This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Meeting between DG ENER and the Conseil de Cooperation Economique'.




Ref. Ares(2020)7906432 - 23/12/2020

 
 
 
  ENGIE is and aims to remain a key player in renewable energies. It is the leader in 
wind and solar in France, leader in micro-grids in the world and 2nd in the world for 
electric vehicle recharging station.  
  ENGIE has 24.8 GW of installed renewable capacity (66% hydro, 22% onshore wind, 
9% solar, 3% other sources). 
  ENGIE is committed to doubling its installed renewable energy generating capacity to 
16,000 MW by 2025. 
  ENGIE would like to increase the share of new renewable energy projects dedicated 
to specific customers to 50% by 2021. 
  The  renewable  strategy  focuses  on  making  zero-carbon  transition  possible  for 
business and local authorities through the development of integrated solutions “as a 
service”  (smart,  energy-efficient  equipment,  powered  using  carbon-free  energy, 
drastically reducing consumption). 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 
 
LINES TO TAKE 
 
SYSTEM INTEGRATION 
 
 
  The  Commission  is  preparing  a  Strategy  on  “Energy  sector 
integration”, which we intend to adopt on 8 July. 
 
  “Energy sector integration” is a broad term, and covers several 
concepts:  
o  the direct electrification of buildings, transport, industry 
o  the  use  of  decarbonised  fuels  in  these  sectors,  such  as 
biogas, hydrogen, or synthetic fuels 
o  but  also  the  move  towards  a  more  “circular”  energy 
system,  where  we  make  better  use  of  waste  heat  and 
waste biomass  
 
  Sector  integration  is  about  looking  at  our  energy  system 
holistically, as a whole, and creating stronger links between the 
electricity, gas, buildings, transport, agriculture and industry. It 
is essentially about optimising our energy system as a whole! 
 
  Sector  integration  is  not  really  an  option.  If  we  are  serious 
about reaching carbon neutrality (and we are!), then  we need 
to make our energy system work as efficiently and as smartly as 
possible. Only by doing so can we limit the cost of the energy 
transition for our citizens. 
 
  The  Strategy  will  present  the  vision  of  the  Commission  for  a 
smart  energy  system  of  the  future,  consistent  with  the 
 
 

 

 
 
 
ambition  of  the  Green  Deal,  and  building  on  the  Long  Term 
Strategy that the Commission presented in 2018.  
 
  It  will  also  propose  a  set  of  actions  that  the  Commission  will 
take in the coming months and years, to implement this vision, 
and  get  Europe  ready  on  track  for  a  smart,  carbon-neutral 
energy system. 
 
  We foresee actions in the following areas: 
 
  Create a more circular energy systemwith “energy-efficiency-
first”  at  its  core:  Too  much  energy  or  potential  energy  is 
wasted  in  our  current  system,  from  heat  and  gases  that  are 
released  into  the  atmosphere,  to  by-products  of  industrial 
processes and energy production, which could be captured and 
used for other purposes.  
 
  Accelerate  electrification,  and  build  a  largely  renewables-
based power system: To meet our emissions reduction goals in 
the  power  sector  we  need  more  electricity  to  be  generated 
from  renewables  and  to  power  areas  such  as  buildings, 
industry, and transport. 
 
  Promote renewable and low-carbon fuels, including hydrogen, 
for  hard-to-decarbonise  sectors:  Some  sectors,  like  heavy 
transport  and  industry,  are  harder  to  electrify,  so  we  need  to 
invest in cleaner fuels to power them.  
 
  Adapt energy markets for decarbonisation and distribution of 
resources: Customer information, choice and access is essential 
 
 

 

 
 
 
to enable and encourage smarter energy use and tackle energy 
poverty.  We  will  ensure  a  more  level-playing  field  across  all 
energy  carriers,  making  electricity  and  gas  markets  fit  for 
decarbonisation.  The  role  of  flexibility  is  crucial  in  this  regard 
(including  the  one  provided  by  flexible  –  increasingly  carbon-
free - generation alongside demand response and storage)  
 
  The work also started on adapting the gas market design to the 
decarbonised  gases  where  we  plan  to  facilitate  an  uptake  of 
clean  hydrogen  and  biomethane  and  prevent  market 
fragmentation  when  such  locally  produced  gases  will  gain 
importance. A proposal is planned for 2021 (Q3). 
 
  Build  a  more  integrated  energy  infrastructure:  by  adopting  a 
new  holistic  approach  for  both  large  –scale  and  local 
infrastructure  planning  for  district  heating,  electricity,  gas, 
hydrogen, and CO2.    
 
  Set  up  a  digitalized  energy  system  and  a  supportive 
innovation  framework:  by  upgrading  market  design  for  digital 
services and supporting research and innovation framework.    
 
RECOVERY PACKAGE 
 
  The Recovery Package underlines the importance of a green, 
digital and resilient recovery. The Commission proposed to 
reinforce the financial strength of the MFF to benefit such 
recovery. 
 
 

 

 
 
 
 
  While the financing instruments for the recovery are largely 
horizontal, (cross-sectoral), 25% will be earmarked for 
delivering the climate goals of the Green Deal. Energy 
investment and reforms are good for the recovery as they 
create growth and jobs, as also recently underlined by the 
International Energy Agency in their proposal for a recovery 
plan. Moreover, from past experience we are confident that 
energy can provide a quick pipeline of “shovel-ready” projects 
to invest the new money, as the financial reinforcement that 
the Commission proposed for the MFF will be concentrated in 
the first years of the MFF. 
 
