This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Carlos Moedas' cabinet meetings with religious lobbyists'.



Ref. Ares(2019)2968224 - 03/05/2019
 
 
 
 
Commissioner Carlos Moedas 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Commissioner Moedas meets S.E. Mgr Alain Paul Lebeaupin, 
Apostolic Nuncio to the European Community 
Friday, 13/03/2015 
10:30 [Commissioner's Office] 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cabinet Member: Giulia Del Brenna 
Main contact person: 
                  
 
 (B6) 
Contributors: B1, B7, C1, E1, E5 
RTD colleague(s) at meeting: 
1/25 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 
 
 
KEY MESSAGES 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 3 
 
1. STEERING BRIEF   

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 3 
 
1.1 Scene setter 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 3 
 
1.2 Objectives 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 4 
 
1.3 Line to take 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 4 
 
2. SPEAKING POINTS 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 5 
 
2.1 Religion and radicalization in research in  
Social Sciences and Humanities (SSH) 

 
 
 
 
 
Page 5 
 
2.2 Human embryonic stem cell research   

 
 
 
 
Page 6 
 
2.3. Social Innovation 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 6 
 
2.4 Science Diplomacy 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 7 
 
 
3. DEFENSIVE POINTS 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 9 
 
3.1 Research Ethics and Research Integrity 
 
 
 
 
Page 9 
3.2. Stem cells 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 10 
 
4. BACKGROUND INFORMATION 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 13 
 
4.1 Curriculum vitae of S.E. Mgr Alain Paul Lebeaupin  
 
 
Page 13 
 
4.2 Dialogue with churches, religious associations or communities and philosophical and 
non-confessional organisations 

 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 14 
 
4.3 Religion in Research in Social Sciences and Humanities (SSH) 

 
Page 15 
 
5. ANNEX(ES) 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Page 18 
 
5.1 Human stem cell regulations and legislation in Europe (May 2010)  

Page 18 
 
5.2 Business process for projects involving use of human embryonic stem cells (hEST) in 
Horizon 2020
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 20 
 
5.3 Registered clinical trials involving human embryonic stem cells and human induced 
pluripotent stem cells (December 2014) 

 
 
 
 
 
Page 23 
2/25 

 
 

Key messages 
  Religious tolerance, preventive and repressive policies against violent 
radicalisation  and  the  peaceful  coexistence  of  religions  in  Europe  are 
of utmost importance. The Commission fully supports these aims and will 
continue to fund research in these areas. 
  Whilst subject to strict oversight, human embryonic stem cell research 
is legal in the vast majority of Member States. After discussion in Council 
and Parliament, it was decided that Horizon 2020 could support research 
involving the use of human embryonic stem cells with strict conditions. 
  The new Commission will continue to support social innovation in order 
to  create  new  jobs  and  encourage  growth,  social  inclusion  and  greater 
citizens'  engagement  in  a  Union  of  democratic  change.  Religious 
authorities can play a useful role in supporting social innovation. 
  Science  diplomacy  can  be  a  useful  tool  for  furthering  peace  in 
international relations. 
 
 
1. STEERING BRIEF 
 
 
1.1 Scene setter
 
 
This  briefing  relates  to  the  following  areas  within  DG  Research  and  Innovation:  Social 
Innovation  (B1),  Religion  and  radicalization  in  Social  Sciences  and  Humanities  Research 
(B6),  Research  Ethics  and  Research  Integrity  (B7),  Peace  (Science  Diplomacy)  (C1),  and 
Stem Cell Research (E1 and E5). 
 
DG  RTD  has  also  consulted  DG  JUST  which  is  in  charge  of  the  dialogue  with  churches, 
religious  associations  or  communities  and  philosophical  and  non-confessional  organisations 
that  started  in  the  early  1990s.  This  dialogue  was  given  legal  force  by  the  Lisbon  Treaty 
(Art.17 TFEU). 
 
The European Commission will adopt in the months to come a European Agenda on Security 
for 2015-2020 which will address several  aspects such as  identifying policy tools to prevent 
and  address  radicalisation;  stepping  up  the  fight  against  terrorism  financing;  strengthening 
cooperation  between  Europol  and  other  European  agencies  and  reinforcing  the  fight  against 
arms trafficking. 
3/25 

1.2 Objectives 
 
  To  ensure  the  Apolostolic  Nuncio  of  the  Commission's  commitment  to  support  the 
message of peace made by all religious authorities in Europe and to carry out research 
on the benefits  of peaceful  religious coexistence  in  Europe  and the causes of violent 
radicalisation.  
  To show that concerns related to stem cell research are taken into account and that the 
necessary measures have been put in place concerning the research projects involving 
the use of human embryonic stem cells. 
  To  point  out  that  research  ethics  is  the  basis  of  the  research  funded  under  the  EU 
Framework Programmes. 
  To inform about the research and innovations actions carried out in the area of social 
innovation in Europe, an area where religious authorities could also play a useful role. 
  To stress that science can play a useful peace role in diplomatic relations and therefore 
that science diplomacy should be encouraged. 
  
