Dies ist eine HTML Version eines Anhanges der Informationsfreiheitsanfrage 'The 61st-90th Commission replies to confirmatory applications issued in 2019'.




DOC 
16
Ref. Ares(2020)4117196 - 05/08/2020
EUROPEAN COMMISSION 
Brussels, 25.2.2019 
C(2019) 1704 final 
 
 
 
Czech Republic 
DECISION OF THE EUROPEAN COMMISSION PURSUANT TO ARTICLE 4 OF THE
IMPLEMENTING RULES TO REGULATION (EC) NO 1049/20011
Subject: 
Your  confirmatory  application  for  access  to  documents  under 
Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001 – GESTDEM 2018/6387 

Dear 
 
I  refer  to  your  letter  of  4  January  2019,  registered  on  7  January  2019,  in  which  you 
submitted a confirmatory application in accordance with Article 7(2) of Regulation (EC) 
No 1049/2001 regarding public access to European Parliament, Council and Commission 
documents2 (hereafter 'Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001').
1.
SCOPE OF YOUR REQUEST
In your initial application of 3 December 2018, addressed to the Directorate-General for 
Budget, you requested access to ‘a document sent by [the] European Commission […] to 
[C]zech representatives in relation to a possible conflict of interests of [P]rime [M]inister
Babiš,  which  [Commissioner  Oettinger]  […]  mentioned  during  [the]  hearing  of  the
European Parliament’s Committee on Budgetary Control [on 3 December 2018]’.
In  its  initial  reply  of  21  December  2018,  the  Directorate-General  for  Budget  identified 
one  document,  registered  under  the  reference  number  Ares(2018)6120850,  as  falling 
within the scope of  your request.  It  refused access to  this document on the  basis of the 
exception  of  Article  4(2),  third  indent  of  Regulation  (EC)  No  1049/2001  (protection  of 
the purpose of inspections, investigations and audits).  
1
Official Journal L 345 of 29.12.2001, p. 94. 
2
Official Journal L 145 of 31.5.2001, p. 43. 
Commission européenne/Europese Commissie, 1049 Bruxelles/Brussel, BELGIQUE/BELGIË - Tel. +32 22991111 

 
In  your  confirmatory  application,  you  requested  a  review  of  this  position  and  you  put 
forward  a  series  of  arguments  in  support  of  your  request.  I  have  taken  your  arguments 
into account in my assessment, the results of which are set out below.  
2. 
ASSESSMENT AND CONCLUSIONS UNDER REGULATION (EC) NO 1049/2001 
When  assessing  a  confirmatory  application  for  access  to  documents  submitted  pursuant 
to Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001, the Secretariat-General conducts a review of the reply 
given by the relevant Directorate-General at the initial stage. 
Following  this  review,  I  wish  to  inform  you  that  I  confirm  the  initial  decision  of  the 
Directorate-General for Budget to refuse access to the requested document on the basis of 
the  exceptions  of  Article  4(2),  third  indent  (protection  of  the  purpose  of  inspections, 
investigations  and  audits),  Article  4(3),  first  subparagraph,  (protection  of  the  decision-
making  process)  and  Article  4(1)(b)  (protection  of  privacy  and  the  integrity  of  the 
individual) of Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001, for the reasons set out below. 
2.1.  Protection of the purpose of inspections, investigations and audits 
Article  4(2),  third  indent  of  Regulation  (EC)  No  1049/2001  provides  that  ‘[t]he 
institutions  shall  refuse  access  to  a  document  where  disclosure  would  undermine  the 
protection of […] the purpose of inspections, investigations and audits, […] unless there 
is an overriding public interest in disclosure.’  
The  document  requested  is  a  letter  sent  by  Commissioner  Oettinger  to  the  Czech 
authorities  on  29  November  2018  and  relates  to  an  ongoing  audit  co-ordinated  by 
different departments of the European Commission. The main purpose of the audit is to 
verify  the  appropriateness  of  the  control  mechanisms  implemented  by  the  Czech 
Republic  to  avoid  conflict  of  interests.  The  audit  covers  the  management  and  control 
systems  in  place before  the entry into force of Regulation (EU, Euratom) 2018/1046  of 
the  European  Parliament  and  of  the  Council  of  18  July  2018  on  the  financial  rules 
applicable  to  the  general  budget  of  the  Union,  amending  Regulations  (EU)  No 
1296/2013,  (EU)  No  1301/2013,  (EU)  No  1303/2013,  (EU)  No  1304/2013,  (EU)  No 
1309/2013,  (EU)  No  1316/2013,  (EU)  No  223/2014,  (EU)  No  283/2014,  and  Decision 
No  541/2014/EU  and  repealing  Regulation  (EU,  Euratom)  No  966/2012  (hereafter 
‘Regulation  (EU,  Euratom)  2018/1046’)3.  It  also  covers  operations  approved  after  the 
entry into force of Regulation (EU, Euratom) 2018/1046. 
The  document  requested  cannot  be  dissociated  from  the  audit  investigation,  which  is 
currently ongoing. Indeed, a common announcement letter on the co-ordinated audit was 
sent  by  the  relevant  European  Commission  services  on  7  December  2018.  The  audit  in 
question  started  on  8  January  2019  and  has  not  yet  been  finalised.  In  particular,  the 
relevant  services  of  the  European  Commission  are  currently  conducting  on-the-spot 
checks at national level, which may involve additional on-the-spot audit visits.  
                                                 
