Esta es la versión HTML de un fichero adjunto a una solicitud de acceso a la información 'The 61st-90th Commission replies to confirmatory applications issued in 2019'.




DOC 12
Ref. Ares(2020)4117196 - 05/08/2020
EUROPEAN COMMISSION 
Brussels, 19.2.2019 
C(2019) 1526 final 
 
Latham & Watkins LLP 
Boulevard du Régent, 43-44 
1000 Brussels 
Belgium 
DECISION OF THE EUROPEAN COMMISSION PURSUANT TO ARTICLE 4 OF THE
IMPLEMENTING RULES TO REGULATION (EC) NO 1049/20011
Subject: 
Your  confirmatory  application  for  access  to  documents  under 
Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001 - GESTDEM 2018/4940 

Dear 
 
I refer to your letter of 3 December 2018, registered on 4 December 2018, in which you 
submitted a confirmatory application, on behalf of your client, in accordance with Article 
7(2) of Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001 regarding public access to European Parliament, 
Council and Commission documents2 (hereafter 'Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001').
1.
SCOPE OF YOUR REQUEST
In your initial application of 21 September 2018, addressed to the Directorate-General for 
Communications Networks, Content and Technology, you requested:  
‘[i]n the context of call for proposals H2020-INFRAEDI-2018-2020(H2020-INFRAEDI-
2018-1), activity INFRAEDI-02-2018, Research and Innovation action, all the proposals 
that were submitted by the applicants, in particular the proposals submitted by MaX and 
EoCoE, as well as the Evaluation Summary Reports that were prepared by the evaluators 
and sent to the applicants by the DG CONNECT, in particular the Evaluation Summary 
Reports sent to MaX and EoCoE’.   
1
Official Journal L 345 of 29.12.2001, p. 94. 
2
Official Journal L 145 of 31.5.2001, p. 43. 
Commission européenne/Europese Commissie, 1049 Bruxelles/Brussel, BELGIQUE/BELGIË - Tel. +32 22991111 

In  its  initial  reply,  the  Directorate-General  for  Communications  Networks,  Content  and 
Technology  considered  that  your  request  covered  all  eligible  proposals  to  the  relevant 
call for proposals and identified 46 documents which matched this criteria. Please note, 
however, that eight of these documents concern other topics of the call, which do not fall 
within  the  scope  of  your  request3.  Please  also  note  that  the  proposal  submitted 
 and the corresponding evaluation summary report are already in possession 
of your client. 
Consequently,  the  European  Commission  has  identified  the  following  36  documents  as 
falling within the scope of your request:  

18 grant proposals submitted by the applicants under the call for proposals
INFRAEDI-02-2018  ‘RIA  Research  and  Innovation  action  Topic  HPC
PPP  –  Centres  of  Excellence  on  HPC  Applications’,  registered  under  the
following Ares references:
o
Proposal  for  grant  agreement,  EXCELLERAT,  reference
Ares(2018)1792253 (hereafter ‘document 1’);
o
Proposal  for  grant  agreement,  CompBioMed2,  reference
Ares(2018)1792399 (hereafter ‘document 2’);
o
Proposal 
for 
grant 
agreement,
SOXESS, 
reference 
Ares(2018)1792156 (hereafter ‘document 3’);
o
Proposal 
for 
grant 
agreement,
BioExcel-2, 
reference 
Ares(2018)1792181 (hereafter ‘document 4’);
o
Proposal 
for 
grant 
agreement,
X-CAero,
reference 
Ares(2018)1792138 (hereafter ‘document 5’); 
o
Proposal 
for 
grant 
agreement,
ChEESE, 
reference 
Ares(2018)1792226 (hereafter ‘document 6’);
o
Proposal 
for 
grant 
agreement,
INTERFACE, 
reference 
Ares(2018)1792173 (hereafter ‘document 7’);
o
Proposal 
for 
grant 
agreement,
PerMedCoE, 
reference 
Ares(2018)1792386 (hereafter ‘document 8’);
o
Proposal 
for 
grant 
agreement,
ESiWACE2, 
reference 
Ares(2018)1792268 (hereafter ‘document 9’);
o
Proposal 
for 
grant 
agreement,
CODE-CoE, 
reference 
Ares(2018)1792163 (hereafter ‘document 10’); 
3
These topics are INFRAEDI-01-2018 ‘Pan-European High Performance Computing infrastructure and 
services  RIA  Research  and  Innovation’,  INFRAEDI  02  CSA  ‘Addressing  the  fragmentation  of 
activities for excellence in HPC applications’ and INFRAEDI-03-2018 ‘Support to the governance of 
High Performance Computing (HPC) Infrastructures’. 



