  setbacks.  Indonesia  believes  it  has 
considerable  potential  for  the  development  of  labour  services,  e.g.  in  construction,  for 
which a successful outcome of the Mode 4 negotiations in the WTO would be beneficial. 
Future Directions 
Economic Perspectives 
The economic outlook for Indonesia has improved mainly as a result of the reforms that it 
has undertaken in recent years, and a healthy external environment.   
The principal economic concerns of the Government relate to its ability to lift economic 
growth sufficiently to create jobs and address poverty. However, it is important for social 
justice, peace and stability to address a wider range of social and economic issues. 
Moreover,  it  is  essential  also  to  help  raise  the  development  of  the  poorer  regions  of  the 
country where the problems of poverty are more acute. However, further progress depends 
on the success of the Government’s efforts in the ongoing implementation of the reforms 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 85 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
and  rebuilding  of  much  needed  infrastructure,  as  well  as  external  developments  in  the 
world economy.   
The  main  source  of  growth  in  the  next  two  years  is  expected  to  come  from  revival  of 
investment  which  in  turn  will  expand  the  capacity  of  exports,  as  well  as  consumption 
growth and to a lesser extent compared with previous years, government spending.  
Government Programmes 
Progress has been made in the Government’s reform programme in terms of a number of 
new  laws  and  regulations,  as  well  as  an  ongoing  process  of  changing  legislation  and 
regulations which are in different stages of implementation.   
Further  reforms,  for  example  in  the  area  of  investment,  are also  under  way  or  are  being 
considered  in  the  light  of  developments. As  part  of  the  effort  to  improve  efficiency and 
public finances, further privatization of state-owned enterprises is being considered, but it 
will take time to prepare some of these businesses for privatization, and due account will 
need to be taken of the social consequences as well as the development implications, for 
example in the areas of public services such as transport and communications. 
There is a need for further efforts to modernize and develop the real sector.  Efforts are 
being  made  to  revitalize  the  agriculture  and  industrial  sectors,  as  the  Government   
recognizes that an efficient services sector is also a key to the development of international 
competitiveness.  From this perspective, its already open trade regime should be seen as a 
complement  to  other  domestic  policies,  while  the  Government  is  moving  carefully  but 
progressively toward even greater opening up of the economy by reducing tariffs and non-
tariff measures, facilitating trade and encouraging investment.  
The  Government  is  confident  that  the  new  Investment  Law  and  the  implementing 
regulations, as well as the other components of the investment package, will contribute in 
an  important  way  towards  improving  the  investment  climate.  Apart  from  its  effort  to 
improve  the  institutional  and  legal  framework,  the  central  Government  needs  to  work 
more closely with the regional governments and the private sector in a number of areas, 
and to further develop an enabling environment for business, encouraging domestic as well 
as foreign direct investment.   
Constraints, Challenges and Opportunities 
The major internal challenges that are now faced by the Government of Indonesia are in 
implementing its reform programme to bring improvements to the quality of life for all its 
peoples.  In  this  respect,  some  of  the  greatest  needs  are  in  the  areas  of  health  and  social 
programmes,  education,  and  physical  infrastructure,  and  the  challenge  is  to  deliver 
improvements across its diverse regions.  
Despite  the  improved  economic  performance,  lower  debt  and  an  improved  reserve 
position,  Indonesia  needs  additional  capital  resources  to  carry  forward  these  social  and 
economic programmes. The new Investment Law will help in this respect, but the progress 
in the implementation of the reforms will be gradual, given the bottom-up nature of the 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 86 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
process, and the new legislative framework needs to be supported by  short  and medium 
term action plans to carry forward the momentum.  
In some areas there is a need, especially in the poorer regions, to develop the administrative 
capacity to carry out reforms, even where funding has been provided.   
In  other  areas,  there  is  still  a  shortage  of  resources,  human  and  capital, where  Indonesia 
needs  greater  private  sector  involvement,  and  where  foreign  investment  and  aid  could 
usefully assist.   
The ongoing reforms also require the continuation of national dialogue to build a sense of 
consensus,  ownership  and  common  purpose  in  the  new  democratic  framework.  Such  a 
process even though it will take time, will also mean that the reforms should “stick”.  
Meanwhile, in the short term, the process of deregulation and bureaucratic reforms as well 
as creating islands of excellence and best practices within certain regions (Special Economic 
Zones) and within institutions, will be continued.  
In terms of opportunities, the growth and increase in per capita incomes of the 220 million 
population  of  Indonesia  offers  opportunities  for  a  robust  market  as  well  as  a  source  of 
young and productive labour force.  Indonesia also has a strong basis of natural resources 
on which to build on for its continued and sustained growth. 
Externally,  the  constraints  facing  Indonesia  include  improved,  secure  access  to  overseas 
markets for its main exports, and increased competition. This can best be addressed in the 
multilateral  framework  of  the  WTO,  and  Indonesia  stands  ready  to  make  substantive 
commitments consistent with its development needs. Indonesia looks forward to continue 
working closely with other WTO Members to achieve a speedy and successful conclusion 
to  the  current  negotiations,  taking  account  of  the  development  dimension  of  the  Doha 
Declaration.   
Indonesia also looks forward to the continued deepening of its integration within the East 
Asia and Asia-Pacific region, which is consistent with the WTO and becomes the building 
block for the multilateral process. 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 87 










TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
Document 10: The Global Competitiveness Report 2009-
2010 Indonesia 
Assessment of Competitiveness of Indonesian Economy  
The 2009-2010 Global Competitiveness Index (GCI) ranks Indonesia 54th out of 133 
countries.  Moving  up  one  place,  the  assessment  is  very  much  in  line  with  that  of  the 
previous three years.   
 
Three  areas,  among  the  most  important  given  Indonesia’s  current  stage  of  development, 
are of particular concern. First, infrastructure is in need of upgrading (84th), in particular 
with  respect  to  ports  (95th)  and  roads  (94th).  Second,  several  indicators  reveal  the  poor 
level  of  public  health:  tuberculosis  and  malaria  incidence  are  among  the  highest  in  the 
world,  while  infant  mortality  remains  high.  The  third  area  of  concern  relates  to 
technological readiness (88th). ICT penetration rates remain low by all measures. 
 
The  GCI  classifies  Indonesian  economy  as  an  economy  in  transition  between  being  a 
factor-driven economy and becoming an efficiency-driven economy.  
 
The  country’s  competitiveness  will  therefore  increasingly  be  driven  by  such  efficiency 
enhancing factors, such as higher education and training; goods market efficiency, labour 
market efficiency, financial market sophistication, technological readiness, market size. 
 
On a more positive note, similar to the situation in India, Indonesia ranks higher in more 
complex factors such as business sophistication (40th) and innovation (39th).This certainly 
bodes  well  for  the  future,  but  does  not  reduce  the  urgency  of  making  improvements  in 
other priority areas highlighted below. 
 
According to the Index, competitiveness is defined as the set of institutions, policies, 
and  factors  that  determine  the  level  of  productivity  of  a  country.  The  level  of 
productivity,  in  turn,  sets  the  sustainable  level  of  prosperity  that  can  be  earned  by  an 
economy. In other words, more-competitive economies tend to be able to produce higher 
levels of income for their citizens. The productivity level also determines the rates of return 
obtained by investments in an economy. Because the rates of return are the fundamental 
drivers  of  the  growth  rates  of  the  economy,  a  more  competitive  economy  is  one  that  is 
likely to grow faster in the medium to long run. 
 
The  concept  of  competitiveness  involves  static  and  dynamic  components:  although  the  productivity  of  a 

country clearly determines its ability to sustain its level of income, it is also one of the central determinants of 
the returns to investment, which is one of the key factors explaining an economy’s growth potential. 

Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 93 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
2.3.2 The 12 Pillars of Competitiveness 
The  determinants  of  competitiveness  are  many  and  complex.  Economists  have  long  tried  to 
understand what determines the wealth of nations. Most recent theories focus on investment 
in  physical  capital  and  infrastructure  as  well  as  other  mechanisms  such  as  education  and  training, 
technological  progress,  macroeconomic  stability,  good  governance,  the  rule  of  law,  transparent  and  well 

functioning institutions, firm sophistication, demand conditions, market size, among others.  
 
The central point, however, is that they are not mutually exclusive, two or more of them 
could be true at the same time. 
 
The  GCI  provides  a  weighted  average  of  many  different  components,  each  of  which 
reflects one aspect of the complex concept called competitiveness. All these components 
are  grouped  into  12  pillars  of  competitiveness,  which  are  described  below.  Indonesia’s 
position is shown at the bottom of each pillar’s description. 
 
It should be noted that, although the 12 pillars of competitiveness are described separately, 
they are not independent: not only are they related to each other, but they tend to reinforce 
each other.  
 
For  example,  innovation  (12th  pillar)  is  not  possible  in  a  world  without  institutions  (1st 
pillar) that guarantee intellectual property rights, cannot be performed in countries with a 
poorly  educated  and  poorly  trained  labour  force  (5th  pillar),  and  is  more  difficult  in 
economies  with  inefficient  markets  (6th,  7th,  and  8th  pillars)  or  without  extensive  and 
efficient infrastructure (2nd pillar).  
 
It  is  clear  that  different  pillars  affect  different  countries  differently:  the  best  way  for 
Indonesia  to  improve  its  competitiveness  is  not  the  same  as  the  best  way  for  (i.e.) 
Switzerland.  This  is  because  Indonesia  and  Switzerland  are  in  different  stages  of 
development,  the  first  being  an  economy  in  transition  between  from  a  factor-driven 
economy to an efficiency-driven economy, the latter an innovation-driven economy. 
 
Here  below  a  description  of  the  12  pillars  is  presented.  For  each  pillar  and  respective 
components, the rank of Indonesia is highlighted. 
 
Basic Requirements - Rank of Indonesia: 70 out of 133 
 
First pillar: Institutions 
 
The  institutional  environment  is  determined  by  the  legal  and  administrative  framework  within  which 
individuals, firms, and governments interact to generate income and wealth in the economy.  
 
