This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'The 61st-90th Commission replies to confirmatory applications issued in 2019'.




DOC 3
Ref. Ares(2020)4117196 - 05/08/2020
EUROPEAN COMMISSION 
Brussels, 7.2.2019 
C(2019) 1070 final 
 
 
 Tervuren 
Belgium 
DECISION OF THE EUROPEAN COMMISSION PURSUANT TO ARTICLE 4 OF THE
IMPLEMENTING RULES TO REGULATION (EC) NO 1049/20011
Subject: 
Your confirmatory application for access to documents under 
Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001 - GESTDEM 2018/2686 

Dear 
 
I refer to your letter of 21 June 2018, registered on the same day, in which you submitted 
a  confirmatory  application  in  accordance  with  Article  7(2)  of  Regulation  (EC)  No 
1049/2001  regarding  public  access  to  European  Parliament,  Council  and  Commission 
documents2 (hereafter 'Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001').
1.
SCOPE OF YOUR REQUEST
In your initial application of 3 May 2018, addressed to the Directorate-General for Health 
and  Food  Safety,  you  requested  access  to  the  data  matching  tables  by  Finchimica, 
ADAMA  and  Sharda  concerning  pendimethalin.  You  specified  that  you  would  like  to 
receive the data matching tables of all requests of all pendimethalin applicants submitted 
in the context of Article 43 of Regulation  (EC) No 1107/20093. You indicated that you
based  your  request  on  Regulation  (EC)  No  1049/2001  and  on  Regulation  (EC)  No 
1367/20064.
1
Official Journal L 345 of 29.12.2001, p. 94. 
2
Official Journal L 145 of 31.5.2001, p. 43. 
3
Regulation  (EC)  No  1107/2009  of  the  European  Parliament  and  of  the  Council  of  21  October  2009 
concerning  the  placing  of  plant  protection  products  on  the  market  and  repealing  Council  Directives 
79/117/EEC and 91/414/EEC, Official Journal L 309 of 24.11.2009, p. 1–50. 
4
Regulation (EC) No 1367/2006 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 6 September 2006 
on  the  application  of  the  provisions  of  the  Aarhus  Convention  on  Access  to  Information,  Public 
Participation  in  Decision-making  and  Access  to  Justice  in  Environmental  Matters  to  Community 
institutions and bodies, Official Journal  L 264 of 25.9.2006, p. 13–19. 
Commission européenne/Europese Commissie, 1049 Bruxelles/Brussel, BELGIQUE/BELGIË - Tel. +32 22991111 

At  the  initial  stage,  the  Directorate-General  for  Health  and  Food  Safety  identified  the 
following documents as falling within the scope of your request: 
  Data matching table Pendimentalin by Finchimica (hereafter ‘document 1’); 
  Data matching table Pendimentalin by Life Scientific (hereafter ‘document 2’);  
  Data matching table Pendimentalin by Sharda (hereafter ‘document 3’).  
 
