This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'The 61st-90th Commission replies to confirmatory applications issued in 2019'.


DOC 1
EUROPEAN COMMISSION 
Brussels, 7.2.2019 
C(2019) 1062 final 
 
 
Générations Futures 
179 Rue Lafayette  
75010 Paris  
France 
DECISION OF THE EUROPEAN COMMISSION PURSUANT TO ARTICLE 4 OF THE
IMPLEMENTING RULES TO REGULATION (EC) NO 1049/20011
Subject: 
Your confirmatory application for access to documents under 
Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001 - GESTDEM 2018/3490 

Dear 

I refer to your letter of 6 August 2018, registered on the next day, in which you submitted 
a  confirmatory  application  in  accordance  with  Article  7(2)  of  Regulation  (EC)  No 
1049/2001  regarding  public  access  to  European  Parliament,  Council  and  Commission 
documents2 (hereafter ‘Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001’).
1.
SCOPE OF YOUR REQUEST
In  your  initial  application  of  27  June  2018,  addressed  to  the  Directorate-General  for 
Health and Food Safety, you requested access to the documents Sulfoxaflor Residues in 
Nectar  and  Pollen  of  Winter  Oil  Seed  Rape_160357,  Ares(2015)4088967  (hereafter 
‘document  1')  and  Sulfoxaflor_Succeding  crop  study,  Ares(2015)4088967  (hereafter 
’document  2’),  containing  confirmatory  information  concerning  the  active  substance 
sufloxaflor,  which  the  applicant  had  to  submit  by  18  August  2017  in  accordance  with 
Implementing Regulation (EU) 2015/1295 of 27 July 2015.  
The Directorate-General for Health and Food Safety consulted the third party from which 
the requested document originates, Dow AgroSciences, in accordance with Article 4(4) of 
1
Official Journal L 345 of 29.12.2001, p. 94. 
2
Official Journal L 145 of 31.5.2001, p. 43. 
Commission européenne/Europese Commissie, 1049 Bruxelles/Brussel, BELGIQUE/BELGIË - Tel. +32 22991111 

 
Regulation  (EC)  No  1049/2001.  Following  the  opposition  of  Dow  AgroSciences  to  the 
disclosure of the documents, the Directorate-General for Health and Food Safety refused 
access  to  the  documents  on  7  August  2018,  based  on  Article  4(2),  third  indent  of 
Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001 (protection of commercial interests, including intellectual 
property). 
In your confirmatory application, you request a review of this position. You support your 
request with detailed arguments, which I address in the corresponding sections below. 
2. 
ASSESSMENT AND CONCLUSIONS UNDER REGULATION (EC) NO 1049/2001 
When  assessing  a  confirmatory  application  for  access  to  documents  submitted  pursuant 
to Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001, the Secretariat-General conducts a fresh review of the 
reply given by the Directorate-General concerned at the initial stage. 
In this context, the Secretariat-General re-consulted Dow AgroSciences based on Article 
4(4) of Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001, with a view to assessing whether an exception in 
paragraph 1 or 2 could  be applicable to  the requested documents,  which  originate from 
that third party.  
While  Dow  AgroSciences  opposed  the  disclosure  of  the  requested  documents  based  on 
Article  4(2),  first  indent  (protection  of  commercial  interests,  including  intellectual 
property),  it  drew  attention  to  the  fact  that  the  decision-making  process  relating  to  the 
evaluation  process  of  sulfoxaflor  was  still  ongoing.  It  specified  that  the  requested 
documents  were  in  the  process  of  being  evaluated.  It  also  indicated  that  ‘disclosing  the 
content  of  the  confirmatory  data  before  the  outcome  of  the  evaluation  process  risk[ed] 
seriously  undermining  this  process  and  preventing  regulators  from  conducting  this 
process in an objective and non-politicised manner, without external pressure and undue 
influence’.  
As  to  the  protection  of  its  commercial  interests,  Dow  AgroSciences  explained  that, 
together with its consultant, it had developed proprietary approaches, which were novel 
for  the  conduct  of  the  requested  studies  and  went  beyond  the  generic  standards,  which 
existed for only some of the individual stages of the studies.  
It  also  stated  that  it  had,  together  with  its  consultant,  invested  considerable  intellectual 
expertise  in  the  methodology  used,  the  disclosure  of  which  would  allow  competitors  to 
follow the specific approaches that had been developed. It  explained that there were no 
specific  and  common  test  methods  or  guidelines  for  the  requested  studies.  In  its  view, 
this  was  pure  confidential  business  information  –  commercially  crucial  ‘know-how’.  It 
concluded that, since the requested study was entirely new and unique and had not been 
published  in  any  public  forum,  disclosure  would  seriously  undermine  its  intellectual 
property and commercial interests.  
 