The quality of institutions has a strong bearing on competitiveness and growth, given the 
increasingly direct role played by the state in the economy of many countries. It influences 
investment  decisions  and  the  organization  of  production,  and  plays  a  central  role  in  the 
ways in which societies distribute the benefits and bear the costs of development strategies 
and  policies.  The  role  of  institutions  goes  beyond  the  legal  framework.  Government 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 94 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
attitudes toward markets and freedoms, and the efficiency of its operations, are also very 
important:  excessive  bureaucracy  and  red  tape,  overregulation,  corruption,  lack  of 
transparency  and  trustworthiness,  and  the  political  dependence  of  the  judicial  system 
impose  significant  economic  costs  to  businesses  and  slow  the  process  of  economic 
development. Proper management of the public finances is also critical to ensuring trust in 
the national business environment. An economy is well served by businesses that are run 
honestly,  where  managers  abide  by  strong  ethical  practices  in  their  dealings  with  the 
government,  other  firms,  and  the  public.  Private  sector  transparency  is  indispensable  to 
business, and can be brought about through the use of standards as well as auditing and 
accounting practices that ensure access to information in a timely manner.  
 
1st Pillar - Institutions – Rank of Indonesia: 58 out of 133 

 
1.01 Property rights ........................................................................81 
1.02 Intellectual property protection...............................................67 
1.03 Diversion of public funds .......................................................59 
1.04 Public trust of politicians........................................................52 
1.05 Judicial independence .............................................................66 
1.06 Favouritism in decisions of government officials ..................36 
1.07 Wastefulness of government spending....................................28 
1.08 Burden of government regulation............................................23 
1.09 Efficiency of legal framework in settling disputes..................59  
1.10 Efficiency of legal framework in challenging regulations. …52  
1.11 Transparency of government policymaking .........................  87  
1.12 Business costs of terrorism......................................................82 
1.13 Business costs of crime and violence .....................................62  
1.14 Organized crime....... ..............................................................81  
1.15 Reliability of police services...................................................79 
1.16 Ethical behaviour of firms ....................................................102  
1.17 Strength of auditing and reporting standards ..........................76  
1.18 Efficacy of corporate boards....................................................32  
1.19 Protection of minority shareholders’ interests ........................48 
 
Second Pillar: Infrastructure  
 
Extensive and efficient infrastructure is an essential driver of competitiveness. It is critical for ensuring 
the  effective  functioning  of  the  economy,  as  it  is  an  important  factor  determining  the 
location  of  economic  activity  and  the  kinds  of  activities  or  sectors  that  can develop  in a 
particular  economy.  In  addition,  the  quality  and  extensiveness  of  infrastructure  networks 
significantly  impact  economic  growth  and  reduce  income  inequalities  and  poverty  in  a 
variety  of  ways.  In  this  regard,  a  well-developed  transport  and  communications 
infrastructure  network  is  a  prerequisite  for  the  ability  of  less-developed  communities  to 
connect  to  core  economic  activities  and  basic  services.  Economies  also  depend  on 
electricity  supplies  that  are  free  of  interruptions  and  shortages  so  that  businesses  and 
factories can work unimpeded. Finally, a solid and extensive telecommunications network 
allows for a rapid and free flow of information, which increases overall economic efficiency 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 95 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
by  helping  to  ensure  that  businesses  can  communicate,  and  that  decisions  made  by 
economic actors take into account all available relevant information.  
 
2nd Pillar – Infrastructure - Rank of Indonesia: 84 out of 133   

 
2.01 Quality of overall infrastructure..............................................96  
2.02 Quality of roads.......................................................................94  
2.03 Quality of railroad infrastructure ............................................60 
2.04 Quality of port infrastructure ..................................................95  
2.05 Quality of air transport infrastructure......................................68  
2.06 Available seat/km………........................................................21 
2.07 Quality of electricity supply ...................................................96  
2.08 Telephone lines.......................................................................79  
 
Third Pillar: Macroeconomic Stability 

 
The stability of the macroeconomic environment is important for business and, therefore, is important for the 
overall  competitiveness  of  a  country.  Although  it  is  certainly  true  that  macroeconomic  stability 
alone cannot increase the productivity of a nation, it is also recognized that macroeconomic 
disarray harms the economy. The government cannot provide services efficiently if it has to 
make  high-interest  payments  on  its  past  debts.  Running  fiscal  deficits  limits  the 
government’s  future  ability  to  react  to  business  cycles.  Firms  cannot  operate  efficiently 
when inflation rates are out of hand. In sum, the economy cannot grow in a sustainable 
manner  unless  the  macro  environment  is  stable.  It  is  important  to  note  that  this  pillar 
focuses only on macroeconomic stability, so it does not directly take into account the way 
in which public accounts are managed by the government.  
 
3rd Pillar: - Macroeconomic Stability - Rank of Indonesia: 52 out of 133 
 
3.01 Government surplus/deficit ................................................74  
3.02 National savings rate...........................................................40  
3.03 Inflation ..............................................................................80  
3.04 Interest rate spread..............................................................60  
3.05 Government debt.................................................................56  
 
 
Fourth Pillar: Health and Primary Education 

 
A  healthy  workforce  is  vital  to  a  country’s  competitiveness  and  productivity.  Workers  who  are  ill 
cannot  function  to  their  potential  and  will  be  less  productive.  Poor  health  leads  to 
significant costs to business, as sick workers are often absent or operate at lower levels of 
efficiency. Investment in the provision of health services is thus critical for clear economic, 
as  well  as  moral,  considerations.  In  addition  to  health,  this  pillar  takes  into  account  the 
quantity  and  quality  of  basic  education  received  by  the  population,  which  is  increasingly 
important in today’s economy. Basic education increases  the efficiency of each individual 
worker.  Moreover,  workers  who  have  received  little  formal  education  can  carry  out  only 
simple manual work and find it much more difficult to adapt to more advanced production 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 96 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
processes and techniques. Lack of basic education can therefore become a constraint on 
business  development,  with  firms  finding  it  difficult  to  move  up  the  value  chain  by 
producing more-sophisticated or value-intensive products. For the longer term, it will be 
essential to avoid significant reductions in resource allocation to these critical areas, given 
that  government  budgets  in  many  countries  will  need  to  be  cut  to  reduce  public  debt 
brought about by the present stimulus spending. 
 
4th Pillar - Health and Primary Education - Rank of Indonesia: 82 out of 133 

 
4.01 Business impact of malaria.................................................97  
4.02 Malaria incidence..............................................................105  
4.03 Business impact of tuberculosis..........................................92  
4.04 Tuberculosis incidence......................................................108  
4.05 Business impact of HIV/AIDS ...........................................88  
4.06 HIV prevalence................................................................... 54  
4.07 Infant mortality....................................................................85 
4.08 Life expectancy....................................................................92  
4.09 Quality of primary education...............................................58 
4.10 Primary enrolment...............................................................56  
4.11 Education expenditure ......................................................127  
INDICATOR RANK/133 
 
Efficiency Enhancers: 50 out of 133 

 
Fifth Pillar: Higher Education and Training 

 
Quality higher education and training is crucial for economies that want to move up the value chain beyond 
simple  production  processes  and  products.  In  particular,  today’s  globalizing  economy  requires 
economies to nurture pools of well-educated workers who are able to adapt rapidly to their 
changing environment. This pillar measures secondary and tertiary enrolment rates as well 
as  the  quality  of  education  as  assessed  by  the  business  community.  The  extent  of  staff 
training  is  also  taken  into  consideration  because  of  the  importance  of  vocational  and 
continuous  on-the-job  training,  which  is  neglected  in  many  economies,  for  ensuring  a 
constant upgrading of workers’ skills to the changing needs of the evolving economy. 
 
5th Pillar - Higher Education and Training: Rank of Indonesia: 69 out of 133 

 
5.01 Secondary enrolment........................................................93  
5.02 Tertiary enrolment............................................................90  
5.03 Quality of the educational system ....................................44  
5.04 Quality of math and science education ............................50  
5.05 Quality of management schools........................................51  
5.06 Internet access in schools .................................................59  
5.07 Local availability of research and training services .........48 
5.08 Extent of staff training ......................................................33  
 
 

Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 97 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
Sixth Pillar: Goods Market Efficiency 
 
Countries  with  efficient  goods  markets  are  well  positioned  to  produce  the  right  mix  of 
products and services given supply-and-demand conditions, as well as to ensure that these 
goods can be most effectively traded in the economy. Healthy market competition, both domestic 
and foreign, is important in driving market efficiency and thus business productivity, by ensuring that the 
most efficient firms, producing goods demanded by the market, are those that thrive.  
The best possible 
environment for the exchange of goods requires a minimum of impediments to business 
activity  through  government  intervention.  For  example,  competitiveness  is  hindered  by 
burdensome taxes and by restrictive and discriminatory rules on foreign direct investment 
(FDI)  limiting  foreign  ownership,  as  well  as  on  international  trade.  The  economic 
slowdown, with the consequent drop in trade and rise in unemployment, has increased the 
pressure  on  governments  to  adopt  measures  to  protect  domestic  firms  and  jobs.  Yet 
limiting global trade would not only amplify the current downturn, but in the longer term it 
would  also  reduce  growth,  in  particular  in  developing  countries.  Market  efficiency  also 
depends on demand conditions such as customer orientation and buyer sophistication. For 
cultural reasons, customers in some countries may be more demanding than in others. This 
can  create  an  important  competitive  advantage,  as  it  forces  companies  to  be  more 
innovative and customer oriented and thus imposes the discipline necessary for efficiency 
to be achieved in the market. 
 
