Esta es la versión HTML de un fichero adjunto a una solicitud de acceso a la información 'Compromise and split amendments Toward a sustainable blue economy in the EU'.

2 February 2022
FINAL VOTING LIST - Short version
Toward a sustainable blue economy in the EU:
the role of the fisheries and aquaculture sectors
(PE697.842 -2021/2188(INI)
TRAN opinion to PECH
Rapporteur: Roman HAIDER
Concerned
AM
Tabled by
Remarks
Rapp Vote
text
CA 1 EPP, S&D, RE,
If adopted, 42, 40, 41, 44, 45,
+
ID, ECR
47, 48 A, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53
and 72 fall

Paragraph 1 a
43 Paulus
-
(new)
Paragraph 1 b
46 Paulus
-
(new)
Paragraph 1 c
48 B Paulus
If adopted will be a separate
-
(new)
paragraph: Calls the
Commission to “encourage
the deployment of legal
degassing infrastructure in

ports”
CA 2 EPP, S&D, RE,
If adopted, 58, 55, 54, 57, 59,
+
ID, ECR
60, 61, 63, 64, 66, 68 and 69
fall

Paragraph 2
56 Paulus
Falls if 58, 55, 54 or 57
-
adopted
If adopted will be a separate
new paragraph

Paragraph 2 a
62 Paulus
-
(new)
Paragraph 2 b
65 Paulus
-
(new)
Paragraph 2 c
67 Paulus
-
(new)
Paragraph 2 e
70 Paulus
-
(new)

Paragraph 2 f
71 Paulus
-
(new)
CA 3 EPP, S&D, RE,
If adopted, 73 A, 75, 74, 76,
+
ID, ECR
77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 82 and 83
fall

CA 4 EPP, S&D, RE,
If adopted, 84, 86, 87, 88 and
+
ID, ECR
91 fall
CA 5 EPP, S&D, RE,
If adopted, 73 B, 85, 92, 93,
+
ID, ECR
95, 97, 94, 99, 106, 107, 108,
109, 100, 104 and 105 fall

Paragraph 4 c
89 Paulus
-
(new)
Paragraph 4 d
90 Paulus
-
(new)
Paragraph 5 –
96 Paulus
-
point 1 (new)
Paragraph 5 –
98 Paulus
-
point 2 (new)
Paragraph 5 a
101 Bauzá Díaz,
-
(new)
Nagtegaal, Oetjen,
Gade
Paragraph 5 a
102 Paulus
-
(new)
Paragraph 5 b
103 Paulus
-
(new)
CA 6 EPP, S&D, RE,
If adopted, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 10,
+
ID, ECR
11 and 13 fall
Citation 1 a
1 Paulus
-
(new)
Citation 1 c
9 Paulus
-
(new)
Citation 1 f
12 Paulus
-
(new)
Citation 1 h
14 Paulus
-
(new)
CA 7 EPP, S&D, RE,
If adopted, 15, 16, 17 and 18
+
ID, ECR
fall
Recital A b
20 Paulus
-
(new)

Recital A c
21 Paulus
-
(new)
Recital A d
22 Paulus
-
(new)
Recital A e
23 Paulus
-
(new)
Recital A f
24 Paulus
-
(new)
Recital A g
25 Paulus
-
(new)
Recital A h
26 Paulus
-
(new)
Recital A j
28 Paulus
-
(new)
CA 8 EPP, S&D, RE,
If adopted, 19, 27, 29, 30, 31,
+
ID, ECR
32, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38 and 39
fall

Recital B a
33 Paulus
-
(new)
Final vote – Draft as amended (Roll-call vote)
+

Final draft version of COMPROMISE amendments
COMPROMISE 1:
Covers AMs: 40, 41, 42, 44, 45, 47, 48 (1st part), 49, 50, 51, 52, 53; 72;
Supported by: EPP, S&D, RE, ID, ECR
1.
Supports the principle of sustainable development within the blue economy as a driver
of economic growth in the EU, in particular in the Atlantic, Mediterranean and Baltic
Sea 
areas  as  a  way  to  foster all  ocean-,  sea- and  coastal  area-related  sectoral  and
intersectoral  activities,  including 
maritime  transport,  shipbuilding,  and  ship  repair
biotechnology, sustainable tourism, offshore wind, commercial and recreational fishing
and  aquaculture,  and  wave  and  tidal  energy; calls  on  the  Commission  to  promote
research,  development  and  innovation  as  tools  that  contribute  towards sustainable
tourism, resource efficiency and renewable energy;