 


 
In  addition,  Dow  AgroSciences  claimed  that  the  disclosure  of  the  requested  documents 
would undermine the confidentiality protection provided for in Article 63 of Regulation 
(EC) No 1107/20093, as well as the confidentiality protection stipulated in the guidance 
document on the procedures for submission and assessment of confirmatory information 
following  approval  of  an  active  substance  in  accordance  with  Regulation  (EC)  No 
1107/2009.4 
Consequently,  Dow  AgroSciences  fully  opposed  any  disclosure  of  the  requested 
documents. 
Following  the  confirmatory  review  and  taking  into  account  the  reply  of  Dow 
AgroSciences
,  I  am  pleased  to  inform  you  that  wide  partial  access  is  granted  to  the 
requested  documents, subject only to the redactions of personal data. The partial refusal 
is  based on  Article 4(1)(b) (protection of privacy and the integrity  of the  individual) of 
Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001, for the reasons set out below.  
Please  note,  however,  that  the  actual  transmission  of  the  documents  is  subject  to  the 
absence  of  a  request,  by  the  third  party  author,  namely  Dow  AgroSciences,  for  interim 
measures as referred to in paragraph 4.  
3. 
PROTECTION OF PRIVACY AND THE INTEGRITY OF THE INDIVIDUAL 
Article 4(1)(b) of Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001 provides that ‘access to a document is 
refused  where  disclosure  would  undermine  the  protection  of  […]  privacy  and  the 
integrity  of  the  individual,  in  particular  in  accordance  with  Community  legislation 
regarding the protection of personal data’. 
In  its  judgment  in  Case  C-28/08  P  (Bavarian  Lager),5  the  Court  of  Justice  ruled  that 
when  a  request  is  made  for  access  to  documents  containing  personal  data,  Regulation 
(EC) No 45/2001 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 18 December 2000 
on  the  protection  of  individuals  with  regard  to  the  processing  of  personal  data  by  the 
Community  institutions  and  bodies  and  on  the  free  movement  of  such  data6 
(‘hereafter Regulation (EC) No 45/2001’) becomes fully applicable.  
Please  note  that,  as  from  11  December  2018,  Regulation  (EC)  No  45/2001  has  been 
repealed by Regulation (EU) 2018/1725 of the European Parliament and of the Council 
of 23 October 2018 on the protection of natural persons with regard to the processing of 
personal  data  by  the  Union  institutions,  bodies,  offices  and  agencies  and  on  the  free 
                                                 
3   Regulation  (EC)  No 1107/2009  of  the  European  Parliament  and  of  the  Council  of  21 October  2009 
concerning  the  placing  of  plant  protection  products  on  the  market  and  repealing  Council  Directives 
79/117/EEC and 91/414/EEC, Official Journal L 309 of 24.11.2009, p. 1–50. 
4   SANCO/5634/2009 rev. 6.1, available here: 
 
https://ec.europa.eu/food/sites/food/files/plant/docs/pesticides aas guidance confirmatory-data rev6-
1 201312 en.pdf.  
5   Judgment of 29 June 2010 in Case C-28/08 P, European Commission v The Bavarian Lager Co. Ltd
EU:C:2010:378, paragraph 59.  
6   Official Journal L 8 of 12 January 2001, page 1.  