Proposal for grant agreement, POP2, reference Ares(2018)1792212 
(hereafter ‘document 11’); 

Proposal 
for 
grant 
agreement, 
HiDALGO, 
reference 
Ares(2018)179328 (hereafter ‘document 12’); 

Proposal 
for 
grant 
agreement, 
CoEHCS, 
reference 
Ares(2018)1792309 (hereafter ‘document 13’); 

Proposal 
for 
grant 
agreement, 
ExaPIPE, 
reference 
Ares(2018)1792340 (hereafter ‘document 14’); 

Proposal for grant agreement, MaX, reference Ares(2018)1792357 
(hereafter ‘document 15’); 

Proposal 
for 
grant 
agreement, 
EoCoE-II, 
reference 
Ares(2018)1792292 (hereafter ‘document 16’); 

Proposal 
for 
grant 
agreement, 
EDGE, 
reference 
Ares(2018)1792276 (hereafter ‘document 17’); 

Proposal 
for 
grant 
agreement, 
BDEM, 
reference 
Ares(2018)1792240 (hereafter ‘document 18’); 
 
18  evaluation  summary  reports  on  the  above-mentioned  grant  proposals, 
registered under the following Ares references: 

Evaluation  Summary  Report  on  the  proposal  submitted  by 
EXCELLERAT, 
European 
Commission, 
reference 
Ares(2018)3847600 (hereafter ‘document 19’); 

Evaluation  Summary  Report  on  the  proposal  submitted  by 
CompBioMed2, 
European 
Commission, 
reference 
Ares(2018)3847645 (hereafter ‘document 20’); 

Evaluation  Summary  Report  on  the  proposal  submitted  by 
SOXESS,  European  Commission,  reference  Ares(2018)3847635 
(hereafter ‘document 21’); 

Evaluation  Summary  Report  on  the  proposal  submitted  by 
BioExcel-2, European Commission, reference Ares(2018)3847602 
(hereafter ‘document 22’); 

Evaluation  Summary  Report  on  the  proposal  submitted  by             
X-CAero,  European  Commission,  reference  Ares(2018)3847646 
(hereafter ‘document 23’) 

Evaluation  Summary  Report  on  the  proposal  submitted  by 
ChEESE,  European  Commission,  reference  Ares(2018)3847648 
(hereafter ‘document 24’); 

Evaluation  Summary  Report  on  the  proposal  submitted  by 
INTERFACE, 
European 
Commission, 
reference 
Ares(2018)3847677 (hereafter ‘document 25’); 



Evaluation  Summary  Report  on  the  proposal  submitted  by 
PerMedCoE, 
European 
Commission, 
reference 
Ares(2018)3847682 (hereafter ‘document 26’); 

Evaluation  Summary  Report  on  the  proposal  submitted  by 
ESiWACE2, European Commission, reference Ares(2018)3847659 
(hereafter ‘document 27’); 

Evaluation  Summary  Report  on  the  proposal  submitted  by     
CODE-CoE, European Commission, reference Ares(2018)3847610 
(hereafter ‘document 28’); 

Evaluation  Summary  Report  on  the  proposal  submitted  by  POP2, 
European  Commission,  reference  Ares(2018)3847663  (hereafter 
‘document 29’); 

Evaluation  Summary  Report  on  the  proposal  submitted  by 
HiDALGO,  European  Commission,  reference  Ares(2018)3847707 
(hereafter ‘document 30’); 

Evaluation  Summary  Report  on  the  proposal  submitted  by 
CoEHCS,  European  Commission,  reference  Ares(2018)3847691 
(hereafter ‘document 31’); 

Evaluation  Summary  Report  on  the  proposal  submitted  by 
ExaPIPE,  European  Commission,  reference  Ares(2018)3847697 
(hereafter ‘document 32’); 

Evaluation  Summary  Report  on  the  proposal  submitted  by  MaX, 
European  Commission,  reference  Ares(2018)3847664  (hereafter 
‘document 33’); 

Evaluation  Summary  Report  on  the  proposal  submitted  by     
EoCoE-II,  European  Commission,  reference  Ares(2018)3847694 
(hereafter ‘document 34’); 

Evaluation Summary Report on the proposal submitted by EDGE, 
European  Commission,  reference  Ares(2018)3847695  (hereafter 
‘document 35’). 