In  accordance  with  Article  4(4)  and  (5)  of  Regulation  (EC)  No  1049/2001,  the 
Directorate-General  for  Health  and  Food  Safety  consulted  the  authorities  of  the 
Netherlands,  which  had  submitted  these  studies  to  the  European  Commission,  with  a 
view  to  assessing  whether  an  exception  in  paragraphs  1  to  3  could  be  applicable.  The 
authorities  of  the  Netherlands,  in  turn,  consulted  the  companies  that  had  submitted  the 
studies to them. These companies communicated their opposition to the disclosure of the 
requested documents to the European Commission. In its initial reply of 6 June 2018, the 
Directorate-General for Health and Food Safety took into account the result of the third 
party  consultations  and  refused  access  to  these  documents,  based  on  the  exception  of 
Article  4(2),  first  indent  (protection  of  commercial  interests,  including  intellectual 
property) of Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001.  
In your confirmatory application, you requested a review of this position. You supported 
your  request  with  detailed  arguments,  which  I  address  in  the  corresponding  sections 
below. 
2. 
ASSESSMENT AND CONCLUSIONS UNDER REGULATION (EC) NO 1049/2001 
When  assessing  a  confirmatory  application  for  access  to  documents  submitted  pursuant 
to Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001, the Secretariat-General conducts a fresh review of the 
reply given by the relevant Directorate-General at the initial stage. 
a.  Consultation of the Dutch authorities 
In  the  context  of  its  confirmatory  review,  the  Secretariat-General  re-consulted  the 
authorities of the Netherlands in accordance with Article 4(4) and (5) of Regulation (EC) 
No 1049/2001, as the requested documents originated from them and had been submitted 
to the European Commission by the latter. 
While agreeing to the public disclosure of the data included in the national introductory 
remarks, the authorities of the Netherlands opposed the disclosure of any other data that 
the  companies  seeking  data  matching  had  filled  in.  In  addition,  they  opposed  the 
disclosure of the names of persons involved in testing on vertebrate animals. They based 
their opposition on Article 4(2), first indent (protection of the commercial interests) and 
Article  4(1)(b)  (protection  of  privacy  and  the  integrity  of  the  individual)  of  Regulation 
(EC) No 1049/2001. 
 
 


The  European  Commission  informed  you  about  the  result  of  the  consultation  of  the 
authorities  of  the  Netherlands  and  asked  whether  you  would  like  receive  those  parts  of 
the documents that the authorities of the Netherlands had agreed to disclose. In response 
to this consultation, you indicated that you withdrew your request regarding Finchimica-
linked pendimethalin materials.  
Consequently, document 1 no longer falls within the scope of your request.  
You also specified that you did not request access to ‘the names of the persons engaged 
in vertebrate testing that may be present in the requested documents’. For the remainder, 
you indicated that you maintained the scope of your request as regards Life Scientific and 
Sharda-linked  pendimethalin  materials.  You  underlined  that  your  request  was  based  on 
both Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001 and Regulation (EC) No 1367/2001. 
Following your reply to its consultation, the European Commission conducted a dialogue 
with the authorities of the Netherlands, who finally agreed to the public disclosure of the 
requested tables, subject to the redaction of: 
  the personal data contained therein, in accordance with Article 4(1)(b) (protection 
of privacy and the integrity of the individual) of Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001; 
and 
  the  columns  under  the  chapters  entitled  ‘title  of  alternative  study  or  case 
referenced/submitted  by  the  applicant’  and  ‘reason  for  equivalence/justification 
for non-provision’, based on the protection of the commercial interests, including 
intellectual  property  of  the  firms  which  had  submitted  this  information  to  the 
authorities  of  the  Netherlands  (Article  4(2),  first  indent  of  Regulation  (EC)  No 
1049/2001).  
b.  ‘At first sight’ assessment by the European Commission 
Following  the  consultation  of  the  authorities  of  the  Netherlands  on  the  possible 
disclosure  of  the  requested  documents,  the  European  Commission  has  carried  out  an  at 
first sight’ 
assessment of the arguments put forward by the authorities of the Netherlands, 
based on Article 4(4) and (5) of Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001.  
In your confirmatory application, you referred to other requests that you have filed in the 
past  for  similar  data  matching  tables  and  to  the  fact  that  these  were  disclosed.  In  this 
context, you request whether the policy of the European Commission has changed in this 
respect.  You  also  argue  that  the  European  Commission  ‘had  no  need  to  ask  the 
Competent Authority [of the Netherlands] for permission.'  
 
