Esta es la versión HTML de un fichero adjunto a una solicitud de acceso a la información 'Meeting between Breton and BusinessEurope'.



Ref. Ares(2022)1293839 - 21/02/2022
 
CAB BRETON / 1028 
 
 
 
 
 
BusinessEurope  Advisory and Support Group  
 event 
_______ 
 
Speech by Commissioner Thierry Breton 
9 November 2021, Brussels 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 
[Introduction: building on our recent achievements] 
 
  Mr 

Mr 

Ladies and gentlemen, 
 
 
  I am delighted to be given the opportunity to exchange 
with  you  this  evening.  I  believe  this  afternoon’s 
programme has been rich and intense. It mirrors, I think, 
the  relentless  dedication  of  BusinessEurope  to  voicing 
the  interests  of  our  companies  throughout  the 
continent.  
 
  And indeed, European companies must be heard, today 
probably more than ever. For nearly two years now, we 
have been navigating through volatile times. Companies, 
and  in  particular  SMEs,  have  been  on  the  frontline, 
having  to  deal  with  the  consequences  of  such 
unpredictability.  
 
  With this being said, the economic outlook has cleared 
up over the last few months, and I think it is fair to say 
that  it  has  to  do  with  our  collective  achievement 
regarding vaccination.  
 

 

 
  Starting  from  scratch,  we  managed,  in  record  time,  to 
give Europe the industrial means not only to cater for its 
own  needs,  but  also  to  live  up  to  its  international 
responsibilities.  We  are  indeed  the  first  provider  of 
vaccine doses in the world.  
 
  Europe  also  spearheaded  global  efforts  on  the  digital 
front:  with  the  EU  Digital  COVID  Certificate,  the 
Commission’s  services  introduced  successfully  the  first 
and so far only system operating at international level.  
 
  Nearly 600 million certificates issued so far across more 
than 40 countries: with this global standard, Europe has 
boosted  people’s  confidence  and  eagerness  to  travel 
again. It has helped the tourism ecosystem get back on 
track.   
 
  Obviously,  the  pandemic  is  still  with  us,  but  this 
European  success  tells  us  one  thing:  when  we, 
Europeans,  get  our  acts  together,  we  set  the  pace  and 
we go the distance. 
 
  Now,  to  be  honest,  we  had  not  anticipated  that  the 
global  economy  would  start  getting  back  on  its  feet  so 
rapidly.  This  sudden  rise  in  global  demand  has  created 
tensions that are partly fuelling the current energy crisis.  
 
  As  you  know,  the  Commission  has  set  up  a  toolbox  to 
mitigate its effects and we are discussing with Member 

 

 
States on how to go about it in the longer run. But there 
is  already  one  lesson  to  learn  from  it:  we  must 
anticipate  our  transition.  We  must  build  on  our  recent 
achievements  to  become  more  confident  about 
Europe’s  capacity  to  lay  the  ground  for  its  strategic 
autonomy, and consequently, for a more resilient Single 
Market. 
 
[Resilience = rebalancing global value chains] 
 
  Resilience  has  been  a  strong  leitmotiv  in  the  last 
months,  but  what  does  it  really  means,  what  does  it 
entail when talking about industry and the economy? 
 
  Well,  first,  we  have  to  think  about  the  scale:  the 
pandemic  has  revealed  to  what  extent  all  economies 
were intertwined at global level.  
 
  Contrary to what some may think, the intention of the 
Commission  is  not  to  flee  this  global  integration  but  to 
better  harness  it,  by  mitigating  Europe’s  dependencies, 
by  finding  a  new  equilibrium,  by  instilling  more 
assertively its values and its rules. 
 
  Industrially  speaking,  this  means  re-balancing  global 
value  chains,  just  like  what  we  did  with  vaccine 
production.  We  must  replicate  this  on  other  fronts.  I 
have  in  mind,  of  course,  semiconductors.  Probably  the 
most striking example of the challenges awaiting us. 

 

 
 
  To put it simply, semiconductors are our future: 5G and 
6G,  edge  computing,  the  Internet  of  Things,  artificial 
intelligence, to name but a few. The market will double 
by the end of the decade.  
 
  We  must  be  ready.  Not  only  for  the  current  20nm 
semiconductors  -  for  which  we  need  to  increase  our 
existing capacities – but also for the next generation of 
semiconductors  below  5nm  and  even  2nm.  These  will 
power  our  green  and  digital  transition  and  ensure  our 
resilience. 
 
  We must also be vigilant about the current geopolitical 
developments.  We  know  that  the  heart  of  the 
geopolitics of chips is in Japan and South Korea. We are 
all aware of the tensions between the US and China.  
 
  In  this  context,  Europe  cannot  afford  to  wait  and  see. 
We  must  be  ambitious.  We  have  the  best  research  in 
the  world.  Take  IMEC,  LETI  or  Fraunhofer.  Europe  has 
the  key  to  technological  breakthrough,  and  with  the 
European Chips Act, recently announced, we will further 
support such excellence.  
 
  And to turn this excellence into industrial leadership, we 
must  beef  up  our  capacities,  in  particular  by  setting  up 
large  manufacturing  facilities.  Let’s  be  clear  about  this: 
the  fabless  approach  is  outdated.  I  am  not  saying  we 

 

 
must  and  we  can  re-shore  everything.  I  am  saying  we 
must 
stop 
systematically 
relocating 
all 
our 
manufacturing processes like we used to. 
 
