Dies ist eine HTML Version eines Anhanges der Informationsfreiheitsanfrage 'The 61st-90th Commission replies to confirmatory applications issued in 2019'.




DOC 14
Ref. Ares(2020)4117196 - 05/08/2020
EUROPEAN COMMISSION 
Brussels, 22.2.2019 
C(2019) 1650 final 
 
 
Specialised Nutrition Europe 
Avenue des Nerviens 9-31 
1040 Brussels  
Belgium 
DECISION OF THE EUROPEAN COMMISSION PURSUANT TO ARTICLE 4 OF THE
IMPLEMENTING RULES TO REGULATION (EC) NO 1049/20011
Subject: 
Your confirmatory application for access to documents under 
Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001 - GESTDEM 2018/5849 

Dear 

I  refer  to  your  e-mail  of  18  December,  registered  on  23  December  2018,  in  which  you 
submitted a confirmatory application in accordance with Article 7(2) of Regulation (EC) 
No 1049/2001 regarding public access to European Parliament, Council and Commission 
documents2 (hereafter ‘Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001’).
1.
SCOPE OF YOUR REQUEST
In your initial application of 8 November 2018, dealt with by the Directorate-General for 
Health  and  Food  Safety,  you  requested  access  to  ‘any  document  related  to  the  current 
discussion  on  a  draft  Commission  Regulation  proposing  to  prohibit  the  use  of  health 
claims  made  on  mandatory  nutrient  for  infants  and  young  children  food 
(SANTE/10891/2015)’. You further specified that ‘[t]hese documents could encompass, 
inter  alia,  any  document/exchange  with  the  Legal  Services  to  assess  the  legal 
feasibility/options of such a prohibition within the EU legislative framework’. 
In  its  initial  reply  of  29  November  2018,  the  Directorate-General  for  Health  and  Food 
Safety informed you that it had identified the two following documents as falling under 
the scope of your request: 
1
Official Journal L 345 of  29.12.2001, p. 94. 
2
Official Journal L 145 of  31.5.2001, p. 43. 
Commission européenne/Europese Commissie, 1049 Bruxelles/Brussel, BELGIQUE/BELGIË - Tel. +32 22991111 

-  a note of 11 May 2017 from the Director-General of the Directorate-General for 
Health and Food Safety to the Head of Cabinet of Commissioner Andriukaitis on 
health  claims  made  on  foods  targeting  infants  and  young  children,  reference 
Ares(2017)2411415 (hereafter ‘document 1’); 
and 
-  an e-mail of 18 May 2017 related to the above note from the Head of Cabinet to 
the    Director-General  of  the  Directorate-General  for  Health  and  Food  Safety, 
reference Ares (2017)2557081 (hereafter ‘document 2’). 
The Directorate-General for Health and Food Safety refused access to the two documents 
pursuant  to  Article  4(3),  first  subparagraph  (protection  of  the  decision-making  process) 
of Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001. 
In your confirmatory application, you asked the European Commission to reconsider this 
position.  
The scope of this confirmatory decision therefore covers the review of the position of the 
Directorate-General for Health and Food Safety with regard to the two above-mentioned 
documents. 
You support your application with several arguments that have been taken into account in 
my review, the results of which are set out below. 
2. 
ASSESSMENT AND CONCLUSIONS UNDER REGULATION (EC) NO 1049/2001 
When  assessing  a  confirmatory  application  for  access  to  documents  submitted  pursuant 
to Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001, the Secretariat-General conducts a review of the reply 
given by the relevant Directorate-General at the initial stage. 
Having  examined  your  confirmatory application,  I  can inform  you that  partial access  is 
granted to document 1. The partial refusal is based on the exceptions of Article (4)(1)(b) 
(protection  of  privacy  and  the  integrity  of  the  individual)  and  of  Article  (4)(3),  first 
subparagraph  (protection  of  the  decision-making  process)  of  Regulation  (EC)  No 
1049/2001. 
Moreover,  I confirm the initial decision of the  Directorate-General for Health and Food 
Safety  to  refuse  access  to  document  2,  based  on  the  exception  of  Article  4(3),  first 
subparagraph  (protection  of  the  decision-making  process)  of  Regulation  (EC)  No 
1049/2001.  
 