1.3 Line to take 
 
  Stress  that  there  is  a  place  for  everyone  in  Europe  independently  of  their  religion,  as 
indicated in the Orientation debate in the College on 21 January 2015.  
  Refer to the Informal meeting of the Heads of State or Government of 12 February 2015 
who in order to prevent radicalisation and safeguard values call for: 
o  communication  strategies  to  promote  tolerance,  non-discrimination,  fundamental 
freedoms  and  solidarity  throughout  the  EU,  including  through  stepping  up  inter-
faith and other community dialogue, and narratives to counter terrorist ideologies, 
including by giving a voice to victims; 
o  initiatives  regarding  education,  vocational  training,  job  opportunities,  social 
integration and rehabilitation in the judicial context to address factors contributing 
to radicalisation, including in prisons. 
 
  Highlight the need for a peaceful coexistence of religions in Europe while acknowledging 
the  tensions  at  play  in  societies.  Consequently,  the  Commission  is  willing  to  support 
research in the area of religion and radicalisation. 
  Highlight the importance of stem cell research, both "adult" cells and human embryonic 
stem cells. Stress the consensual approach taken by the EU institutions in this area. 
  Highlight that social innovation contributes to achieving the goals of the new Commission 
around jobs, growth, fairness and democratic change, and that Commissioner Moedas will 
ensure that research innovation, including social innovation,  will play  an important  role. 
Fully recognise the important role that the Church plays in this area.  
  Highlight  the  importance  of  science  diplomacy  as  a  key  element  of  international 
cooperation contributing to peace and prosperity. 
4/25 

 
2. SPEAKING POINTS  
 
I  fully  share  the  ambitions  of  the  dialogue  between  churches,  religious  associations  or 
communities as well as philosophical and non-confessional organisations as stated by Art.17 
of the TFEU and I am willing to offer the support of research to this dialogue. In particular, 
more research under Social Sciences and Humanities should be envisaged. The Commission 
will continue to apply strict ethical rules regarding research on stem cells. 
 
2.1. Religion and radicalization in research in Social Sciences and Humanities (SSH) 
 
 
Religion  or  some  aspects  of  religion  have  been  the  subject  of  research  in  Social 
Sciences and Humanities under FP7. In total, more than € 10 million have been invested in 
this field in FP7, mostly from the Humanities (History, Philosophy, Theology) and the Social 
Sciences (Political Sciences, and Sociology). 
 
In  Horizon  2020,  Societal  Challenge  6,  the  Commission  will  invest  around  €  10 
million in these fields. Thus, Horizon 2020 will support several topics which will reflect upon 
religious  diversity  in  Europe  as  well  as  cultural  and  political  history  and  current  state  of 
religious  tolerance and co-existence, but  which will also  open the floor for investigating the 
roots and developments of political, societal and religious radicalisation.  
 
The following topics (that will have to be confirmed by the Programme Committee in 
the  next  months)  are  proposed  for  the  2016  and  2017  Horizon  2020  programme  under  the 
Societal  Challenge  6  –  "Europe  in  a  changing  world:  inclusive,  innovative  and  reflective 
societies":  
1) 
"Contemporary  radicalisation  trends  in  Europe"  researchers  will  investigate  the 
scope, origins, dynamics and drivers of radicalisation, violence and hate crime with particular 
focus on young generation and the role of inequalities and discrimination for its radicalisation. 
This  research  is  aiming  at  enhancing  the  knowledge  base  on  the  scope,  origins,  causes  and 
dynamics  of  radicalisation,  on  provision  of  indicators  for  evaluating  policies  with  regard  to 
their  effects  on  radicalisation  and  on  giving  recommendations  on  how  to  address  religious 
fundamentalism in particular.  
2) 
"Situating  Europe  into  the  global  context:  the  virtues  of  intercultural 
understanding"  will  touch  upon  global  trends  of  secularization  and  religious  radicalisation 
from  the  comparative  world-wide  perspective.  In  this  case,  researchers  will  compare  and 
analyse various types and experiences of the functioning of secular and religion-based states 
5/25 

and  clarify  reasons  for  and  pathways  of  transformation  between  the  two  perceptions  of  the 
role of religion in state governance.  
3) 
"Religious  diversity  in  Europe  –  past,  present  and  future"  should  consider  the 
widest possible historical and geographical comparative perspective and touch upon the long 
history of the role which religious beliefs and affiliation to religious groups and communities 
played for the functioning of societal relations in Europe. It should also identify the political, 
social and economic tools for overcoming religious intolerance and ensuring the preservation 
of  democratic  European  values  of  peaceful  coexistence  among  the  diverse  religious 
communities existing in today's Europe.  
4) 
"Shifting  global  geopolitics  and  Europe's  preparedness  for  managing  risks  and 
fostering  peace"  will  identify  and  investigate  global  and  regional  external  risks  facing  the 
EU by considering the rise of radical Islamic groups, movements, conflicts and risks in Syria, 
Iraq, South Asia, Sub-Saharan Africa as well as in other countries and regions.  
 
2.2 Human embryonic stem cell research 
 

  Whilst subject to strict oversight, human embryonic stem cell research is legal in the 
vast  majority  of  Member  States1.  After  discussion  in  Council  and  Parliament,  it  was 
decided  that  Horizon  2020  could  support  research  involving  the  use  of  human 
embryonic  stem  cells  on  the  condition  that  (1)  national  legislation  is  respected  (EU 
projects must follow the laws of the country in which the research is carried out), (2) 
projects  are  scientifically  validated  by  peer  review  and  undergo  rigorous  ethical 
review, and (3) EU funds may not be used for derivation of new stem cell lines or for 
research that destroys blastocysts including for the procurement of stem cells. 
2.3. Social Innovation 
 
 
Social  innovation  can  play  a  significant  role  in  addressing  societal  challenges  and 
responding  to  social  needs.  Social  innovation  is  about  improving  peoples'  lifes  and  peoples' 
capabilities  –using  the  economy,  through  application  of  new  technological  and  business 
solutions.  
 