6th Pillar - Goods Market Efficiency - Rank of Indonesia: 41 out of 133 
 
6.01 Intensity of local competition ..............................................47  
6.02 Extent of market dominance ................................................34  
6.03 Effectiveness of anti-monopoly policy.................................30  
6.04 Extent and effect of taxation ................................................22 
6.05 Total tax rate ........................................................................54 
6.06 No. of procedures required to start a business......................99  
6.07 Time required starting a business........................................121  
6.08 Agricultural policy costs .......................................................22  
6.09 Prevalence of trade barriers...................................................38  
6.10 Tariff barriers ........................................................................71  
6.11 Prevalence of foreign ownership...........................................41  
6.12 Business impact of rules on FDI ..........................................41  
6.13 Burden of customs procedures .............................................83  
6.14 Degree of customer orientation ............................................54  
6.15 Buyer sophistication .............................................................30 
 
Seventh Pillar: Labour Market Efficiency 

 
The efficiency and flexibility of the labour market are critical for ensuring that workers are allocated to their 
most efficient use in the economy and provided with incentives to give their best effort in their jobs.
 Labour 
markets must therefore have the flexibility to shift workers from one economic activity to 
another  rapidly  and  at  low  cost,  and  to  allow  for  wage  fluctuations  without  much  social 
disruption. Efficient labour markets must also ensure a clear relationship between worker 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 98 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
incentives and their efforts, as well as the best use of available talent, which includes equity 
in the business environment between women and men. 
INDICATOR RANK/133 
 
7th Pillar - Labour Market Efficiency: Rank of Indonesia: 75 out of 133 

 
7.01 Cooperation in labour-employer relations ..........................42 
7.02 Flexibility of wage determination........................................92 
7.03 Rigidity of employment.......................................................82  
7.04 Hiring and firing practices ..................................................34 
7.05 Firing costs ........................................................................119 
7.06 Pay and productivity............................................................29  
7.07 Reliance on professional management ...............................55  
7.08 Brain drain...........................................................................25  
7.09 Female participation in labour force..................................104 
 
 
Eighth Pillar: Financial Market Sophistication 

 
The  present  economic  crisis  has  highlighted  the  central  role  of  a  sound  and  well-
functioning  financial  sector  for  economic  activity.  An  efficient  financial  sector  allocates  the 
resources saved by citizens as well as those entering the economy from abroad to their most productive uses
It  channels  resources  to  those  entrepreneurial  or  investment  projects  with  the  highest 
expected rates of return, rather than to the politically connected. A thorough and proper 
assessment  of  risk  is  therefore  a  key  ingredient.  Business  investment  is  critical  to 
productivity.  Therefore  economies  require  sophisticated  financial  markets  that  can  make 
capital  available  for  private-sector  investment  from  such  sources  as  loans  from  a  sound 
banking  sector,  well-regulated  securities  exchanges,  venture  capital,  and  other  financial 
products. In order to fulfil all those functions, the banking sector needs to be trustworthy 
and transparent, and financial markets need appropriate regulation to protect investors and 
other actors in the economy at large. 
 
8th Pillar - Financial Market Sophistication: Rank of Indonesia 61 out of 133 
 
8.01 Financial market sophistication................................................56  
8.02 Financing through local equity market.....................................13  
8.03 Ease of access to loans .............................................................21  
8.04 Venture capital availability ......................................................15  
8.05 Restriction on capital flows .....................................................33  
8.06 Strength of investor protection.................................................42  
8.07 Soundness of banks .................................................................96  
8.08 Regulation of securities exchanges..........................................45  
8.09 Legal rights index.....................................................................98  
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 99 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
Ninth Pillar: Technological Readiness 
 
This  pillar  measures  the  agility  with  which  an  economy  adopts  existing  technologies  to  enhance  the 
productivity  of  its  industries.  Technology  has  increasingly  become  an  important  element  for 
firms to compete and prosper. In particular, ICT have evolved into the “general purpose 
technology”  of  our  time,  given  the  critical  spill-over  to  the  other  economic  sectors  and 
their  role  as  efficient  infrastructure  for  commercial  transactions.  Therefore,  ICT  access 
(including the presence of an ICT-friendly regulatory framework) and usage are included in 
the pillar as essential components of economies’ overall level of technological readiness. In 
this context, whether the technology used has or has not been developed within national 
borders is irrelevant for its effect on competitiveness. The central point is that the firms 
operating in the country have access to advanced products and blueprints and the ability to 
use them. In this context, the level of technology available to firms in a country needs to be 
distinguished from the country’s ability to innovate and expand the frontiers of knowledge. 
 
9th Pillar - Technological Readiness:  Rank of Indonesia: 88 out of 133 

 
9.01 Availability of latest technologies.........................................72 
9.02 Firm-level technology absorption..........................................65 
9.03 Laws relating to ICT..............................................................65  
9.04 FDI and technology transfer .................................................49  
9.05 Mobile telephone subscriptions.............................................94  
9.06 Internet users .........................................................................87  
9.07 Personal computers..............................................................103  
9.08 Broadband Internet subscribers............................................101  
 
Tenth Pillar: Market Size 
 
The  size  of  the  market  affects  productivity  because  large  markets  allow  firms  to  exploit 
economies  of  scale.  In  the  era  of  globalization,  international  markets  have  become  a 
substitute for domestic markets, especially for small countries. Trade openness is positively 
associated with growth. Trade has a positive effect on growth, especially for countries with 
small  domestic  markets.  Thus,  exports  can  be  thought  of  as  a  substitute  for  domestic 
demand in determining the size of the market for the firms of a country. Further lowering 
barriers to trade would support this process.  
 
10th Pillar - Market Size - Rank of Indonesia 16 out of 133 
10.01 Domestic market size index.................................................16  
10.02 Foreign market size index....................................................23 
 
Innovation and Sophistication Factors: Rank of Indonesia 40  out of 133 
 
Eleventh Pillar: Business Sophistication 

 
Business sophistication is conducive to higher efficiency in the production of goods and services. This leads, 
in  turn,  to  increased  productivity,  thus  enhancing  a  nation’s  competitiveness.  Business 
sophistication concerns the quality of a country’s overall business networks as well as the 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 100 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
quality  of  individual  firms’  operations  and  strategies.  The  quality  of  a  country’s  business 
networks and supporting industries is important for a variety of reasons. When companies 
and  suppliers  from  a  particular  sector  are  interconnected  in  geographically  proximate 
groups  (“clusters”),  efficiency  is  heightened,  greater  opportunities  for  innovation  are 
created, and barriers to entry for new firms are reduced. Individual firms’ operations and 
strategies (branding, marketing, the presence of a value chain, and the production of unique 
and sophisticated products) all lead to sophisticated and modern business processes. 
 
11th Pillar - Business Sophistication: Rank of Indonesia 40 out of 133 

 
11.01 Local supplier quantity ......................................................50 
11.02 Local supplier quality ........................................................58 
11.03 State of cluster development ............................................. 24 
11.04 Nature of competitive advantage........................................34  
11.05 Value chain breadth............................................................35 
11.06 Control of international distribution ..................................39  
11.07 Production process sophistication ......................................60  
11.08 Extent of marketing ............................................................56 
11.09 Willingness to delegate authority .......................................26  
 
Twelfth Pillar: Innovation 

 
The  final  pillar  of  competitiveness  is  innovation.  Although  substantial  gains  can  be 
obtained  by  improving  institutions,  building  infrastructure,  reducing  macroeconomic 
instability,  or  improving  human  capital,  all  these  factors  eventually  seem  to  run  into 
diminishing returns. The same is true for the efficiency of the labour, financial, and goods 
markets.  In  the  long  run,  standards  of  living  can  be  expanded  only  with  innovation. 
Although less-advanced countries can still improve their productivity by adopting existing 
technologies  or  making  incremental  improvements  in  other  areas,  for  those  that  have 
reached the innovation-driven stage of development, this is no longer sufficient to increase 
productivity. Firms in these countries must design and develop cutting-edge products and processes to 
maintain a competitive edge. This requires an environment that is conducive to innovative activity, supported 
by  both  the  public  and  the  private  sectors.
  In  particular,  this  means  sufficient  investment  in 
research  and  development  (R&D)  especially  by  the  private  sector,  the  presence  of  high-
quality  scientific  research  institutions,  extensive  collaboration  in  research  between 
universities and industry, and the protection of intellectual property.  
 
12th Pillar – Innovation - Rank of Indonesia: 39 out of 133 
 
12.01 Capacity for innovation .......................................................44  
12.02 Quality of scientific research institutions.............................43  
12.03 Company spending on R&D. ..............................................28  
12.04 University-industry collaboration in R&D ......................... 43  
12.05 Government procurement of advanced tech products .........34  
12.06 Availability of scientists and engineers ............. .................31  
12.07 Utility patents........................................................................87 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 101 


TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
Document 11: Doing Business Report 2010 Indonesia 
Doing  Business  2010:  Reforming  Through  Difficult  Times  is  the  seventh  in  a  series  of  annual 
reports investigating regulations that enhance business activity and those that constrain it. 
Doing Business presents quantitative indicators on business regulations and the protection 
of  property  rights  that  can  be  compared  across  183  economies,  from  Afghanistan  to 
Zimbabwe, over time. 
 
A set of regulations affecting 10 stages of a business’s life are measured: starting a business, 
dealing with construction permits, employing workers, registering property, getting credit, 
protecting investors, paying taxes, trading across borders, enforcing contracts and closing a 
business.  Data  in  Doing  Business  2010:  Reforming  Through  Difficult  Times  are  current  as  of  1 
June  1  2009.  The  indicators  are  used  to  analyze  economic  outcomes  and  identify  what 
reforms have worked, where, and why. 
 
According  to  the  Doing  Business  Report  2010,  Indonesia  ranks  122th  out  of  183 
economies.  
 
Here below, a summary of Doing Business indicators for Indonesia can be found. The data 
used for this country profile come from the Doing Business database and in the full report 
are  summarized  in  graphs.  These  graphs  allow  a  comparison  of  the  economies  in  each 
region  not  only  with  one  another  but  also  with  the  “good  practice”  economy  for  each 
indicator. 
 
The  good-practice  economies  are  identified  by  their  position  in  each  indicator  as  well  as 
their overall ranking and by their capacity to provide good examples of business regulation 
to other countries. These good-practice economies do not necessarily rank number 1 in the 
topic or indicator, but they are in the top 10. 
 
 
 
Starting a Business 
161 
 
Dealing with Construction Permits  61 
 
Employing Workers 
149 
 
Registering Property 
95 
 
Getting Credit 
113 
 
Protecting Investors 
41 
 
Paying Taxes 
126 
 
Trading Across Borders 
45 
 
Enforcing Contracts 
146 
 
Closing Business 
142 
 
 
 
 
 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 103 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
In  the  year  under  investigation,  Indonesia  eased  incorporation  and  post-incorporation 
processes for new business registration by introducing online services, eliminating certain 
licenses,  making  the  registry  more  efficient,  and  cutting  company  deed  legalization  fees, 
publication fees, registration fees, and business license fees.  
 
As a result, 2 procedures and 16 days were cut and the average company start-up cost was 
reduced by almost 52 percent of gross national income per capita.  
 
Property registration also became easier because time limits were introduced for standard 
procedures at the land registry.  
 
In addition, Indonesia increased investor protections by expanding disclosure requirements 
for related-party transactions. 
 
