Esta es la versión HTML de un fichero adjunto a una solicitud de acceso a la información 'No Border-, Animal Rights- and Environmental Protest'.
TE-SAT 2011
EU Terrorism Situation and Trend Report
2011 – 45 pp. 21 x 29,7 cm
ISBN Number:978-92-95018-86-0
ISSN Number: 1830-9712
DOI: 10.2813/14705


-
C
J
-
1
1
-
0
0
1
-
E
N
L
-
A
Q
TE-S
A
TE-SAT 2011
T 2011
EU TERRORISM SITUATION  
AND TREND REPORT
eu terrorism situ
a
tion and trend repor
t
ISBN Number:978-92-95018-86-0
ISSN Number: 1830-9712
DOI: 10.2813/14705

TE-SAT 2011
EU TERRORISM SITUATION  
AND TREND REPORT

TE-SAT 2011
www.europol.europa.eu
© European Police Office, 2011
Al  rights reserved. Reproduction in any form or  
by any means is al owed only with the prior permis-
sion of Europol.
Acknowledgements
The EU Terrorism Situation and Trend Report  
(TE-SAT) has been produced by analysts and 
experts at Europol, drawing on contributions from 
EU Member States and external partners. Europol 
would like to express its gratitude to Member 
States, Eurojust, third countries and partner or-
ganisations for their high-quality contributions. 
Photographs
Europol: Jo Gidney, Max Schmits; European law  
enforcement authorities: France: GIGN; Greece: 
Greek Police Bomb Squad; Portugal: PJ-UNCT  
(Counter Terrorist National Unit of the Judicial Police); 
Sweden: Swedish Bomb Data Centre; Shutterstock; 
and Peter Wehle.
2 |
   TE-SAT 2011

Table of contents
1.  Foreword by the Director .................................................................................................................4
2.  Key judgments .................................................................................................................................6
3.  Introduction.....................................................................................................................................8
4.   General overview of the situation in the EU in 2010 ..........................................................................9
 
4.1.  Terrorist attacks and arrested suspects .....................................................................................9
 
4.2.  Threat statements recorded ................................................................................................... 10
 
4.3.  Terrorist and extremist activities ............................................................................................ 11
 
4.4.  Terrorism and organised crime ............................................................................................... 12
 
4.5.  Convictions and penalties ....................................................................................................... 12
5.  Islamist terrorism ........................................................................................................................... 15
 
5.1.  Terrorist attacks and arrested suspects ................................................................................... 15
 
5.2.  Terrorist activities .................................................................................................................. 17
 
5.3.  The situation outside the EU .................................................................................................. 18
6.  Separatist terrorism ....................................................................................................................... 21
 
6.1.  Terrorist attacks and arrested suspects ................................................................................... 21
 
6.2.  Terrorist activities .................................................................................................................. 22
7. 
Left-wing and anarchist terrorism .................................................................................................. 25
 
7.1.  Terrorist attacks and arrested suspects ................................................................................... 25
 
7.2.  Terrorist and extremist activities ............................................................................................ 27
8.  Right-wing terrorism .....................................................................................................................29
 
8.1.  Terrorist activities ..................................................................................................................29
 
8.2.  Right-wing extremist activities ...............................................................................................29
 
9.  Single-issue terrorism .................................................................................................................... 31
 
9.1.  Single-issue terrorist and extremist activities ......................................................................... 31
 
10.  Annexes ........................................................................................................................................ 34
TE-SAT 2011  | 3 


