This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Documents from the expert group on intra-EU investment environment'.


  
EUROPEAN COMMISSION  
Directorate-General for Financial Stability, Financial Services and Capital Markets Union  
  
INVESTMENT AND COMPANY REPORTING  
  
 
 
   Free movement of Capital and application of EU law  
  
Minutes of the 4th Meeting of the Expert Group on intra-EU investment environment  
  
Brussels, 01 June 2018  
AGENDA POINT 1: Registration.  
AGENDA POINT 2: WELCOME, ADOPTION OF AGENDA, ADOPTION OF THE MINUTES OF THE THIRD 
MEETING OF 23 March 2018  
The Expert Group (EG) adopted the agenda of the fourth meeting, as well as the minutes of the third 
meeting  of  23  March  2018,  with  one  comment.  One  Member  Stated  asked  the  minutes  to  be 
supplemented  with  a  statement  that  the  Commission  recognized  that  some  Member  States  had 
started termination processes on a bilateral level.    
AGENDA POINT 3: PRESENTATION OF KEY SUBSTANTIVE STANDARDS OF INVESTOR PROTECTION 
UNDER EU LAW  
The  Chair  explained  that  Commission  services  would  make  a  presentation  on  key  substantive 
standards of investor protection, which would serve as a basis for the forthcoming Communication. 
The main message of the Communication would be that EU law grants EU investors complete, strong 
and effective protection, so as to reassure them. The aim was to provide a user-friendly document for 
investors and practitioners and therefore a balance should be found between comprehensiveness and 
focus on most relevant aspects.   
The  Commission  delivered  a  presentation,  including  an  overview  of  key  EU  investment  protection 
rules. The Commission recalled that when investors from Member States exercise their fundamental 
freedoms, they act within the scope of application of Union law1. Where a Member State enacts a 
measure that derogates from the fundamental freedoms, that measure also falls within the scope of 
Union  law  and  the  fundamental  freedoms,  the  general  principles  of  Union  law  and  the  rights 
guaranteed by the Charter apply.2 The fundamental internal market freedoms ensure protection at all 
stages of investment. Furthermore, investors enjoy in particular the principle of nondiscrimination, 
the  fundamental  freedoms  to  conduct  a  business  and  right  to  property  under  the  Charter  of 
Fundamental  Rights;  the  general  principles  of  good  administration,  legal  certainty  and  legitimate 
expectations, enforcement  of  rights  under  EU  law  –  including  direct  effect  and primacy of  EU  law, 
preliminary  ruling  procedure,  the  principles  of  procedural  autonomy  and  equivalence  and 
effectiveness and the right to an effective remedy under Art. 47 of the EU Charter of Fundamental 
Rights, including a wide range of standards and rights; the principle of state liability for damages for 
breaches of EU law.   
                                                           
1 Judgment in Pfleger, C-390/12, EU:C:2014:281, paragraphs 30 to 37.  
2 Judgment in Online Games Handels, C-685/15, EU:C:2017:452, paragraphs 55 and 56.   
1  
  

All  Member  States  which  intervened  were  positive  and  acknowledged  the  usefulness  of  an 
interpretative Communication on investment protection under EU law. The majority of interventions 
stressed the need to send a clear message that investment protection would not be lowered after 
intra-EU  BITs  were  terminated  and  to  focus  on  procedural  standards.  Enforcement  of  investment 
protection rights, rather than substantive EU law is perceived to be the key area of investor concern.   
Some  Member  States  considered  that  a  Communication,  while  useful,  would  not  be  sufficient  to 
reassure investors. These Member States were concerned that following the Achmea judgment law 
firms advised their companies to hold back intra-EU investments and invest in third countries or via 
third countries with which BITs were in place (e.g. Canada, Norway, Switzerland, Serbia). Therefore, 
several  Member  States  called  for  further  reflections  on  the  need  for  an  alternative  investment 
protection framework to address these concerns, as requested by the ECOFIN Council conclusions of 
June 2017.   
As regards procedural standards to be included in the Communication, Member States referred to the 
following aspects: indicating that national courts have to observe a number of standards and rights 
under  EU  law,  the  importance  of  a  well-functioning  preliminary  ruling  procedure;  possibility  for 
indirect  access  to  the  Court  of  Justice  via  infringement  proceedings;  possibility  for  judicial 
specialization on enterprises in national courts.   
As regards substantive standards, several Member States stressed the importance of Article 17 of the 
EU Charter of Fundamental Rights  and more  clarity on rules on expropriation, including conditions 
when  this  is  lawful,  circumstances  when  retroactivity  is  allowed  and  to  what  extent.  A  couple  of 
Member States questioned whether Art. 51 of the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights left a loophole 
as regards protection, given that the Charter only applied when Member States implemented EU law.  
One Member State called for a clarification of the concept of investor under EU law.   
The  Chair  welcomed  the  Member  States’  interventions,  noting  that  feedback  from  investors  was 
particularly useful. Member States were invited to comment on the presented main elements by 15 
June.   
The  Commission intervened recognizing the importance  of enforcement  and procedural aspects. It 
noted that the EU system contained many enforcement mechanisms, and among others, was geared 
towards conflict prevention. For instance, Member States have to notify certain measures to avoid 
unjustified barriers, national administrations are bound to carry out an EU law conform interpretation, 
the  national courts can set  aside rules contrary to EU law, the  Koebler  state liability case-law is an 
incentive for national judges  to observe the rules on preliminary ruling references. Furthermore, a 
package of secondary legislation strengthening the internal market was in the pipeline, including the 
company law package and the directive on a services notification procedure, the regulation on free 
flows of non-personal data in the EU. The Commission also clarified that there was no “loophole”, as 
an investor exercising its fundamental freedoms was always within the scope of application of Union 
law, pointing to the relevant case-law of the Court of Justice.  
AGENDA POINT 4: ACHMEA FOLLOW-UP AND TERMINATION PROCESS  
The  Chair  presented  an  overview  of  Member  States  positions  on  the  termination  process.  There 
seemed to be a broad agreement of Member States to the proposed two step approach: (1) a political 
declaration  containing  a  political  commitment  to  terminate  intra-EU  BITs  and  (2)  a  coordinated 
approach to termination of intra EU BITs, preferably via a plurilateral treaty. It was noted that this does 
not prevent Member States from proceeding with ongoing bilateral termination processes, which in 
certain situations may lead to faster compliance.  
2  
  