The breakdown of the most problematic factors for doing business in Indonesia is shown 
here below: 
 
The most problematic factors for doing business have been identified as follows: 
 
                                                                                        % 
 
Inefficient government bureaucracy............................20.2 
Restrictive labour regulations........................................7.1 
Inadequately educated workforce..................................4.7 
Access to financing........................................................7.3 
Inadequate supply of infrastructure.............................14.8 
Poor work ethic in national labour force .......................3.7 
Corruption..................................................................... 8.7 
Foreign currency regulations.........................................5.2 
Tax regulations ..............................................................6.8 
Inflation .........................................................................6.1 
Tax rates ........................................................................1.9 
Policy instability............................................................ 9.0 
Poor public health...........................................................0.5 
Crime and theft ................ .............................................0.4 
Government instability/coups ........................................3.6 
                                                                                    100.0 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 104 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
Document 12: Economic Assessment of Indonesia 
OECD 2008, Policy Brief 
This  Policy  Brief  presents  the  Executive  Summary  of  the  2008  Economic  Assessment  of  Indonesia.  A 
draft of this Economic Assessment was prepared by the Economics Department and discussed at a meeting 

of the Economic Development and Review Committee, which is made up of the 30 member countries and 
the  European  Commission,  on  9  June  2008.  The  Economic  Assessment  is  published  under  the 

responsibility of the Secretary-General of the OECD. 
Indonesia’s  economic  performance  has  improved  markedly  over  the  last  few  years.  The 
economy has recovered in earnest from the 1997-98 financial crisis, and GDP growth has 
been  around  5½  per  cent  per  year  since  2004.  This  rate  is  below  that  of  some  regional 
peers,  but  high  enough  to  deliver  broad-based  improvements  in  living  standards.  The 
contribution of private consumption has trended up, especially since 2004, on the back of 
robust credit creation. 
Investment also appears to be rebounding, although it remains lower than elsewhere in the 
region  when  measured  in  relation  to  GDP.  Export  growth  has  been  supported  by  high 
commodity prices. The momentum of the current expansion is expected to be maintained 
in  2008-09,  with  GDP  growth  likely  exceeding  6%  per  year.  Yet,  the  current  level  of 
growth is insufficient to speed up the pace of reduction in poverty and unemployment. 
Therefore, raising the economy’s growth potential and sustaining it over the longer term is 
Indonesia’s  foremost  policy  challenge.  To  achieve  this,  concerted  efforts  are  required  in 
several areas, especially if the goals set out in Vision 2030 – a well thought-out initiative by 
a group of independent experts to achieve high growth – are to be fulfilled. 
  Should price subsidies be reduced further? 
 
  How can monetary policy be strengthened? 
 
  What can be done to improve the business environment? 
  How to encourage investment? 
  Would a more flexible labour code deliver lower unemployment? 
  How to make social protection more effective? 
 
Against  this  background,  the  OECD  Economic  Assessment  of  Indonesia  discusses  a 
number  of  policy  options  for  improving  the  business  climate  and  making  better  use  of 
labour  inputs.  Progress  in  these  areas  will  contribute  to  enhancing  economic  efficiency 
further,  so  as  to  narrow the  gap  in  relative  living standards  that  currently  exists  between 
Indonesia and the more prosperous countries in the OECD area.  
 
Should price subsidies be reduced further? 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 105 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
Responsible conduct of fiscal policy in an increasingly decentralised setting has delivered 
low  budget  deficits  and  falling  public  indebtedness  in  relation  to  GDP.  The  budget  has 
therefore benefitted from an “interest dividend”, which has allowed the authorities to begin 
to  reallocate  scarce  resources  towards  meritorious  programmes  in  the  social  and 
infrastructure development areas.  
 
Emphasis on human capital accumulation, and particularly on improvements in the quality 
of services, including labour training, would be particularly welcome, given that Indonesia’s 
educational  attainment  indicators  fare  particularly  poorly  in  relation  to  some  regional 
comparator  countries  and  the  OECD  area.  Efforts  are  also  under  way  to  strengthen  tax 
administration, to alleviate the income tax burden on the business sector and to improve 
value-added taxation. 
 
Decentralisation, which has put the local governments at the helm of service delivery since 
2001, was implemented rapidly and yet without disruption. There is broad agreement that, 
based on its favourable public debt dynamics, Indonesia will in all likelihood continue to 
benefit  from  a  relatively comfortable  fiscal  position  in  the  years  to  come. Therefore,  the 
time  is  now  ripe  for  building  on  past  achievements,  which  are  commendable,  and  for 
strengthening the fiscal framework further. 
 
Indonesia continues to subsidise fuel and electricity consumption by maintaining a sizeable 
gap between domestic and international oil prices. Subsidies are expected to make up about 
20%  of  central  government  expenditure  in  2008,  with  those  on  fuel  taking  up  the  lion’s 
share of the total. A few selected food items are also subsidised, but such outlays account 
for a small share of outlays on subsidies.  
 
Efforts  to  eliminate  fuel  price  subsidisation  have  yielded  mixed  results.  For  example,  a 
mechanism  introduced  in  2001-02  for  automatically  adjusting  domestic  prices  so  as  to 
reduce the gap between domestic and international fuel prices was abolished not long after.  
 
These  subsidies  are  an  inefficient  use  of  scarce  budgetary  resources  at  a  time  when 
resources  are  needed  for  human  capital  accumulation  and  infrastructure  development,  in 
addition to creating considerable fiscal stress when international fuel prices are high. First 
and foremost, a significant share of government spending on some subsidies (about two-
thirds in the case of fuel, according to official estimates) accrue to individuals in the top 
two quintiles of the income distribution, rather than benefitting vulnerable social groups. 
These subsidies also make it difficult for the oil and electricity companies to pursue their 
commercial objectives independently of the government’s social policies.  
 
Moreover,  extensive  subsidisation  complicates  the  regulatory  framework,  because 
uncertainty in price setting discourages much needed private investment in these sectors. 
Finally, by keeping the price of fossil fuels artificially low, such price support encourages 
wasteful  consumption  and  discourages  a  search  for  alternative  sources  of  energy,  with  a 
detrimental  impact  on  the  environment.  Therefore,  the  authorities’  efforts  to  gradually 
reduce  the  gap  between  domestic  and  international  energy  prices  would  be  welcome, 
provided  that  targeted  compensatory  measures  (discussed  below)  are  taken  to  shield  the 
needy from the attendant price rises. The increase in domestic fuel prices by nearly 30% in 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 106 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
mid-May  was  a  step  in  the  right  direction,  but  the  introduction  of  a  formula-based 
mechanism  for  setting  domestic  fuel  prices  would  have  the  advantage  of  making  price 
changes transparent and removing them from the political arena.  
 
How can monetary policy be strengthened? 
 
Monetary policy has been conducted within a fully-fledged inflation-targeting regime since 
mid-2005,  when  monetary  targeting  was  formally  abandoned.  Following  an  upsurge  in 
2005-06 as a result of fuel-price hikes, inflation was reduced and kept within the end-year 
target range of 5-7% in 2007. Increases in food and energy prices are nevertheless weighing 
on  inflation  outcomes  yet  again.  Headline  inflation  and  expectations  have  risen  and  are 
now well above the ceiling of the target range of 4-6% for 2008.  
 
The  effect  of  high  food  prices  on  inflation  is  particularly  strong  in  emerging-market 
economies,  where  these  items  account  for  a  comparatively  high  proportion  of  the 
consumer-price  index.  To  strengthen  credibility  in  the  policy  regime,  the  central  bank  is 
advised to react pre-emptively by tightening the monetary policy stance should the outlook 
for inflation and expectations deteriorate further.   
 
International  experience  shows  that  resolute,  forward-looking  action  is  essential  for 
anchoring expectations and enhancing policy credibility in countries that have a short track 
record  with  inflation  targeting.  Over  the  longer  term,  policy  effort  should  also  focus  on 
lowering  inflation  towards  the  average  of  Indonesia’s  main  trading  partners.  The 
announcement of gradually decreasing targets for the coming years, from 4-6% in 2008 to 
3-5%  over  the  medium  term,  is  therefore  a  welcome  signal  of  commitment  to  inflation 
convergence, which will require a sustained effort to achieve those targets. 
 
The  steps  taken  to  strengthen  the  financial  sector  since  the  financial  crisis  of  1997-98, 
including the most recent biennial Structural Reform Programme, have largely paid off: the 
banking system is sound, capital-adequacy and liquidity indicators have improved over the 
years, and the quality of loan portfolios has been strengthened. Nevertheless, State-owned 
banks have a large presence in the sector, in part due to the rescue of failing banks after the 
crisis, and the non bank sector is relatively small. Credit-to-GDP ratios are lower than in 
regional peers and Indonesia’s pre-crisis level, despite a robust expansion over the last few 
years.  
 
As in other countries with a large informal sector, access to credit is particularly difficult for 
small  and  unregistered  enterprises,  which  tend  to  rely  on  informal,  costly  sources  of 
finance. Indonesia would therefore benefit from further financial deepening, including in 
particular the development of the non bank market segment and an expansion of credit to 
small  businesses.  Progress  in  this  area  could  unleash  opportunities  for  entrepreneurship, 
but  policy  action  should  continue  to  be  guided  by  high  standards  of  financial-sector 
supervision and prudential regulations. 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 107 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
What can be done to improve the business environment? 
 
Pro-competition  product-market  regulations  tend  to  be  growth-enhancing,  because  the 
reallocation of inputs towards higher-productivity sectors is unencumbered. An assessment 
of Indonesia’s regulatory environment on the basis of the OECD methodology for gauging 
competitive pressures in product markets suggests considerable scope for improvement.  
 
In  particular,  despite  recent  deregulation  efforts  and  reforms,  Indonesia  still  fares 
particularly poorly in comparison with OECD countries in terms of the size and scope of 
government. For example, the government owns al  or the majority of large firms in several 
sectors,  including  network  industries.  It  is  also  involved  in  manufacturing  and  services, 
including banking and insurance.  
Sector-specific  restrictions  on  private-sector  involvement  also  remain,  including  in 
transport and retail distribution, as well as foreign ownership ceilings, as discussed below. 
Options are being put forward by the authorities for liberalising State-owned monopolies 
in  key  network  industries,  which  would  contribute  to  opening  up  opportunities  for  the 
private sector.  
 
The  experience  of  several  countries  in  the  OECD  area  and  beyond  suggests  that,  with 
appropriately  designed  regulatory  frameworks,  the  withdrawal  of  the  State  from  network 
industries  has  been  accompanied  by  an  expansion  of  supply  and  a  reduction  in  service 
prices, as well as increases in productivity. 
 