In  the  last  five  years  as  part  of  the  Innovation  Union,  DG  Research  and  innovation, 
has been strongly supporting research, innovation, capability building and piloting and scaling 
                                                 
1 It is unlawful in Slovakia, Lithuania and Poland, see annex 1 
6/25 

up of new schemes. We have invested more than 23 million in research in social innovation, 
and additionally supported big projects in health, environment, and agriculture and food.   
 
Horizon  2020  continues  to  support  social  innovation,  by  going  beyond  research 
towards piloting/ experimenting so as to have a higher impact at European level.  
 
The Juncker Commission has placed a big emphasis in ensuring that we bring together 
all  stakeholders  and  resources  of  society  and  build  synergies  in  favour  of  our  common 
objectives for social cohesion and inclusion, for less poverty and better skills in Europe.  
 
2.4 Science Diplomacy 
 
  Not only is the EU the world's largest trading partner and aid donor, a key contributor to 
international  organisations,  and  a  significant  provider  of  security  in  its  own  right  and  in 
cooperation with key strategic partners.  
  The  EU  is  also  a  leading  global  actor  in  research  and  innovation.  This  is  especially 
important in a world of increasing fragmentation and geopolitical tensions where science 
can be a means of building bridges between people of different cultures and societies and 
help making informed political decisions to identify and jointly address shared challenges.  
  Science diplomacy is an emerging term in the EU context and a recent one at the broader 
international  level.  It  covers  a  broad  range  of  initiatives  and  instruments  that  link 
international  scientific  cooperation  with  the  external  relations  domain:  from  EU 
diplomatic  relations  with  strategic  international  partners,  to  challenges  in  the  European 
Neighbourhood,  to  those  related  to  development  policy,  humanitarian  assistance,  trade 
and international negotiations on global challenges such as climate change. 
  Science diplomacy has three main dimensions: 
1.  First, 'science diplomacy' can help to support peace. 
2.  'science in diplomacy' provides evidence and advice to inform and support external 
action  objectives,  for  instance  towards  a  more  effective  sustainable  development 
policy, or towards an equitable solution in the Middle East. 
3.  Second,  'diplomacy  for  science'  can  facilitate  international  scientific  cooperation, 
for  example  by  brokering  agreements  on  international  multilateral  initiatives,  on 
joint research infrastructures, programmes and projects, or through bilateral and bi-
regional policy dialogues. 
  One  example  of  'science  diplomacy  for  peace'  is  taking  place  in  the  Middle  East.  The 
synchrotron  particle  accelerator,  SESAME,  in  Jordan,  has  the  joint  support  from 
7/25 

countries  often  at  odds,  ranging  from  Israel  to  Iran,  Pakistan,  Egypt,  and  Palestine.  It 
brings  together  researchers  from  countries  that  would  normally  never  meet.  SESAME 
now allows researchers to collaborate across the Middle East. 
 
SESAME  has  undoubtedly  a  great  potential  to  contribute  to  broader  science 
diplomacy  in  the  region  by  fostering  scientific  collaboration  between  Europe,  the  Middle 
East  and  the  EU's  extended  neighbourhood.  The  EU  support  not  only  provides  additional 
funds  for  this  project,  it  also  sends  a  strong  message  of  political  endorsement  to  assure 
contributions from local partners. 
8/25 

3. DEFENSIVE POINTS 
 
3.1. Research Ethics and Research Integrity 

 
Q1. What are the main elements of the ethics approach in Horizon 2020? 
Research  ethics  including  research  integrity  is  the  basis  of  the  trust  society  has  in  the 
scientific endeavour. It is a key in guaranteeing the quality of the research outcome. Horizon 
2020  is  unambiguous  about  its  priorities  and  considers  research  ethics  as  a  prerequisite 
condition for achieving excellence. There is no excellence when there is no ethics. 
Horizon  2020  activities  related  to  ethics  have  two  main  pillars.  The  first  focuses  on 
minimising  the  breaches  of  ethics  principles  and  related  legislation  in  the  activities  funded. 
The  second  aims  at  promoting  the  highest  ethical  standards  in  the  research  and  innovation 
system, in the EU and internationally.  
 
Q2. How is ethics compliance ensured in activities funded under Horizon 2020? 
Horizon 2020 has a robust ethics legal framework. All funded activities will need to comply 
with  the  ethical  principles  and  the  relevant  National,  Union  and  international  legislation 
including the Charter of Fundamental Rights. 
This is ensured by the Ethics Appraisal Scheme. It starts at the project proposal stage with the 
Ethics  Review  process.  For  each  project  raising  ethical  issues,  prior  to  the  signature  of  a 
contract,  an analysis is conducted by independent ethics experts. The concerned projects  are 
then monitored by the EC project officers and when required, by the help of experts. The type 
of issues is very diverse: human involvement and intervention (human subjects in research), 
data  protection,  dual  use,  malevolent  use  of  research  results,  animal  welfare,  fair  benefit 
sharing, environment protection, etc. 
In the case some research activities are carried out outside the Union, Horizon 2020 requires 
that the same research would have been allowed in an EU Member State. The objective of this 
measure  is  to  reduce  the  risk  of  “ethics  dumping”;  the  exportation  of  unethical  practices 
outside the EU. 
  