1. Foreword by the director
After  the  Organised  Crime  Threat  Assessment 
(OCTA),  the  TE-SAT  is  Europol’s  most  significant 
strategic  analysis  product.  It  provides  law  enforce-
ment  officials,  policymakers  and  the  general  public 
with facts, figures and trends regarding terrorism in 
the EU. It is a public document produced annually on 
the basis of information provided and verified by the 
competent authorities of the EU Member States. This 
and previous editions of the TE-SAT reports are avail-
able on Europol’s website: www.europol.europa.eu.
In  some  cases  it  remains  difficult  to  differentiate  be-
tween crime and acts of terrorism and extremism. EU 
Member  States  have  agreed  to  regard  terrorist  acts 
as those which aim to intimidate populations, compel 
states to comply with the perpetrators demands and/
Europol plays a key role in the fight against organised  or destabilise the fundamental political, constitutional, 
crime and terrorism, utilising its unique information  economical or social structures of a country or an inter-
capabilities and expertise to support the competent  national organisation. The TE-SAT recognises that defi-
authorities  of  the  EU  Member  States.  Nearly  ten  nition in the col ection and reporting of its source data.
years  after  the  attacks  of  11  September  2001,  ter-
rorism continues to pose a serious threat to the Eu- In 2010, terrorist attacks took place in nine Member 
ropean Union and its citizens. In 2010, seven people  States. An increasing number of individuals were ar-
died and scores of individuals were injured as a result  rested for the preparation of attacks in the EU. Also, 
of  terrorist  attacks  in  EU  Member States. The  fight  Member  States  prevented  the  execution  of  various 
against  terrorism,  therefore,  remains  a  top  priority  attacks, including attacks by Islamist terrorist groups, 
for the European Union and for Europol. 
which aimed to cause mass casualties. 
4 |
   TE-SAT 2011

Meanwhile, developments affecting the political sta- I would like to thank all Member States and Eurojust 
bility of neighbouring regions have registered an im- for their contributions, which are essential to the an-
pact on the internal security of the EU. Developments  nual  production  of  the TE-SAT.  I  would  also  like  to 
in  the  Northern  Caucasus,  North  Africa  and  some  express  my  gratitude  to Colombia, Croatia,  Iceland, 
conflict zones, for example, have influenced terrorist  Norway,  Switzerland,  Turkey,  the  United  States  of 
activities carried out in Europe. 
America  and  Interpol  for  their  own  valuable  contri-
butions. Finally, particular thanks go to the members 
The  economic  recession  has  led  to  political  and  so- of  the  Advisory  Board  for  their  advice  and  support 
cial tensions and, in a number of Member States, has  throughout  the  year  and  their  unique  input  to  the 
fuelled  the  conditions  for  terrorism  and  extremism.  2011 edition of the TE-SAT. 
Although  the  number  of  attacks  executed  by  sepa-
ratist terrorist groups decreased and a high number  Rob Wainwright
of leaders of these terrorist groups were arrested, the  Director
threat  from  these  groups  remains  substantial.  Left-
wing, anarchist, terrorist and extremist activities be-
came more violent in 2010 and led to the death of six 
people. Right-wing extremists are increasingly using 
the internet for propaganda and single-issue extrem-
ist groups, including animal-rights extremists, are co-
operating more on an international level. 
In  conclusion,  therefore,  this  report  finds  that  the 
threat from terrorism remains high in the EU and is 
diversifying in scope and impact. 
TE-SAT 2011  | 5 

2. Key judgments
The threat of attacks by Islamist terrorists in the  al-Qaeda but it could also result in more powerful 
EU remains high and diverse. 

terrorist organisations impacting the EU, and an 
increase in the radicalisation of individuals both in 
In  the  past  year,  several  EU  Member  States  have  North Africa and the EU. In the short term, the ab-
successful y prevented attacks by Islamist terrorist  sence of terrorist organisations amongst the mass 
groups, which aimed to cause mass casualties. Dur- Arab  protests  across  the  region  has  left  al-Qaeda 
ing 2010, 179 individuals were arrested for offences  struggling  for  a  response.  Should  Arab  expecta-
linked to Islamist terrorism, representing a 50% in- tions not be met, the consequence may be a surge 
crease compared with 2009. Furthermore a higher  in support for those terrorist organisations, and an 
proportion of those arrests related to the prepara- increase in radicalisation, both in North Africa and 
tion of attacks in the EU (47% compared with 10%  elsewhere. 
in 2009). 
The  current  and  future  flow  of  immigrants  origi-
Additional y, the high number of threat statements  nating from North Africa could have an influence 
to the EU (46) posted by Islamist terrorist organisa- on the EU’s security situation. Individuals with ter-
tions or their media fronts indicates terrorist groups’  rorist  aims  could  easily  enter  Europe  amongst  the 
clear intent to target the European Union. 
large numbers of immigrants.
Islamist terrorist groups are changing in composi- Although the goals of terrorist and organised crime 
tion and leadership. Terrorist groups are becoming  groups  (OCGs)  are  different,  the  connections  be-
multi-national, command and control from outside  tween  terrorist  and  organised  criminal  activities 
the EU is decreasing and more lone actors with EU  appear  to  be  growing.  Crime  is  being  extensively 
citizenship are involved in terrorist activities. 
used  to  finance  terrorist  activities.  Criminal  ac-
tivities that terrorist groups are involved in, either 
Returning jihadists from conflict zones continue to  through  affiliation  with  individual  criminals  and 
be a threat to the EU. They return with specific con- criminal  groups  or  through  their  own  operations, 
tacts, skil s and modi operandi, and the potential in- can include the trafficking of il egal goods and sub-
tent to apply these in EU Member States.
stances  such  as  weapons  and  drugs,  trafficking  in 
human  beings,  financial  fraud,  money  laundering 
The political situation in the Northern Caucasus is  and  extortion.  Separatist  terrorist  groups  such  as 
increasingly reflected by the activities of members  the PKK/KONGRA-GEL and LTTE are involved in the 
of the Caucasian diaspora in the EU, supporting ac- trafficking of drugs and human beings to raise funds 
tivities of terrorist groups in the Northern Caucasus  for their terrorism activities.
financial y and otherwise. 
 