There  is  near-consensual  agreement  that  long-term  growth  is  being  held  back  more  by 
supply- rather than demand-side constraints. The private sector can play a prominent role 
in the growth process, so long as the business climate can be improved considerably. 
 
Economic  and  regulatory  uncertainty,  deficiencies  in  law  enforcement  and  infrastructure 
bottlenecks  are  among  the  main  barriers  to  entrepreneurship.  Indonesia’s  ranking  in 
international indicators of perceived corruption also suggests that there is significant room 
for improvement in that area too.  
 
The authorities are aware of the need to take decisive action to tackle these deficiencies, 
and  there  has  been  unequivocal  progress  in  some  policy  domains  in  recent  years.  In 
particular, enactment of the Investment Law in 2007 was a considerable step forward. The 
Law  makes  the  investment  regime  more  transparent  to  investors,  and  ensures  equal 
treatment  for  domestic  and  foreign  investment.  Screening,  notification  and  approval 
procedures have been simplified, but ownership ceilings remain in many sectors.  
 
As a result, Indonesia’s FDI legislation remains more restrictive than those of most OECD 
countries  on  the  basis  of  the  OECD  methodology  for  assessing  and  comparing  FDI 
regimes  across  countries.  Further  liberalisation  of  foreign  ownership  restrictions  could 
therefore  be  envisaged  in  support  of  policy  efforts  to  encourage  investment  and  boost 
entrepreneurship. Policy effort in this area would therefore be welcome to nurture investor 
confidence in the new FDI regime. 
 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 108 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
How to encourage investment? 
 
Indonesia’s  ratio  of  investment  to  GDP  remains  below  those  of  regional  comparator 
countries.  This  has  raised  concern among  policymakers  about  the country’s  ability  to lift 
and maintain potential growth over the longer term and to match the growth rates of the 
fastest-growing economies in the region, including China and India.  
 
At the same time, Indonesia has some of the weakest infrastructure development indicators 
in Southeast Asia, suggesting ample pent-up demand for such investment. A strong fiscal 
position  is  creating  room  in  the  budget  for  increasing  government  spending  on 
infrastructure.  But  greater  private-sector  involvement  in  infrastructure  development  and 
maintenance  would  be  essential.  For  that,  regulatory  uncertainty  must  be  reduced, 
especially with reference to the pricing of water/sanitation services, fuels and electricity.  
 
Price  subsidisation  complicates  investment  decisions,  because  it  makes  it  difficult  for 
investors  to  assess  the  rates  of  return  of  projects.  Existing  restrictions  on  foreign 
ownership in these sectors also constrains private-sector involvement.  
The design of a new, pro-investment regulatory framework, including price liberalisation, 
free  entry  into  network  industries  and  the  setting  up  of  independent  regulators  would 
obviously be a complex task but could create attractive opportunities for the private sector 
to participate in infrastructure development. 
 
The decentralisation programme that was implemented in 2001 granted local governments 
considerable  autonomy  to  issue  business  regulations,  including  licenses,  and  to  levy  fees 
and  user  charges  for  the  provision  of  local  services.  Based  on  this  prerogative,  most 
jurisdictions  have  introduced  several  levies,  often  without  the  accord  of  the  central 
government, as a means of raising revenue.  
 
Central  government  efforts  to  tackle  this  problem  have  so  far  yielded  mixed  results. 
Initiatives  have  nevertheless  been  put  in  place,  including  by  independent  think-tanks,  to 
raise  awareness  among  district-level  policymakers  of  the  undesirable  effects  of  a 
proliferation of local regulations on business activity.  
 
These efforts seem to be bearing fruit. Several local governments are setting up one-stop 
shops  as  a  means  of  facilitating  business  registration  and  the  issuance  of  licenses.  Also, 
legislation is under consideration by the central government to abolish local levies that are 
deemed  in  breach  of  nation  wide  regulations.  Continued  efforts  to  simplify  business 
regulation procedures further and to make them more business-friendly would therefore be 
welcome. Steadfast progress in this area is crucial for rendering the regulatory framework 
more transparent and pro-investment. 
 
Decentralisation  has  put  the  local  governments  at  the  forefront  of  service  delivery, 
including  in  public  investment  programmes.  But  capacity  constraints  have  resulted  in  a 
backlog of investment projects. At the same time, delays in approval of local government 
budgets by the Ministry of Home Affairs, which is required by law, have taken a toll on the 
implementation of investment projects.  
 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 109 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
In  addition,  a  focus  on  short-term,  calendar-year  budgeting  makes  it  difficult  for  local 
governments to carry out and finance multi year investment projects. Anecdotal evidence 
suggests that deficiencies in public procurement and tighter oversight in the context of the 
authorities’ ongoing anti-corruption initiatives have made local government officials wary 
of executing budgetary commitments for fear of prosecution. This may be an unavoidable 
short-term cost of anti corruption efforts towards boosting accountability at the all levels 
of government over time.  
 
The stock of unspent budgetary appropriations, especially those financed through revenue 
sharing with the natural resource-rich jurisdictions, has increased over time, taking a toll on 
the  government’s  ability  to  implement  investment  projects.  There  is,  therefore, 
considerable  scope  for  reducing  capacity  constraints  at  the  local  level  and  for  making 
budgetary processes, including central government approval of local government budgets, 
swifter and better equipped to deal with the multi-year nature of investment projects. 
 
Would a more flexible labour code deliver lower unemployment? 
 
Better utilisation of labour inputs is another pre requisite for putting growth on a higher, 
sustainable trajectory. A tightening of labour legislation, especially with enactment of the 
Manpower Law of 2003, has contributed to poor labour-market outcomes. These include 
unemployment,  persistent  informality  and  a  loss  of  dynamism  in  labour-intensive 
manufacturing  sectors,  such  as  textiles,  clothing  and  footwear,  in  which  Indonesia  has  a 
comparative advantage.  
Indonesia’s labour legislation is rigid in relation to most countries in the OECD area, and 
particularly in comparison with regional peers.  
 
On  the  basis  of  the  OECD  methodology  for  assessing  the  stringency  of  a  country’s 
Employment  Protection  Legislation  (EPL),  the  Indonesian  labour  code  is  particularly 
restrictive  on  regular  contracts,  due  essentially  to  bureaucratic  dismissal  procedures  and 
costly severance-pay requirements. 
 
There  are  also  constraints  on  the  use  of  temporary  and  fixed-term  contractual 
arrangements,  because  of  strict  provisions  on  the  duration  and  number  of  extensions  of 
such  contracts,  as  well  as  on  the  nature  of  the  activities  and  occupations  to  which  such 
arrangements  apply.  Alternative  indicators,  such  as  those  featured  in  the  World  Bank’s 
Doing Business reports, also underscore the stringency of Indonesia’s EPL in comparison 
with regional peers and OECD countries.  
 
Several options can be considered for making labour legislation more flexible. In particular, 
consideration could be given to simplifying procedures for dismissals in the case of regular 
contracts, relaxing restrictions on temporary work and fixed-term contracts, and reducing 
the burden of severance pay and long-term compensation on employers. 
 
At  about  65%  of  the  median  wage  of  salaried  workers,  the  minimum  wage  is  already 
relatively  high  in  Indonesia  in  comparison  with  OECD  countries.  It  has  risen  fast, 
especially  after  decentralisation  in  2001,  because  the  task  of  setting  the  value  of  the 
minimum wage is now under the local governments’ purview.  
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 110 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
This increase has had a deleterious impact on labour-market performance: increases in the 
minimum  wage  that  are  out  of  step  with  productivity  gains  are  likely  to  displace  lower-
skilled workers. As in the case of EPL stringency, the loss of dynamism in labour-intensive 
sectors can be attributed to a large extent to the rising relative value of the minimum wage.  
 
Therefore,  further  increases  in  the  minimum  wage  could  be  capped  so  as  not  to  exceed 
labour productivity gains. This, or, if it were possible, a gradual reduction over time would 
help to alleviate the adverse employment impact of such a high minimum wage (in relation 
to the median) on low-skilled workers and to facilitate formalisation in the labour market.  
 
How to make social protection more effective? 

 
Burdensome  labour  laws,  including  minimum-wage  provisions,  often  penalise  vulnerable 
workers, instead of protecting them. This is because legal provisions are not binding in the 
informal sector, where income is likely to be lower and job security more precarious. Also, 
increases  in  the  minimum  wage  are  most  harmful  to  the  workers  at  greatest  risk  of  job 
losses in the formal sector.  
 
Therefore,  policy  initiatives  to  build  effective  social  protection  while  making  the  labour 
code more flexible could yield considerable dividends, including in terms of labour-market 
performance.  To  make  tangible  progress  in  this  area,  several  policy  options  could  be 
considered. For example, unemployment insurance could be introduced in lieu of onerous 
dismissal/severance compensation entitlements.  
 
There are several options for designing an effective unemployment insurance scheme. But, 
as  a  general  rule,  it  is  important  that  such  schemes  be  fiscally  sound  and  affordable  to 
workers  and  employers.  At  the  same  time,  budget  finances  permitting,  formal  social 
insurance  programmes  could  be  developed.  To  this  end,  once  credibility  in  the  existing 
social insurance programme (Jamsostek) has been built, participation could be extended to 
the self-employed and employees in smaller enterprises on a voluntary basis, as envisaged 
by the 2004 Social Security Law (Jamsosnas).  
 
Policy action in this area would be welcome to broaden the array of options for saving for 
retirement and to facilitate access to health care for those workers and their families who 
are currently uninsured. In any case, it should be acknowledged that the attractiveness of 
coverage, both by unemployment and social insurance, depends ultimately on the perceived 
benefits  of  social  protection  and  the  affordability  of    contributions,  which  may  be  a 
significant constraint for individuals on low incomes. 
 
Indonesia  already  has  a  number  of  formal,  government-financed  safety  nets.  The 
authorities’  efforts  to  strengthen  these  programmes  since  the  1997-98  financial  crisis 
through  community-based  and  targeted  income  transfers  to  vulnerable  and  poor 
individuals  are  commendable.  These  programmes  are  perceived  to  be  working  well, 
following efforts to improve targeting and governance in the delivery of benefits.  
 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 111 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
Emphasis  is  now  shifting  towards  enhancing  social  assistance  by  equipping  vulnerable 
individuals with the minimum skills needed to pull themselves out of poverty. This change 
is of course welcome.  
 