 


Please  note  in  this  respect  that  the  European  Commission  consults  the  Member  State 
from which a document originates whenever it is not clear whether access shall or shall 
not be granted to the document, as it did in the case at hand. This administrative practice 
flows from  Article 4(4) and (5) of  Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001, as  further set out in 
Article  5(4)  of  the  European  Commission’s  Detailed  Rules  for  the  Application  of 
Regulation (EC) No 1049/20015.  
Therefore,  the  European  Commission  was  entitled  to  request  the  opinion  of  the 
authorities  of the Netherlands  on  the possible disclosure of documents  originating  from 
them.  Consequently,  it  was  also  entitled  to  take  into  consideration  their  views  on  the 
possible disclosure of these documents.  
In  its  judgment  of  8  February  2018  in  Case  T-74/16  (Pagkyprios  Organismos 
Ageladotrofon)
,  the  General  Court  clarified  that  ‘before  refusing  access  to  a  document 
originating  from  a  Member  State,  the  institution  concerned  must  examine  whether  that 
Member State has based its objection on the substantive exceptions in Article 4(1) to (3) 
of Regulation No 1049/2001 and has given proper reasons for its position. Consequently, 
when taking a decision to refuse access, the institution must make sure that those reasons 
exist and refer to them in the decision it makes at the end of the procedure’.6 
The General Court clarified in this judgment that the institution ‘must, in its decision, not 
merely record the fact that the Member State concerned has objected to disclosure of the 
document applied for, but also set out the reasons relied on by that Member State to show 
that one of the exceptions to the right of access provided for in Article 4(1) to (3) of the 
regulation applies’7. 
The General Court also clarified that ‘the institution to  which a request for access to a 
document  has  been  made  does  not  have  to  carry  out  an  exhaustive  assessment  of  the 
Member State’s decision to object by conducting a review going beyond the verification 
of  the  mere  existence  of  reasons  referring  to  the  exceptions  in  Article 4(1)  to  (3)  of 
Regulation  No 1049/2001.[…]  The  institution  must,  however,  check  whether  the 
explanations given by the Member State appear to it, prima facie, to be well founded’8. 
Following  this  assessment,  I  have  come  to  the  conclusion  that  the  authorities  of  the 
Netherlands  based  their  objection  to  the  disclosure  of  parts  of  the  requested  documents 
on  Article  4(2),  first  indent  (protection  of  commercial  interests,  including  intellectual 
property)  and  on  Article  4(1)(b)  of  Regulation  (EC)  No  1049/2001  and  Article  63  of 
Regulation (EC) No 1107/2009 and have given proper reasons for their position.  
These arguments justify at first sight the application of the exceptions of Article 4(1)(b) 
(protection of privacy and the integrity of the individual) and of Article 4(2), first indent 
(protection of commercial interests, including intellectual property). 
                                                 
5   Commission Decision of 5 December 2001 amending its rules of procedure (notified under document 
number C(2001) 3714), Official Journal L 345 of 29.12.2001, p. 94–98.  
6   Judgment  of  the  General  Court  of  8  February  2018,  Pagkyprios  Organismos  Ageladotrofon  v 
Commission, Case T-74/16, EU:T:2018:75, paragraph 55. 
7   Idem, paragraph 56.  
8   Idem, paragraph 57. 