3   Official Journal L 193 of 30.7.2018, p. 1–222. 


 
Hence, the document to which you seek to obtain access concerns audits proceedings that 
are fully ongoing.  
The  General  Court  acknowledged  that  the  exception  of  Article  4(2),  third  indent  of 
Regulation  (EC)  No  1049/2001  applies  if  the  disclosure  of  the  documents  under  the 
request  may  endanger  the  completion  of  inspections,  investigations  or  audits.  It  stated 
that  ‘[t]he  interest  protected  by  that  exception  is  the  interest  in  allowing  audits  to  be 
conducted independently and free of pressures, whether these come from the body being 
audited, from other interested bodies or from the general public’.4 
The public disclosure of the requested document, at least at this stage, would negatively 
influence  the  outcome  of  the  above-mentioned  audits,  which  are  still  in  progress.  It 
would expose the relevant European Commission departments to the foreseeable risk of 
coming under outside pressure, which would be detrimental to the proper conduct of the 
audit  and  undermine  its  effectiveness.  It  could  also  affect  the  European  Commission’s 
capacity to carry out appropriate follow-up measures, if deemed necessary. 
Moreover,  public  access  to  the  requested  document  would  compromise  the  smooth 
cooperation  between  the  European  Commission  and  the  Czech  authorities,  which  is  an 
essential precondition for the effective fulfilment of the duties of the relevant European 
Commission services.  Indeed, it would lead to  a reduced willingness,  by  the authorities 
of  the  Member  State  concerned,  to  participate  constructively  in  ongoing  and  future 
investigations.  
Against this background, there is a foreseeable and non-hypothetical risk that the public 
release  of  the  document  requested  would  undermine  the  purpose  of  the  ongoing  audit, 
which is, in this instance, to obtain reasonable assurance that the management and control 
systems  implemented  by  the  Member  State  under  investigation  are  functioning 
effectively and, ultimately, to protect the Union’s financial interests.  
I conclude, therefore, that access to the requested document must be denied on the basis 
of the exception of Article 4(2), third indent of Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001, at least as 
long as the audit procedure is ongoing. 
2.2.  Protection of the decision-making process 
Article 4(3), first subparagraph of Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001 provides that:‘[a]ccess 
to a document, drawn up by an institution for internal use or received by an institution, 
which relates to a matter where the decision has not been taken by the institution, shall be 
refused  if  disclosure  of  the  document  would  seriously  undermine  the  institution's 
decision-making process, unless there is an overriding public interest in disclosure’. 
The  document  to  which  you  request  access  contains  sensitive  preliminary  conclusions 
regarding an alleged conflict of interests on which the European Commission has not yet 
taken  a  final  position.  These  preliminary  considerations  might  be  subject  to  further 
                                                 