Separatist and ethno-nationalist terrorist groups 
The turmoil in North Africa that began in January  rely substantial y on extortion to finance their ac-
2011 is likely to impact al-Qaeda’s core and affiliat- tivities. It is unlikely that  ceasefire declarations  by 
ed organisations, in both the short and long term.  separatist terrorist groups wil  mark the end of ter-
The  current  situation  could  lead  to  a  setback  for  rorist  attacks  or  activities.  In  2010,  123  individuals 
6 |
   TE-SAT 2011

in France and 104 in Spain were arrested on terror- - they use various methods of communication to pri-
ist  offences  related  to  violent  separatist  activities.  oritise, coordinate and support direct action. Cam-
These figures represent a decline from 2009 levels.
paigns  of  animal-rights  activists  indicate  a  shift  of 
activities from the UK towards the European main-
The  economic  recession  is  conducive  to  political  land  which  started  in  2008/2009  and  continued  in 
tensions  and,  in  a  number  of  Member  States,  is  2010. There are indications that some members of 
triggering  both  left-  and  right-wing  extremists  to  animal rights, anarchist and environmental extrem-
demonstrate  their  views  both  on  the  recession’s  ist  groups  are  moving  towards  a  shared  ideology. 
causes and on the solutions required. This is raising  Environmental extremism is on the increase. 
public order concerns and threatening social cohe-
sion.  Growing  unemployment,  especial y  among  Terrorist  and  extremist  groups  are  demonstrating 
young people seeking to enter the job market, has  increased professionalism in using web-based tech-
radicalised some youths, even those with relatively  nologies  to  present  themselves  and  communicate 
high levels of education. In 2010, 45 left-wing and  their ideologies to a larger audience. The internet is 
anarchist
  attacks  occurred. The  increased  use  of  developing into a crucial facilitator for both terror-
violence led to six fatalities. 
ists and extremists.
Evidence  shows  increased  international  coop-
eration  
between  terrorist  and  extremist  groups  in 
and outside the EU. Left–wing, but also separatist 
groups,  are  col aborating  international y.  During 
2010,  clear  links  between  ETA  and  FARC  were  de-
termined. The  coordination  of  activities  is  greatly 
facilitated by the wide availability of online commu-
nication tools and applications, and the rise of social 
media.
The  professionalism  of  right-wing  propaganda 
shows  that  right-wing  extremist  groups  have  the 
wil   to  enlarge  and  spread  their  ideology,  and  still 
pose a threat in EU Member States. If the unrest in 
North Africa leads to a major influx of immigrants 
into Europe, right-wing terrorism might gain a new 
lease of life by articulating more widespread public 
apprehension about immigration.
In 2010, protests by single-issue extremist groups 
increasingly  focused  on  the  fur  industry.  These 
groups are becoming increasingly network-based
 