 
2.1. 
Protection of the decision-making process 
Article 4(3), first subparagraph of Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001 provides that ‘[a]ccess 
to  a document, drawn up by  an institution for internal  use or received by an institution, 
which relates to a matter where the decision has not been taken by the institution, shall be 


refused  if  disclosure  of  the  document  would  seriously  undermine  the  institution's 
decision-making process, unless there is an overriding public interest in disclosure’. 
Document  1  contains  information  on  the  three  policy  options  identified  by  the 
Directorate-General  for  Health  and  Food  Safety  concerning  the  authorisation  of  health 
claims made on foods targeting infants and young children.  
More specifically, this document contains a description of each of these options as well 
as an evaluation of the latter's advantages and disadvantages from the perspective of the 
responsible  Directorate-General.  Furthermore,  the  document  includes  strategic  elements 
insofar as it evaluates the potential positions of the different parties in the EU decision-
making process and of relevant stakeholders as well as the possible political implications 
resulting from the implementation of each policy option. 
Finally, the document presents the conclusion of the Directorate-General for Health and 
Food Safety on the preferable option. The purpose of this note was to seek the views of 
the  Head  of  Cabinet  of  Commissioner  Andriukaitis  on  the  way  forward  concerning  the 
option to be submitted to the consultation of Member States and the other services of the 
European Commission. 
Document 2 contains the reply of the Head of Cabinet of Commissioner Andriukaitis to 
document 1. 
Both documents have been drawn up for use within the relevant services of the European 
Commission. 
There  are  discussions  ongoing  on  the  authorisation  of  health  claims  made  on  foods 
targeting  infants  and  young  children,  which  the  European  Commission  intends  to 
regulate by means of an implementing act.  
This  very  complex  matter  relates  to  three  different  pieces  of  legislation,  i.e.  
Regulation 
(EU) 
No 
1169/20113, 
Regulation 
(EC) 
No 
1924/20064 
and 
Regulation (EU) No 609/20135. 
                                                 
3   Regulation (EU) No 1169/2011 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 25 October 2011 on 
the provision of food information to consumers, amending Regulations (EC) No 1924/2006 and (EC) 
No 1925/2006  of  the  European  Parliament  and  of  the  Council,  and  repealing  Commission  Directive 
87/250/EEC,  Council  Directive  90/496/EEC,  Commission  Directive  1999/10/EC,  Directive 
2000/13/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council, Commission Directives 2002/67/EC and 
2008/5/EC  and  Commission  Regulation  (EC)  No 608/2004,  Official  Journal  L  304  of  22.11.2011,  
p. 18. 
4   Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 20 December 2006 
on nutrition and health claims made on foods, Official Journal L 404 of 30.12.2006, p. 9. 
5   Regulation (EU) No 609/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 12 June 2013 on food 
intended for infants and young children, food for special medical purposes, and total diet replacement 
for  weight  control  and  repealing  Council  Directive  92/52/EEC,  Commission  Directives  96/8/EC, 
1999/21/EC, 2006/125/EC and 2006/141/EC, Directive 2009/39/EC of the European Parliament and of 
the Council and Commission Regulations (EC) No 41/2009 and (EC) No 953/2009, Official Journal L 
181 of 29.6.2013, p. 35. 