There was also a broad consensus that currently the focus should be on the political declaration, as it 
is essential to send a clear message to stakeholders and arbitration tribunals quickly in the interest of 
legal certainty. Such a political commitment by Member States would also give the Commission the 
necessary assurances to put infringement proceedings on hold.   
As regards questions on the nature of the declaration, the Commission clarified that it would be in its 
first  part  an  authoritative  interpretation  of  the  Member  States,  describing  and  informing  of  the 
common understanding of Member States on the legal situation after the Achmea judgment.  While it 
did  not  modify  treaties,  it  would  have  a  legal  impact  by  informing  arbitration  tribunals  applying 
international law. In its second part, it would be a commitment on the political steps to be undertaken.   
Member States agreed that discussions on the content of the declaration should continue within the 
Expert Group on intra-EU investment environment, as it was already dealing with this subject. Several 
Member States stressed that it was essential to send a clear signal fast.  
The Chair acknowledged that Member States still had different views on the forum for preparatory 
works on the treaty, with views generally split between the auspices of the Council, the Expert Group 
on intra-EU investment environment, and a suggestion for an intergovernmental approach. Further 
steps will be discussed once all Member States have commented in writing.  
Subsequently, the Chair opened the substantive discussion on the termination, which developed based 
on the circulated drafts of a declaration and treaty, prepared by 2 MS and COM. After presentation of 
the drafts Member States commented, raising a number of specific issues, to be resolved either in the 
declaration or at the treaty phase.   
The first issue concerned the non-application of Energy Charter Treaty (ECT) between Member States 
as a consequence of the Achmea judgment.  
All  Member  States'  interventions  concerning  sun-set  clauses  converged  on  their  immediate  non-
applicability, which should also be addressed in the declaration.   
Member States discussed transitional arrangements for pending arbitration cases. In view of legal and 
practical complexities, several Member States noted the need for further discussions.   
Another issue concerned the possible treatment of concluded arbitration cases.  
Other  issues  suggested  to  be  addressed  at  the  declaration  stage  included  the  need  for  further 
reflections  on  the  investor  protection  framework  at  EU  level  and  a  reference  to  the  forthcoming 
interpretative Commission Communication on investment protection under EU law.   
The Chair then proposed an approach to the immediate next steps in the termination process, focusing 
on the declaration. The Chair noted that there seemed to be a general agreement among Member 
States to sign this political declaration as soon as possible and in the margins of the Council. The Chair 
suggested  working  towards  a  declaration  in  the margins  of  the  Council  meeting  on  26  June,  while 
acknowledging  that  in  view  of  the  open  issues  and  additional  time  for  consultations  requested  by 
Member States this timing was ambitious.    
The Chair invited Member States to send their comments relating to the declaration in writing by 8 
June. The Chair further suggested holding another meeting of the Expert Group on 12 June to discuss 
the declaration text. If needed, the Commission further offered to organise an additional meeting of 
the Expert Group on 21 June.  
In conclusion, the Chair thanked Member States for the constructive debate and said that Member 
States'  concerns  and  comments  were  well  noted.  The  Chair  acknowledged  the  need  to  reassure 
investors that they enjoy strong protection under EU law. In this context, the Chair recalled that the 
3  
  

Commission  was  assisting  Member  States  on  improving  national  justice  systems  via  various  tools, 
including the European Semester, the EU Justice Scoreboard and European funds.  
  
4