Evaluation Summary Report on the proposal submitted by BDEM, 
European  Commission,  reference  Ares(2018)3847620  (hereafter 
‘document 36’). 
In  its  initial  reply  of  6  November  2018,  the  Directorate-General  for  Communications 
Networks, Content and Technology refused access to the requested documents, based on 
the  exceptions  of  Article  4(2),  first  indent  (protection  of  commercial  interests),  Article 
4(3), first subparagraph (protection of the decision-making process), and  Article 4(1)(b)  
(protection  of  privacy  and  the  integrity  of  the  individual)  of  Regulation  (EC)  No 
1049/2001.  


In your confirmatory application, you requested a review of this position. You supported 
your  request  with  detailed  arguments,  which  I  address  in  the  corresponding  sections 
below.   
2. 
ASSESSMENT AND CONCLUSIONS UNDER REGULATION (EC) NO 1049/2001 
When  assessing  a  confirmatory  application  for  access  to  documents  submitted  pursuant 
to Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001, the Secretariat-General conducts a review of the reply 
given by the Directorate-General concerned at the initial stage. 
Following this review, I can inform you that partial access is granted to documents 19 to 
36.  The  undisclosed  parts  of  these  documents  have  been  redacted  on  the  basis  of  the 
exception  of  Article  4(2),  first  indent  of  Regulation  (EC)  No  1049/2001  (protection  of 
commercial interests). Please find these documents enclosed. 
As regards document 1 to 18, I wish to inform you that I confirm the initial decision of 
Directorate-General  for  Communications  Networks,  Content  and  Technology  to  refuse 
access,  based  on  the  exceptions  of  Article  4(2),  first  indent  (protection  of  commercial 
interests) and Article 4(1)(b) (protection of privacy and the integrity of the individual) of 
Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001, for the reasons set out below. 
2.1.  Protection of commercial interests of a natural or legal person 
Article  4(2),  first  indent  of  Regulation  (EC)  No  1049/2001  provides  that  ‘[t]he 
institutions  shall  refuse  access  to  a  document  where  disclosure  would  undermine  the 
protection  of  commercial  interests  of  a  natural  or  legal  person,  including  intellectual 
property, […] unless there is an overriding public interest in disclosure’.  
In your confirmatory application, you argue that the European Commission was wrong to 
apply  the  above-mentioned  exception  to  the  documents  under  the  request,  and  you  put 
forward  a  number  of  arguments  in  support  of  your  position.  These  arguments  can  be 
summarised as follows: 
Firstly,  you  claim  that  the  European  Commission  has  not  explained  ‘how  disclosure  of 
the  requested  documents  could  specifically  and  actually’  undermine  the  commercial 
interests of the grant applicants. Secondly, you argue that the European Commission was 
wrong to apply by analogy the Cosepuri v EFSA judgment4 to the case at hand. Thirdly, 
you underline that, in order to apply the above-referred exception, ‘it must be shown that 
the documents at issue contain elements which may, if disclosed, seriously undermine the 
commercial interests of a legal person’. 
Finally,  you  argue  that  ‘the  present  request  for  access  does  not  relate  to  any  of  those 
categories  of  documents  which  are  covered  by  a  general  presumption  of  confidentiality 
[…]’. 
                                                 
4   Judgment  of  the  General  Court  of  29  January  2013,  Cosepuri  v  EFSA  (hereafter  referred  to  as 
Cosepuri v EFSA judgment’), Joint Cases T-339/10 and T-532/10, EU:T:2013:38. 


