This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'The 61st-90th Commission replies to confirmatory applications issued in 2019'.




DOC 21
Ref. Ares(2020)4117196 - 05/08/2020
EUROPEAN COMMISSION 
Brussels, 28.2.2019 
C(2019) 1816 final 
 
Corporate Europe Observatory 
Rue d’Edimbourg 26 
1050 Brussels 
Belgium 
DECISION OF THE EUROPEAN COMMISSION PURSUANT TO ARTICLE 4 OF THE
IMPLEMENTING RULES TO REGULATION (EC) NO 1049/20011
Subject: 
Your confirmatory application for access to documents under 
Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001 - GESTDEM 2018/4847 

Dear 
 
I refer to your letter of 14 December 2018, registered on 25 January 2019, in which you 
submitted a confirmatory application in accordance with Article 7(2) of Regulation (EC) 
No 1049/2001 regarding public access to European Parliament, Council and Commission 
documents2 (hereafter 'Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001').
1.
SCOPE OF YOUR REQUEST
In your initial application of 14 September 2018, addressed to the Directorate-General for 
Energy, you requested access to:  
 ‘A  list  of  all  lobby  meetings  held  by  [the  Directorate-General  for  Energy]
Directorate  B  between  9  March  2018  and  today  where  renewable  gas  was
discussed. The list  should include:  date, Commission  attendees, the name of the
organisation(s) attending, who attended on their behalf, and a more precise topic
if that exists.
 The minutes of all lobby meetings held by [the Directorate-General for Energy]
Directorate  B  between  9  March  2018  and  today  renewable  gas  was  discussed.
This should also include any documents that were distributed at the meeting, and
any presentations that were made.
1
Official Journal L 345 of 29.12.2001, p. 94. 
2
Official Journal L 145 of 31.5.2001, p. 43. 
Commission européenne/Europese Commissie, 1049 Bruxelles/Brussel, BELGIQUE/BELGIË - Tel. +32 22991111 

 
  All  correspondence,  electronic  or  otherwise,  between  lobbyists  and  by  [the 
Directorate-General for Energy] Directorate B between 9 March 2018 and today 
where renewable gas was discussed.’ 
The European Commission considered your request to cover documents drawn up to the 
date  of  your  initial  application  of  14  September  2018  and  identified  the  following 
documents as falling under the scope of your request: 
 
Presentation  by  National  Grid  on  sector  coupling,  at  a  meeting  on 
12/04/2018, reference Ares(2018)5950880 (hereafter 'document 1'); 
 
Presentation  by 
  GRTgaz)  to 
the  Deputy  Director-General  of  the  Directorate-General  for  Energy  of  a 
study  summary  ‘A  100%  renewable  gas  mix  in  2050’,  at  a  meeting  on 
19.07.2018, reference Ares(2018)5951109 (hereafter 'document 2');  
 
Presentation  by  GASAG  on  Berlin’s  national  gas  storage  facility,  at  a 
meeting  on  29.08.2018,  reference  Ares(2018)5951383  (hereafter 
'document 3'). 
In  its  initial  reply  of  3  December  2018,  the  Directorate-General  for  Energy  gave  full 
access  to  document  2  and  partially  refused  access  to  documents  1  and  3,  based  on  the 
exceptions  of  Article  4(2)  first  indent  (protection  of  commercial  interests,  including 
intellectual  property)  and  Article  4(1)(b)  (protection  of  privacy  and  integrity  of  the 
individual) of Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001.  
In  your  confirmatory  application,  you  requested  a  review  of  the  decision  of  the 
Directorate-General for Energy as regards the absence of the requested list of meetings, 
as  well  as  the  absence  of  documents  containing  the  minutes  of  the  meetings  and  the 
correspondence exchanged in the context of those meetings. Therefore, the scope of this 
confirmatory  review  is  limited  to  those  issues.  I  note  that  you  did  not  challenge  the 
partial access granted at the initial level to documents 1 and 3. 
You support your request with detailed arguments, which I address in the corresponding 
sections below. 
2. 
ASSESSMENT AND CONCLUSIONS UNDER REGULATION (EC) NO 1049/2001 
When  assessing  a  confirmatory  application  for  access  to  documents  submitted  pursuant 
to Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001, the Secretariat-General conducts a review of the reply 
given by the Directorate-General concerned at the initial stage. 
 