Therefore,  I  can  inform  you  that  partial  access  is  granted  to  documents  2  and  3.  The 
partial refusal is based on the exceptions of Article 4(1)(b) (protection of privacy and the 
integrity  of  the  individual)  and  Article  4(2),  first  indent  (protection  of  commercial 
interests,  including  intellectual  property)  of  Regulation  (EC)  No  1049/2001,  for  the 
reasons set out below. 
3. 
PROTECTION OF PRIVACY AND THE INTEGRITY OF THE INDIVIDUAL 
Article 4(1)(b) of Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001 provides that ‘access to a document is 
refused  where  disclosure  would  undermine  the  protection  of  […]  privacy  and  the 
integrity  of  the  individual,  in  particular  in  accordance  with  Community  legislation 
regarding the protection of personal data’. 
In  its  judgment  in  Case  C-28/08  P  (Bavarian  Lager)9,  the  Court  of  Justice  ruled  that 
when  a  request  is  made  for  access  to  documents  containing  personal  data,  Regulation 
(EC) No 45/2001 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 18 December 2000 
on  the  protection  of  individuals  with  regard  to  the  processing  of  personal  data  by  the 
Community  institutions  and  bodies  and  on  the  free  movement  of  such  data10 
(hereafter ‘Regulation (EC) No 45/2001’) becomes fully applicable.  
Please note that Regulation (EC) No 45/2001, as from 11 December 2018, was repealed 
by  Regulation  (EU)  2018/1725  of  the  European  Parliament  and  of  the  Council  of  23 
October  2018  on  the  protection  of  natural  persons  with  regard  to  the  processing  of 
personal  data  by  the  Union  institutions,  bodies,  offices  and  agencies  and  on  the  free 
movement  of  such  data,  and  repealing  Regulation  (EC)  No  45/2001  and  Decision  No 
1247/2002/EC11 (hereafter ‘Regulation 2018/1725’). 
However,  the  case  law  issued  with  regard  to  Regulation  (EC)  No  45/2001  remains 
relevant for the interpretation of Regulation 2018/1725. 
In  the  above-mentioned  judgment,  the  Court  of  Justice  stated  that  Article  4(1)(b)  of 
Regulation  (EC)  No  1049/2001  ‘requires  that  any  undermining  of  privacy  and  the 
integrity of the individual must always be examined and assessed in conformity with the 
legislation of the Union concerning the protection of personal data, and in particular with 
[…] [the Data Protection] Regulation’12. 
Article  3(1)  of  Regulation  (EC)  2018/1725  provides  that  personal  data  ‘means  any 
information relating to an identified or identifiable natural person […]’.  
                                                 
9   Judgment of the Court of Justice of 29 June 2010, European Commission v The Bavarian Lager Co. 
Ltd,  Case  C-28/08 P,  EU:C:2010:378  (hereinafter  referred  to  as  the  ‘judgment  in  Case  C-28/08  P’), 
paragraph 59.  
10   Official Journal L 8 of 12.1.2001, page 1.  
11   Official Journal L 205 of 21.11.2018, p. 39. 
12   Judgment in Case C-28/08 P, cited above, paragraph 59. 


As the Court of Justice confirmed in Case C-465/00 (Rechnungshof), ‘there is no reason 
of principle to justify excluding activities of a professional […] nature from the notion of 
private life’.13 
The requested documents include the names of natural persons, for example the names of 
the authors of (unpublished) studies. 
As  you  do  not  request  access  to  the  names  of  persons  involved  in  testing  on  vertebrate 
animals, those names fall outside the scope of your request.  
In any case, I consider that the disclosure of the names and addresses of persons involved 
in testing on vertebrate animals is deemed to undermine the protection of privacy and the 
integrity of the individuals concerned, according to Article 63(2)(g) of Regulation (EC) 
No 1107/2009. 
This  information  clearly  constitutes  personal  data  in  the  sense  of  Article  3(1)  of 
Regulation 2018/1725.  
Pursuant  to  Article  9(1)(b)  of  Regulation  2018/1725,  ‘personal  data  shall  only  be 
transmitted to recipients established in the Union other than Union institutions and bodies 
if    ‘[t]he  recipient  establishes  that  it  is  necessary  to  have  the  data  transmitted  for  a 
specific  purpose  in  the  public  interest  and  the  controller,  where  there  is  any  reason  to 
assume that the data subject’s legitimate interests might be prejudiced, establishes that it 
is  proportionate  to  transmit  the  personal  data  for  that  specific  purpose  after  having 
demonstrably weighed the various competing interests’. 
Only if these conditions are fulfilled and the processing constitutes lawful processing in 
accordance  with  the  requirements  of  Article  5  of  Regulation  2018/1725,  can  the 
transmission of personal data occur. 
In Case C-615/13 P (ClientEarth), the Court of Justice ruled that the institution does not 
have  to  examine  of  its  own  motion  the  existence  of  a  need  for  transferring  personal 
data.14  This  is  also  clear  from  Article  9(1)(b)  of  Regulation  2018/1725,  which  requires 
that  the  necessity  to  have  the  personal  data  transmitted  must  be  established  by  the 
recipient. 
 