As mentioned above, documents 1 to 18 are applications for grant agreements submitted 
by the participants in a call for proposals launched under the Horizon 2020 programme5. 
The proposals describe in detail the work to be undertaken under the projects, including 
budgets  and  respective  roles  in  the  projects.  They  reflect  technical  know-how  and 
detailed  operational  aspects  concerning  the  implementation  of  the  projects  such  as  the 
descriptions of actions and milestones. They also include extensive business information 
of  the  participating  organisations,  including  the  budget  breakdown  and  the  intended 
approach towards competitors.  
Documents  19  to  36  are  evaluation  summary  reports  of  the  above-mentioned  grant 
proposals.  The  withheld  parts  of  these  documents  have  been  redacted  as  they  contain 
valuable commercial information, including information on budgets, which could be used 
in future calls for proposals. 
The  public  disclosure  of  the  above-mentioned  information  would  not  only  damage  the 
commercial  interests  of  the  participants,  by  placing  in  the  public  domain  sensitive 
commercial  information  about  their  projects,  but  would  also  affect  their  competitive 
position  in  the  market,  as  it  would  reveal  their  strategies  and  specific  know-how. 
Moreover, if such information were to be released by the European Commission, it could 
be  used  by  applicants  in  future  calls  for  proposals,  to  the  detriment  of  the  participants 
concerned. In this way, competitors would gain an unfair competitive advantage, thereby 
harming the position of the private entities concerned.  
Therefore, there is a risk that public access to the grant proposals and the redacted parts 
of  documents  1  to  18  would  undermine  the  commercial  interests  of  the  private  entities 
concerned.  Given  the  foreseen  launch,  in  summer  2019,  of  the  follow-up  call  for 
proposals ‘Centres of Excellence on High Performance Computing (HPC) Applications’, 
I consider this risk as reasonably foreseeable and not purely hypothetical. 
In  this  context,  I  would  like  to  bring  to  your  attention  Case  T-439/08  (Agapiou 
Joséphidès
)6,  where  the  General  Court  ruled  that  ‘methodology  and  expertise  […] 
highlighted as part of the grant application, […] relate to the specific know-how […] and 
contribute to the uniqueness and attractiveness of applications in the context of calls for 
proposals  such  as  that  at  issue,  which  was  intended  to  select  one  or  more  applications, 
following  in  particular  a  comparative  review  of  proposed  projects.  Thus,  particularly 
given  the  competitive  environment  in  which  [the  project  promoters]  operate,  it  is 
necessary to consider that the information in question is confidential’. 
Furthermore,  in  its  Cosepuri  v  EFSA  judgment,  the  General  Court  acknowledged  the 
existence  of  a  general  presumption  of  non-disclosure  in  cases  concerning  access  to  the 
bids  submitted  by  tenderers  in  a  public  procurement  procedure  in  the  event  that  the 
request for access is made by another tenderer.7 The General Court also considered that, 
in order to attain the objective of undistorted competition, it is important that contracting 
                                                 
5   https://ec.europa.eu/programmes/horizon2020/en. 
6   Judgment  of  the  General  Court  of  21  October  2010,  Agapiou  Joséphidès  v  Commission,  T-439/08, 
EU:T:2010:442, paragraphs 127 to 128. 
7   Cosepuri v EFSA judgment, cited above, paragraph 101. 


