Esta es la versión HTML de un fichero adjunto a una solicitud de acceso a la información 'Meetings with detailed Minutes, Reports on Cloning and their offsprings'.



Ref. Ares(2015)2430276 - 10/06/2015


 
 
 
Summary 
 
Cloning is  generating  a  growing interest  in  the  medical  and  pharmaceutical  areas, 
where  the  technique  could  potentially  be  used  to  produce  donor  organs  and 
medicines.  Such  kinds  of  applications  are  reasonably  well  accepted  by  EU 
consumers, who can see a benefit for human health. 
In  contrast,  for  a  variety  of  reasons  ranging  from  ethical  and  animal  welfare 
concerns to the wish to support a less intensive and industrialised farming system, 
the vast majority of Europeans have little appetite for cloning to produce food. 
Cloning is indeed used in several third countries to replicate elite farm animals (e.g. 
high-yielding dairy cows). It is a relatively new technique, for which success  rates 
are  still  very  low,  and  it  has  been  associated  with  frequent  miscarriage  and 
pregnancy problems for the surrogate mothers (who carry the clones).  
As for the clones, most of them simply do not survive birth or die shortly after. The 
cost  of  producing  a  clone  remains  fairly  high;  therefore  cloned  animals  are  not 
meant for food supply, but instead for breeding purposes. Food from their offspring 
and  descendants,  on  the  other  hand,  is  meant  to  end  up  on  supermarket  shelves 
and might find its way onto Europeans’ plates.  
In  December  2013,  the  European  Commission  published  a  package  of  two 
legislative proposals on the use of the cloning technique and the sale of food from 
cloned animals respectively.  
These  proposals  fall  short  of  EU  consumers’  expectations.  Whereas  the  vast 
majority of Europeans have little appetite for food produced with the use of cloning 
and  would  overwhelmingly  want  food  from  the  offspring  of  clones  to  be  labelled 
(83%), the Commission proposals merely suggest a (temporary) ban on the cloning 
of animals for food supply and on the sale of food from clones in the EU. They do 
not say a word about food from cloned animals’ offspring and descendants. 
In  view  of  the  upcoming  discussions  in  the  Council  and  European  Parliament,  The 
European Consumer Organisation (BEUC), wishes to stress the following: 
  Many  EU  consumers  strongly  disapprove  of  the  use  of  cloning  for  food 
production. This should be recognised and respected
  EU consumers should be able to make an informed choice when it comes to 
purchasing  and  consuming  food  from  cloned  animals’  offspring  and 
descendants

  As  the  minimum,  we  wish  to  see  the  reintroduction  of  the  package  of 
measures  on  which  the  Council  and  European  Parliament  could  have  agreed 
back in 2011. 
  As  the  EU  negotiates  free  trade  agreements  with  countries  using  cloning  e.g. 
Canada and the US,  we look to the Council and European Parliament to  stand 
by EU consumers and put their interests before trade

 
 
 
 



 
 
 
 
I. 
Introduction 
 
Cloning is a relatively new technology which allows for the production of almost 
exact  replications  of  an  animal.  The  method  commonly  adopted  for  mammals  is 
known  as  “somatic  cell  nuclear  transfer”  (SCNT),  whereby  a  genetic  copy  of  an 
animal is produced by replacing the nucleus of an unfertilised egg cell (from another 
animal)  with  the  nucleus  of  a  body  cell  from  the  animal  to  be  cloned  to  form  an 
embryo.  The  embryo  is  then  transferred  to  a  surrogate  dam  (mother),  where  it 
develops until birth.  
 
Cloning technology has been applied to animals since the early 1980s but the major 
breakthrough came with the birth of Dolly the sheep in 1996. Cloning has a range of 
applications  including  research,  production  of  pharmaceuticals  or  the  conservation 
of  endangered  species  and  breeds.  However,  this  position  paper  focuses  on 
application to the agri-food sector where it has been  used for several farm animal 
species, notably cattle and pigs. The use of the cloning technique in the agricultural 
sector  aims  to  replicate  “elite”  breeding  animals,  e.g.  highest  yielding  dairy 
cows or fastest growing pigs. 
 