 
                                                 
13   Judgment  of  the  Court  of  Justice  of  20  May  2003,  preliminary  rulings  in  proceedings  between 
Rechnungshof  and  Österreichischer  Rundfunk,  Joined  Cases  C-465/00,  C-138/01  and  C-139/01, 
EU:C:2003:294, paragraph 73. 
14   Judgment of the Court of Justice of 16 July 2015, ClientEarth v European Food Safety Agency, Case 
C-615/13 P, EU:C:2015:489, paragraph 47. 


According to Article 9(1)(b) of Regulation 2018/1725, the European Commission has to 
examine the further conditions for the lawful processing of personal data only if the first 
condition  is  fulfilled,  namely  if  the  recipient  establishes  that  it  is  necessary  to  have  the 
data transmitted for a specific purpose in the public interest. It is only in this case that the 
European Commission has to examine whether there is a reason to assume that the data 
subject’s  legitimate  interests  might  be  prejudiced  and,  in  the  affirmative,  establish  the 
proportionality  of  the  transmission  of  the  personal  data  for  that  specific  purpose  after 
having demonstrably weighed the various competing interests. 
Notwithstanding the above, there are reasons to assume that the legitimate interests of the 
data  subjects  concerned  would  be  prejudiced  by  the  disclosure  of  the  personal  data 
reflected  in  the  documents,  as  there  is  a  real  and  non-hypothetical  risk that  such  public 
disclosure would harm their privacy and subject them to unsolicited external contacts. 
Consequently,  I  conclude  that,  pursuant  to  Article  4(1)(b)  of  Regulation  (EC)  No 
1049/2001,  access  cannot  be  granted  to  the  personal  data,  as  the  need  to  obtain  access 
thereto  for  a  purpose  in  the  public  interest  has  not  been  substantiated    and  there  is  no 
reason  to  think  that  the  legitimate  interests  of  the  individuals  concerned  would  not  be 
prejudiced by disclosure of the personal data concerned. 
3.1.  Protection of commercial interests  
Article  4(2),  first  indent  of  Regulation  (EC)  No  1049/2001  stipulates  that  ‘[t]he 
institutions  shall  refuse  access  to  a  document  where  disclosure  would  undermine  the 
protection of […] commercial interests of a natural or legal person, including intellectual 
property, […] unless there is an overriding public interest in disclosure’.  
In  your  confirmatory  application,  you  state  that  ‘the  know-how  claimed  by  parties 
objecting to [your] request for access to the Data Matching tables are seeking to protect 
knowledge  that  should  not  be  required  of  them  if  the  responsible  public  body  had 
undertaken  its  duty  as  called  upon  the  regulation’.  In  this  statement,  you  implicitly 
acknowledge  that  the  requested  documents  contain  information  that  is  based  on  the 
specific knowledge of these companies15.  
Certain parts of the requested documents are withheld in application of Article 4(2), first 
indent  of  Regulation  (EC)  No  1049/2001  (protection  of  commercial  interests,  including 
intellectual  property),  as  their  disclosure  would  undermine  the  commercial  interests, 
including  the  intellectual  property,  of  the  companies  seeking  to  authorise  a  plant 
protection  product.  The  withheld  parts  are  the  columns  under  the  chapters  ‘title  of 
alternative  study  or  case  referenced/submitted  by  the  applicant’  and  ‘reason  for 
equivalence/justification for non-provision’.  
These parts have commercial value, as the applicants have to suggest alternative studies 
and  explain  the  reasons  why  they  consider  them  equivalent  or  justify  the  reasons  why 
they  do  not  provide  any  alternative  study.  This  information  is  the  result  of  a  legal, 
                                                 
15   Please  note  that  this  confirmatory  decision  is  limited  to  your  request  for  access  to  documents  and 
cannot address other concerns you express regarding national public bodies. 


regulatory,  technical  or  scientific  analysis,  which  reflects  the  specific  know-how  of  the 
companies.  The withheld parts  contain a  selection of studies  based on the special skills 
and  knowledge  of  the  companies  concerned  and  a  specific  reasoning  in  which 
considerable  intellectual  expertise  was  invested.  The  disclosure  of  these  parts,  at  this 
stage, would seriously undermine the commercial interests of the companies concerned, 
including  their  intellectual  property,  as  it  would  negatively  affect  their  commercial 
activity, in particular in the competitive context.  
Therefore, there is a real and non-hypothetical risk that the disclosure of this information 
would  adversely  affect  the  commercial  interests  and  activities  of  the  concerned 
companies.  
 