authorities do not release information relating to contract award procedures, which could 
be  used  to  distort  competition.8  This  case  law  has  been  confirmed  in  case  T-363/14 
(Secolux).9 
As  the  Directorate-General  for  Communications  Networks,  Content  and  Technology 
pointed  out  in  its  reply,  the  same  conclusions  apply  by  analogy  to  the  grant  proposals. 
Indeed,  the  process  to  award  a  grant  is  also,  by  its  nature,  a  highly  competitive  one,  in 
which the information about each proposal serves to determine the success or failure of 
the  applicants.  It  is  thus  reasonably  foreseeable  that  disclosing  details  of  competing 
proposals to the public, and thus to competitors, would undermine the interest set out in 
Article 4(2), first indent of Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001.  
I would also like to underline that Article 149(1) of Regulation (EU, Euratom) 2018/1046 
of  the  European  Parliament  and  of  the  Council  of  18  July  2018  on  the  financial  rules 
applicable  to  the  general  budget  of  the  Union,  amending  Regulations  (EU)  No 
1296/2013,  (EU)  No  1301/2013,  (EU)  No  1303/2013,  (EU)  No  1304/2013,  (EU)  No 
1309/2013,  (EU)  No  1316/2013,  (EU)  No  223/2014,  (EU)  No  283/2014,  and  Decision 
No  541/2014/EU  and  repealing  Regulation  (EU,  Euratom)  No  966/2012  (hereafter 
'Regulation  (EU,  Euratom)  2018/1046')10,  concerning  the  submission  of  application 
documents,  states  that  ‘the  means  of  communication  chosen  shall  be  such  as  to  ensure 
that there is genuine competition and that the following conditions are satisfied:  
(a) each submission contains all the information required for its evaluation;  
(b) the integrity of data is preserved;  
(c) the confidentiality of application documents is preserved;  
(d)  the  protection  of  personal  data  in  accordance  with  Regulation  (EC)  No 
45/2001 is ensured.’ 
I  take  the  view  that  applying  Regulation  (EC)  No  1049/2001  cannot  have  the  effect  of 
rendering  the  above-mentioned  provisions,  over  which  it  does  not  have  precedence, 
ineffective. 
Contrary to your statement, I would like to stress that Article 4(2) of Regulation (EC) No 
1049/2001  does  not  require  disclosure  to  ‘seriously  undermine’  the  protection  of 
commercial  interests.  It  is  sufficient  that  disclosure  would  undermine  the  protection  of 
the commercial interest of the concerned parties. 
 
 
                                                 
8   Ibid, paragraph 100.  
9   Judgment  of  the  General  Court  of  21  September  2016,  Secolux  v  European  Commission, T-363/14, 
EU:T:2016:521, paragraph 49. 
10   Official Journal L 193 of 30.7.2018, p. 1–222. 


In  your  confirmatory  application,  you  argue  that  the  reference,  in  the  initial  reply,  to 
Article 339 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union, which lays down the 
obligation of professional secrecy by members of the Union institutions, ‘cannot be seen 
as  an  argument  in  favour  of  the  existence  of  a  general  rule  of  confidentiality  as  far  as 
documents in the context of a call for proposals are concerned’. You outline that the right 
of  access  to  documents  and  the  duty  of  professional  secrecy  and  ‘are  not  absolute  and 
mutually exclusive’ and that the latter must be weighed ‘against the public interest that 
the activities of the Union institutions take place as openly as possible’.  
Although I agree that Article 339 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union 
does  not  establish,  as  such,  a  general  rule  of  confidentiality  with  regard  to  all  public 
procurement documents, I am of the view that the exception relating to the protection of 
commercial  interests  based  on  Article  4(2),  first  indent  of  Regulation  (EC)  No 
1049/2001, is an expression of the institution’s obligation of professional secrecy, which 
stems from Article 339 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union. Indeed, 
as  you  rightly  point  out  in  your  confirmatory  application,  ‘in  so  far  as  provisions  of 
[secondary  legislation]  prohibit  the  disclosure  of  information  to  the  public,  that 
information  must  be  considered  to  be  covered  by  the  obligation  of  professional 
secrecy’11.  
Please also note that the Union legislature has weighed the above-mentioned interest with 
the public interest in transparency in the activity of the Union institutions by establishing 
the  obligation  not  to  disclose  documents  where  their  release  would  undermine  the 
protection  of  the  commercial  interests  of  the  natural  or  legal  persons  concerned,  unless 
there is an overriding public interest in disclosure.   
Therefore, I consider that the reference in the initial reply to Article 339 of the Treaty on 
the Functioning of the European Union is appropriate and that the European Commission 
must  take  all  necessary  precautions  to  ensure  that  the  protection  of  information  about 
undertakings  covered  by  professional  secrecy  and  other  confidential  information  is  not 
undermined.  
In  light  of  the  above,  I  conclude  that  the  use  of  the  exception  under  Article  4(2),  first 
indent  of  Regulation  (EC)  No  1049/2001  on  the  grounds  of  protecting  commercial 
interests of a natural or legal person is justified, and that access to grant proposals and the 
relevant undisclosed parts of documents 1 to 18 must be refused on that basis.  
2.2.  Protection of privacy and the integrity of the individual 
Article  4(1)(b)  of  Regulation  (EC)  No  1049/2001  provides  that  ‘[t]he  institutions  shall 
refuse  access  to  a  document  where  disclosure  would  undermine  the  protection  of  […] 
privacy and the integrity of the individual, in  particular in  accordance  with  Community 
legislation regarding the protection of personal data’. 
                                                 
11   Judgment  of  the  General  Court  of  30  May  2006,  Bank  of  Austria  Creditanstalt  v  Commission,             
T-198/03, EU:T:2006:136, paragraph 74.  