- stresses particularly that the offshore renewable energy has the potential to become
an  important component  of  Europe’s  energy  system  by  2050  and  calls  to  create
incentives  and  funding  for  investments  in  port  infrastructure  in  order  to  facilitate
servicing of the offshore industry;

1 a. Recognises that  the  EU’s  recovery  efforts  must  be  centred  on  sustainability,
competitiveness and  growth  objectives; Highlights that the  decarbonisation  of  the
sector will require an integrated and cross-sectoral approach and that EU measures in
this  regard shall go  hand  in  hand  with  national  and  local  policies and  respect
technological  neutrality;  stresses  the  need  for  sustainable  financing  instruments  in
driving  this  transition,  including  through  the  strengthening  of  public  and  private
investment;

1 b. Highlights that blue economy shall contribute to the objective of climate neutrality and
the digitalisation of the European economy, while respecting the principles of energy
and  cost efficiency,  technological  neutrality,  competitiveness  preservation,  circular
economy and the preservation of biodiversity and shall create more sustainable and
smart practices that are beneficial for socio-economic development and contribute to
the  increase  of  employment  opportunities,  moreover  it  should  be  based  on  impact
assessment analysis;

1 c.
Recalls the existence of tools such as the European CleanSeaNet programme, which
aims  to  monitor  oil  pollution;  emphasises  that  regional  cooperation,  including  with
third  countries,  is  essential,  especially  in  the  Mediterranean  Sea;  calls  on  the
Commission,  therefore,  to  reinforce  the  exchange  of  information  and  cooperation
among  countries; Underlines  the  importance  of  collaborative,  inclusive  and  cross-
sectoral  maritime  spatial  planning,

taking  into  account  socio-economic,
environmental and biodiversity  concerns;  stresses  the  importance  of  the  energy
transition,  where  the  blue  economy  sector  can  promote  renewable  offshore  power
generation technologies, such as tidal, wave, solar and wind energy; underlines the
importance of supporting the decarbonisation of the shipping and maritime transport
industries,  developing  sustainable technologies,  increasing  the  use  of  low-emission
and renewable energy sources;

1 d. Welcomes the Horizon Europe 'Mission: Restore our Ocean and Waters', recognising

the need for a systemic and coordinated approach to our ocean and waters at EU and
national level;

1 e.
Highlights  that  coastal  and  ocean-dependent  communities  can  contribute  for  the
development  of  a  sustainable  blue  economy  sector,  considering  their  specific
circumstances and needs, and that they can lead pilot projects of different nature, such
as offshore renewable energy technologies, development of nature-based activities and
the contribution of sustainable fisheries and aquaculture for healthy, resilient and safe
food systems;

1.f  Highlights the importance of improving ocean literacy culture and the renewal of the
traditional  and  small-scale  fisheries  fleet, as  a  way  of  attractiveness  for  young
generation in the sector of the fisheries-related tourism;


COMPROMISE 2:
Covers AMs: 54, 55, 57, 59, 60, 61, 63, 64, 66, 68
Falls: 58
Supported by: EPP, S&D, RE, ID, ECR
2.
Highlights that maritime sector is a key link for international connectivity and a global
trading  system,  for  the  European  economy and  its  competitiveness and  for  their
regions;  stresses  the  importance  of  enhancing  the role  of  ports  and  the  need  of
investments in smart infrastructures, as well as the development and management of
ports, which should enable further capacities to accommodate trade growth;

2a.Supports the principle of sustainable development as the main driver for economic growth
in the EU, and particularly in the Atlantic, Mediterranean and Baltic areas through
maritime transport, shipbuilding, biotechnology, sustainable tourism, offshore wind,
fishing and aquaculture, wave and tidal energy;

2b.Calls  on  the  Commission  to  ensure  that  the  EU  is achieving  and maintaining
technological leadership, retaining talent and producing energy while reducing any
potential impacts on the marine environment;

2c.Highlights  the  need for  the  blue  economy  sectors of  appropriate  financial  support  to
enable large-scale investments in research, technology and infrastructure at the EU
and  Member  States  level.  Therefore  calls  on  the  Commission  and  the  industry  to
evaluate  the  benefit  of  establishing  European  partnerships for  maritime  transport,
including  the  private  sector at  EU  and  international  level, 
in  order  to address  the
current international trade and supply chain challenges, in order to foster innovation
and  competitiveness within  the  sector,  to  contribute  to  decarbonisation,  to  create
infrastructures  for  loading  and  supplying  alternative  fuels  in  ports  and  cargo
terminals, shore-side electricity and to develop waste management plans for Atlantic,
Mediterranean and  Baltic ports; welcomes  therefore  the  establishment  of  the