 


 
In  your  confirmatory  application,  you  first  contest  the  absence  of  the  list  of  meetings. 
You  indicate  that  in  your  previous  application  GESTDEM  2018/1235,  such  a  list  of 
meetings was provided. You also challenge the absence of any documents containing the 
minutes of those meetings, as well as the absence of the correspondence exchanged in the 
context  of  those  meetings.  You  state  that  ‘the  notes  taken  and  then  shared  from  those 
meetings  […]  should  be  provided’  as  well  as  ‘the  emails  asking  for  a  meeting, 
confirming the meeting, thanking […] for the meeting and attaching the presentations.’  
Regarding  your  request  for  meeting  minutes,  I  would  like  to  point  out  that  there  is  no 
legal obligation for the European Commission to draw up minutes of every meeting with 
interest representatives. In the present case, no minutes were established for the meetings 
concerned by your request.  
As  regards  an  updated  list  of  lobby  meetings,  I  have  to  confirm  that  such  a  document 
does not exist. As specified in Article 2(3) of Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001, the right of 
access as defined in that regulation applies only to existing documents in the possession 
of the institution. In its judgment in Case C-491/15 P (Typke v Commission3), the Court 
of  Justice  ruled  that  ‘an  application  for  access  that  would  require  the  Commission  to 
create  a  new  document,  even  if  that  document  were  based  on  information  already 
appearing  in  existing  documents  held  by  it,  falls  outside  the  framework  of  Regulation 
[EC] No 1049/2001’. 
As regards the correspondence exchanged in relation to the meetings concerned, I would 
like  to  underline  that,  according  to  Article  4  of  Commission  Decision  2002/47/EC, 
ECSC,  Euratom4  of  23  January  2002  amending  its  Rules  of  Procedure,  a  document 
drawn up or received by the European Commission must only be registered if it contains 
important  information  that  is  not short-lived and/or may involve action or follow-up by 
the  European  Commission  or  one  of  its  departments.  An  item  of  correspondence 
concerning  meetings  referring  to  logistical  arrangements  is  indeed  a  short-lived 
document.  Therefore,  I  confirm  that  the  European  Commission  does  not  hold  any  such 
further documents containing correspondence as requested by you. 
However,  as  part  of  this  review,  the  European  Commission  has  carried  out  a  renewed, 
thorough search for possible documents falling under the scope of your request.  
Based  on  this  renewed  search,  the  European  Commission  has  identified  the  following 
documents: 
 
Email  exchanges  between  the  Directorate-General  for  Energy  and 
representatives of National Grid, setting up the meeting of the 12.04.2018, 
reference Ares(2019)839205 (hereafter ‘document 4’)5; 
                                                 
3   Judgment of the Court of Justice of 11 January 2017, Typke v Commission, C-491/15 P, EU:C:2017:5, 
paragraph 31. 
4   Official Journal L 21 of 24.1.2002, p. 23. 
5   The attachment included in this email exchange was already partially released (as document 1) in the 
initial reply sent to you on 3.12.2018. 