Moreover, the issues at stake are highly sensitive, as they concern health claims on food 
for  infants  and  young  children,  who  are  a  vulnerable  population  needing  specific 
protection.   
Different positions and views on the option to be chosen came up in the framework of the 
discussions  of  the  Directorate-General  for  Health  and  Food  Safety  with  the  Member 
States. 
Therefore,  contrary  to  the  assumption  expressed  in  your  confirmatory  application, 
according to which the decision-making process is ‘already at advanced stages’, it must 
be noted that this process is still in an early phase.  
In  fact,  the  discussions  with  Member  States  on  the  approach  are  ongoing  and  all  three 
options as  set  out  in document 1 are still under discussion. The  Directorate-General  for 
Health and Food Safety is currently analysing the different positions of Member States.  
Therefore,  the  conclusion  on  the  preferable  option  is  still  subject  to  change,  and  the 
consultation of the other relevant services of the European Commission has not yet been 
launched by the responsible Directorate-General.  
Against this background, the public disclosure of the advantages and disadvantages of the 
three options and of the conclusion on the preferable option, as set out in document 1, as 
well  as  of  the  relating  reply  of  the  Head  of  Cabinet  of  Commissioner  Andriukaitis 
contained  in  document  2,  at  this  stage  of  the  process  would  reveal  preliminary 
assessments and evaluations.  
However,  there  is  the  real  risk  that  such  preliminary  positions  of  the  European 
Commission,  taken  out  of  context,  could  be  considered  as  final  and  thus  result  in 
misleading  and  even  erroneous  conclusions  on  the  policy  option  to  be  implemented 
through the relevant implementing act. 
This,  in  turn,  would  seriously  undermine  the  margin  of  manoeuvre  of  the  European 
Commission in exploring, in the framework of the ongoing discussions with the Member 
States, all possible policy options free from external pressure. However, it is essential to 
prevent any external interference and pressure, as such interference would jeopardise the 
efficiency  and  integrity  of  the  decision-making  process.  In  this  instance,  the  European 
Commission has to preserve a certain room for manoeuvre and ‘space to think’.  
Public  disclosure  at  this  stage  of  the  process  would  also  seriously  undermine  the 
European Commission’s capacity to  propose and  promote compromises concerning the 
issues still under discussion.  
The fact that the matter of health claims on food for a vulnerable population attracts a lot 
of  attention  and  that  the  documents  requested  contain  strategic  elements,  which  the 
European Commission will use in its exchanges with the Member States, only reinforces 
this conclusion.  


As  a  result,  public  disclosure  would  seriously  restrict  the  margin  of  manoeuvre  of  the 
European Commission in exploring all possible options in this regard free from external 
pressure and thus seriously undermine the latter's decision-making process with regard to 
the relevant draft implementing act as a whole.  
Therefore, I conclude that the refusal of access to the relevant parts of document 1 and to 
document 2 is justified, based on Article 4(3), first subparagraph of Regulation (EC) No 
1049/2001. 
2.2. 
Protection of privacy and the integrity of the individual 
Article  4(1)(b)  of  Regulation  (EC)  No  1049/2001  provides  that  ‘[t]he  institutions  shall 
refuse  access  to  a  document  where  disclosure  would  undermine  the  protection  of  […] 
privacy and the integrity of the individual, in  particular in  accordance  with  Community 
legislation regarding the protection of personal data’. 
In  its  judgment  in  Case  C-28/08  P  (Bavarian  Lager)6,  the  Court  of  Justice  ruled  that 
when  a  request  is  made  for  access  to  documents  containing  personal  data,  Regulation 
(EC) No 45/2001 of the  European Parliament and of the Council of 18 December 2000 
on  the  protection  of  individuals  with  regard  to  the  processing  of  personal  data  by  the 
Community  institutions  and  bodies  and  on  the  free  movement  of  such  data7 
(hereafter ‘Regulation (EC) No 45/2001’) becomes fully applicable.  
Please  note  that,  as  from  11  December  2018,  Regulation  (EC)  No  45/2001  has  been 
repealed by Regulation (EU) 2018/1725 of the European Parliament and of the Council 
of 23 October 2018 on the protection of natural persons with regard to the processing of 
personal  data  by  the  Union  institutions,  bodies,  offices  and  agencies  and  on  the  free 
movement  of  such  data,  and  repealing  Regulation  (EC)  No  45/2001  and  Decision  No 
1247/2002/EC8 (hereafter ‘Regulation (EU) 2018/1725’). 
However,  the  case  law  issued  with  regard  to  Regulation  (EC)  No  45/2001  remains 
relevant for the interpretation of Regulation (EU) 2018/1725. 
In  the  above-mentioned  judgment,  the  Court  stated  that  Article  4(1)(b)  of  Regulation  
(EC)  No  1049/2001  ‘requires  that  any  undermining  of  privacy  and  the  integrity  of  the 
individual  must  always  be  examined  and  assessed  in  conformity  with  the  legislation  of 
the  Union  concerning  the  protection  of  personal  data,  and  in  particular  with  […]  [the 
Data Protection] Regulation’.9 
Article  3(1)  of  Regulation  (EU)  2018/1725  provides  that  personal  data  ‘means  any 
information relating to an identified or identifiable natural person […]’.  
                                                 
6   Judgment of the Court of Justice of 29 June 2010,  European Commission v The Bavarian Lager Co. 
Ltd  (hereafter  referred  to  as  ‘European  Commission  v  The  Bavarian  Lager  judgment’)  C-28/08 P, 
EU:C:2010:378, paragraph 59. 
7   Official Journal L 8 of 12.1.2001, page 1.  
8   Official Journal L 205 of 21.11.2018, p. 39. 
9   European Commission v The Bavarian Lager judgment, cited above, paragraph 59. 