4   Judgment  of  the  General  Court  of  12  May  2015,  Technion  v  European  Commission,  T-480/11, 
EU:T:2015:272, paragraph 63. 


 
discussions  between  the  relevant  services  of  the  European  Commission,  as  the  co-
ordinated audit is still ongoing.  
Hence,  public  access  to  the  requested  document  would  place  in  the  public  domain 
preliminary conclusions that have not yet been confirmed. This might create confusion in 
the public opinion. 
Against this background, there is a risk that the release of the requested document would 
seriously undermine the ongoing decision-making process of the European Commission 
with regard to the pending assessment of a possible conflict of interests, by prejudicing 
its  outcome.  Given  the  particular  circumstances  in  this  case,  I  consider  this  risk  as 
reasonably  foreseeable  and  not  purely  hypothetical.  Please  note  that  the  General  Court 
has confirmed that the above-referred exception can be applied to documents sent to third 
parties.5 
Consequently,  I  consider  that  the  requested  document  is  also  covered  by  the  exception 
seeking  to  protect  the  decision-making  process  (Article  4(3),  first  subparagraph,  of 
Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001) and that access must therefore be refused on that basis.  
2.3.  Protection of privacy and the integrity of the individual 
Article  4(1)(b)  of  Regulation  (EC)  No  1049/2001  provides  that  ‘[t]he  institutions  shall 
refuse  access  to  a  document  where  disclosure  would  undermine  the  protection  of  […] 
privacy and the integrity of the individual, in  particular in  accordance  with  Community 
legislation regarding the protection of personal data’. 
In  its  judgment  in  Case  C-28/08  P  (Bavarian  Lager)6,  the  Court  of  Justice  ruled  that 
when  a  request  is  made  for  access  to  documents  containing  personal  data,  Regulation 
(EC) No 45/2001 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 18 December 2000 
on  the  protection  of  individuals  with  regard  to  the  processing  of  personal  data  by  the 
Community  institutions  and  bodies  and  on  the  free  movement  of  such  data7 
(hereafter ‘Regulation (EC) No 45/2001’) becomes fully applicable.  
Please  note  that,  as  from  11  December  2018,  Regulation  (EC)  No  45/2001  has  been 
replaced by Regulation (EU) 2018/1725 of the European Parliament and of the Council 
of 23 October 2018 on the protection of natural persons with regard to the processing of 
personal  data  by  the  Union  institutions,  bodies,  offices  and  agencies  and  on  the  free 
movement  of  such  data,  and  repealing  Regulation  (EC)  No  45/2001  and  Decision  No 
1247/2002/EC8 (hereafter ‘Regulation (EU) 2018/1725’). 
                                                 
5   Judgment  of  the  General  Court  of  26  April  2016,  Strack  v  European  Commission,  T-221/08, 
EU:T:2016:242, paragraph 165.  
6   Judgment of the Court of Justice of 29 June 2010,  European Commission v The Bavarian Lager Co. 
Ltd  (hereafter  referred  to  as  ‘European  Commission  v  The  Bavarian  Lager  judgment’),  C-28/08 P, 
EU:C:2010:378, paragraph 59. 
7   Official Journal L 8 of 12.1.2001, p. 1.  
8   Official Journal L 205 of 21.11.2018, p. 39. 