TE-SAT 2011  | 7 

3. Introduction
The  EU Terrorism  Situation  and Trend  Report  (TE-SAT)  The TE-SAT is a situation report which describes and anal-
was  established  in  the  aftermath  of  the  11  September  yses the outward manifestations of terrorism, i.e. terror-
2001 attacks in the United States of America (US), as a  ist attacks and activities. It does not seek to analyse the 
reporting mechanism from the Terrorism Working Party  root causes of terrorism, neither does it attempt to assess 
(TWP) of the Council of the EU to the European Parlia- the impact or effectiveness of counter-terrorism policies 
ment.  The  content  of  the  TE-SAT  reports  is  based  on  and  law  enforcement  measures  taken,  although  it  can 
information supplied by EU Member States, some third  serve  to  il ustrate  some  of  these. The  methodology  for 
states  (Colombia,  Croatia,  Iceland,  Norway,  Switzer- producing this annual report was developed by Europol 
land, Turkey, and the United States of America) and third   five years ago and was endorsed by the Justice and Home 
organisations (Eurojust and Interpol), as wel  as informa- Affairs (JHA) Council on 1 and 2 June 2006.
tion gained from open sources.
 
This edition of the TE-SAT has been produced by Europol 
In accordance with ENFOPOL 65 (8196/2/06), the TE-SAT  in  consultation  with  the  2011  TE-SAT  Advisory  Board, 
is produced annual y to provide an overview of the ter- composed  of  representatives  of  the  past,  present,  and 
rorism phenomenon in the EU, from a law enforcement  future EU Presidencies, i.e. Belgium, Hungary and Poland 
perspective. It seeks to record basic facts and assemble  (the  ‘Troika’),  along  with  permanent  members,  repre-
figures regarding terrorist attacks and arrests in the Eu- sentatives of France and Spain, the EU Situation Centre 
ropean Union. The report also aims to present trends and  (EU SITCEN),1 Eurojust and Europol staff.
new  developments  from  the  information  available  to  
Europol.
1  The EU SITCEN provides early warning, situational awareness and intelligence analysis to assist policy development in the areas of the CFSP (Common For-
eign and Security Policy), the CSDP (Common Security and Defence Policy) and counter terrorism. Focus lies on sensitive geographical areas, terrorism and the 
proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. The EU SITCEN functions under the authority of Catherine Ashton, the EU High Representative for Foreign Affairs 
and Security Policy.

8 |
   TE-SAT 2011

4. General overview of the 
situation in the EU in 2010
•  249 terrorist attacks 
Terrorism continues to impact on the lives of EU citizens - 
•  611 individuals arrested for terrorist  
in 2010, seven people died in the EU as a result of terrorist 
related offences
attacks. 
•  46 threat statements against EU  
Member States
Islamist terrorists carried out three attacks on EU terri-
•  307 individuals tried for terrorism charges
tory. Separatist groups, on the other hand, were respon-
•  the internet: a crucial facilitating factor for 
sible for 160 attacks, while left-wing and anarchist groups 
terrorists and extremists
were responsible for 45 attacks. One single-issue attack 
was reported from Greece. 
4.1. Terrorist attacks and  In 2010, 611 individuals were arrested for terrorism-re-
arrested suspects
lated  offences.  An  increased  percentage  of  individuals 
linked to Islamist terrorism (47%) were arrested for the 
In 2010, 249 terrorist attacks were reported in nine Mem- preparation of attacks in Member States – an indication 
ber States, while 611 individuals were arrested for terror- that Islamist terrorists continue to undertake attack plan-
ism-related offences. The majority of these attacks were  ning against Member States.
in France (84) and Spain (90). A recent fal  in attacks in 
the EU was reflected by a drop of nearly 50% in attacks in 
Spain. Several Member States were successful in prevent-  
ing attacks by terrorist groups including those by Islamist 
terrorist groups. 
800
Attacks
Arrests
700
600
500
b
e
r
400
u
m
N 300
200
316
249
623
611
100
0
2009             2010  
Figure 1: Number of failed, foiled or completed attacks; number of arrested suspects, 2009 and 20102 
2  A complete overview of the attacks and arrests per Member State and per affiliation can be found in Annex 2 and 3. For the UK, the figures represent the number of 
charges for 2009 and 2010, to provide a more accurate comparison with the number of judicial arrests in other Member States. However, at this stage in the criminal justice 
process it is not possible to assign an affiliation to individual cases.