I  conclude  that  the  disclosure  of  the  withheld  parts  of  the  requested  document  would 
undermine the protection of the commercial interests of concerned companies within the 
meaning of Article 4(2), first indent, of Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001. 
In  your  confirmatory  application,  you  claimed  that  the  requested  documents  contain 
information  that  relates  to  emissions  into  the  environment  and  should  be  disclosed  in 
accordance  with  Regulation  (EC)  No  1367/200616.  I  examine  the  existence  of  an 
overriding public interest in disclosure under point 4.  
4. 
NO OVERRIDING PUBLIC INTEREST IN DISCLOSURE 
The  exception  laid  down  in  Article  4(2),  first indent  of  Regulation  (EC)  No  1049/2001 
must  be  waived  if  there  is  an  overriding  public  interest  in  disclosure.  Such  an  interest 
must, firstly, be public and, secondly, outweigh the harm caused by disclosure. 
In  your confirmatory  application, you  claimed  that  ‘not only do Regulations  1049/2001 
and  1367/2006  override  the  desire  of  the  [Rapporteur  Member  State]  to  keep  the  data 
owner’s  Data  Matching  lists  and  methodology  secret,  but  Regulation  1107/2009/EU 
mandates that such information be disclosed’. You also indicated that you consider that 
you are entitled to have this information, based on Articles 61 and 63 of Regulation (EC) 
No  1107/2009  ‘in  order  to  understand  precisely  which  studies  or  waivers  any  applicant 
has  put  forward  to  use  for  the  purposes  of  his  product  authorisation  or  reauthorisation 
applications’. You also claimed that this ‘knowledge is intended to be a matter of public 
record and the process entirely non-discriminatory and fair and thereby transparent’.  
You also referred to  Article 63(2) of  Regulation (EC) No 1107/2009,  indicating that ‘it 
provides for a clear definition as to which information may not be disclosed in avoidance 
of undermining commercial interests or the privacy of individuals by means of requests 
for  public  access  to  information’.  In  your  view,  such  information  is  not  included 
normally in data matching tables. 
                                                 
16   This  Convention  was  approved  on  behalf  of  the  European  Community  by  Council  Decision 
2005/370/EC of 17 February 2005, Official Journal L 124 of 17.5.2005, p. 1. It is applicable in EU law 
through Regulation (EC) No 1367/2006 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 6 September 
2006, cited in footnote 4. 