 
 
Email exchanges between the Deputy Director-General of the Directorate-
General for Energy and representatives of Hydrogen Europe, setting up a 
meeting 
on 
12.03.2018, 
reference 
Ares(2019)850507 
(hereafter 
‘document 5’). 
I  would  like  to  inform  you  that  wide  partial  access  is  granted  to  documents  4  and  5, 
subject  to  the  redaction  of  personal  data  only  on  the  basis  of  the  exception  of  Article 
4(1)(b) of Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001 (protection of privacy and the integrity of the 
individual). 
2.1.  Protection of privacy and the integrity of the individual 
Article  4(1)(b)  of  Regulation  (EC)  No  1049/2001  provides  that  ‘[t]he  institutions  shall 
refuse  access  to  a  document  where  disclosure  would  undermine  the  protection  of  […] 
privacy and the integrity of the individual, in  particular in  accordance  with  Community 
legislation regarding the protection of personal data’. 
In  its  judgment  in  Case  C-28/08  P  (Bavarian  Lager)6,  the  Court  of  Justice  ruled  that 
when  a  request  is  made  for  access  to  documents  containing  personal  data,  Regulation 
(EC) No 45/2001 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 18 December 2000 
on  the  protection  of  individuals  with  regard  to  the  processing  of  personal  data  by  the 
Community  institutions  and  bodies  and  on  the  free  movement  of  such  data7 
(hereafter ‘Regulation (EC) No 45/2001’) becomes fully applicable.  
Please  note  that,  as  from  11  December  2018,  Regulation  (EC)  No  45/2001  has  been 
repealed by Regulation (EU) 2018/1725 of the European Parliament and of the Council 
of 23 October 2018 on the protection of natural persons with regard to the processing of 
personal  data  by  the  Union  institutions,  bodies,  offices  and  agencies  and  on  the  free 
movement  of  such  data,  and  repealing  Regulation  (EC)  No  45/2001  and  Decision  No 
1247/2002/EC8 (hereafter ‘Regulation (EU) 2018/1725’). 
However,  the  case  law  issued  with  regard  to  Regulation  (EC)  No  45/2001  remains 
relevant for the interpretation of Regulation (EU) 2018/1725. 
In  the  above-mentioned  judgment,  the  Court  stated  that  Article  4(1)(b)  of  Regulation  
(EC)  No  1049/2001  ‘requires  that  any  undermining  of  privacy  and  the  integrity  of  the 
individual  must  always  be  examined  and  assessed  in  conformity  with  the  legislation  of 
the  Union  concerning  the  protection  of  personal  data,  and  in  particular  with  […]  [the 
Data Protection] Regulation’.9 
Article  3(1)  of  Regulation  (EU)  2018/1725  provides  that  personal  data  ‘means  any 
information relating to an identified or identifiable natural person […]’.  
                                                 
6   Judgment of the Court of Justice of 29 June 2010,  European Commission v The Bavarian Lager Co. 
Ltd  (hereafter  referred  to  as  ‘European  Commission  v  The  Bavarian  Lager  judgment’)  C-28/08 P, 
EU:C:2010:378, paragraph 59. 
7   Official Journal L 8 of 12.1.2001, p. 1.  
8   Official Journal L 205 of 21.11.2018, p. 39. 
9   European Commission v The Bavarian Lager judgment, cited above, paragraph 59. 