Given the cost  of  producing a clone (approximately €15,000)1, cloned animals are 
normally  not  meant  to  end  up  as  a  steak  on  consumers’  plates,  but  for 
reproductive  material
  (semen,  ova  and  embryo).  This  reproductive  material 
produces, via traditional2 breeding techniques, progeny (i.e. offspring – also known 
as “first generation” – and descendants) mostly destined for direct use in the food 
chain.  
 
Although clones are not produced to obtain meat or milk 
Although clones 
for the food chain, this may happen for meat at the end 
are not meant to 
of  the  clone’s  breeding  life  after  being  sent  to  the 
produce meat or 
abattoir.  
milk, they can end 
 
up in the food 
While  the  limited  data  available  seems  not  to  indicate 
chain when too old 
any food safety risk stemming from the consumption of 
to breed. 
meat and milk from cloned animals and their offspring3, 
the  animal  welfare  issues  associated  with  cloning 
are undisputable both for the clone itself and its surrogate mother.  
 
Moreover,  ethical  considerations  are  also  at  stake.  In  the  EU,  an  overwhelming 
majority4 of consumers do not want cloning to be used for food production.  
 
Under  current  EU  rules,  food  from  clones  is  considered  a  “novel  food”  and  so  is 
subject  to  pre-market  approval.  Regulation  (EC)  No  258/97  on  novel  foods 
                                           
1   European Commission Staff Working Document (2013) 519 final. Impact Assessment accompanying 
the cloning legislative proposals from December 2013. 
2   Artificial insemination in most cases. 
3   EFSA  Scientific  Opinion  on  Food  Safety,  Animal  Health  and  Welfare  and  Environmental  Impact  of 
Animals  derived  from  Cloning  by  Somatic  Cell  Nucleus  Transfer  (SCNT)  and  their  Offspring  and 
Products Obtained from those Animals, 15 July 2008. 
4   84% of respondents. ‘Europeans’ attitudes towards animal cloning’, Flash Barometer 238, Oct. 2008.  
http://ec.europa.eu/food/food/resources/docs/eurobarometer_cloning_en.pdf 
 



 
 
makes authorisation compulsory in order to sell e.g. meat and milk from clones.  
 
 
Food from the progeny of clones, on the other hand, is not subject to any particular 
regulation.  While  commercial  cloning  for  food  supply  currently  takes  place  in 
several countries
 (e.g. US, Canada, Argentina, Brazil), to date cloning is not used 
in the EU and no company has ever applied to sell food from cloned animals on the 
European market.  
 
However,  clones’  reproductive  material,  the  live 
offspring from clones, their semen and embryos as 
Selling food from 
well as food from clones’ offspring can be imported 
clones requires 
to  the  EU  from  such  countries  as  the  US,  Brazil 
approval in the EU. To 
and  Argentina  without  consumers  having  the 
date, no authorisation 
slightest indication.  
has ever been sought. 
 
But food from clones’ 
When the Novel Foods Regulation was reviewed in 
offspring can freely 
2011, the cloning issue was such a stumbling block 
reach EU supermarket 
it  made  negotiations  between  the  EU  institutions 
shelves, with 
collapse.  The  question  of  the  clone  offspring  and 
consumers unaware. 
food  thereof  and  whether  these  deserved  specific 
measures  particularly  divided  the  Council  and 
European  Parliament5.  As  a  result,  the  European  Commission  committed  itself  to 
presenting a standalone proposal on animal cloning for food. 
 