TE-SAT 2011  | 9 

2009
2010
4.2. Threat statements 
 
recorded
Threat statements
42
46
For the purpose of this overview, only threat statements  Figure 2: Number of threat statements recorded, 
made by terrorist organisations were taken into account.  2009 and 2010
Threat statements by and against individuals (often hoax-
es) were not taken into consideration. In 2009 and 2010,  •  deployment of troops in support of the Afghan gov-
88 threat declarations3 were made by terrorist organisa-
ernment’s fight against al-Qaeda and the Taliban. 
tions (42 in 2009, 46 in 2010). 
Islamist  terrorists  deliberately  and  repeatedly  use  sym-
The vast majority of these threat statements had an Is- bolic  cases  in  their  propaganda  (like  the  Muhammad 
lamist  terrorist  background. The  threat  statements  fo- caricatures or the veil issue) to mobilise support. Threats 
cused  either  on  the  European Union  as  a  whole,  on  in- originating from Islamist terrorist groups might also be 
dividual  Member  States,  or  were  directed  at  European  used as a tool for seeking logistical and financial support 
interests abroad. Other threat statements were made by  and as a means of recruitment. 
separatist, left-wing and anarchist groups. 
Many of these controversial issues are not new, however 
In  recent  years,  there  has  been  a  notable  increase  in  they are stil  cited as reasons for Islamist terrorist groups 
statements  written  in Western  languages  (French, Ger- to engage in acts of terrorism against the EU or against 
man, Spanish, etc), which broadens the audience for such  European interests abroad, as in, for example:
statements.  In  December  2010,  the  Court  of Appeal  in 
Brussels, Belgium delivered a verdict for two defendants.  Osama bin Laden’s audio speech “To the French peo-
The investigations concerned the use of a Jihadist Salafist  ple” as broadcast by al-Jazeera on 27 October 2010:
propaganda tool on the internet – mainly used to cal  for 
Jihad against France. The website was run from Belgium.
“How can it be right that you intervene in the affairs of Mus-
Although most Islamist terrorist threats are in the form  lims  in  North  and West Africa  in  particular,  support  your 
of more general communiqués addressed to EU Member  agents against us and take much of our resources by means 
States, some are more specific and appear to be issued  of shady deals, whereas our people there experience many 
in the hope of inciting vulnerable individuals to commit  kinds of misery and poverty? And if you become abusive and 
violent  acts  in  the  EU.  In  most  cases,  the  threats  refer  you think that you have the right to prevent free women 
to issues perceived as expressions of Western anti-Islam  from wearing the hijab, do we not have the right to expel 
sentiments, such as the:
your invading men by striking the necks?”
•  Muhammad  caricature  publishing  incidents  in  Den-
mark and Sweden, 
Although most of these statements are not direct indi-
•  banning of the veil in France,
cators of future attacks, they may serve as a motivating 
•  Swiss  vote  regarding  the  construction  of  further  factor  for  home-grown  terrorists  or  diaspora  groups  to 
mosques, and 
engage in terrorist activities. 
3   The data regarding threat statements is based on Member State contributions and open source intel igence (OSINT).
10 |
   TE-SAT 2011

Left-wing,  anarchist  and  separatist  groups  often  prefer  tion, easy, quick, and not restricted by borders. Of note 
to use newspapers or TV stations as conduits for threats.  are developments in money transfer via mobile phones. 
Reviewing  the  threats  issued  by  these  groups  in  recent 
years, it has become clear that these often precede actual  Some  of  the  money  is  financing  terrorist  organisations 
terrorist attacks. 
outside the EU. Police investigations in Spain have led to 
the detention of 11 individuals linked to Islamist terrorist 
4.3. Terrorist and 
groups that were active in recruiting new members and in 
 