I do not agree with your arguments. Firstly, the application of both Regulations (EC) No 
1049/2001  and  (EC)  No  1367/2006  do  not  result  in  an  automatic  disclosure  of  the 
requested  information.  Secondly,  Article  63(2)  of  Regulation  (EC)  No  1107/2009  does 
not contain a closed list of exceptions. It merely lists information, the disclosure of which 
shall normally be deemed to undermine the protection of the commercial interests or of 
privacy and the integrity of the individuals concerned. This means that Article 4(2), first 
indent of Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001 continues to apply. Thirdly, I do not share the 
view that the withheld parts of the documents are information relating to emissions into 
the environment.  
I  would  like  to  refer  in  this  respect  to  the  judgment  of  the  Court  of  Justice  in  Case  C-
673/13  P  (Stichting  Greenpeace  Nederland  and  PAN  Europe  )17.  That  judgment 
interprets  the  concept  of  information  relating  to  emissions  into  the  environment,  for 
which Article 6(1) of Regulation (EC) No 1367/2006 stipulates that an overriding public 
interest  is  deemed  to  exist  as  regards  the  exceptions  of  Article  4(2),  first  and  third 
indents, of Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001. 
The interpretation is as follows: 
‘In  the  light  of  the  objective  set  out  in  the  first  sentence  of  Article 6(1)  of  Regulation 
No 1367/2006  of  ensuring  a  general  principle  of  access  to  “information  […]  [which] 
relates to emissions into the environment”, that concept must be understood to include, 
inter  alia,  data  that  will  allow  the  public  to  know  what  is  actually  released  into  the 
environment  or  what,  it  may  be  foreseen,  will  be  released  into  the  environment  under 
normal  or  realistic  conditions  of  use  of  the  product  or  substance  in  question,  namely 
those under which the authorisation to place that product or substance on the market was 
granted and which prevail in the area where that product or substance is intended to be 
used. Consequently, that concept must be interpreted as covering, inter alia, information 
concerning the nature, composition, quantity, date and place of the actual or foreseeable 
emissions, under such conditions, from that product or substance.’18 
In  this  context,  it  is  important  to  underline  that  the  Court  of  Justice  acknowledges  that 
‘the  purpose  of  access  to  environmental  information  provided  by  […]  [Regulation 
1367/2006] is, inter alia, to promote more effective public participation in the decision-
making  process,  thereby  increasing,  on  the  part  of  the  competent  bodies,  the 
accountability of decision-making  and contributing to  public awareness and support  for 
the  decisions  taken.  In  order  to  be  able  to  ensure  that  the  decisions  taken  by  the 
competent authorities in environmental matters are justified and to participate effectively 
in decision-making in environmental matters, the public must have access to information 
enabling it to ascertain whether the emissions were correctly assessed and must be given 
                                                 
17   Judgment  of  the  Court  of  Justice  of  23  November  2016,  Commission  v  Stichting  Greenpeace 
Nederland and PAN Europe, Case C-673/13 P, EU:C:2016:889.  
18   Ibid, paragraph 79. 


the opportunity reasonably to understand how the environment could be affected by those 
emissions’19 (emphasis added). 
In the present case, however, there are several reasons why the withheld information in 
the documents requested does not fall under the above-mentioned definition of 'emissions 
into  the  environment'.  Firstly,  the  decision  has  not  yet  been  taken  by  the  competent 
authorities,  who  are  in  the  process  of  assessing  the  information  provided  by  the 
applicants. Although the purpose of Regulation (EC) No 1307/2006, as explained by the 
Court of Justice, is to increase, on the part of the competent bodies, the accountability of 
decision-making contributing to public awareness and support for the decisions taken, it 
is  not  to  substitute  the  decision-making  process  of  the  competent  institutions  through  a 
public review.  
The Court of Justice has specified that ‘the interpretation of “information on emissions 
into the environment” […] does not in any way mean that all data contained in files for 
authorisation to place plant protection products or biocides on the market, in particular, 
all data from studies carried out in order to obtain that authorisation, are covered by that 
concept  and  must  always  be  disclosed.  Only  data  relating  to  “emissions  into  the 
environment”  are  covered  by  that  concept,  which  excludes,  inter  alia,  not  only 
information  which  does  not  concern  emissions  from  the  product  in  question  into  the 
environment, but also […] information which relates to hypothetical emissions, that is to 
say  emissions  which  are  not  actual  or  foreseeable  from  the  product  or  substance  in 
question under representative circumstances of normal or realistic conditions of use’20.  
The withheld information relates to the alternative studies submitted or cases referred to 
by the applicant and to the reasons provided when claiming equivalence to the study used 
to approve an active substance. This information is clearly not related to emissions into 
the environment, as it is information supporting the claim of the applicant that its active 
substance data package is equivalent to the one used to approve (or renew the approval 
of)  an  active  substance.  In  addition,  information  on  an  active  substance  that  is  not 
released as such into the environment does not fulfil the criteria developed by the Court 
of Justice. 
The Court of Justice has explicitly underlined the need not to render void any legitimate 
protection of commercial interests: 
‘(…) while […] it is not necessary to apply a restrictive interpretation of the concept of 
“information [which] relates to emissions into the environment”, that concept may not, in 
any  event,  include  information  containing  any  kind  of  link,  even  direct,  to  emissions 
into  the  environment.  If  that  concept  were  interpreted  as  covering  such  information,  it 
would to a large extent deprive the concept of “environmental information” as defined in 
Article 2(1)(d) of Regulation (EC) No 1367/2006 of any meaning. Such an interpretation 
would  deprive  of  any  practical  effect  the  possibility,  laid  down  in  the  first  indent  of 
                                                 