  Not  only  should  we  regain  manufacturing  power,  we 
should  also  get  our  strongest  international  partners  to 
establish  their  own  manufacturing  capacities  on 
European soil; to invest in European know-how.    
 
  This  will  be  good  for  our  competitiveness  and  for  our 
jobs. Obviously, we will have to ensure that we have the 
right skillset to match such transformation. Through the 
Pact  for  skills,  we  launched  several  skills  partnerships, 
including  on  microelectronics.  We  want  to  ensure  that 
businesses, large and small, have all the talents needed 
to innovate and grow.  
 
  So  you  see,  re-balancing  global  value  chains  entails  a 
series of bold decisions, from domestic capacity building 
to international  partnerships,  from  technological  know-
how to industrial deployment. 
 
  And what goes for semi-conductors goes for many other 
sectors, such as raw materials - another essential driver 
of our twin transition - where we will also need to strike 
the  right  balance  between  domestic  sourcing  and 
international partnerships.  
 

 

 
  I also have in mind hydrogen. Here again, Europe has to 
lessen the gap between its technological excellence and 
industrial scale-up.  
 
  But I am confident: lately I have referring quite often to 
the  first  fossil-free  steel  vehicle  that  I  discovered  in 
Sweden a few weeks ago. I see this as the shining proof 
that  decarbonising  at  industrial  scale  is  becoming 
possible;  that  Europe  is  showing  the  way  towards  new 
markets for low-carbon products. 
 
  I am also confident that Europe has enough leverage to 
attract  the  big  players  and  to  rebalance  the  industrial 
world map, notably because we have our Single Market, 
the biggest integrated market in the world.  
 
 
[Strengthening the Single Market] 
 
  Which brings me to my second point: strengthening the 
Single Market.  
 
  It  is  indeed  the  ultimate  engine  of  our  long-term 
recovery.  It  is  the  cornerstone  of  Europe’s  economy. 
When  the  pandemic  started,  companies,  in  particular 
SMEs,  were  hit  hard  and  were  all  taken  off-guard.    We 
must  ensure  that  it  is  functioning  well,  under  any 
circumstances. 
 

 

 
  This is why, in 2022, we will come up with a proposal for 
a Single Market Emergency Instrument.  This instrument 
will  provide    a    swift    and  flexible    response    to    the  
impact  of  any  given  crisis  on  the  Single  Market, with 
one sole objective: to safeguard free movement. 
 
  Emergency  measures  must  be  complemented  by  a 
structural approach. 
 
  As  you  know,  last  May,  along  with  the  updated 
Industrial Strategy, we published the first Annual Single 
Market  Report.  It  analyses,  industrial  ecosystem  by 
industrial  ecosystem,  the  progress  made  in  addressing 
Single 
Market 
barriers 
and 
reports 
on 
the 
implementation  of  the  Single  Market  Enforcement 
Action Plan. 
 
  The  Commission  knows  too  well  that  businesses 
continue to face too many barriers to cross-border trade 
and  investment,  especially  in  services.  This  is  why  we 
will  explore  a  legislative  proposal  to  facilitate  cross-
border  trade  in  services  for  key  business  services 
supported by harmonised standards. 
 
  It  is  also  important  that  the  Commission  and  Member 
States  continue  to  cooperate  in  addressing  and 
preventing  barriers.  It  is  vital  that  we  assess  and 
anticipate  the  impact  on  the  Single  Market  of  any 
planned national measure.  

 

 
 
  Hence the importance of the Single Market Enforcement 
Task  Force,  which  was  set  up  to  discuss  transparently 
about how to remove barriers to the Single Market. 
 
  The Commission will continue to ensure Member States’ 
compliance  with  their  existing  obligations.  We  will  also 
strengthen  market  surveillance  of  products  and 
continue to mobilise investments to support SMEs. 
 
  In  this  endeavour,  the  Single  Market  Programme, 
adopted before the summer, will be key. It pools crucial 
activities  financed  under  several  previous  programmes. 
It  provides  a  more  coherent  and  agile  framework  that 
will help our Single Market reach its full potential, in the 
interest of businesses and consumers.       
 
 
[Conclusion] 
 
  Ladies and gentlemen, 
 
  I have used the word “confidence” a couple of times and 
will  use  it  one  last  time  to  conclude.  In  these  times  of 
hardship  and  uncertainty,  we  have  set  ourselves 
ambitious  goals  and  we  have  come  up  with  ambitious 
tools to achieve them. 
 

 

 
  I could have mentioned all the collective work we have 
been doing under the industrial alliances.    
 
  I  could  have  mentioned  also  the  Fit  for  55  package, 
which  will  provide  Europe’s  new  growth  strategy  with 
the  right  regulatory  framework,  or  the  Recovery  plan, 
which will give us enough firepower to uphold our green 
and digital transition. 
 
  This goes to show that we have all it takes to succeed. 
Rest  assure  that  the  Commission  will  do  its  utmost  to 
provide 
businesses 
with 
the 
most 
conducive 
environment to sustainability and competitiveness. 
 
  Thank you. 
 
[1500 words]   
 
10