Q3. How does Horizon 2020 promote high ethical standards? 
At  policy  level,  beyond  the  ethics  appraisal  scheme,  Horizon  2020  regulation  stresses  “the 
need to promote the highest ethical standards”.  
Concretely, this will for example be achieved via activities to:  
• Better understand the socio-economic costs associated with research misconduct, its deep 
roots and the way to effectively promote research integrity.  
9/25 

•  Support  the  design  of  effective  responses  to  the  risks  of  ethics  dumping  in  public  and 
private  research  via  practical  methodologies  to  improve  the  adherence  to  high  ethical 
standards in areas of the world where it is most needed 
As  regards  research  integrity,  the  commission  services  are  developing  a  Research  integrity 
strategy and a research integrity code of conduct for Horizon 2020 activities. In addition my 
services have started close cooperation with the Research  Integrity responsible authorities in 
the  Member  States  in  order  to  facilitate  the  exchange  of  good  practice  and  a  possible 
alignment of activities to foster the responsible conduct of research. 
 
Q4. What type of ethics related research is funded under Horizon 2020? 
 
Horizon  2020  builds  on  the  previous  research  programmes  (FP7  and  FP6)  which  have 
financed several projects in the area of research ethics along the following main axis:  
 
•  Networking  or  capacity  building,  through  for  example  the  support  for  the  European 
network  of  National  Research  Ethics  Committees  and  the  European  Forum  of  National 
Bioethics Committees 
• Research on privacy issues related to new technologies and applications, from biometrics 
for security through to the Internet of Things.  
• Research into ethical implications of new applications or emerging technologies, such as 
synthetic biology and human enhancement.  
All  these activities not only improve the knowledge base or facilitate the work of the actors 
but  also  have  an  impact  on  the  legislative  process  at  the  EU  level  and  have  provided 
substantial input to the design and implementation of EU legislation (i.e.  clinical trials, data 
protection, dual use, animal protection). 
 
3.2. Stem cells 
 

Q1. Why is stem cell research important and included in Horizon 2020? 
Stem cells are the body's supplier of new cells. Stem cells fix our injured or diseased tissues 
and replace cells when they routinely die. They keep us healthy and prevent us from ageing 
prematurely.  The  best  example  of  the  use  of  stem  cells  in  therapy  is  bone  marrow 
transplantation for overcoming cancer of the blood. These are tissue-specific or "adult" cells 
and can only be used for regenerating blood. But for many tissues the only way to obtain the 
cells  needed  is  by  cultivating  embryonic  stem  cells,  which  can  potentially  form  any  of  the 
hundreds  of  cell  types  found  in  the  body  and  which  can  multiply  indefinitely.  The  first 
isolation  and  culturing  of  human  embryonic  stem  cells  in  1998  stirred  great  interest, 
particularly in view of the potential of these cells for the treatment of incurable diseases, such 
as Parkinson's or blindness, and opened-up the field of regenerative medicine. 
Research  on  stem  cells  is  also  carried  out  in  order  to  better  understand  basic  biological 
processes, such as development and differentiation, to make models of disease in order to test 
new drugs ("disease in the dish"), to develop toxicity testing systems that replace the use of 
10/25 

animals  in  research,  to  provide  new  treatment  options  for  cancer  and  to  develop  advanced 
therapies to treat rare, common and incurable diseases. 
Because of its high potential stem cell therapy is seen as a possible next revolution in medical 
treatment providing enormous possibilities for growth and diverse applications. Europe has a 
very  strong  science  base  in  the  area  and  numerous  efforts  are  being  undertaken  by  Member 
States  and  the  EU  to  stimulate  innovation  in  the  field,  develop  the  associated  industry  and 
translate results into treatments for patients. 
 
Q2. What is the European Commission's position on human embryonic stem cells and how 
is human embryonic stem cell research handled in Horizon 2020? 

For the Commission, human embryonic stem cells are an important  field  of study; however, 
they are controversial because they are obtained from in vitro fertilisation programmes when 
spare blastocysts2 are donated for research and are not implanted. 
Whilst  subject  to  strict  oversight,  human  embryonic  stem  cell  research  is  legal  in  the  vast 
majority of Member States3. After discussion in Council and Parliament, it was decided that 
Horizon 2020 could support research involving the use of human embryonic stem cells on the 
condition that: 
  National legislation is respected – EU projects must follow the laws of the country in 
which the research is carried out; 
  Projects  be  scientifically  validated  by  peer  review  and  undergo  rigorous  ethical 
review; 
  EU funds may not be used for derivation of new stem cell lines or for research that 
destroys blastocysts including for the procurement of stem cells. 
The full position is set out in a Commission Statement published in the Official Journal at the 
same  time  as  the  Horizon  2020  decision4  and  the  internal  business  process  for  projects 
involving use of human embryonic stem cells is attached in annex 2. 
In order to encourage innovation, the Commission does not favour any one type of stem cell 
over  others  in  research;  subject  to  the  conditions  mentioned  above,  it  is  science  that  should 
determine the best cell type for a particular use and that to this end all avenues should be kept 
open  for  research  as  needed.  In  the  Seventh  Framework  Programme,  of  the  87  projects 
involving stem cells supported by the Health programme, 27 involve human embryonic stem 
cells. 
 