To build on previous achievements, conditionality could be improved in the main existing 
income transfer programme (Program Keluarga Harapan) to strengthen the link between 
social protection and durable improvements in social outcomes.  
 
International  experience,  especially  in  the  Latin  America  countries  that  pioneered  the 
design  of  conditional  income  transfers,  suggests  that  the  most  effective  eligibility 
requirements  are  related  to  school  attendance  and participation  in  preventive  health  care 
programmes.  
 
Complementary  initiatives  can  also  be  taken  to  improve  the  targeting  of  overall 
government  social  spending.  A  reduction  in  outlays  on  price  subsidies  for  fuels  and 
electricity, which are on balance poorly targeted, as mentioned above, would be a starting 
point. Budgetary resources could then be diverted to the financing of programmes that do 
reach the most vulnerable segments of society, improving the overall progressivity of social 
spending.
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 112 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
Document 13: FDI and Growth in East Asia: Lessons for 
Indonesia – 4.1(b)
, NBER and City 
University, New York, 4.1(b)
, RIIE, 
Őrebro University, Stockholm, 2010 
Introduction 
Foreign direct investment (FDI) has been a key aspect of increased globalization in recent 
decades.  The  growth  in  FDI  has  been  higher  than  growth  in  international  trade. 
Multinational  firms  have  come  to  account  for  about  10%  of  world  output  and  30%  of 
world exports, and a large share of new technologies is developed and controlled by these 
firms.  Most  studies  find  FDI  to  have  been  a  source  of  the  rapid  growth  of  some  Asian 
countries. 
FDI often requires coordinating complicated operations over long distances: input goods 
and services need to be shipped between different branches of the multinational firm; and 
coordination and supervision requires visits by staff and a steady flow of information. It is 
clear that the complexities of operations across national borders put large requirements on 
the  host  country  economic  environment.  Countries  differ  in  their  ability  to  attract  FDI, 
depending  on  characteristics  such  as  infrastructure,  trade  regimes,  labor  force  skills,  and 
institutional quality. It should therefore not come as a surprise that inflows of FDI differ 
substantially among countries in Asia.  
However, Indonesia has been an outlier within the region, with lower inflows of FDI than 
other countries, especially in manufacturing, and with lower inflows than could be expected 
from its size and other country characteristics. The inflows of FDI that have taken place 
have benefited Indonesia and we use the Asian experience to provide some suggestions as 
to  what  measures  would  increase  FDI.  A  relatively  poor  business  environment  with 
inefficient  institutions  seems  to  be  an  important  explanation  behind  the  low  inflows  of 
FDI. 
Indonesia  is  a  country  where  FDI  inflows  have  been  relatively  modest,  and  lower  than 
what would be expected from the size of the country. This paper tries to explain the low 
inflows of FDI by relating the situation in Indonesia to the experience of other countries in 
the  region.  Asia  is  a  heterogeneous  region  and  countries  differ  in  many  aspects.  This 
provides a possibility to evaluate the determinants of FDI.  
Indonesia as a recipient of FDI 
FDI  inflows  have  been  large  to  most  countries  in  East  Asia  but  relatively  modest  to 
Indonesia.  A  way  of  describing  Indonesia‘s  record  in  attracting  inward  FDI  is  by 
comparing inward stocks over time with what might be predicted from equations relating 
the expected inward stock to several possible determinants of inflow of FDI.  
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 113 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
The actual inward stock of FDI in  Indonesia in 1985 as reported in  the UNCTAD data 
base  was  31%  of  the  stock  predicted  by  the  equation  and  reached  40  percent  of  the 
predicted stock by 2005, when actual levels for four East Asian countries were higher than 
predicted levels and only the Philippines had a lower ratio of actual to predicted FDI stock   
 
The data on aggregate stocks and flows of FDI to individual countries are subject to many 
problems of measurement and interpretation. For some countries, part of the FDI inflow 
does  not  add  to  the  productive  assets  of  the  nominal  destination  country,  but  flows 
through to other countries, where the labor and physical capital financed by the flow end 
up. That is the case, for example for inflows to Hong Kong and Singapore. In other cases, 
the  inflows  never  reach  the  supposed  destination  country,  except  as  notations  on 
accounting statements.  
 
Inflows  of  FDI  from  countries  where  similar  data  on  activities  in  foreign  affiliates  are 
available have been examined. The results above of lower inflows of FDI than what could 
be  expected  were  largely  confirmed.  For  instance,  German  FDI  in  Indonesia  was  lower 
than  would  be  expected  from  a  prediction  based  on  FDI  in  all  developing  countries, 
whereas  employment  in  Japanese-owned  manufacturing  plants  in  Indonesia  was  close  to 
predicted levels.  
 
The variables included in the predictions described above refer to Indonesia as a market for 
the investing firms and therefore capture mostly market seeking FDI. However, the results 
of the study were confirmed in other studies using broader sets of variables that reflect also 
Indonesia‘s attractiveness as a location for export-oriented production. For instance,  
 
Indonesia  exhibits  underperformance  in  terms  of  FDI  inflows,  compared  to  what  one 
would  expect  from  country  characteristics,  according  to  UNCTAD  (2010).  They  rank 
Indonesia as number 119 out of 141 countries in terms of FDI inflows. This figure could 
be compared to what UNCTAD refers to as the potential inflows of FDI, which is based 
on 12 different economic and policy variables, where Indonesia is ranked as number 85.  
 
The history of FDI in Indonesia has thus been one of relatively low participation of foreign 
firms,  as  compared  with  their  role  in  other  countries  in  the  region.  Indonesia  is  not  the 
country most closed to foreign firms, but it ranks low as a location for FDI in general and 
for participation in chains of production organized by foreign firms. The modest inflow of 
FDI  to  Indonesia  stands  in  sharp  contrast  to  the  neighbouring  countries  which  are  al  
characterized by a heavy concentration of MNEs.  
 
The effects of FDI on the Indonesian economy
 
 
It would be in Indonesia‘s interest to increase inflows of FDI only if such inflows benefits 
the country.  
 
The  empirical  literature  surveyed  shows  surprisingly  consistent  benefits  of  FDI  to 
Indonesia.  For  instance,  foreign  firms  bring  in  new  production  processes  or  start  to 
produce  new  products  benefits  the  country  and  will  manifest  itself  in  relatively  high 
productivity in foreign firms. A number of studies show that this is indeed the case: foreign 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 114 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
firms have higher labor productivity and higher total factor productivity than local firms. 
Moreover, not only the level but also the growth of productivity is high in   foreign firms. 
Finally,  all  of  the  listed  studies  find  productivity  to  be  high  even  after  controlling  for 
various firm characteristics, such as size and capital intensities.  
 
Previous  literature  also  shows  a  clear  difference  in  export  intensities:  foreign  firms  are 
substantially  more  integrated  in  the  international  economy  through  exports.  This  is  not 
surprising but a result found in most countries.  
 
One interesting finding on Indonesia is that even foreign firms that start producing only 
for the Indonesian market are more able to switch to export than are local firms.  
 
Foreign-owned establishments in Indonesia pay also higher wages than domestically owned 
establishments,  even  given  the  educational  level  of  their  labor  forces.  They  also  pay  a 
higher  premium  the  higher  the  level  of  education.  Foreign  firms’  entry  thus  not  only 
increases  wages,  but  also  increases  the  returns  to  education  and  encourages 
workers‘investments  in  additional  education.  Accordingly,  foreign  acquisition  of  an 
Indonesian manufacturing plant results in higher wages for the plant‘s employees. Hence, 
foreign ownership and foreign acquisition increase wages relative to domestic ownership.  
 
A similar story applies to growth in employment. Foreign firms have relatively high growth 
in employment and foreign acquisitions of domestic firms increase growth in employment, 
despite foreign-owned firms are relatively large and large firms tend to have relatively low 
growth rates in employment.  
 
The study suggests that foreign firms have high productivity and export, pay high wages, 
and  show  a  high growth in  employment.  If  local  firms  benefit  from  FDI,  it  is  clear  that 
there are gains to the country from hosting foreign multinational firms, but the benefits are 
less clear if local firms are instead hurt by the presence of foreign firms. The effects of FDI 
on local firms are often expressed as spillovers.  
 
Positive  spillovers  could for  instance  arise  from  transfer  of  technologies  from  foreign  to 
domestic firms or from expanding markets for domestic suppliers of intermediate goods. 
Negative spillovers could result from increased competition which forces domestic firms 
out of business or forces them to operate at a lower scale of production.  
 
Most  studies  focus  on  the  effect  on  productivity  but  there  almost  all  of  the  studies  find 
evidence  of  positive  spillovers:  local  firms  benefit  from  the  presence  of  foreign  firms 
within the industry or region. For productivity, the positive effect is likely to come from 
technology  spillovers,  new  technologies  and  knowledge  that  are  made  available  for 
domestic firms, and from increased competition, a pressure to improve to secure market 
shares and survival. For wages, the positive effect of FDI is likely to be the result both of 
increased productivity through the discussed spillovers, and thought an increased demand 
for labor. Since the foreign plants also have higher productivity and pay higher wages than 
local firms, the two factors together imply that higher foreign presence raises the general 
productivity and wage level in a province and industry.  
  
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 115 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
Policy Discussion: how could Indonesia attract more FDI? 
 
If faster growth is an important goal of economic policy, it would seem to be in Indonesia‘s 
interest  to  increase  inflows  of  FDI  considering  the  benefits  FDI  brings  in  terms  of 
productivity  growth,  higher  wages  and  strong  employment  growth.  However,  the 
Indonesian attitude towards FDI has always been rather ambivalent.  
 
Indonesia‘s continuing ambivalence toward FDI is reflected in the fact that in each year‘s 
review of FDI policy in UNCTAD‘s World Investment Report in the last few years, some 
added  restrictions  in  Indonesia  are  mentioned.  For  example,  in  the  2008  WIR 
“…Indonesia extended the list of business activities that are closed and partially restricted 
to  foreign  investment.  In  the  2009  WIR,  “…in  Indonesia…the  Ministry  of 
Communications issued a decree barring foreigners from investing in the construction and 
ownership  of  wireless  communications  towers,  and  in  the  2010  WIR,  “…some  new 
restrictions  to  engage  in  certain  activities  were  introduced  (e.g.  in  India  and  Indonesia)”. 
Indonesia was the only country mentioned as introducing new restrictions in all three years.  
 