 
As the Court of Justice confirmed in Case C-465/00 (Rechnungshof), ‘there is no reason 
of principle to justify excluding activities of a professional […] nature from the notion of 
private life’.10 
Documents 4 and 5 contain personal data such as the names, initials and contact details 
of  staff  members  who  do  not  form  part  of  the  senior  management  of  the  European 
Commission.  They  also  contain  names  and  contact  details  of  representatives  of  third 
parties. 
The names11 of the persons concerned as well as other data from which their identity can 
be  deduced  undoubtedly  constitute  personal  data  in  the  meaning  of  Article  3(1)  of 
Regulation (EU) 2018/1725.  
Pursuant  to  Article  9(1)(b)  of  Regulation  (EU)  2018/1725,  ‘personal  data  shall  only  be 
transmitted to recipients established in the Union other than Union institutions and bodies 
if ‘[t]he recipient establishes that it is necessary to have the data transmitted for a specific 
purpose in the public interest and the controller, where there is any reason to assume that 
the  data  subject’s  legitimate  interests  might  be  prejudiced,  establishes  that  it  is 
proportionate  to  transmit  the  personal  data  for  that  specific  purpose  after  having 
demonstrably weighed the various competing interests’. 
Only if these conditions are fulfilled and the processing constitutes lawful processing in 
accordance  with  the  requirements  of  Article  5  of  Regulation  (EU)  2018/1725,  can  the 
transmission of personal data occur. 
In Case C-615/13 P (ClientEarth), the Court of Justice ruled that the institution does not 
have to examine by itself the existence of a need for transferring personal data.12 This is 
also  clear  from  Article  9(1)(b)  of  Regulation  (EU)  2018/1725,  which  requires  that  the 
necessity to have the personal data transmitted must be established by the recipient. 
According to  Article 9(1)(b) of Regulation  (EU)  2018/1725,  the European Commission 
has to  examine the  further conditions  for the lawful  processing of personal  data only if 
the  first  condition  is  fulfilled,  namely  if  the  recipient  establishes  that  it  is  necessary  to 
have  the  data  transmitted  for  a  specific  purpose  in  the  public  interest.  It  is  only  in  this 
case that the European Commission has to examine whether there is a reason to assume 
that  the  data  subject’s  legitimate  interests  might  be  prejudiced  and,  in  the  affirmative, 
establish  the  proportionality  of  the  transmission  of  the  personal  data  for  that  specific 
purpose after having demonstrably weighed the various competing interests. 
 
 
                                                 
10   Judgment  of  the  Court  of  Justice  of  20  May  2003,  Rechnungshof  and  Others  v  Österreichischer 
Rundfunk, Joined Cases C-465/00, C-138/01 and C-139/01, EU:C:2003:294, paragraph 73. 
11   European Commission v The Bavarian Lager judgment, cited above, paragraph 68. 
12   Judgment  of  the  Court  of  Justice  of  16  July  2015,  ClientEarth  v  European  Food  Safety  Agency,  
C-615/13 P, EU:C:2015:489, paragraph 47. 


 
In your confirmatory application, you do not put forward any arguments to establish the 
necessity  to  have  the  data  transmitted  for  a  specific  purpose  in  the  public  interest. 
Therefore, the European Commission does not have to examine whether there is a reason 
to assume that the data subjects’ legitimate interests might be prejudiced. 
Notwithstanding the above, there are reasons to assume that the legitimate interests of the 
data  subjects  concerned  would  be  prejudiced  by  the  disclosure  of  the  personal  data 
reflected  in  the  documents,  as  there  is  a  real  and non-hypothetical  risk  that  such  public 
disclosure would harm their privacy and subject them to unsolicited external contacts.  
Consequently,  I  conclude  that,  pursuant  to  Article  4(1)(b)  of  Regulation  (EC)  No 
1049/2001,  access  cannot  be  granted  to  the  personal  data,  as  the  need  to  obtain  access 
thereto  for  a  purpose  in  the  public  interest  has  not  been  substantiated  and  there  is  no 
reason  to  think  that  the  legitimate  interests  of  the  individuals  concerned  would  not  be 
prejudiced by the disclosure of the personal data concerned. 
3. 
OVERRIDING PUBLIC INTEREST IN DISCLOSURE 
Please note also that Article 4(1)(b) of Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001 does not include 
the possibility for the exceptions defined therein  to be set aside by  an overriding public 
interest. 
4. 
PARTIAL ACCESS 
As indicated  above,  wide partial  access  is  granted to  documents 4  and 5, subject  to  the 
redaction  of  personal  data  only  on  the  basis  of  the  exception  of  Article  4(1)(b)  of 
Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001 (protection of privacy and the integrity of the individual). 
 
 



 
5. 
MEANS OF REDRESS 
Finally, I draw your attention to the means of redress available against this decision. You 
may  either  bring  proceedings  before  the  General  Court  or  file  a  complaint  with  the 
European  Ombudsman  under  the  conditions  specified  respectively  in  Articles  263  and 
228 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union. 
Yours sincerely, 
For the Commission 
Martin SELMAYR 
Secretary-General 

 
 
Enclosures: (2)