 
However,  the  case  law  issued  with  regard  to  Regulation  (EC)  No  45/2001  remains 
relevant for the interpretation of Regulation (EU) 2018/1725. 
In  the  above-mentioned  judgment,  the  Court  stated  that  Article  4(1)(b)  of  Regulation  
(EC)  No  1049/2001  ‘requires  that  any  undermining  of  privacy  and  the  integrity  of  the 
individual  must  always  be  examined  and  assessed  in  conformity  with  the  legislation  of 
the  Union  concerning  the  protection  of  personal  data,  and  in  particular  with  […]  [the 
Data Protection] Regulation’.9 
Article  3(1)  of  Regulation  (EU)  2018/1725  provides  that  personal  data  ‘means  any 
information relating to an identified or identifiable natural person […]’. 
As the Court of Justice confirmed in Case C-465/00 (Rechnungshof), ‘there is no reason 
of principle to justify excluding activities of a professional […] nature from the notion of 
private life’.10 
The  document  to  which  you  requested  access  contains  biometric  data  from 
Commissioner Oettinger, in particular his signature and handwritten comments.  
Pursuant  to  Article  9(1)(b)  of  Regulation  (EU)  2018/1725,  ‘personal  data  shall  only  be 
transmitted to recipients established in the Union other than Union institutions and bodies 
if ‘[t]he recipient establishes that it is necessary to have the data transmitted for a specific 
purpose in the public interest and the controller, where there is any reason to assume that 
the  data  subject’s  legitimate  interests  might  be  prejudiced,  establishes  that  it  is 
proportionate  to  transmit  the  personal  data  for  that  specific  purpose  after  having 
demonstrably weighed the various competing interests’. 
Only if these conditions are fulfilled and the processing constitutes lawful processing in 
accordance  with  the  requirements  of  Article  5  of  Regulation  (EU)  2018/1725,  can  the 
transmission of personal data occur. 
In Case C-615/13 P (ClientEarth), the Court of Justice ruled that the institution does not 
have to examine by itself the existence of a need for transferring personal data.11 This is 
also  clear  from  Article  9(1)(b)  of  Regulation  (EU)  2018/1725,  which  requires  that  the 
necessity to have the personal data transmitted must be established by the recipient. 
According to  Article 9(1)(b) of Regulation  (EU)  2018/1725,  the European Commission 
has to examine the further conditions for a lawful processing of personal data only if the 
first  condition  is  fulfilled,  namely  if  the  recipient  has  established  that  it  is  necessary  to 
have  the  data  transmitted  for  a  specific  purpose  in  the  public  interest.  It  is  only  in  this 
case that the European Commission has to examine whether there is a reason to assume 
that  the  data  subject’s  legitimate  interests  might  be  prejudiced  and,  in  the  affirmative, 
                                                 
9   European Commission v The Bavarian Lager judgment, cited above, paragraph 59. 
10   Judgment  of  the  Court  of  Justice  of  20  May  2003,  Rechnungshof  and  Others  v  Österreichischer 
Rundfunk, Joint Cases C-465/00, C-138/01 and C-139/01, EU:C:2003:294, paragraph 73. 
11   Judgment of the Court of Justice of 16 July 2015, ClientEarth v European Food Safety Agency,  
C-615/13 P, EU:C:2015:489, paragraph 47. 


 
establish  the  proportionality  of  the  transmission  of  the  personal  data  for  that  specific 
purpose after having demonstrably weighed the various competing interests. 
In your confirmatory application, you do not put forward any arguments to establish the 
necessity  to  have  the  personal  data  transmitted  for  a  specific  purpose  in  the  public 
interest. Therefore, the European Commission does not have to examine whether there is 
a reason to assume that the data subject’s legitimate interests might be prejudiced. 
Notwithstanding  the  above,  please  note  that  there  is  a  risk  that  the  disclosure  of  the 
handwritten text reflected in the document would prejudice the legitimate interests of the 
person concerned.  
Consequently,  I  conclude  that,  pursuant  to  Article  4(1)(b)  of  Regulation  (EC)  No 
1049/2001,  access  cannot  be  granted  to  the  personal  data  contained  in  the  document 
requested, as the need to obtain access thereto for a purpose in the public interest has not 
been  substantiated  and  there  is  no  reason  to  think  that  the  legitimate  interests  of  the 
individual  concerned  would  not  be  prejudiced  by  the  disclosure  of  the  personal  data  in 
question. 
3. 
OVERRIDING PUBLIC INTEREST IN DISCLOSURE 
The  exception  laid  down  in  Articles  4(2),  third  indent,  and  4(3),  first  subparagraph  of 
Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001 must be waived if there is an overriding public interest in 
disclosure.  Such  an  interest  must,  firstly,  be  public  and,  secondly,  outweigh  the  harm 
caused by the disclosure. 
In  your  confirmatory  application,  you  argue  that  ‘there  is  a  clear  public  interest  in 
disclosure of [the document requested] since the publication of all documents relating to 
this  case  […]  was  demanded  by  the  European  Parliament  in  its  resolution  of  13 
December 2018 on conflict of interest and the protection of [the European Union] budget 
in the Czech Republic’.  
Whilst I understand that there is a certain interest in the subject-matter at hand, I consider 
that this interest would not override the public interest in ensuring that the ongoing audits 
are properly conducted, free from external pressure, and that the decision-making process 
of  the  European  Commission  takes  place  in  conditions  that  cannot  seriously  undermine 
it.  
In addition, in your confirmatory application, you refer to several General Court rulings, 
including the Toland v Parliament12MasterCard and Others v Commission13 and Borax 
Europe v Commission14
 judgments and you argue that ‘the administrative activity of the 
                                                 