Fiscal  incentives  are  often  mentioned  when  policies  to  attract  FDI  are  discussed  in 
Indonesia. Such incentives have been used in other parts of East Asia, both in the form of 
favorable tax treatments and direct subsidies. Fiscal incentives can only be justified if the 
benefit to the host economy is larger than the cost of the fiscal incentives. Many authors 
argue that this is seldom the case. Moreover, most studies suggest that fiscal incentives are 
not important in MNE‘s localization decisions. One serious problem is that fiscal incentive 
schemes  are  difficult  to  administer  and  often  lead  to  corruption.  The  past  and  present 
problems with the Indonesian Investment Promotion Agency (BKMP) suggest that such 
fiscal incentive policies run the risk of being relatively inefficient also in Indonesia.  
 
It  is  therefore  fruitful  to  address  the  general  business  climate  in  Indonesia.  Previous 
discussions on determinants of FDI in East Asia suggested that high levels of education, 
good institutions, and openness to trade are all important factors in the location decision of 
multinational firms.   
 
Education  is  very  poor  in  Indonesia.  The  exception  is  enrolment  in  primary  education 
which was substantially expanded in the 1970‘s with the use of public revenues from oil. 
However, enrolment in tertiary and secondary education has been lower than in most other 
countries in East Asia. Moreover, there are signs that the quality of education is relatively 
poor.  
 
Improved  education  is  important  for  attracting  FDI  but  it  will  also  affect  Indonesia‘s 
absorptive capacity. The better the level of education the more Indonesia will benefit from 
foreign  MNEs.  The  same  can  be  said  about  the  technological  capacity  in  Indonesia.  A 
higher  technological  capacity  would  encourages  foreign  MNEs  to  upgrade production  to 
higher  value  added  activities  in  Indonesia,  rather  than  placing  such  production  in  other 
countries,  and  it  would  also  increase  spillovers  by  facilitating  knowledge  transfers  from 
MNEs to local firms.  
 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 116 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
Technological  capability  is  another  area  where  there  seems  to  be  large  potentials  for 
improvements, which would be positive for attracting FDI. Indonesian technology policies 
before the Asian crisis were dominated by large high-tech projects in aircraft, shipbuilding, 
railroads,  telecommunications,  electronics,  steel  and  machinery.  Poor  management  and  a 
weak scientific and engineering infrastructure made most of these projects fail High-tech 
projects were mostly abandoned after the crisis but no new technology policy has emerged 
in its place. As a result, Indonesia remains at the bottom of the technology ladder in the 
region.  One  indication  of  the  poor  state  of  technology  development  and  technology 
capability,  or  perhaps  one  of  the  causes,  is  the  very  low  investment  in  research  and 
development. 
 
The same stark contrasts can be seen for R&D expenditures per employee, 5 or 6 thousand 
dollars  per  employee  in  the  highest  countries,  Singapore  and  Taiwan,  but  only  $80  per 
employee in Indonesia.  
 
Infrastructure is a related issue affecting the interest of foreign multinational firms to locate 
in  Indonesia.  The  importance  of  infrastructure  is  clear  from  the  East  Asian  experience 
where  many  countries  have  used  improvements  to  infrastructure  deliberately  to  attract 
foreign  firms  and  to  integrate  in  international  production  networks.  It  is  also  clear  that 
many  East  Asian  countries  continue  to  invest  heavily  in  infrastructure  and  that  such 
investments  increased  further  in  for  instance  China  after  the  outbreak  of  the  global 
financial crisis in 2008.  
 
Unfortunately,  infrastructure  is  poor  in  Indonesia.  A  report  on  Indonesia  in  The 
Economist  in  2009  quoted  a  Jakarta  bank  executive  as  saying  that  infrastructure  had 
become  the  top  obstacle  to  doing  business  in  Indonesia  among  his  banks’  clients. 
“…roads,  air-  and  seaports  are  inadequate…Electricity  generation  lags  demand…Only 
18%  of  the  population  have  piped  water  and  only  2.5%  are  connected  to  a  sewer 
system…Export industries are hindered by a lack of ports…(The Economist, September 
12, 2009, pp. 11-12)”.  
 
The  crisis  in  the  late  1990‘s  had  a  negative  effect  on  investments  in  infrastructure. 
However,  investments  remained  very  low  even  after  the  crisis  was  over.  In  2010,  The 
Global Competitiveness Report ranked Indonesia only as number 96 in terms of the quality 
of infrastructure, out of 133 included countries.  
 
Some signs of an improvement came in 2009 when the government tried to balance a large 
drop  in  external  demand  by  launching  a  program  for  major  infrastructure  investments. 
However, insufficient public funding is only one of many factors that restrain infrastructure 
development.  Other  problems  that  will  be  difficult  to  solve  include  a  lack  of  technical 
capabilities at responsible local governments, poor coordination between central and local 
governments and between different regions, and large problems with land acquisitions.  
  
FDI  might  be  one  way  to  improve  infrastructure.  Investments  by  foreign  firms  in 
infrastructure,  and  also  in  utilities,  finance,  construction  and  other  non-tradable,  are 
affected by various institutional factors such as competition and pricing policies. Complex 
regulations are often required to attract investments in these sectors.  
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 117 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
Indonesia has a mixed history in dealing with inward investments in infrastructure projects 
Lack of administrative capacity, poor regulatory structures and corruption are some of the 
main causes of failing investments in infrastructure. Wells (2007) suggest some policies to 
improve upon the investment regime: a closer look at international best practices, a ban on 
equity  arrangements  where  importantly  placed  Indonesians  get  a  share  of  foreign 
investments, and an institutional arrangement where only one government agency has the 
full responsibility to negotiate and make agreements with foreign investors in infrastructure 
projects.  
 
The quality of institutions is perhaps the most important determinant to FDI. In a survey 
of  Japanese  firms  that  chose  various  countries  as  prospective  sites  for  their  foreign 
manufacturing locations, over 80% of those choosing Indonesia listed “Political and Social 
Environment”  as  a  weak  point,  far  more  than  for  any  other  location.  Indonesia  has 
traditionally  been  seen  as  having  some  of  the  world‘s  most  corrupt  institutions.  In  a 
comment on corruption in Indonesia in 2008, Transparency International (2008) notes that 
Indonesia is plagued by rampant corruption, but with some signs of improvements during 
recent years. Despite this possible slight improvement, corruption remains a real problem 
and some recent reports indicate new setbacks when the police force, the parliament, and 
the  Attorney  General  Office  have  been  obstructing  the  work  of  the  anti-corruption 
commission. 
 
It is difficult to know exactly how negative corruption is for FDI inflows to Indonesia but 
there are ample  of anecdotal stories of foreign firms who do not invest in Indonesia for 
fear that corruption will lead to bad-will or with problems with home country authorities.  
 
There  are  also  reasons  why  the  changing  nature  of  corruption  might  be  negative. 
Corruption was high under the New Order regime but it was also highly institutionalized 
and predictable: once a standard contribution to the Suharto family or its closest allies had 
been  made,  the  regime  made  sure  that  the  foreign  firms’  activities  were  not  disturbed. 
Corruption  after  Suharto  is  mainly  caused  by  local  governments’  regulations  Corruption 
differs between provinces and districts, is highly arbitrarily, and therefore more difficult for 
foreign multinationals to deal with.  
 
The business environment is generally seen to be poorer in Indonesia than in other East 
Asian  countries.  For  instance,  the  Foreign  Policy  magazine  Globalization  Index  is  an 
indicator of investors’ perception of the investment climate in different countries and are 
often said to be closely watched by the international community. Indonesia was ranked as 
number  86  out  of  156  countries  and  behind  all  included  countries  in  East  Asia  except 
Cambodia and Vietnam.  
 
The government has since 2006 tried to reform the investment climate for foreign firms. 
Some  reforms  of  particular  importance  are  the  equal  treatment  of  foreign  and  domestic 
investors  and  the  streamlined  application  procedures  for  investment  approvals  However, 
25  sectors  are  closed  to  foreign  firms.  More  importantly,  Indonesia  still  uses  ownership 
sharing  requirements  for  foreign  investments  Ownership  sharing  has  been  abandoned  in 
many  other  countries,  since  they  don‘t  provide  any  additional  benefits  to  the  host 
economy, and might deter inflows of FDI.  
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 118 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
The  problems  for  foreign  firms  are  often  caused  by  local  authorities.  With  the 
decentralization  of  Indonesia  in  2001,  the  quality  of  public  policies  and  economic 
governance  differ  markedly  across  regions  in  Indonesia.  Some  local  governments  have 
been encouraging local and foreign firms, whereas many others have constrained firms by 
imprudent taxation, corruption and inefficient bureaucracy Good local leadership seems to 
make a very big difference in fostering a good business environment.  
 
Openness  to  trade  is  another  important  determinant  of  FDI,  especially  for  multinational 
firms  with  vertically  integrated  production  chains.  The  trade  regime  in  Indonesia 
deteriorated  after  the  crisis  in  1997-98  with  increased  corruption  at  the  customs  services 
and with increased time and costs for clearing goods. In recent years, the situation seems to 
be improving.  
 
One of the included criteria in the World Bank‘s Doing Business survey is trading across 
borders, which is defined as the documents, time and cost to export and import. Indonesia 
is ranked as number 45, hence substantially better than its average ranking of 122. It is also 
better than the ranking of many other countries in the region, and about the same ranking 
as China (rank 44). A slightly worrying sign, however, is that Indonesia dropped from rank 
40 in 2007. Poor integration in the international economy is presumably one reason why 
Indonesia in not participating in international production networks to the same extent as 
many other East Asian countries. 
 
Conclusion 

 
FDI has been important  in East Asia‘s economic  development. Multinational firms have 
contributed to host country development by bringing in new technologies and providing 
access  to  foreign  markets.  The  benefits  have  become  increasingly  obvious  for  policy 
makers  over  time  and  explain  the  changing  attitude  towards  FDI  in  East  Asia:  from  a 
negative view where most policies aimed at keeping foreign firms out, to a situation where 
substantial resources are spent on attracting foreign firms.  
 
Multinational  firms  have  responded  to  the  policy  changes  and  invested  heavily  in  the 
region. Production networks, where different parts of multinationals’ production chain are 
located in affiliates in different countries, seem to be particularly important in East Asia. 
  
Indonesia  has  not  fully  participated  in  this  development  and  attracts  less  FDI  than  what 
could be expected from its size and growth, particularly in the periods up to 1990 and in 
recent years. This coincides with a relative restrictive FDI regime and with later failures to 
continue  with  liberalizations.  In  the  1990‘s,  when  the  FDI  regime  was  substantially 
liberalized, FDI inflows were larger.  
 