 
movement  of  such  data,  and  repealing  Regulation  (EC)  No  45/2001  and  Decision  No 
1247/2002/EC7 (‘hereafter Regulation (EU) 2018/1725’). 
However,  the  case  law  issued  with  regard  to  Regulation  (EC)  No  45/2001  remains 
relevant for the interpretation of Regulation (EU) 2018/1725. 
In  the  above-mentioned  judgment,  the  Court  stated  that  Article  4(1)(b)  of  Regulation 
(EC)  No  1049/2001  ‘requires  that  any  undermining  of  privacy  and  the  integrity  of  the 
individual  must  always  be  examined  and  assessed  in  conformity  with  the  legislation  of 
the  Union  concerning  the  protection  of  personal  data,  and  in  particular  with  […]  [the 
Data Protection] Regulation’.8 
Article  3(1)  of  Regulation  (EU)  2018/1725  provides  that  personal  data  ‘means  any 
information relating to an identified or identifiable natural person […]’.  
As the Court of Justice confirmed in Case C-465/00 (Rechnungshof), ‘there is no reason 
of principle to justify excluding activities of a professional […] nature from the notion of 
private life’.9 
The  requested  documents  include  the  names  and  contact  details  of  natural  persons,  for 
example  the  names  of  the  authors  of  the  studies  or  the  names  of  natural  persons 
intervening  in  the  preparation  or  validation  of  studies,  their  signatures  or  their  contact 
details.  
This  information  clearly  constitutes  personal  data  in  the  sense  of  Article  3(1)  of 
Regulation (EU) 2018/1725.  
Pursuant  to  Article  9(1)(b)  of  Regulation  (EU)  2018/1725,  ‘personal  data  shall  only  be 
transmitted to recipients established in the Union other than Union institutions and bodies 
if    ‘[t]he  recipient  establishes  that  it  is  necessary  to  have  the  data  transmitted  for  a 
specific  purpose  in  the  public  interest  and  the  controller,  where  there  is  any  reason  to 
assume that the data subject’s legitimate interests might be prejudiced, establishes that it 
is  proportionate  to  transmit  the  personal  data  for  that  specific  purpose  after  having 
demonstrably weighed the various competing interests’. 
Only if these conditions are fulfilled and the processing constitutes lawful processing in 
accordance  with  the  requirements  of  Article  5  of  Regulation  (EU)  2018/1725,  can  the 
transmission of personal data occur. 
In Case C-615/13 P (ClientEarth), the Court of Justice ruled that the institution does not 
have  to  examine  of  its  own  motion  the  existence  of  a  need  for  transferring  personal 
data.10  This  is  also  clear  from  Article  9(1)(b)  of  Regulation  (EU)  2018/1725,  which 
                                                 
7   Official Journal L 205 of 21.11.2018, p. 39. 
8   Quoted above, paragraph 59. 
9   Judgment of 20 May 2003 in Joined Cases C-465/00, C-138/01 and C-139/01, preliminary rulings in 
proceedings between Rechnungshof and Österreichischer Rundfunk, EU:C:2003:294, paragraph 73. 
10   Judgment  of  16  July  2015  in  Case  C-615/13  P,  ClientEarth  v  European  Food  Safety  Agency, 
EU:C:2015:489, paragraph 47. 


 
requires  that  the  necessity  to  have  the  personal  data  transmitted  must  be  established  by 
the recipient. 
According to  Article 9(1)(b) of Regulation  (EU)  2018/1725,  the European Commission 
has to  examine the  further conditions  for  the lawful processing of personal  data only if 
the  first  condition  is  fulfilled,  namely  if  the  recipient  establishes  that  it  is  necessary  to 
have  the  data  transmitted  for  a  specific  purpose  in  the  public  interest.  It  is  only  in  this 
case that the European Commission has to examine whether there is a reason to assume 
that  the  data  subject’s  legitimate  interests  might  be  prejudiced  and,  in  the  affirmative, 
establish  the  proportionality  of  the  transmission  of  the  personal  data  for  that  specific 
purpose after having demonstrably weighed the various competing interests. 
In your confirmatory application, you assert that ‘[t]he functioning of ecosystems we all 
depend  on  is  a  public  interest’  and  that  there  is  ‘an  overriding  public  interest  in  the 
process of approval of new insecticides such as sufloxaflor and the data it is based on’.  
However,  you  do  not  refer  in  any  way  to  the  personal  data  included  in  the  requested 
studies,  nor  do  you  put  forward  any  arguments  to  establish  the  necessity  to  have  the 
personal data included in the documents transmitted for a specific purpose in the public 
interest. Therefore, the European Commission does not have to examine whether there is 
a reason to assume that the data subject’s legitimate interests might be prejudiced. 
Notwithstanding the above, there are reasons to assume that the legitimate interests of the 
relevant data subjects would be prejudiced by the disclosure of the personal data reflected 
in the documents, as there is a real and non-hypothetical risk that such public disclosure 
would harm their privacy and subject them to unsolicited external contacts. 
As  to  the  handwritten  signatures  appearing  in  the  requested  studies,  which  constitute 
biometric data, there is a risk that their disclosure would prejudice the legitimate interests 
of the persons concerned. 
Consequently,  I  conclude  that,  pursuant  to  Article  4(1)(b)  of  Regulation  (EC)  No 
1049/2001,  access  cannot  be  granted  to  the  personal  data,  as  the  need  to  obtain  access 
thereto  for  a  purpose  in  the  public  interest  has  not  been  substantiated  and  there  is  no 
reason  to  think  that  the  legitimate  interests  of  the  individuals  concerned  would  not  be 
prejudiced by the disclosure of the relevant personal data. 
I would also like to point out that Article 4(1)(b) has an absolute character and does not 
envisage the possibility of demonstrating the existence of an overriding public interest. 
4. 
DISCLOSURE AGAINST THE EXPLICIT OPINION OF THE AUTHOR 
According  to  Article  5(5)  and  (6)  of  Commission  Decision  of  5  December  2001 
amending  its  rules  of  procedure11,  ‘[t]he  third-party  author  consulted  shall  have  a 
                                                 