In  December  2013,  following  an  extensive  consultation  process,  the  European 
Commission  finally  published  a  package  of  two  proposals  dealing  respectively 
with the use of cloning technology and the placing of food from cloned animals on 
the EU market6. It suggests temporarily prohibiting both the use of cloning for food 
production and the sale of food from clones in the EU. By way of contrast and most 
disappointingly,  the  crucial  issue  of  cloned  animal’s  offspring  remains 
unaddressed

 
As the cloning proposals are being debated in the Council and European Parliament, 
this paper aims to present the consumer perspective on 
Consumers’ right 
animal cloning for food.  
to make informed 
 
food choices is 
We  believe  that  not  only  should  food  derived  from 
denied by the lack 
cloning  be  unequivocally  proven  safe,  but  it  is  also 
of EU rules on 
important to hear consumer concerns over a technique 
labelling food from 
which causes unnecessary animal suffering.  
clones’ progeny. 
 
The European Consumer Organisation (BEUC) calls on 
EU  legislators  to  adopt  cloning  regulations  which 
respect European consumers’ lack of appetite for food derived from cloning 
and  recognise  their  right  to  decide  themselves  on  the  food  they  put  on  their 
plate.  
 
                                           
5   European Parliament press release on the novel food talks failure.  
6   Proposals for a Council Directive on the placing on the market of food from clones and for a Directive 
of the European Parliament and of the Council on the cloning of animals of the bovine, porcine, ovine, 
caprine and equine species kept and reproduced for farming purposes. 18 December 2013. 
 



 
 
 
 
 
II. 
Food derived from animal cloning: safe to eat? 
 
The European Food Safety Authority  (EFSA) was tasked with evaluating the safety 
of  food  derived  from  cloned  animals3.  Due  to  the  limited  data  available  on  other 
species,  EFSA’s  assessment  was  limited  to  meat  and  milk  from  cloned  cattle  and 
meat from cloned pig. 
 
In  a  2008  Opinion,  looking  at  the  composition,  nutritional  value,  microbiological 
quality  and  potential  allergenicity  of  food  from  clones,  EFSA  found  no  indication 
that differences may exist in terms of food safety
 between food products from 
healthy cattle and pig clones and their progeny, compared with those from healthy 
conventionally-bred  animals.  It  must  be  noted,  however,  that  cloning  being  a 
relatively  new  technique,  the  extent  of  the  current  knowledge  on  this 
technology and whether it may affect food safety and quality is still limited

EFSA  itself  recommended  that  the  “database  on  compositional  and  nutritional 
characteristics  of  edible  animal  products  derived  from  clones  and  their  progeny 
should be extended
”3. 
 
Moreover,  research  tends  to  suggest  that  clones’  immune  system  may  be 
weaker
 than that of their conventionally-produced counterparts7.  
 
Due  to  the  scarcity  of  information  with  regard  to  clones’  immune  functions,  EFSA 
recognised it is unclear whether or not cloned animals might be more susceptible to 
zoonotic 
pathogens 
than 
conventionally-bred 
animals.  This  might  mean  an  increase  in  risk  of 
Clones may be more 
infections,  which  in  turn  could  present  risks  to 
prone to infections due 
human  health  if  clones  are  more  prone  to  carry 
to a weaker immune 
bacteria,  some  of  which  may  be  of  concern  to 
system. The potential 
human health.  
consequences for 
 
human health are yet 
As  pointed  out  by  EFSA,  should  clones’  reduced 
to be fully studied.  
immune  functions  be  confirmed,  “it  should  be 
investigated  whether,  and  if  so,  to  what  extent, 
consumption of meat and milk derived from clones or their offspring may lead to an 
increased human exposure to transmissible agents
”.  
 
Another  potential  consequence  of  clones’  weaker  immune  systems  and  increased 
susceptibility  to  infections  might  be  a  more  frequent  need  to  recourse  to  and 
administer veterinary medicines, including antibiotics. This in turn might impact on 
the global, life-endangering problem of antibiotic resistance. 
 