“European  Partnership  for  a  climate  neutral,  sustainable  and  productive  blue
economy”,  aiming  to  align  national,  regional  and  EU  research  and  innovation
priorities;

2 d. Calls on the Commission and Member States to invest in ports located along the EU
coast to focus on missing connections with the hinterland, with the overall objective of
making transport more resilient and turning ports into logistic platforms and strategic
clusters for multi-modal transport, energy generation, storage and distribution as well
as  tourism
Stresses  the  importance  of  concluding  a  market-based  measure  in  the
International  Maritime  Organisation  (IMO)  for  the  reduction  of  greenhouse  gases
from  maritime  transport  ,  to  achieve  a  carbon  offsetting  scheme  in  international
shipping and to ensure a realistic path of emissions reduction
;

2 e.
Highlights that the 2020 communication on a sustainable and smart mobility strategy
aims to bring the first zero emission vessels to market by 2030
,and that the EU has
already  financed  via  H2020  substantial  research  in  the  field  of  hybridisation  and
electrification of vessels. Calls on the Commission to further accelerate the support for
electric vessels for short routes
;

2 f.
Highlights  that  the  green  transition  in  maritime  transport  should  allow  for

technological  neutrality, progressively  increased  blending  mandates,  roadmaps  for
supplying and charging points, and a clear commitment to transitional fuels such as
LNG
; calls on the Commission to support all ship-owners and commercial operators
to  implement  all  available  operational  and  technical  measures  to  improve  energy
efficiency and reduce  emissions from maritime sector, including slow steaming and
speed  optimisation,  wind  propulsion,  anti-fouling  coatings,  electrification  from
renewable sources and energy storage, digitalisation and logistics optimisation;


COMPROMISE 3:
Covers AMs: 73 (1s part), 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83
Supported by: EPP, S&D, RE, ID, ECR
3.
Calls on the Commission and the Member States to complete priority projects included
in 
the trans-European  transport  network  (TEN-Tfor the  AtlanticMediterranean  and
Baltic Sea,  especially  in  cross  border areas and  in  the  context  of  the  future  TEN-T
guidelines and the Connecting Europe Facility (2021-2027), to promote, simplify and
invest with adequate funding in 
the full development of the TEN-T motorways of the
sea better  integrating  short  seas  shipping  to  distribute  goods  more  widely  via  ports
connecting 
islands to the mainland and a comprehensive multimodal transport system;
stresses  that  it  is  essential  to  create  seamless  and  sustainable  transport  chains  for
passengers and cargo across all transport modes, and in particular rail, maritime and
inland waterways transport; believes that projects should pay particular attention to
the connectivity and accessibility needs of peripheral, islands and outermost regions of
the Atlantic, Mediterranean, and Baltic Sea;

3 a. Highlights that ports can be used to boost the blue economy, having a key role in the
economic activities of this sector and to ensure its transition towards a sustainable and
smart mobility in line with the principles of the European Green Deal; calls on the
Commission  to  reallocate  more  EU  funding  to  improve  accessibility  to  TEN-T  core
ports, improving transport efficiency, and reducing costs. This includes investment in
continuous  dredging,  channel  deepening  and  other capacity-building  measures  in
selected ports;recalls the Commission and Member States that further investment in
sustainable, and intelligent port infrastructures is needed, enabling them to become
multimodal  mobility  and  transport  hubs,  as  well  as  energy  hubs  for  integrated
electricity systems, hydrogen and other alternative fuels, and testbeds for waste reuse
and the circular economy
;

3 b. Highlights that the potential of an blue economy strategy can only be achieved through
the  cooperation  of  all  different  stakeholdersnotes  the  increasing  use  of  data  and
artificial intelligence in the maritime transport and calls on the Commission to assess
the socio-economic impact of automation and digitalisation of the sector
;

3 c. Calls for an improved and more coordinated implementation of all available financial
instruments, including the structural and investment funds, to better promote the blue
economy strategy
;
3 c.
Calls  on  the  Commission  to  collect  consistent  data  enabling  the  intelligent
management  of  coastal  tourism,  avoiding  the  pressure  on  ecosystems  and  local
communities, as well as the competition with the so-called traditional activities such
artisanal and coastal fishing;