11   Commission Decision of 5 December 2001 amending its rules of procedure (notified under document 
number C(2001) 3714), Official Journal of 29.12.2001, L 345, p. 94.  


 
deadline for reply which shall be no shorter than five working days but must enable the 
Commission to abide by its own deadlines for reply. In the absence of an answer within 
the  prescribed  period,  or  if  the  third  party  is  untraceable  or  not  identifiable,  the 
Commission  shall  decide  in  accordance  with  the  rules  on  exceptions  in  Article  4  of 
Regulation  (EC)  No  1049/2001,  taking  into  account  the  legitimate  interests  of  the  third 
party  on  the  basis  of  the  information  at  its  disposal.  If  the  Commission  intends  to  give 
access to a document against the explicit opinion of the author, it shall inform the author 
of its intention to disclose the document after a ten-working day period and shall draw his 
attention to the remedies available to him to oppose disclosure.’ 
At  initial  and  confirmatory  level,  Dow  AgroSciences  objected  to  the  disclosure  of  the 
requested  documents  on  the  grounds  that  this  would  undermine  the  protection  of  its 
commercial interests, including intellectual property and the decision-making process.  
 
The  European  Commission  informed  the  applicant  that,  according  to  Article  4(4)  of 
Regulation  (EC)  No  1049/2001,  a  third  party,  other  than  a  Member  State,  is  consulted 
with  a  view  to  assessing  whether  an  exception  in  paragraph  1  or  2  is  applicable.  The 
exception of Article 4(3) of Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001 cannot be invoked by a third 
party  other  than  a  Member  State.  Furthermore,  the  European  Commission  does  not 
consider  that  its  decision-making  process  would  be  seriously  undermined  by  the 
disclosure of the  requested studies. As to  the exception relating to  the protection of the 
commercial  interests,  including  the  intellectual  property  of  Dow  Agrosciences,  after  a 
detailed examination of the requested studies, the European Commission concluded that 
these  interests  would  not  be  undermined  by  disclosure  at  this  stage.  It  also  concluded 
that, even if it could be considered that public disclosure at this stage would undermine 
the  protection  of  the  commercial  interests,  including  intellectual  property  of  Dow 
Agrosciences
, such disclosure is  justified,  as there is  an overriding public interest  in  its 
disclosure. 
 
Since  the  decision  to  grant  wide  access  is  taken  against  the  objection  of  the  third  party 
author expressed at initial and confirmatory level, the European Commission will inform 
the  third  party  author  of  its  decision  to  give  wide  partial  access  to  the  documents 
requested. The European Commission will not grant such partial disclosure until a period 
of ten working days has elapsed from the formal notification of this decision to the third 
party author, in accordance with the provisions mentioned above.  
 
This  time  period  will  allow  the  third  party  author  to  inform  the  European  Commission 
whether  it  will object  to the partial disclosure using the remedies  available to  it, i.e. an 
application  for  annulment  and  an  application  for  interim  measures  before  the  General 
Court.  Once  this  period  has  elapsed,  and  if  the  third-party  author  has  not  signalled  its 
intention  to  avail  itself  of  the  remedies  at  its  disposal,  the  European  Commission  will 
forward the redacted documents to you. 
 
 



 
5. 
MEANS OF REDRESS 
Finally, I draw your attention to the means of redress available against this decision. You 
may  either  bring  proceedings  before  the  General  Court  or  file  a  complaint  with  the 
European  Ombudsman  under  the  conditions  specified  respectively  in  Articles  263  and 
228 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union. 
Yours sincerely, 
 
 
 
  For the Commission 
Martin SELMAYR 
 
Secretary-General 
Enclosures: (2)