EFSA  statements  published  subsequently  in  20098,  20109  and  201210  have 
                                           
7   Vajta G, Gjerris M. Science and technology of farm animal cloning: state of the art. In Anim Reprod 
Sci. 2006 May; 92(3-4):211-30. 
8   EFSA Statement (2009). Further Advice on the Implications of Animal Cloning (SCNT). 
9   EFSA Statement (2010). Update on the state of play of animal cloning. 
10   EFSA Statement (2012). Update on the state of play of Animal Health and Welfare and Environmental 
Impact  of  Animals  derived  from  SCNT  Cloning  and  their  Offspring,  and  Food  Safety  of  Products 
Obtained from those Animals. 
 



 
 
consistently confirmed the 2008 Opinion, concluding on the “still limited information 
available  on  species  other  than  cattle  and  pigs
”  to  conduct  a  risk  assessment  and 
underscoring animal welfare issues. 
III.  Animal health and welfare concerns linked to cloning 
 
It  is  widely  recognised  that  cloning  is  associated  with  animal  health  and  welfare 
issues for both the surrogate mother (who carries the clone) and the cloned animal 
itself.  
 
Surrogate mothers 
With regard to the surrogate motherhigh rates of 
experience higher 
miscarriage as well as problems during pregnancy 
miscarriage and C-
(e.g.  placental  abnormalities  and  enlarged  umbilical 
section rates. Most 
cords  with  dilated  vessels)  have  been  observed 
clones do not 
(particularly in cattle). As the risk of abnormally large 
survive birth or die 
offspring  is  also  higher  than  for  “conventional” 
shortly after. 
pregnancies,  Caesarean  sections  tend  to  be  more 
frequent in cattle carrying a clone3.  
 
As far as the clones are concerned, most of them simply do not survive birth 
or die shortly thereafter
. The “efficiency” of the technique is very low (6-15% for 
cattle and about 6% for pigs1) and increased mortality rates have been reported in 
the perinatal period for pigs and bovine clones as well as during the juvenile period 
(before  weaning)  for  bovine  clones.  For  those  few  animals  who  do  survive,  they 
appear  to  be  normal  and  healthy  although  uncertainties  remain  as  to  the  possible 
effects of cloning on their longevity3.  
 
The  aforementioned  adverse  health  outcomes  mean  reduced  welfare  for  both 
animal clones and the surrogate mothers
. An indirect side-effect of cloning – as 
with  similarly  selective  breeding  techniques  –  may  also  be  the  loss  of  genetic 
diversity  within  livestock  populations  if  only  a  limited  number  of  animals  are 
multiplied  in  breeding  programmes3.  This  may  in  turn  increase  susceptibility  to 
infections  and  diseases,  threatening  animal  health  and  welfare,  which  are 
interconnected.  All  the  more  so  as  “elite”  farm  animals  are  often  those  with  the 
highest  welfare  problems,  e.g.  incidences  of 
mastitis  and  lameness  in  dairy  cows  has  been 
     Clone 
linked to their milking performance11. 
 
 
 
Data pertaining to the health and welfare of the 
  Offspring             
progeny  of  clones  (i.e.  their  offspring  and 
(1st generation)  
descendants)  is  very  scarce.  From  the  limited 
 
 
       Progeny 
evidence  available,  there  seems  no  indication 
 
 
        
that  these  animals’  health  might  be  affected3. 
Descendants 
No  specific  studies  on  the  welfare  of  clones’ 
progeny have been reported in livestock species. 
Nevertheless, previous considerations related to the loss in genetic diversity and the 
selective  reproduction  of  highly  productive  animals  and  their  effect  on  animal 
welfare are equally relevant for clones’ progeny.  
 
 
                                           
11   EFSA (2009). Scientific opinion on welfare of dairy cows in relation to udder problems based on a risk 
assessment  with  special  reference  to  the  impact  of  housing,  feeding,  management  and  genetic 
selection. 
 



 
 
 
 
IV. 
EU consumers’ attitudes towards cloning 
 
EU  consumers  overwhelmingly  disapprove  of  the  use  of  cloning  for  food 
production
,  as  reflected  by  two  Eurobarometer  surveys  which  investigated 
Europeans’ perceptions of animal cloning for food supply.  
 