extremist activities
financing terrorism. There are indications that an increas-
ing  number  of  Islamist  terrorist  cel s  in  Europe  are  col-
Financing
lecting money for their own activities and no longer send 
Al  terrorist organisations need logistical support for their  much to their parent organisations outside the EU. Mem-
activities. The maintenance of a network, the support of  ber States  with  Kurdish  diasporas  are  witnessing  -  and 
cel s and the procurement of material items (tools, weap- actively  combating  -  fundraising  activities  of  adherents 
ons, communication systems, false identity documents)  of the PKK/KONGRA-GEL in their jurisdictions. There are 
al   cost  money.  These  activities,  together  with  recruit- also indications that criminal y obtained funds are being 
ment,  training  and  transport,  can  be  a  severe  drain  on  used to support terrorist groups in the North Caucasus.
resources. In recent years, an increasing number of Mem-
ber States have reported on specific instances and meth- Communication
ods of financing of terrorism, in al  likelihood an indica- The internet is currently a crucial facilitating factor for 
tion that more terrorist groups are attempting to increase  both terrorists and extremists. The internet has reached 
their resource bases.
a firmly established position in the array of instruments 
used  for  radicalisation  and  self-radicalisation,  propa-
In order to acquire the necessary means to fund their il- ganda,  incitement  and  recruitment. The  use  of  social 
legal activities or establish and further expand their posi- media  broadens  exposure  and  increases  the  speed  of 
tion, terrorist groups tend to resort to various sources of  communication,  enabling  terrorist  and  extremist  net-
financing which may, in a few cases, include state spon- works,  individuals  and  associates  to  share  information 
sorship. More common are voluntary or coercive contri- quickly.  Internet  videos  explaining  a  movement’s  ideol-
butions  from  domestic  or  diaspora  communities.  Inter- ogy and tactics al ow groups to transmit important infor-
net  and  mobile  telecommunication  platforms  are  used  mation to fol owers without having to travel across bor-
to  send  video  clips  to  potential  donors  on  their  mobile  ders. 
phones, fol owed by requests for financial support. 
Another  method  of  communication  used  by  separatist 
Money for terrorist activities can be generated from le- terrorist groups, is the posting of messages through tele-
gal investments and legitimate businesses. Alternatively,  text via a television network. They use these methods to 
terrorists resort to criminal acts, such as kidnapping and  try and reduce the risk of their communications being in-
extortion,  fraud,  armed  robbery,  counterfeiting  opera- tercepted.
tions, and trafficking drugs and human beings. Terrorist 
groups in the Sahel region, in particular, rely heavily on  Although terrorist and extremist propaganda on the in-
kidnappings for ransom. This is facilitated by the transfer  ternet  is  a  powerful  tool  for  the  mobilisation  and  radi-
of money which is now, thanks to global telecommunica- calisation of vulnerable individuals, the internet and so-
TE-SAT 2011  | 11 


money laundering, and fraud for the purpose of funding 
terrorist  (support)  operations.  Several  Member  States 
also report that terrorist groups are in contact with OCGs 
to procure weapons. 
Low level, individual and tribal contacts between OCGs 
active in drugs trafficking in West Africa, and ‘sub groups’ 
of Al-Qaeda  in  the  Islamic  Maghreb  (AQIM),  raises  the 
possibility that drugs trafficking to the EU could become 
a source of funding for some terrorist groups operating in 
the Sahel region.
4.5. Convictions and 
 
penalties
In 2010, there were 125 court proceedings involving ter-
cial media alone might not initiate terrorist or extremist  rorist charges reported in 10 Member States. In 2010, 307 
activities. Social media tools al ow al  kinds of groups to  individuals were tried on terrorism charges, for which a 
lower the cost of participation, organisation, recruitment  total of 332 verdicts were handed down. Out of those 307, 
and training; they also al ow members of terrorist groups  26 were female. The number of individuals tried in 2010 
to communicate easily among themselves and often in a  decreased compared to 2009, when 398 individuals were 
relatively secure way. Despite net-based communication  tried. 
technology, face-to-face contact and real world interac-
tion remain important. 
The highest number of individuals tried for terrorist of-
fences in 2010 were in Spain, repeating the trend shown 
4.4. Terrorism and 
in 2009. France reported a decrease in the number of in-
 
organised crime
dividuals brought before court. Germany, Ireland and the 
Netherlands saw an increase compared to 2009, whereas 
Although  the  goals  of  terrorist  and  organised  crime  Italy and the UK have seen a steady decrease in the past 
groups (OCGs) are different, an issue which is of growing  three years.
concern to EU law enforcement are the connections be-
tween terrorist and organised crime groups’ activities.
  Not al  individuals arrested in one reporting period wil  be 
brought to trial in the same or fol owing year. Many of the 
Drugs and human trafficking are occasional y joint ven- cases reported are linked to events of previous years. In 
tures between organised crime and terrorist groups, and  2009 there was a significant decrease in the number of ar-
are  sometimes  an  in-house  activity  of  terrorist  groups.  rests compared to previous years. Equal y, the number of 
Information  obtained  from  EU  Member  States  shows,  individuals brought to trial in 2010 declined by almost a 
for instance, that both the PKK/KONGRA-GEL and LTTE  quarter, for example:
are actively involved in drugs and human trafficking, the 
facilitation of il egal immigration, credit card skimming, 
12 | TE-SAT 2011