Q3. Are there alternatives to human embryonic stem cells? 
Owing to their unique characteristics of being able to form any of the cells in the body and to 
multiply indefinitely, no alternative can fulfil all their functions. The nearest alternative is the 
                                                 
2 A blastocyst is the structure consisting of about a hundred cells formed at about five or six days after fertilisation and not 
yet implanted in the uterus. 
3 It is unlawful in Slovakia, Lithuania and Poland, see annex 1 
4 Official Journal of the European Union, C373/12 of 20.12.2013. 
11/25 

induced  pluripotent  stem  cell  which  is  created  from  adult  tissue  without  destruction  of  the 
blastocyst. These cells are now being used extensively in drug testing but their clinical use is 
limited  because  of  the  genetic  modifications  they  carry.  In  addition,  the  natural  embryonic 
cell will always be needed for studying development and for comparative purposes. 
It should be noted that at the moment the number of human embryonic stem cell lines banked5 
means  there  is  not  a  great  pressure  to  produce  new  lines.  By  collating  information  on  the 
characteristics  of  the  different  lines  that  have  been  developed  the  European  registry  helps 
avoid duplication and unnecessary blastocyst destruction. 
 
Q4. What is the status of clinical research based on human embryonic stem cells? 
World-wide there are now 12 registered clinical trials of therapies based on human embryonic 
stem cells6. Of these, three are taking place in Europe; one for heart repair in Paris and 2 for 
blindness in London. It is probable that more products of human embryonic stem cell research 
will  reach  the  clinical  trial  phase  in  the  near  future.  The  EU  funds  clinical  research  on 
innovative therapies, including for children and vulnerable populations, and there is currently 
a drive in  the field  of rare diseases.  All  EU-funded clinical  trials  are subject  to  strict ethical 
review  and  management  during  the  life  of  the  project.  As  health  care  issues,  clinical  trial 
regulation and ethical rules are a Member State competence. 
Q5. What happened to the European Citizens Initiative "One of us"? 
This  Citizens  Initiative, which proposed a ban on human embryonic stem  cell research, was 
answered by the Commission on 28 May 20147. Commissioner Máire Geoghegan-Quinn said 
at the time: 
"We have engaged with this Citizens' Initiative and given its request all due attention. 
However,  Member  States  and  the  European  Parliament  agreed  to  continue  funding 
research  in  this  area  for  a  reason.  Embryonic  stem  cells  are  unique  and  offer  the 
potential  for  life-saving  treatments,  with  clinical  trials  already  underway.  The 
Commission will continue to apply the strict ethical rules and restrictions in place for 
EU-funded research, including that we will not fund the destruction of embryos.”8
 
Q6.  What  is  the  Commission's  position  on  mitochondrial  donation  (3-parent  in  vitro 
fertilisation)? 

Mitochondrial  donation  is  a  new  technique  to  help  parents  with  genetic  disorders  of  the 
mitochondria. It involves the mother's egg nucleus being transplanted into a donor egg from 
which  the  nucleus  has  been  removed.  It  has  been  in  the  news  recently  because  on  24  Feb 
2015,  following  approval  in  the  Commons,  the  UK  Upper  House  voted  to  pass  regulations 
permitting mitochondrial donation, making the UK the first country in the world to legislate 
for the use of mitochondrial donation techniques in treatment. 
The  EU  has  supported  biomedical  research  underlying  mitochondrial  disease;  however, 
assisted reproduction is not a priority in Horizon 2020. 
                                                 
5 Around 600 in European human stem cell registry www hescreg.eu  
6 See list in annex 3 
7 COM(2014) 355 final 
8 European Commission press release IP/14/608, 28 May 2014 
12/25 

4. BACKGROUND INFORMATION 
 
4.1 Curriculum vitae of S.E. Mgr Alain Paul Lebeaupin  
 
 
CURRICULUM VITAE 
de 
S.E. Mgr Alain Paul LEBEAUPIN 
Nonce Apostolique auprès de l'Union Européenne 
 
 
 
 
      
 
 
 
13/25 

 
4.2. Dialogue with churches, religious associations or communities and philosophical and 
non-confessional organisations  - 
under the responsibility of DG JUST 
 
Since  the  early  1990s,  the  Commission  has  developed  a  dialogue  that  is  probably  unique  in 
the  world:  European  political  institutions  seek  the  opinion  of  religions  and  communities  of 
convictions  in  order  to  factor  their  views  into  the  policy  making  process.  Dialogue  with 
"churches,  religious  associations  or  communities,  philosophical  and  non-confessional 
organisations"  was  given  legal  force  by  the  Lisbon  Treaty  (Article  17  TFEU).  This  is 
governed by guidelines established in 2013. 
 