As the Court of Justice confirmed in Case C-465/00 (Rechnungshof), ‘there is no reason 
of principle to justify excluding activities of a professional […] nature from the notion of 
private life’.10 
Document 1 contains personal data such as the names and initials of persons who do not 
form part of the senior management of the European Commission. Moreover, it contains 
a handwritten signature and a handwritten salutation to the addressee. 
The names11 of the persons concerned as well as other data from which their identity can 
be  deduced  undoubtedly  constitute  personal  data  in  the  meaning  of  Article  3(1)  of 
Regulation (EU) 2018/1725.  
Pursuant  to  Article  9(1)(b)  of  Regulation  (EU)  2018/1725,  ‘personal  data  shall  only  be 
transmitted to recipients established in the Union other than Union institutions and bodies 
if ‘[t]he recipient establishes that it is necessary to have the data transmitted for a specific 
purpose in the public interest and the controller, where there is any reason to assume that 
the  data  subject’s  legitimate  interests  might  be  prejudiced,  establishes  that  it  is 
proportionate  to  transmit  the  personal  data  for  that  specific  purpose  after  having 
demonstrably weighed the various competing interests’. 
Only if these conditions are fulfilled and the processing constitutes lawful processing in 
accordance  with  the  requirements  of  Article  5  of  Regulation  (EU)  2018/1725,  can  the 
transmission of personal data occur. 
In Case C-615/13 P (ClientEarth), the Court of Justice ruled that the institution does not 
have to examine by itself the existence of a need for transferring personal data.12 This is 
also  clear  from  Article  9(1)(b)  of  Regulation  (EU)  2018/1725,  which  requires  that  the 
necessity to have the personal data transmitted must be established by the recipient. 
According to  Article 9(1)(b) of Regulation  (EU)  2018/1725,  the European Commission 
has to  examine the  further conditions  for  the lawful processing of personal  data only if 
the  first  condition  is  fulfilled,  namely  if  the  recipient  establishes  that  it  is  necessary  to 
have  the  data  transmitted  for  a  specific  purpose  in  the  public  interest.  It  is  only  in  this 
case that the European Commission has to examine whether there is a reason to assume 
that  the  data  subject’s  legitimate  interests  might  be  prejudiced  and,  in  the  affirmative, 
establish  the  proportionality  of  the  transmission  of  the  personal  data  for  that  specific 
purpose after having demonstrably weighed the various competing interests. 
In your confirmatory application, you do not put forward any arguments to establish the 
necessity  to  have  the  data  transmitted  for  a  specific  purpose  in  the  public  interest. 
Therefore, the European Commission does not have to examine whether there is a reason 
to assume that the data subjects’ legitimate interests might be prejudiced. 
                                                 
10   Judgment  of  the  Court  of  Justice  of  20  May  2003,  Rechnungshof  and  Others  v  Österreichischer 
Rundfunk, Joined Cases C-465/00, C-138/01 and C-139/01, EU:C:2003:294, paragraph 73. 
11   European Commission v The Bavarian Lager judgment, cited above, paragraph 68. 
12   Judgment  of  the  Court  of  Justice  of  16  July  2015,  ClientEarth  v  European  Food  Safety  Agency,  
C-615/13 P, EU:C:2015:489, paragraph 47. 