In  your  confirmatory  request,  you  argue that the  European Commission  ‘failed to  carry 
out  an  examination  demonstrating  that  granting  access  to  [the  requested  document] 
would  specifically  and  actually  undermine  the  privacy  of  [the  persons  concerned],  and 
neither  did  it  verify  whether  the  risk  of  the  protected  interest  being  undermined  was 
reasonably foreseeable and not purely hypothetical’.  
Furthermore,  you  state  that  the  European  Commission  ‘disregards  that  the  framework 
applicable  for  access  to  documents  is  [Regulation  (EC)  No  1049/2001]  and  not 
[Regulation  (EC)  No  45/2001]’  and  that  ‘the principles that  apply  are those established 
by [the case-law] in respect to the assessment under [Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001]’. In 
particular,  you stress  that  ‘it is  for [the European Commission] to  prove that (i)  access 
[…] would [specifically] and [actually] undermine the protected interest and (ii) there is 
no overriding public interest in disclosure’.  
I  would  like  to  draw  your  attention  to  the  judgment  of  the  Court  of  Justice  in  Case         
C-28/08 P (Bavarian Lager)12, in which the Court ruled that when a request is made for 
access  to  documents  containing  personal  data,  Regulation  (EC)  No  45/2001  of  the 
European 
Parliament 
and 
of 
the 
Council 
of 
18 
December 
2000 
on  the  protection  of  individuals  with  regard  to  the  processing  of  personal  data  by  the 
Community  institutions  and  bodies  and  on  the  free  movement  of  such  data13 
(hereafter ‘Regulation (EC) No 45/2001’) becomes fully applicable.  
Please  note  that,  as  from  11  December  2018,  Regulation  (EC)  No  45/2001  has  been 
replaced by Regulation (EU) 2018/1725 of the European Parliament and of the Council 
of 23 October 2018 on the protection of natural persons with regard to the processing of 
personal  data  by  the  Union  institutions,  bodies,  offices  and  agencies  and  on  the  free 
movement  of  such  data,  and  repealing  Regulation  (EC)  No  45/2001  and  Decision  No 
1247/2002/EC14 (hereafter ‘Regulation (EU) 2018/1725’). 
However,  the  case  law  issued  with  regard  to  Regulation  (EC)  No  45/2001  remains 
relevant for the interpretation of Regulation (EU) 2018/1725. 
In  the  above-mentioned  judgment,  the  Court  stated  that  Article  4(1)(b)  of  Regulation  
(EC)  No  1049/2001  ‘requires  that  any  undermining  of  privacy  and  the  integrity  of  the 
individual  must  always  be  examined  and  assessed  in  conformity  with  the  legislation  of 
the  Union  concerning  the  protection  of  personal  data,  and  in  particular  with  […]  [the 
Data Protection] Regulation’.15 
Article  3(1)  of  Regulation  (EU)  2018/1725  provides  that  personal  data  ‘means  any 
information relating to an identified or identifiable natural person […]’. 
                                                 
12   Judgment of the Court of Justice of 29 June 2010,  European Commission v The Bavarian Lager Co. 
Ltd  (hereafter  referred  to  as  ‘European  Commission  v  The  Bavarian  Lager  judgment’)  C-28/08 P, 
EU:C:2010:378, paragraph 59. 
13   Official Journal L 8 of 12.1.2001, page 1.  
14   Official Journal L 205 of 21.11.2018, p. 39. 
15   European Commission v The Bavarian Lager judgment, cited above, paragraph 59. 