COMPROMISE 4:
Covers AMs: 86, 87, 88, 91
Falls: 84
Supported by: EPP, S&D, RE, ID, ECR
4.
Highlights that fostering the blue economy is key to reviving the economy as a whole
and restoring the economic and social aspects of several sectors such as transport and
tourism among others
severely affected by the COVID-19 pandemic;
4 a. Highlights the importance of management and adaptation measures that are necessary
to protect coastal communities, habitats and biodiversity and that would represent costs
well spent vis-a-vis the enormous climate change impacts and resulting costs; calls on
the Commission to set up an alert and observation system for increased storms and
floods  and  to  provide  adequate  environmental  and  health  monitoring  and  conduct
research  into  early  warnings; calls  on  the Commission  to  assess  different  scenarios
and  measures  to  face  possible  sea  level  rise  and  intensification  of  severe  weather
events;

4 b. Calls for the development of instruments to utilize maritime resources in a sustainable
way and to diversify the ocean economy, including through support for new products
connected to and derived from fishing activities, which can add value to our cultural
and natural heritage, specifically by providing high-quality tourism options
;


COMPROMISE 5:
Covers AMs: 73 (2nd part), 85, 92, 93, 94, 95, 97, 99, 100, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108, 109
Supported by: EPP, S&D, RE, ID, ECR
5.
Calls on the Commission to develop new forms of sustainable maritime coastal
tourism, to boost new forms of tourism activities, to provide additional income
streams 
and increase employment all year round, to enhance the value of maritime
and coastal areas, while protecting the environment and the blue cultural heritage
and preserving marine and coastal habitats; highlights the importance of the circular
economy in the tourism sector in developing more sustainable practices that benefit
local development; recognises that the tourism sector should engage with coastal
communities and it needs support to boost the efficiency and sustainability of
infrastructure and the competitiveness of marine and tourism resorts
;
5 a. Calls on the Commission to include sustainable maritime, island and coastal tourism
in  related  actions  and  programmes,  to  support  initiatives  that  encourage  the
diversification of coastal, maritime and marine tourism, to make tourist activities and
employment  less seasonal
highlights the  need  of  collecting  better  data  on  the
contribution of recreational angling tourism;

5aa. Stresses the importance of the Blue Economy in the Outermost Regions, namely in the
Tourism sector. Therefore calls on the Commission to create a "POSEI Transport" to
address the needs of the island and outermost regions more directly and support the
operation of some commercial routes to them;

5 b. Supports sustainable practices in coastal and maritime tourism, since they are essential
for the competitiveness of the Atlantic, Mediterranean and Baltic Sea areas and in the
creation  of  high-value  jobs  focusing  on  blue  education  and  vocational  training;
stresses that specific training on blue economy activities would contribute to raising
awareness of marine ecosystems and of the need to protecting them;

5b.a.  Calls on  the  Commission  to  conduct  a  broad  consultation  of  regional  and  local
authorities and all related stakeholders, in order to identify tailor made solutions for
local and regional communities;

5bc. Asks the Commission to assess possible solutions to promote the resilience of the tourism
sector against the impacts of future pandemics or any kind of disruptive events that
risk the operability of tourism activities, and to come up with appropriate initiatives to
improve the working and employment conditions for workers in the sector, increasing
its attractiveness and helping to realise the full potential of the blue economy;

5 c.
Underlines  the  importance  of  yachting  and  sailing  for  maritime  tourism,  the
importance  of  beach  and  underwater  tourism, angling  tourism,  ecotourism, water
sports,  the  cruise  industry  and  the  role  of  local  culture  and  gastronomy  in  the
development of European coastal tourism;

5 d. Stresses the importance of marine protected areas as an instrument for protecting the
oceans,  constituting  an  opportunity  for  the  development  of  the  so-called  scientific
tourism
;


5 e.
Notes that reliable, high-quality and harmonised ocean data are an important factor
the for a sustainable transformation of the blue economy; welcomes the initiative of
sharing  marine  data  and  ocean  observations  via  EMOD  net,  and  the  work  of  the
Copernicus  marine  environment  service  providing  satellite  data  and  forecasting
services in the EU sea basins and in the world
;


Citation & Recitals
COMPROMISE 6:
Covers AMs: 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 11, 13
Supported by: EPP, S&D, RE, ID, ECR

having regard to the Commission communication of 17 May 2021 on a new approach
for a sustainable blue economy in the EU – transforming the EU’s Blue Economy for a
Sustainable Future (COM(2021)0240),

having regard to the competence of the European Parliament’s Committee on
Transport and Tourism in the area of maritime programming and an integrated
maritime policy,


having regard to the Commission communication of 20 May 2020 entitled ‘EU
Biodiversity Strategy for 2030: Bringing nature back into our lives’
(COM(2020)0380),