 
ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND RENOVATION WAVE 
 
  Meeting our ambitious climate objectives will require pushing 
the  boundaries  in  every  field  –  also  energy  efficiency,  even  if 
more and more energy comes from renewable source. 
 
  In line with the European Green Deal the Commission will strive 
to  address  energy  efficiency  as  a  matter  of  priority.  In  this 
context,  we  will  try  to  ensure  that  the  energy-efficiency-first 
principle is followed across the board and applied in all parts of 
energy systems and the whole value chain.  
 
  In times of crisis, the energy efficiency first principle becomes 
ever  more  compelling,  because  energy  efficiency  investments 
 
 

 

 
 
 
can  be  directed  to  modernise  industries,  to  reduce  operating 
costs,  and  contribute  to  affordable  energy  bills  for  energy 
consumers,  local  jobs  supporting  employment,  a  smarter  and 
healthier environment for all people.  
 
  Indeed, energy efficiency investments and buildings renovation 
fit under the dual challenge we are facing currently: the energy 
sector decarbonisation and the green recovery after the COVID 
crises.  
 
  The  Renovation  Wave  is  a  flagship  area  under  the  Recovery 
Plan for Europe. Financing the renovation of buildings is one of 
the most urgent and immediate action that the EU can take to 
stimulate  the  economic  recovery  and  help  achieve 
decarbonisation of our economy. 
 

  This is as a flagship initiative of the European Green Deal, and 
central to the Recovery package.  
 
  With  buildings  being  the  largest  energy  consumer  (40%  of 
energy use in the EU) and responsible for 36% of greenhouse 
gas  emissions
,  they  are  indispensable  for  reaching  the  EU’s 
carbon  neutrality,  energy  efficiency  and  renewable  energy 
objectives. 
 
  The initiative’s aim is at least doubling the rate of renovation of 
existing building, lowering energy bills and improving living and 
working conditions. 
 
 
 

 

 
 
 
  In addition to the  reinforced regulatory and financial support, 
the  aim  is  to  remove  barriers  to  renovation  (e.g.  whether 
regulatory,  financial,  lack  of  skills  or  information,  skills  or 
workforce shortages). 
  Utilities have an essential role to play for energy  efficiency  of 
buildings,  and  for  building  renovation  by  proposing  affordable 
and innovative products and services to consumers.  
 
  We  know  ENGIE  is  engaged  in  this  endeavour  notably  via 
digitalisation, smart technologies and services. 
 
 
TEN-E 
 
  The TEN-E revision to be presented by the end of the year will 
be  crucial  in  ensuring  that  our  infrastructure  policy  fully 
supports  the  Green  Deal,  but  also  to  kick-start  the  economic 
recovery post the COVID 19 pandemic. 
 
  This  revision  will  strengthen  the  focus  on  electrification  and 
renewables  integration,  including  offshore,  the  need  to  scale 
up  smarter  grid  solutions,  and  address  the  different 
opportunities  to  decarbonise  the  gas  grid  by  looking  into  the 
potential  of  hydrogen  and  other  carbon  neutral/renewable 
gases,  retrofitting  of  existing  infrastructure  and  elements  of 
smart sector integration. 
 
 
 

 

 
 
 
  The  revised  TEN-E,  as  well  its  funding  priorities  under  the 
Connecting Europe Facility will continue to be fully dedicated to 
the  accelerated  deployment  and  financing  of  sustainable 
infrastructure. 
 
OFFSHORE ENERGY STRATEGY 
 
  The  Strategy  on  Offshore  Renewable  Energy  –  planned  for 
autumn  2020  -  will  provide  a  vision  and  a  series  of  policy 
initiatives  for  steering  the  multi-dimensional  step  change 
necessary  to  achieve  a  massive,  rapid,  cost-effective  and 
sustainable  scale  up  of  offshore  renewable  energies  in  the 
whole EU up to 2050. 
 
 
 

 

 
 
 
 
Background on energy system integration 
Energy  sectors  that  used  to  be  separate  are  becoming  more  and  more  interlinked  as  the 
economy  transitions  towards  carbon  neutrality.  The  electrification  of  transport  is  a  good 
example. Electric vehicles connect the transport sector and power sector, but also buildings, 
where charging points are often located. 
Smart  sector  integration  is  a  way  to  anticipate,  plan  and  accelerate  the  transition  to  the 
sustainable energy system of the future, making sure that it happens in a cost-effective way 
that benefits all citizens and where all sectors of the economy play their part. 
This  integration  is  required  because  of  changes  in  energy  supply,  in  energy  demand  and 
advances  in  energy  technologies.  Over  the  last  decades,  the  bulk  of  energy  demand  has 
moved  from  traditional  heavy  industries  towards  transport  and  service  industries. 
Simultaneously, the European energy supply is changing, away from fossil fuels and towards 
renewable  energy.  This transformation  of the  whole  energy  system  will  continue over  the 
next  30  years  as  we  progress  towards  our  objective  of  a  climate-neutral  economy.  Sector 
integration  combined  with  decentralised  energy  technologies,  digitalisation,  changing 
consumer  needs,  and  environmental  constraints  are  also  changing  when,  where,  and  by 
whom energy is used and produced. .  
These  changes  in  energy  demand  and  supply  creates  opportunities  to  rethink  how  the 
energy system and its infrastructure is organised and regulated. By looking at how different 
sources  and  carriers  of  renewable  energy  can  be  coupled  with  end-use  sectors  the  total 
investment  and  operation  cost  of  renewable  energy  production,  transmission,  transport, 
distribution, storage and energy conversion can be minimised.  
 
 
 
10