As the Court of Justice confirmed in Case C-465/00 (Rechnungshof), ‘there is no reason 
of principle to justify excluding activities of a professional […] nature from the notion of 
private life’.16 
The  grant  proposals  submitted  by  the  applicants  contain  personal  data,  in  particular  the 
names  and  contact  details,  including  telephone  numbers  and  personal  addresses,  of  the 
persons leading each consortium and each partner institution. They also contain personal 
data from the researchers, including their curricula vitae and telephone numbers. 
Pursuant  to  Article  9(1)(b)  of  Regulation  (EU)  2018/1725,  ‘personal  data  shall  only  be 
transmitted to recipients established in the Union other than Union institutions and bodies 
if ‘[t]he recipient establishes that it is necessary to have the data transmitted for a specific 
purpose in the public interest and the controller, where there is any reason to assume that 
the  data  subject’s  legitimate  interests  might  be  prejudiced,  establishes  that  it  is 
proportionate  to  transmit  the  personal  data  for  that  specific  purpose  after  having 
demonstrably weighed the various competing interests’. 
Only if these conditions are fulfilled and the processing constitutes lawful processing in 
accordance  with  the  requirements  of  Article  5  of  Regulation  (EU)  2018/1725,  can  the 
transmission of personal data occur. 
In Case C-615/13 P (ClientEarth), the Court of Justice ruled that the institution does not 
have to examine by itself the existence of a need for transferring personal data.17 This is 
also  clear  from  Article  9(1)(b)  of  Regulation  (EU)  2018/1725,  which  requires  that  the 
necessity to have the personal data transmitted must be established by the recipient. 
According to  Article 9(1)(b) of Regulation  (EU)  2018/1725,  the European Commission 
has to examine the further conditions for a lawful processing of personal data only if the 
first  condition  is  fulfilled,  namely  if  the  recipient  has  established  that  it  is  necessary  to 
have  the  data  transmitted  for  a  specific  purpose  in  the  public  interest.  It  is  only  in  this 
case that the European Commission has to examine whether there is a reason to assume 
that  the  data  subject’s  legitimate  interests  might  be  prejudiced  and,  in  the  affirmative, 
establish  the  proportionality  of  the  transmission  of  the  personal  data  for  that  specific 
purpose after having demonstrably weighed the various competing interests. 
In your confirmatory application, you do not put forward any arguments to establish the 
necessity  to  have  the  personal  data  transmitted  for  a  specific  purpose  in  the  public 
interest. Therefore, the European Commission does not have to examine whether there is 
a reason to assume that the data subject’s legitimate interests might be prejudiced. 
Notwithstanding  the  above,  please  note  that  there  is  a  risk  that  the  disclosure  of  the 
requested personal data would prejudice the legitimate interests of the person concerned.  
                                                 
16   Judgment  of  the  Court  of  Justice  of  20  May  2003,  Rechnungshof  and  Others  v  Österreichischer 
Rundfunk, Joint Cases C-465/00, C-138/01 and C-139/01, EU:C:2003:294, paragraph 73. 
17   Judgment of the Court of Justice of 16 July 2015, ClientEarth v European Food Safety Agency,  
C-615/13 P, EU:C:2015:489, paragraph 47. 
10 