Having regard the Article 349 of the article 349 of the Treaty on the Functioning of
the European Union,


having regard to the Commission communication of 9 December 2020 entitled
'Sustainable and Smart Mobility Strategy’ - putting European transport on track for
the future' (COM(2020) 789),


having regard to the political agreement between Parliament and the Council of
11March 2021 on the Connecting Europe facility 2021-2027,


having regard to the Commission communication of 23 July 2020 entitled ‘A new
approach to the Atlantic maritime strategy – Atlantic action plan 2.0: An updated
action plan for a sustainable, resilient and competitive blue economy in the

European Union Atlantic area’ (COM(2020)0329) and to the European Parliament
resolution of 14 September 2021 on 'A new approach to the Atlantic maritime
strategy' (2020/2276(INI)),


having regard to Directive 2007/60/EC of the European Parliament and of the
Council of23 October 2007 on the assessment and management of flood risks,


having regard to Directive(EU) 2018/2001 of the European Parliament and of the
Council of 11 December 2018 on the promotion of the use of energy from renewable
sources,


having regard to Directive 2008/56/EC of the European Parliament and of the
Council of 17 June 2008 establishing a framework for community action in the field
of marine environmental policy (Marine Strategy Framework Directive),)


COMPROMISE 7:
Covers AMs: 16, 17
Falls: 15, 18
Supported by: EPP, S&D, RE, ID, ECR
A.
- Whereas Europe’s blue economy provides 4.5million direct jobs, it encompasses all
industries and 
sectors related to oceans, seas and coasts, whether they are based in the
marine  environment (e.g.  shipping,  seagoing  passenger  transport,  fisheries,  energy
generation) or 
on land (e.g. ports, shipyards, coastal tourism, land-based aquaculture),
and it is a broad, fast-moving segment of our economy, which over the past decade has
taken significant steps to modernise and diversify and which will play an important
role in improving the environmental, social and economic development;

Ab.
- whereas it will further provide new prospects and new jobs creation, namely in areas
such  as  ocean  renewable  energy,  the  blue  bio-economy,  bio-technology  and
desalination;


COMPROMISE 8:
Covers AMs: 19, 27, 29, 31, 32, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39
Supported by: EPP, S&D, RE, ID, ECR
B.
whereas maritime and coastal tourism constitute a pillar of the blue economy, with over
half of the EU’s tourist accommodation located in coastal areas and 30 % of overnight
stays occurring at beach resorts, while the Communication on Tourism and Transport
in 2020 and Beyond underscores the importance of protecting and restoring Europe´s
land and marine natural capital
;
B a. whereas  biodiversity  conservation  and  the  preservation  and  restoration  of  marine
ecosystems  is  essential  for  humankind  as  they  are  fundamental for  the  proper
functioning of oceans as carbon sinks, for global food security and human health, and
as  a  source of  economic  activities  including  transport,  trade,  tourism,  fisheries,
renewable energy and health products;

B  aa.  whereas  coastal  communities  need  to  diversify  their  incomes  in  order  to  sustain
economic and social shocks;
B  ab.  whereas  angling  tourism  can  be  a  sector  to  diversify  the  income  sources,  while
ensuring  the  sustainability  and  good  status  of  fish  stocks  and  providing  social  and
health benefits
;

B ac. whereas maritime and coastal tourism accounts for 60% of the employment in the
blue economy; whereas a competitive, resilient and socially fair blue economy needs
highly qualified and skilled professionals, “blue jobs” can promote growth and
career opportunities;

B ae. whereas biodiversity conservation and protection should be safeguarded when
promoting maritime economic activity;
B af. whereas several sectors of the blue economy were affected by the COVID-19 pandemic,
in particular coastal and maritime tourism; whereas blue economy could help to repair
the economic and social damaged caused by the current crisis;

B b. Whereas  EU  shipyards  could  seize  the  opportunities  arising  from  the  fast- growing
markets of innovative energy-efficient service vessels;
B c. Whereas  Ports  are  crucial  to  the  connectivity  and  the  economy  of  regions  and
countries,  and  play  an  important  role  in  the  promotion  of  sustainable  development
contributing  to  tackling  biodiversity  loss,  as  envisaged  by  the  new  EU biodiversity
strategy for 2030, and As Europe´s industrial landscape changes (for example with the
expansion of offshore renewable energy), the role of ports will evolve too;

B d. Whereas in coastal regions, developing sustainable infrastructure will help preserve
biodiversity, coastal ecosystems and landscapes, strengthening the sustainable
development of tourism and of the coastal regions’ economy;
B da. whereas the blue economy sector plays a vital role in the prosperity of outermost
regions, that, due to their insularity, are especially dependent on blue economy-based

activities, such as maritime transport, shipping, and tourism, with ports being an
important hub for the transport of goods and passengers;