12   Judgment  of  the  General  Court  of  7  June  2011,  Ciarán  Toland  v  European  Parliament,  T-471/08, 
EU:T:2011:252. 
13   Judgment of the General Court of 9 September 2014, MasterCard v European Commission, T-516/11, 
EU:T:2014:759. 
14   Judgment  of  the  General  Court  of  11  March  2009,  Borax  Europe  Ltd  v  European  Commission,  T-
121/05, EU:T:2009:64. 


 
institutions  does  not  escape  in  any  way  from  the  scope  of  [Regulation  (EC)  No 
1049/2001]’.  
In this regard, I would like to draw your attention to the judgement of the Court of Justice 
in Case C-139/07 (TGI)15, in which the Court confirmed that administrative activities are 
to  be  clearly  distinguished  from  legislative  procedures,  for  which  the  Court  has 
acknowledged  the  existence  of  wider  openness.  The  General  Court  confirmed  this 
jurisprudence  in  Case  T-476/12  (Saint-Gobain)16,  stressing  the  need  to  preserve  the 
serenity  of  administrative  proceedings  and  to  protect  administrative  procedures  from 
external pressure17.  
In  these  circumstances,  I  consider  that  the  public  interest  is  better  served  by  protecting 
the  purpose  of  the  ongoing  audits,  in  accordance  with  Article  4(2),  third  indent  and 
Article 4(3), first subparagraph, of Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001.  
Please also note that Article 4(1)(b) of Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001 does not include 
the  possibility  for  the  exception  defined  therein  to  be  set  aside  by  the  existence  of  an 
overriding public interest.  
4. 
PARTIAL ACCESS 
In  accordance  with  Article  4(6)  of  Regulation  (EC)  No  1049/2001,  I  have  considered 
whether partial access could be granted to the document identified under your request.  
However,  I  consider  that  no  meaningful  partial  access  is  possible  without  undermining 
the interests described above. Therefore, I conclude that the document under the request 
is covered in its entirety by the invoked exceptions to the right of public access.  
 
 
                                                 
15   Judgment  of  the  Court  of  Justice  of  29  June  2010,  European  Commission  v  Technische  Glaswerke 
Ilmenau GmbH, C-139/07 P, EU:C:2010:376, paragraph 60.  
16   Judgment of 11 December 2014, Saint-Gobain Glass Deutschland GmbH v European Commission, T-
476/12, EU:T:2014:1059, paragraph 82.  
17   Ibid, paragraph 81. 



 
 
5. 
MEANS OF REDRESS 
Finally, I draw your attention to the means of redress available against this decision. You 
may  either  bring  proceedings  before  the  General  Court  or  file  a  complaint  with  the 
European  Ombudsman  under  the  conditions  specified  respectively  in  Articles  263  and 
228 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union. 
Yours sincerely, 
For the Commission 
Martin SELMAYR 
Secretary-General