According to the 2008 Eurobarometer  report12, 84% of  EU citizens had  concerns 
over the long-term effects of animal cloning on nature
. While the use of the 
cloning technique for certain purposes such as preserving endangered species was 
acceptable  to  some  extent  among  EU  citizens 
(approximately two-thirds), they were significantly less 
While 2/3 of EU 
willing  to  accept  cloning  for  food  production.  58% 
citizens may accept 
considered it totally unjustifiable.  
cloning as a means 
 
to preserve 
A majority of EU citizens said it was unlikely that they 
endangered species, 
would  buy  meat  or  milk  from  cloned  animals 
they see its use for 
(regardless  of  whether  or  not  it  is  safe  to  eat)  and 
food production 
83%  said  that  they  would  want  food  from  the 
unjustifiable. 
offspring  of  cloned  animals  to  be  labelled  if  it 
were to become available in EU supermarkets. 
 
The  ethical  dimension  of  consumers’  lack  of  appetite  for  food  from  clones  and 
their progeny must be  stressed with  three-quarters  of  Europeans agreeing there 
could be ethical grounds for rejecting animal cloning and 69% agreeing that 
animal cloning would risk treating animals as commodities rather than creatures 
with feelings.  
 
This echoes the European Group on Ethics (EGE)’s stance on 
83% of EU 
animal  cloning  for  food  supply:  in  a  2008  report13,  the  EGE 
consumers 
stated  that  "considering  the  current  level  of  suffering  and 
want food 
health  problems  of  surrogate  dams  and  animal  clones,  [it 
from clone 
had]  doubts  as  to  whether  cloning  animals  for  food  supply 
offspring to 
[was]  ethically  justified”,  while  recognising  that  further 
be labelled. 
research  was  needed  before  any  such  conclusion  could  be 
drawn in relation to clones’ progeny.  
 
The EGE made it equally clear it “[did not see] convincing arguments to justify the 
production of food from  clones and their offspring
”. The Treaty on the Functioning 
of  the  European  Union  itself  acknowledges  that  animals  are  “sentient  beings”  and 
states “full regard [shall be paid] to the welfare requirements of animals”14. 
 
The  2010  Eurobarometer15  findings  confirmed  that  EU  consumers  “have  strong 
reservations about animal cloning in food production (67%), do not see the benefits 
(57%), and feel that it should not be encouraged (70%)
”. 
 
                                           
12   Flash Eurobarometer 238 published in October 2008. Europeans’ attitudes towards animal cloning. 
13   The European Group on Ethics in Science and New Technologies to the European Commission. Ethical 
aspects of animal cloning for food supply. Opinion N°23 published in January 2008. 
14   TFEU. Title II, Article 13. 
15   Special Eurobarometer 341 published in October 2010. Biotechnology. 
 



 
 
 
 
V. 
Traceability of clones, their offspring and descendants 
 
Commercial cloning of farm animals is not taking place in the EU for now. However, 
this  technique  is  developing  (especially  for  cattle)  in  a  number  of  countries  from 
which the EU imports reproductive material (essentially bovine material from the US 
and  Canada),  beef,  sheep  meat  and  dairy  (notably  from  Argentina,  Brazil  and  the 
US) as well as a small number of live animals (mostly pigs and, to a lesser extent, 
cattle, sheep and goats)16. 
 
In  terms  of  numbers,  imports  of  live  animals  represent  less  than  0.01%  of  the 
EU’s livestock. Imports of (mostly bovine) reproductive material account for 2.5% 
on average of the EU’s use of reproductive material, but may represent up to 20% 
in some Member States. The share of EU imports of meat and dairy products is also 
low (<5%), except for sheep and goat meat (20%, essentially from New Zealand)1. 
 