Objective 
A  two-way  discussion  on  policy.  The  Commission  stands  ready  to  discuss 
policy issues where the EU has a competence and take their views into account in the policy 
making  process.  It  also  proactively  consults religious and non-confessional organisations  on 
relevant issues (eg. freedom of religion or belief, migration, social policies). 
Dialogue partners 
The  guidelines  specify:  "dialogue  partners  can  be  churches, 
religious  associations  or  communities  as  well  as  philosophical  and  non-confessional 
organisations  that  are  recognized  or  registered  as  such  at  national  level  and  adhere  to 
European  values.  There  is  no  official  recognition  or  registration  of  interlocutors  at  the 
European level." All dialogue partners are encouraged to register under the EU Transparency 
Register, but so  far this is voluntary.9 There are in total about 50 registered organisations of 
which the vast majority are religious organisations. Their numbers are growing. 
Issues   Recent included Kosher/Halal slaughtering versus animal welfare (SANCO); climate 
change  and  migration  (CLIMA/HOME);  Guidelines  on  freedom  of  religion  and  belief 
(EEAS);  Antidiscrimination;  Anti-Semitism/Racism,  Charter  of  Fundamental  Rights 
(Freedom of  conscience,  freedom  of  speech, freedom of  religion and beliefs),  Europe of  the 
citizen  (JUST);  Labour  market/European  Social  model  (EMPL);  TTIP  (DG  TRADE),  the 
European elections and the future of the EU in general (the subject in June 2014). The place 
of religion in the public space has become a focal point for legal conflict in many European 
countries  in  recent  years,  which  is  reflected  by  the  rising  number  of  cases  before  national 
courts and the European Court of Human Right – notably the place of religious symbols in the 
public  space  and  "life-stance"  issues  such  as  embryo  stem  cell  research,  abortion  and 
euthanasia.  
Meetings  
The  customary  pattern  has  been  an  annual  high-level  meeting  with  the 
Presidents  of  EP,  Council  and  Commission  with  about  20  religious  leaders  or  non-
confessional  representatives  respectively.  These  4-hour  high-level  meetings  are  the  flagship 
events  of  the  dialogue  and  include  a  press  conference.  The  June  2014  meeting  included  the 
innovation  of  a  joint  declaration  by  the  religious  leaders  and  the  Presidents  of  the  three 
institutions (on the case  of 
, the 
 
 condemned to death for 
                                                 
9 The register includes a special category for "representative offices of churches and religions". The non-confessional organisations register 
under "civil society" or any other category they regard as appropriate. 
14/25 

apostasy10). The meetings are supplemented 5-6 dialogue seminars per year on working level 
with individual organisations and stakeholders.  
Consultations   "Ad-hoc consultations" are a recent instrument which focuses on specific and 
timely input on certain policy documents. A first ad-hoc consultation was organised in 2012 
in the context of drafting  "EU  guidelines  on  religion  and belief",  adopted  by  the Council  in 
June 2013. In the process we pro-actively consulted the main Christian churches, a Jewish and 
a  Muslim  organisation  as  well  as  a  Humanist  and  a  Free-tinker  organisation.  The  outcome 
was  tangible  and  rewarding  for  all  sides  as  a  concrete  result  was  attained  in  relatively  short 
time.  
 
4.3. Religion in Research in Social Sciences and Humanities(SSH) 
 
Religion or some aspects of religion have been the subject of research in Social Sciences and 
Humanities under FP7. Thus, the following projects have been funded in this area: 
 
  ACCEPT PLURALISM (Tolerance, pluralism and social cohesion: responding to 
the  challenges  of  the  21st  century  in  Europe)  -  Duration:  2010–2013;    EU 
contribution: 2,601,430 € 
The project addressed the need to explore and understand tolerance of ethnic, cultural 
and religious diversity in European societies and sought to identify key messages for 
policymakers.  In  particular  the  project  analysed  the  kinds  of  tolerance  existing  in 
practice in 14 EU Member States and one candidate country. 
  RELIGARE  (Religious  diversity  and  secular  models  in  Europe:  innovative 
approaches to law and policy) - Duration: 2010–2013; EU contribution: 2,699,943 € 
RELIGARE  focused  on  religions,  belonging,  beliefs  and  secularism.  The  project 
investigated the diversity of convictions in contemporary Europe with a focus on law 
and on questions relating to management of pluralism under State Law. 
  REMC  (Religious  education  in  a  multicultural  society:  school  and  home  in 
comparative context) – Duration: 2008-2009: EU Contribution: 828.842 € 
This  project  explored  how  religious/secular  beliefs  are  formed  in  the  arenas  of  the 
education system and the family across different EU country contexts. 
  FACIT  (Faith  based  organization  and  exclusion  in  European  cities)  –  Duration: 
2008-2010;  EU contribution: 1,495,980 € 
The  project  examined  the  current  role  of  faith  based  organisations  in  matters  of 
poverty and other forms of  social exclusion (such as homelessness or undocumented 
persons) in cities. A faith based organisation is any organisation that refers directly or 
indirectly  to  religion  or  religious  values,  and  functions  as  a  welfare  provider  or  as  a 
political actor. 
  IME  (Identities  and  modernities  in  Europe:  European  and  national  identity 
construction programmes, politics, culture, history and religion) – Duration: 2009 
– 2012; EU contribution: 1,447,773 € 
The project addressed three major issues regarding European identities: what they are, 
in what ways they have been formed and what trajectories they may take in the future. 
                                                 