Please note also that Article 4(1)(b) of Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001 does not include 
the  possibility  for  the  exception  defined  therein  to  be  set  aside  by  an  overriding  public 
interest. 
Consequently,  I  conclude  that,  pursuant  to  Article  4(1)(b)  of  Regulation  (EC)  No 
1049/2001,  access  cannot  be  granted  to  the  personal  data  contained  in  the  documents 
under the request, as the need to obtain access thereto for a purpose in the public interest 
has not been substantiated and there is no reason to think that the legitimate interests of 
the individuals concerned would not be prejudiced by disclosure of the personal data  in 
question. 
3. 
OVERRIDING PUBLIC INTEREST IN DISCLOSURE 
The  exception  laid  down  in  Article  4(2),  first  indent  of  Regulation  (EC)  No  1049/2001 
must  be  waived  if  there  is  an  overriding  public  interest  in  disclosure.  Such  an  interest 
must, firstly, be public and, secondly, outweigh the harm caused by the disclosure. 
In  your  confirmatory  application,  you  argue,  in  essence,  that  there  is  an  overriding 
interest in transparency of the procedures for the award of grants under the Horizon 2020 
framework,  notably  as  regards  the  public  interest  in  knowing  ‘whether  the  award  of 
grants was rightly adjudicated and assigned’. You refer to several Court judgments and 
you state that ‘the principle of transparency becomes even more prevalent when required 
to  ensure  greater  participation  by  citizens  in  the  decision-making  process  and  to 
guarantee  that  the  administration  enjoys  greater  legitimacy  and  is  more  effective  and 
more  accountable  to  the  citizen  in  a  democratic  system’.  You  also  state  that  ‘[the 
principle of transparency] has more weight where, like in this case, the documents relate 
to an administrative procedure, in which [the European Commission] acts as the selecting 
body’.  
I would like to refer to the judgment of the Court of Justice in Case C-127/13 (Strack)18, 
in which the Court ruled that, in order to establish the existence of an overriding public 
interest in transparency, it is not sufficient to merely rely on that principle. The applicant 
has  to  show  why,  in  the  specific  situation,  the  principle  of  transparency  is  especially 
pressing  and  capable,  therefore,  of  prevailing  over  the  reasons  justifying  non-
disclosure.19 
The  arguments  that  you  put  forward  in  support  of  your  request  do  not  establish 
sufficiently  how,  in  the  present  case,  the  public  interest  in  knowing  whether  the  grants 
were  rightly  adjudicated  is  particularly  compelling  so  as  to  prevail  over  the  reasons 
justifying  the  refusal  to  disclose  the  grant  proposals,  as  explained  in  section  2.1  above. 
Whilst  I  understand  that  there  could  indeed  be  a  public  interest  regarding  this  subject 
matter,  I  consider  that  such  a  public  interest  has  been  satisfied  by  the  (wide)  partial 
access that is herewith granted to the evaluation summary reports (documents 19 to 36).  
                                                 
18   Judgment  of  the  Court  of  Justice  of  2  October  2014,  Strack  v  Commission,  C-127/13  P, 
EU:C:2014:2250, paragraph 128. 
19   Ibid, paragraph 129. 
11 


The  fact  that  the  documents  relate  to  an  administrative  procedure  and  not  to  any 
legislative  act,  for  which  the  Court  of  Justice  has  acknowledged  the  existence  of  wider 
openness,20 provides further support to this conclusion. 
In  these  circumstances,  I  consider  that  the  public  interest  is  better  served  by  protecting 
the  commercial  interests  of  the  private  entities  concerned,  in  accordance  with  Article 
4(2), first indent of Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001.  
4. 
PARTIAL ACCESS 
In  accordance  with  Article  4(6)  of  Regulation  (EC)  No  1049/2001,  I  have  considered 
whether partial access could be granted to the documents identified under your request. 
As stated above, partial access is herewith granted to documents 19 to 36. As regards the 
remaining  parts  of  these  documents,  I  consider  that  further  partial  access  cannot  be 
granted as this would harm the interest referred to in section 2.1 of this decision.  
As  regards  documents  1  to  18,  these  documents  are  covered  in  their  entirety  by  the 
exception  to  the  public  access  to  documents  laid  down  in  Article  4(2),  first  indent  of 
Regulation  (EC)  No  1049/2001  for  the  reasons  explained  above.  Hence,  I  consider  that 
no  meaningful  partial  access  is  possible  without  undermining  the  interests  protected 
under this provision.  
5. 
MEANS OF REDRESS 
Finally, I draw your attention to the means of redress available against this decision. You 
may  either  bring  proceedings  before  the  General  Court  or  file  a  complaint  with  the 
European  Ombudsman  under  the  conditions  specified  respectively  in  Articles  263  and 
228 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union. 
Yours sincerely, 
For the Commission 
Martin SELMAYR 
Secretary-General 

 
 
Enclosures: (18) 
 
 
 
                                                 
20   Judgment  of  the  Court  of  Justice  of  29  June  2010,  Commission  v  Technische  Glaswerke  Ilmenau 
Gmbh,  C-139/07,  EU:C:2010:376,  paragraphs  53-55  and  60;  European  Commission  v  The  Bavarian 
Lager 
judgment, cited above, paragraphs 56-57 and 63.  
12