A survey of the literature shows that FDI has increased economic growth, wages, export, 
and employment in the Indonesian economy. What could be done if Indonesia wished to 
attract more FDI? As global and regional competition for FDI has increased, a FDI regime 
and an economic environment that were sufficient for attracting FDI some years ago are 
not sufficient today.  
 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 119 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
An analysis of determinants of FDI in East Asia gives some guidance: good institutions, a 
skilled workforce, and openness to trade. Some of these are factors where Indonesia has 
shown  improvements  in  recent  years.  These  improvements,  if  they  are  continued  and 
intensified,  will  presumably  make  Indonesia  more  attractive  for  multinational  firms, 
although it will take time before the improvements have more widespread impact on the 
economy.  
 
It is important to  recognize that the business environment is poorer  than in many other 
East Asian countries. Indonesian institutions need to be improved further. Corruption is 
one area with some small signs of improvements, but where the situation remains worse 
than  in  most  other  countries  in  East  Asia.  Poor  institutions  and  corruption  increase  the 
costs of production. Multinational firms that can choose between different locations will 
tend to stay out of Indonesia unless these issues are addressed.  
 
On  a  positive  note,  there  are  some  provinces  that  in  recent  years  have  been  able  to 
implement good policies and improve local institutions. To use these good examples for 
reforms  and  changes  at  a  national  level  would  increase  inflows  of  FDI  and  thereby  be 
fruitful for the continued development of Indonesia. 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 120 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
Document 14:  Foreign Ownership and Employment 
Growth in Indonesia Manufacturing - 
 
4.1(b)
, City University of 
New York, 4.1(b)
, RIIE, Őrebro 
University, Stockholm, 2010 
Introduction 
Many developing countries would like to increase the share of modern or formal sectors in 
their employment. One way to accomplish this goal may be to encourage the entrance of 
foreign firms. They are typically relatively large, with high productivity and good access to 
foreign  markets,  and  might  therefore  be  better  at  creating  jobs  than  domestic  firms  are. 
However, previous research on the issue has been limited by the paucity of long data sets 
for firm operations. 
This study examined employment growth in Indonesia in a large panel of plants between 
1975 and 2005, and especially in plants taken over by foreign owners from domestic ones. 
Employment  growth  is  relatively  high  in  foreign-owned  establishments,  although  foreign 
firms own relatively large domestic plants, which in general grow more slowly than smaller 
plants.  For  plants  that  change  the  nationality  of  ownership  during  our  period,  we  find  a 
strong  effect  of  shifts  from  domestic  to  foreign  ownership  in  raising  the  growth  rate  of 
employment, but no significant effects of shifts from foreign to domestic ownership. 
The faster growth of employment in the foreign-owned plants in general is concentrated in 
the takeovers, especially in the year of acquisition.  
The  study  compared  growth  in  foreign-owned  and  domestically  owned,  and  examined 
employment  growth  after  foreign  acquisitions  of  domestically  owned  establishment  and 
domestic  acquisition  of  foreign-owned  establishments.  These  observations  hold  constant 
the  identity  of  the  individual  establishments.  If  foreign  ownership  provides  superior 
technology  or  better  access  to  world  markets,  establishments  should  tend  to  raise  their 
employment after foreign takeover. 
If these advantages require continued foreign ownership, there may be employment losses 
when a foreign-owned company is acquired by a domestic firm. 
On the other hand, if the technological or other gains from foreign ownership are retained 
in  the  establishment,  its  level  and growth  of  employment  may  continue  after  a  domestic 
acquisition. 
Foreign Plants in Indonesian Manufacturing 
Indonesian manufacturing data were supplied by the Indonesian Statistical Office for the 
period 1975 to 2005.  Employment in manufacturing plants with more than 20 employees 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 121 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
increased  from  fewer  than  700  in  1975  to  about  4  million  in  1997  and  later  years.  That 
growth was driven mainly by a strong increase in employment. 
 
The  industry  sector  and  the  ownership  groups  differed  in  some  important  aspects.  One 
extreme difference was in size: government-owned plants were far larger than domestically-
owned private plants, over 5 times as large in 2005. They were much larger also within the 
industry groups, with a few exceptions. Foreign-owned plants were also much larger, about 
three  times,  in  every  group.  The  size  disparity  may  be  an  element  in  the  frequency  and 
success of takeovers. 
 
To the extent the share of blue-collar workers in total employment can be associated with 
the  average  skill  level  in  an  establishment,  it  appears  that  foreign  firms  tended  to  use  a 
slightly  higher  skill  labour  force  than  private  domestic  firms  in  the  same  industry.  
Government-owned  plants  operated  with  the  lowest  proportions  of  blue-collar  workers 
consistently  across  almost  all  industries.  Only  government-owned  plants  employed  work 
forces  made  up  to  the  extent  of  30  percent  or  more  of  white-collar  workers,  almost  40 
percent in a few cases, while private domestic plants employed more than 20 percent white-
collar workers in only one industry group in one year.  
 
The  changes  in  the  share  of  Indonesian  manufacturing  employment  in  foreign-owned 
plants,  discussed  above,  came  about  in  several  different  ways.  One  was  takeovers  of 
domestically-owned plants by foreign firms, offset by takeovers of foreign-owned plants by 
Indonesian owners. Another was the establishment of new plants by foreign owners and 
the demise of existing plants A third source of change was any differences in average rates 
of growth in employment between locally-owned and foreign-owned plants.  
 
Foreign takeovers and employment growth  
 
Regarding the effects of foreign takeovers from those of foreign ownership in general,   the 
study estimates that the effect of foreign ownership aside from foreign acquisition effects is 
about  5%  per  year  faster  growth  in  employment.  The  effect  of  foreign  acquisition  is 
subsequent growth in employment at a rate 9% faster than in domestic plants.  
 
The fixed effect approach looks at growth in employment within a firm before and after 
the acquisition and removes the time-constant unobserved plant characteristics that could 
confound  the  explanation  of  acquisition  effects.  Fixed  effect  estimates  raise  the  foreign 
acquisition effect to 11%. The effect on blue-collar workers is about twice as large as the 
effect on white-collar workers. 
 
The effect of FDI on employment might differ between trade regimes. FDI flows drawn to 
a developing country to take advantage of cheaper labor costs would respond to an export-
oriented  policy  by  expansion.  By  contrast,  FDI  induced  by  import  substitution  policy  is 
limited by the size and income level of the host-country market. To test for the possible 
impact of differences in trade regimes, suggested above, we divide Indonesia’s history since 
1975 into three periods, which we think of as an import substitution period 1975-1985; a 
trade liberalization period 1986-1996; and the crisis and post-crisis period 1997-2005. The 
results  support  the  idea  that  the  effects  of  FDI  on  host  countries  are  affected  by  trade 
Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 122 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
regimes.  During  the  trade  liberalization  period  1986-1996,  the  employment  growth  rate 
effect of foreign acquisition was as high as 19 percent. In contrast, foreign takeovers had 
no significant effects on employment growth rates during the earlier, import substitution, 
period 1975-1985.  Up through 1989, foreign takeovers accounted for a large part of total 
growth  in  employment  in  foreign-owned  manufacturing  establishments,  but  they  were 
offset by declines in such employment from local takeovers of foreign-owned plants. After 
1989,  the  foreign  takeovers  added  more  to  the  foreign-owned  share  than  the  domestic 
takeovers  took  away.  The  numbers  of  takeovers  had  been  fairly  similar  in  the  two 
directions  until  the  1990s,  but  since  then,  foreign  takeovers  have  been  more  numerous, 
except in 1997, during the Asian crisis. However, the net effect of foreign and domestic 
takeovers  was  less  important  as  a  source  of  employment  growth  in  foreign-owned 
establishments  than  the  combination  of  the  establishment  of  new  foreign-owned  plants 
and their more rapid growth. 
 
Matched comparisons of domestic and foreign takeovers 
 
These results were tested for possible biases from the selectivity of acquisitions by using 
propensity score matching. Foreign takeovers raise the growth rate of employment by 10% 
on average during the acquisition and post-acquisition period, after correcting for the pre-
acquisition  differences  between  acquired  and  non-acquired  plants.  This  is  similar  to  the 
fixed  effect  estimate.  Domestic  takeovers,  according  to  the  matched  comparison,  do  not 
affect employment growth rates.  
 
While the employment growth rates in foreign takeovers do not differ significantly from 
those  of  plants  remaining  domestically-owned  in  the  first  and  second  years  after  the 
takeover, the impact of the foreign takeovers continues, because the acquired plants grow 
so  much  in  the  year  of  takeover  that  the  same  growth  rate  after  takeover  implies  a 
considerably larger absolute growth in employment in the following years in the acquired 
plants,  relative  to  domestic  plants.  There  are  no  similar  effects  in  absolute  terms  from 
domestic acquisitions of foreign plants.  
 
One implication of this concentration in the year of acquisition is that the usual assumption 
that “Greenfield” investment adds resources to the recipient country, but acquisitions only 
change ownership is wrong. Acquisitions can be associated with very substantial additions 
to resources, quite apart from any gains that might arise from transfers from less-skilled to 
more-skilled management.  
 
Conclusions  
 
Most  of  the  employment  effects  of  foreign  takeovers  took  place  in  the  year  of 
takeover. There was relatively little effect on growth rates in the following years, but 

the absolute additions to employment in  the years after takeover were larger than 
they would have been under continued local ownership because the base was much 

larger.  The  negative  or  insignificant  effect  of  domestic  acquisition  on  foreign-
owned  plants,  as  in  the  fixed  effects  estimate  and  the  difference-in-differences 

estimate  from  a  matched  sample,  shows  that  the  advantages  of  foreign-owned 
plants that accounted for more rapid growth required continued foreign ownership. 

Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 123 

TECHNICAL CAPACITY TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE VISION GROUP ENHANCING  
EU-INDONESIA TRADE AND INVESTMENT RELATIONS 
ADE 
They are apparently lost if the plant returns to domestic ownership. One possible 
implication  of  the  concentration  of  growth  in  the  year  of  acquisition  is  that  the 
distinction between “Greenfield investments” and acquisitions is not as sharp as is 

often  assumed.  Many  of  the  acquisitions  apparently  involve  major  changes  in  the 
size and possibly other dimensions of the target firms. 

Synopsis report – November 2010 
Page 124