19   Judgment of the Court of Justice of 23 November 2016, Bayer CropScience SA-NV and Stichting De 
Bijenstichting  v  College  voor  de  toelating  van  gewasbeschermingsmiddelen  en  biociden,  Case 
C-442/14, EU:C:2016:890, paragraph 100. 
20   Ibid. 
10 

Article  4(2)  of  Regulation  (EC)  No  1049/2001,  for  the  institutions  to  refuse  to  disclose 
environmental information on the ground, inter alia, that such disclosure would have an 
adverse effect on the protection of the commercial interests of a particular natural or legal 
person and. It would would jeopardise the balance which the EU legislature intended 
to  maintain  between  the  objective  of  transparency  and  the  protection  of  those 
interests
  also  constitute  a  disproportionate  interference  with  the  protection  of  business 
secrecy  ensured  by  Article  339  [of  the  Treaty  on  the  Functioning  of  the  European 
Union]’ (emphasis added). 
This conclusion is reinforced by a judgment of the General Court, which states that it is 
‘only  at  the  stage  of  the  national  authorisation  procedure  to  place  a  specific  plant 
protection product
 on the market that the Member State assesses any emissions into the 
environment  and  that  specific  information  emerges  concerning  the  nature,  composition, 
quantity,  date  and  place  of  the  actual  or  foreseeable  emissions,  under  such  conditions, 
from the active substance and the specific plant protection product containing it’.21 
The  full  disclosure  of  the  requested  documents  at  this  stage  would  indeed  lead  to  a 
disproportionate  undermining of  the protection of the rights ensured by Articles  16 and 
17 of the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union and by Article 39(3) of 
the Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights.  
I therefore conclude that there is no public interest capable of overriding the public and 
private interests protected by Article 4(2), third indent of Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001 
for the withheld (parts of) the requested documents.  
The  fact  that  the  documents  relate  to  an  administrative  procedure  and  not  to  any 
legislative  act,  for  which  the  Court  of  Justice  has  acknowledged  the  existence  of  wider 
openness,22 provides further support to this conclusion. 
Please also note that Article 4(1)(b) of Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001 does not include 
the possibility for the exceptions defined therein to be set aside by an overriding public 
interest. 
The  fact  that  the  requested  documents  are  now  partially  released  only  reinforces  this 
conclusion. 
 
 
                                                 
21   Judgment of the General Court of 21 November 2018, Stichting Greenpeace Nederland and Pesticide 
Action  Network  Europe  (PAN  Europe)  v  Commission,  Case  T-545/11  RENV,  EU:T:2018:817, 
paragraph 88. 
22   Judgment  of  the  Court  of  Justice  of  29  June  2010,  Commission  v  Technische  Glaswerke  Ilmenau 
Gmbh, Case C-139/07 P EU:C:2010:376, paragraphs 53-55 and 60 and judgment in Case C-28/08 P, 
cited above, paragraphs 56-57 and 63. 
11 


 
5. 
MEANS OF REDRESS 
Finally, I draw your attention to the means of redress available against this decision. You 
may  either  bring  proceedings  before  the  General  Court  or  file  a  complaint  with  the 
European  Ombudsman  under  the  conditions  specified  respectively  in  Articles  263  and 
228 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union. 
Yours sincerely, 
For the Commission 
Martin SELMAYR 
Secretary-General 

 
 
Enclosures: (2) 
12