10 This was referenced by Secretary of State Kerry and widely covered in the 
 media 
15/25 

  RESPECT (Towards a topography of tolerance and equal respect: a comparative 
study  of  policies  for  the  distribution  of  public  spaces  in  culturally  diverse 
societies)
 – Duration: 2010 – 2011; EU contribution: 1,341,533 € 
The  RESPECT  project  aimed  to  address  the  issue  of  tolerance  in  the  distribution  of 
public spaces from both a theoretical and applied perspective, employing the tools of 
comparative analysis across a highly representative set of European and non-European 
countries. 
  EURISLAM (Finding a place for Islam in Europe: cultural interactions between 
Muslim  immigrants  and  receiving  societies)  –  Duration:  2009-2012;  EU 
contribution: 1,448,283 € 
The  project  explored  how  different  traditions  of  national  identity,  citizenship  and 
church-state relations have influenced European immigration countries‘  incorporation 
of  Islam  and  the  consequences  of  these  approaches  for  patterns  of  cultural  distance 
and  interaction  between  Muslim  immigrants  and  their  descendants  and  the  receiving 
society. 
 
Moreover,  under  the  ERANET  HERA  JRP  CE  (Humanities  in  the  European  Research 
Area – Cultural  Encounters)  
-  Duration:  2012  –  2016;  EU contribution: 6,000,000 €,  four 
out of the 18 projects co-funded through this ERANET are on religion: 
  Currents of Faith, Places of History: Connections, Moral Circumscriptions and 
World-  Places  of  History  brings  together  a  multidisciplinary  team  of  scholars  who 
share  a  concern  for  religion,  mobility,  place  and  heritage  in  the  Atlantic  space.  Our 
goal  is  to  rethink  creatively  theories  of  Atlantic  history  by  focusing  on  ‘religious 
Diasporas’ via three main concepts: ideas of ‘connections’, ‘moral  circumscriptions’ 
and ‘world-making’. 
  Defining  and  Identifying  Middle  Eastern  Christian  Communities  in  Europe 
(DIMECCE)The objectives of this interdisciplinary project are to explore the migrant 
experiences  of  Middle  Eastern  Christian  communities  in  Europe  in  order  to  identify 
the  cultural  encounters  taking  place  and  to  examine  their  impact  on  defining  and 
shaping  identities.  The  European  context  is  central  to  understanding  the  similarities 
and  differences  of  these  experiences  and  can  add  to  current  understandings  of  the 
categorization of migrants and its implications on integration and the construction of 
identity within migrant groups. 
  Encounters  with  the  Orient  in  Early  Modern  European  Scholarship  (EOS)The 
project will explore how the Orient changed from being a source for Christian truths to 
being an object of cultural studies. The three main objectives will be 1) to describe the 
scholarly and religious incentives for this encounter between Europe and the Orient; 2) 
to  document  the  exchange  of  knowledge,  ideas,  values  and  material  objects  this 
encounter stimulated in the early modern period, and 3) to explore the institution- al, 
conceptual and religious transformations which the encounter initiated in theology and 
Biblical studies, in the teaching and learning of Arabic and other Oriental languages, 
in literature and poetry, and in historical and anthropological thinking in general. 
  Iconic Religion. How Imaginaries of Religious Encounter Structure Urban Space 
(IcoRel) The interdisciplinary research group focuses on religious icons and icons of 
religious encounter in the metropolises of Amsterdam, Berlin and London. In order to 
consider the complex nature of icons and to analyze how the religious dimension may 
become  dominant  over  other  dimensions  of  meaning,  Iconic  Religion  combines 
spatial,  material-aesthetic,  visual  analysis,  and  communicative-semiotic  approaches 
with  dis-  course  analysis  and  reception  studies.  The  project  expects  to  achieve 
16/25 

research  results  on  the  mechanisms  of  how  religious  images  in  the  urban  space 
construct either stereotypes or concepts of successful cultural encounter. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

17/25 


5. ANNEX(ES) 
 
5.1 Human stem cell regulations and legislation in Europe (May 2010) 
 

 
18/25 


 
19/25 


5.2 Business process for projects involving use of human embryonic stem cells (hEST) in 
Horizon 2020 

 
20/25 


 
21/25 


 
 
 
22/25 

5.3 Registered clinical trials involving human embryonic stem cells and human induced 
pluripotent stem cells (December 2014) 

Human embryonic stem cells (in clinicaltrials.gov database): 
 
These treatments all involve culturing human embryonic stem cells in the laboratory and then 
applying  growth  factors  and  other  stimulants  to  direct  their  differentiation  to  the  cells  of 
interest. Most of the trials listed are safety studies of the treatments so efficacy is not expected 
to  be  evident  at  this  stage;  however,  signs  of  efficacy  have  been  noted  in  some  of  the 
blindness trials. 
 
Spinal cord injury repair 
 
For  patients  who  have  had  accidents,  such  as  falling  from  a  ladder  or  a  car  crash.  The 
treatment consists of transplanting nerve cells grown in the laboratory into the injury site in an 
attempt  to  rejoin  the  severed  parts.  The  first  trial,  which  has  been  completed,  demonstrated 
safety  of  the  treatment.  The  second  trial  will  test  increasing  doses  of  cells  to  determine  the 
optimum number for efficacy. 
 
1.  Safety Study of GRNOPC1 in Spinal Cord Injury 
 
Geron, USA 
 
Identifier: NCT01217008 
 
2.  Dose Escalation Study of AST-OPC1 in Spinal Cord Injury 
 
Asterias Biotherapeutics, INC, USA 
 
Identifier: NCT02302157 
 
 
Heart repair 
 
After  heart  attack,  heart  muscle  cells  die.  This  trial  applies  muscle  progenitor  cells  in  a  gel 
patch to hearts of heart attack patients in order to regain heart beating function. 
 