Notwithstanding the above, there are reasons to assume that the legitimate interests of the 
data  subjects  concerned  would  be  prejudiced  by  the  disclosure  of  the  personal  data 
reflected  in  the  documents,  as  there  is  a  real  and non-hypothetical  risk  that  such  public 
disclosure would harm their privacy and subject them to unsolicited external contacts.  
As  to  the  handwritten  signature  and  the  handwritten  salutation  appearing  in  document  1, 
which  constitute  biometric  data,  there  is  a  risk  that  their  disclosure  would  prejudice  the 
legitimate interest of the person concerned. 
Consequently,  I  conclude  that,  pursuant  to  Article  4(1)(b)  of  Regulation  (EC)  No 
1049/2001,  access  cannot  be  granted  to  the  personal  data,  as  the  need  to  obtain  access 
thereto  for  a  purpose  in  the  public  interest  has  not  been  substantiated  and  there  is  no 
reason  to  think  that  the  legitimate  interests  of  the  individuals  concerned  would  not  be 
prejudiced by the disclosure of the personal data concerned. 
3. 
PARTIAL ACCESS 
Partial access is hereby granted to document 1, as set out above. 
In accordance with Article 4(6) of Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001, I have also considered 
the  possibility  of  granting  partial  access  to  document  2.  Nonetheless,  no  meaningful 
partial  access  to  this  document  is  possible  without  undermining  the  interests  described 
above, based on the exception of Article 4(3), first subparagraph of Regulation (EC) No 
1049/2001.   
4. 
OVERRIDING PUBLIC INTEREST IN DISCLOSURE 
The  exception  provided  in  Article  4(3),  first  subparagraph  of  Regulation  (EC)  No 
1049/2001 must be waived if there is an overriding public interest in disclosure. Such an 
interest must, firstly, be public and, secondly, outweigh the harm caused by disclosure. 
In  your  confirmatory  application,  you  point  out  that  no  stakeholder  consultation  was 
carried out on the draft measure prepared by the Directorate-General for Health and Food 
Safety and that, therefore, your organisation was prevented from ‘[h]aving access to the 
information  necessary  to  get  a  clear  understanding  of  the  Commission’s  rationale  and 
proposal  and  anticipate  the  impacts  on  the  sector’  and  ‘[b]eing  able  to  comment  at  an 
early stage the measure so that adequate and informed comments could be formulated’. 
In this context, I would like to highlight that your organisation had expressed its position 
on  several  occasions  via  different  means  (i.e.  meetings,  position  papers  and  e-mail 
exchanges  with  representatives  of  the  Directorate-General  for  Health  and  Food  Safety), 
which have been considered in the context of the decision-making process.  
Whilst I acknowledge that it is in the public interest that the EU decision-making process 
is as transparent as possible, I am also of the view that it is in the public interest that the 
decision-making takes place under circumstances allowing the European Commission to 
explore  all  policy  options  free  from  external  pressure  and  without  limiting  the  latter's 
margin of manoeuvre. 



Against this background, I consider that the arguments put forward in your confirmatory 
application are not capable of demonstrating the existence of a public interest that would 
override  the  need  to  protect  the  decision-making  process  of  the  European  Commission 
concerning the relevant draft implementing act. 
Nor  have  I,  based  on  the  elements  at  my  disposal,  been  able  to  identify  any  elements 
capable of demonstrating the existence of an overriding public interest.  
Indeed,  I consider that in this specific case and at this stage, the public interest is better 
served  by  protecting  the  European  Commission’s  decision-making  process  free  from 
external pressure, which is of particular relevance in the case at hand because the issues 
to be regulated concern a vulnerable population needing specific protection. 
In conclusion, I am of the view that the public interest is fully served in the present case 
by  the  partial  disclosure  of  document  1,  which  reveals  the  policy  options  under 
discussion and allows your organisation and other stakeholders to comment on them. 
Please note that Article 4(1)(b) (protection of privacy and the integrity of the individual) 
of  Regulation  (EC)  No  1049/2001  is  an  absolute  exception  and  does  not  need  to  be 
balanced against any possible overriding public interest in disclosure.  
5. 
MEANS OF REDRESS 
Finally, I draw your attention to the means of redress available against this decision. You 
may  either  bring  proceedings  before  the  General  Court  or  file  a  complaint  with  the 
European  Ombudsman  under  the  conditions  specified  respectively  in  Articles  263  and 
228 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union. 
Yours sincerely, 
 
For the Commission 
Martin SELMAYR 
Secretary-General 

 
 
Enclosure: (1)