Individual  animal  traceability  is  already  in  place 
in  the  EU  for  bovine  animals
  (including  when 
While the EU has 
imported  into  the  EU).  For  pigs,  sheep  and  goats, 
traceability 
traceability is generally in place on a batch basis, while 
systems in place 
individual systems are limited to high-value animals.  
for food-producing 
 
animals and their 
Pedigree  information  is  generally  recorded  in 
reproductive 
databases  managed  by  the  national  herd  books  for 
material, this is not 
bovine  breeding  animals16.  Private  initiatives  are  also 
the case for all of 
developing  in  some  countries  (e.g.  The  Netherlands, 
its trading 
France)  to  collect  parentage  information  for  elite 
partners. 
breeding  pigs.  As  far  as  reproductive  materials  are 
concerned  (including  imported  to  the  EU),  EU  law 
requires  individual  identification  and  traceability
  i.e.  the  donor  and  parents 
must  be  known  for  semen  and  embryo  respectively16.  Germany  is  an  exception 
for this
, as it exports clone semen to third countries and has set up a registration 
system  for  clones  and  their  reproductive  material.  There  is  currently  no  EU 
requirement to specifically register clones in herd books. There are however a few 
voluntary  initiatives,  such  as  that  registering  clones  from  the  dairy  cattle  breed 
Holstein17.  
 
Looking now to the EU’s trading partners, most of them – except for the US  – 
do have individual beef traceability systems in place
. However this is not the 
case  for  other  species16.  New  Zealand  is  the  only  country  requiring 
identification  of  cloned  animals  and  registration  
in  an  official  database  (with 
the declared purpose of facilitating access to foreign markets, should an importing 
country introduce restrictions on food derived from clones)1.  
 
In  Canada,  food  from  clones  and  their  progeny  is  considered  novel  and 
requires  pre-market  safety  assessment  (although  the  system  rests  on  notification 
by  industry)1.  In  all  other  countries,  clones,  their  progeny  and  reproductive 
materials are subject to the exact same regulations as conventional animals1.  
                                           
16   ICF/GHK study (Dec. 2012). Impact in the EU and third countries of EU measures on animal Cloning 
for food production. 
17  World Holstein Friesian Federation. Guidelines for registering clones. October 2006. 
 



 
 
 
 
Clones are registered by private companies in the US, Canada and Brazil. There are 
some  private  systems  in  place  in  the  US  and  Canada  that  can  help  exclude 
reproductive  materials  from  clones  from  EU  imports16.  In  contrast,  Argentina  and 
Australia reported to the European Commission that clones are not registered.  
 
VI. 
BEUC position 
 
As  of  today,  although  no  official  figures  are  available  given  the  absence  of  clone 
traceability,  considering  the  novelty  of  the  cloning  technique  and  its  low  “success 
rate”  it  can  be  reasonably  assumed  that  third  countries’  livestock  populations 
include  very  few  clones.  This  is  therefore  the  right  moment  for  the  EU  to  set  its 
conditions  towards  potential  exporters  and  urgently  adopt  a  robust  regulatory 
framework on cloning for food production
 that fully recognises the right of EU 
consumers  to  decide  whether  or  not  to  eat  food  produced  with  the  use  of  the 
cloning technique. 
 
As  the  European  Commission’s  two  legislative  proposals  on  cloning  are  in  the 
Council  and  European  Parliament  for  debate,  BEUC  wishes  to  stress  the  following 
elements: 
 

Consumers’ lack 
 
The  view  of  the  overwhelming  majority  of  EU 
consumers  who  disapprove  of  the  use  of  cloning 
of appetite for 
for food production must be heard and respected
cloning must be 
As  they  stand,  the  cloning  proposals  largely  fail  to 
heeded and 
address  Europeans’  concerns.  Indeed  although  they 
reflected in the 
do  (on  a  temporary  basis)  ban  cloning  in  the  EU  as 
law. 
well as the sale of food from cloned animals, they do 
 
not  touch  upon  the  crucial  issue  of  the  progeny  of 
clones. However, it is widely admitted that clones, unlike their progeny, are not 
meant to produce meat or milk, but rather to be used as elite breeding animals. 
  