3.  Transplantation of Human Embryonic Stem Cell-derived Progenitors in Severe Heart 
Failure (ESCORT) 
 
Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris (Menasché) 
 
Identifier: NCT02057900 
 
Type 1 diabetes treatment 
 
Type  1  or  juvenile  diabetes  results  from  the  autoimmune  destruction  of  the  insulin-
producing beta cells in the pancreas. The subsequent lack of insulin leads to increased 
blood  and  urine  glucose.  Regular  insulin  injections  are  essential  for  survival.  This 
treatment consists of growing insulin-secreting cells in the laboratory, placing them in 
a  semi-permeable  capsule  that  permits  the  diffusion  of  insulin  and  glucose  but 
prevents antibody ingress, and placing it under the patient's skin.  
 
4.  A  Safety,  Tolerability,  and  Efficacy  Study  of  VC-01™  Combination  Product  in 
Subjects With Type I Diabetes Mellitus 
 
Viacyte, USA 
 
Identifier: NCT02239354 
 
23/25 

Treatments for blindness 
 
The eye is a favoured site for stem cell treatment because the immune system is weaker there 
than  in  other  organs,  meaning  that  transplanted  cells  are  less  prone  to  attack  by  the  body's 
defences and  require  less  suppression of the immune system by drugs.  Moreover, the  eye is 
relatively self-contained and could be removed easily in case of problems with the treatment. 
All  the treatments  in this section involve applying new retina cells derived in  the laboratory 
from  human  embryonic  stem  cells  in  order  to  revive  light  sensitivity.  One  of  the  main 
differences between the trials concerns the method of application of the cells and whether or 
not they are applied in a biomaterial bandage to hold them in place. 
 
The different forms of blindness studied include macular degeneration, which occurs in "dry" 
and "wet" forms, and usually affects older adults and results in a loss of vision in the center of 
the  visual  field;  and  Stargardt's  macular  degeneration,  an  inherited  condition  that  usually 
starts between the ages of 6 and 12 years old and causes progressive vision loss usually to the 
point of legal blindness. 
 
5.  A  Study  Of  Implantation  Of  Human  Embryonic  Stem  Cell  Derived  Retinal  Pigment 
Epithelium  In  Subjects  With  Acute  Wet  Age  Related  Macular  Degeneration  And 
Recent Rapid Vision Decline 
 
Pfizer-Univ Coll London (Coffey) 
 
Identifier: NCT01691261 
 
6.  Safety  and  Efficacy  Study  of  OpRegen  for  Treatment  of  Advanced  Dry-Form  Age-
Related Macular Degeneration 
 
Cell Cure Neurosciences Ltd, Israel 
 
Identifier: NCT02286089 
 
7.  Safety and Tolerability of Sub-retinal Transplantation of hESC Derived RPE (MA09-
hRPE) Cells in Patients With Advanced Dry Age Related Macular Degeneration (Dry 
AMD) 
 
Advanced Cell Technology, USA 
 
Identifier: NCT01344993 
 
8.  A Phase I/IIa, Open-Label, Single-Center, Prospective Study to Determine the Safety 
and  Tolerability  of  Sub-retinal  Transplantation  of  Human  Embryonic  Stem  Cell 
Derived Retinal Pigmented Epithelial(MA09-hRPE) Cells in Patients With Advanced 
Dry Age-related Macular Degeneration(AMD) 
 
CHA Bio & Diostech, Korea 
Identifier: NCT01674829 
 
9.  Safety and Tolerability of Sub-retinal Transplantation of Human Embryonic Stem Cell 
Derived  Retinal  Pigmented  Epithelial  (hESC-RPE)  Cells  in  Patients  With  Stargardt's 
Macular Dystrophy (SMD) 
 
Advanced Cell Technology, UK (Bainbridge and Dhillon) 
 
Identifier: NCT01469832 
 
10. Sub-retinal  Transplantation  of  hESC  Derived  RPE(MA09-hRPE)Cells  in  Patients  With 
Stargardt's Macular Dystrophy 
 
Advanced Cell Technology, USA 
24/25 

 
Identifier: NCT01345006 
 
11. Safety  and  Tolerability  of  MA09-hRPE  Cells  in  Patients  With  Stargardt's  Macular 
Dystrophy (SMD) 
 
CHA Bio & Diostech, Korea 
 
Identifier: NCT01625559 
 
12. Research  With  Retinal  Cells  Derived  From  Stem  Cells  for  Myopic  Macular 
Degeneration 
 
University of California, Los Angeles Advanced Cell Technology, USA 
 
Identifier: NCT02122159 
 
 
Human induced pluripotent stem cells 
 
One study has been initiated using human induced pluripotent stem cells as starting material 
for the treatment of eye disease in a similar way to the trials described above. 
 
1.  A Study of transplantation of autologous induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) derived 
retinal  pigment  epithelium  (RPE)  cell  sheet  in  subjects  with  exudative  age  related 
macular degeneration 
 

 
RIKEN Laboratory for Retinal Regeneration, Japan 
 
WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform 
 
Identifier: JPRN-UMIN000011929 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
25/25