  The  assumption  that  “the  cloning  technique  itself  may  improve  over  time  and 
thus  become  more  acceptable  to  consumers”18  disregards  the  fundamental 
ethical concerns
 many consumers have with the cloning technique, regardless 
of its technical “efficiency” (see section IV. above).   
 
  EU  consumers  should  be  able  to  make  informed  choices  when  it  comes  to 
purchasing and consuming food derived from cloned  animals’  offspring 
and descendants
 (for as many generations as is scientifically feasible). 
 
  In March 2011,  just before the  Novel Foods  conciliation failed, the Council had 
proposed the following package of measures19 including: 
 
1.  a temporary ban on animal cloning in the EU for food production; 
2.  a temporary ban on food from cloned animals, whatever their origin; 
3.  a temporary ban on any supply of clones in the EU for food production; 
                                           
18   EC  Proposal  for  a  Council  Directive  on  the  placing  on  the  market  of  food  from  animal  clones. 
Recital(8). 
19   http://www.consilium.europa.eu/uedocs/cms_data/docs/pressdata/en/lsa/120351.pdf  
 



 
 
as well as 
 

4.  a  traceability  system  for  semen  and  embryos  from  cloned 
animals
5.  a  traceability  system  for  the  live  offspring 
of cloned animals
6.  introducing  labelling  requirements  for 
Traceability is a 
fresh  meat  of  cloned  cattle  offspring 
must, be it for 
within  six  months  of  the  new  regulation’s 
clone 
entry into force; 
reproductive 
7.  labelling  requirements  would  have  been 
material, live 
extended to all other foods from the offspring 
offspring and 
of  cloned  animals,  subject  to  a  Commission 
food derived 
feasibility report. 
therefrom. 
 
As  a  minimum,  we  seek  the  reintroduction  of  these  measures  deemed 
feasible back in 2011 to
 the cloning proposals on the table.  
 
As  the  EU  already  has  a  strong  traceability  system  in  place  for  beef,  new  EU 
requirements  for  the  traceability  of  cloned  cattle  and  its  progeny  and  for  the 
labelling of meat from cloned cattle offspring should be adopted as a matter of 
urgency. In parallel, a feasibility study20 should look at other food products (e.g. 
milk), more extensive labelling requirements (on several generations as far as is 
scientifically feasible), and other species (pig, sheep, goat and horse). 
 
  The  remarkable  developments  since  2011  are 
the free trade agreement negotiations the EU 
Pressure from its 
has  meanwhile  engaged  into  (with  Canada 
trading partners 
and the US notably). It is hard not to believe 
should not prevent 
this  new  situation  might  have  influenced  the 
the EU from adopting 
European  Commission’s  decision  to  not  even 
rules on cloning in 
propose the “lowest common denominator” on 
line with its citizens’ 
which  the  Council  and  Parliament  could  have 
demands. 
agreed  three  years  ago.  As  a  leaked  legal 
opinion21  from  the  Council  legal  Services 
revealed,  requiring  food  from  cloned  animals’  offspring  to  be  labelled 
would not put the EU in breach of international trade rules
. Therefore, we 
look to the Council and European Parliament  to stand by EU consumers and 
put their interests before trade

 
 
- END - 
 
 
                                           
20   Whereas  the  terms of  reference  of  the  study  commissioned  by  the  EC  on  the  labelling  of  products 
from cloned animals and their offspring also cover meat from cloned cattle’s offspring. 
21   Full opinion available on the website of Food & Water Watch: 
 
http://documents.foodandwaterwatch.org/doc/CouncilPositionCloningMarch2011.pdf# ga=1.201496
465.1251649350.1396536769  
 
See also joint BEUC/Eurogroup for Animals press release of 11 May 2011. 
 
10 


 
 
 
 
11