2009
2010
trials  conducted  for  Islamist  and  left-wing  terrorism. 
France comes second with regard to the number of ver-
Individuals tried
398
307
dicts handed down for separatist and Islamist terrorism. 
Figure 3: Number of individuals tried for terrorism  Italy is third for verdicts of left-wing terrorism, fol owed 
charges in 2009 and 20104 
by the UK with Islamist terrorism. In Germany and Bel-
gium, Islamist terrorism accounted for ten and nine ver-
A  German  court  in  Düsseldorf  convicted  four  men  in  dicts respectively.
connection  with  a  foiled  terrorist  plot  against Western 
targets.  Evidence  showed  that  they  had  begun  mixing  In early 2010, the Audiencia Nacional in Spain tried a case 
explosive materials that could have resulted in a strong  of  seven  individuals,  who  were  held  responsible  for  a 
blast,  more  powerful  than  the  attacks  in  July  2005  on  bomb attack in the city of Vigo in May 2000. Two secu-
London’s public transport network and the 2004 Madrid  rity guards were kil ed and four others seriously injured in 
Atocha train bombings. In 2007, the German defendants  the attack. Two of the suspects are considered leaders of 
of the Sauerland group had stockpiled 700 kgs of highly  the GRAPO, who gave orders to commit terrorist actions 
concentrated hydrogen peroxide; mixed with other sub- and who have been prosecuted in the past for numerous 
stances it could have led to the manufacture of explosives  terrorist attacks. Five defendants were convicted by the 
equivalent to 500 kgs of dynamite. The German authori- court. 
ties had, during the surveil ance period, covertly replaced 
the  hydrogen  peroxide  with  a  diluted  substitute  that  Across the EU, the percentage of acquittals has gone up 
could not have been used to produce a working bomb.  from 17% in 2009 to 27% in 2010. In 2008, that percentage 
The  group’s  planned  targets  included  the  Ramstein Air  was 23%. 
Base and other U.S. military and diplomatic instal ations 
in Germany, with the aim of forcing Germany to stop us- Reported court proceedings in relation to separatist ter-
ing an air base in Uzbekistan to supply German troops in  rorism have the highest acquittal rate (32%), fol owed by 
Afghanistan. The defendants had been members of the  proceedings related to left-wing and Islamist terrorism, 
Islamic Jihad Union (IJU) since 2006 and had trained at  with an acquittal rate of 22% and 21% respectively. This 
camps in Pakistan. They were found guilty of member- fol ows similar reports in 2009.
ship of a terrorist organisation and of providing support 
to the organisation. Al  defendants confessed to their role  Five out of ten Member States have a ful  conviction rate. 
in the plot, which contributed to the successful comple- Belgium, Ireland, Italy and the UK have had mostly suc-
tion of the trial. Sentences of up to 12 years’ imprison- cessful  prosecutions. Of  the  332  verdicts,  157  were  still 
ment were handed down.
pending appeal at the end of 2010. 
The majority of reported verdicts in EU Member States  The acquittal rate in Spain, which has the largest number 
in 2010, as with 2009, relate to separatist terrorism. The  of verdicts, went up from 21% in 2009 to 38% in 2010. 
total number of verdicts decreased from 408 in 2009 to  These acquittals are due to characteristics of the Spanish 
332 in 2010. Spain continues to experience the majority  judicial system, which is strongly focused on prevention 
of separatist attacks. It also has the highest number of   and protection. 
4    Details per Member State, see annex 4.
TE-SAT 2011  | 13 

Member State
Average
Belgium
5
Denmark
<1
France
7
Germany
6
Ireland (Republic of)
5
Italy
8
The Netherlands
3
Spain
12
Sweden
3
United Kingdom
15
Figure 4: Average penalty per convicted 
individual (in years)5

The  average  penalty  imposed  in  Europe  is  now  approxi-
mately 6 years. The average punishment appears to be 11 
years for verdicts handed down for separatist terrorism, 13 
years for left-wing and 7 years for Islamist terrorism acts. 
5    In the UK, there were four life sentences given for conspiracy to murder. For the purpose of the overview, sentences exceeding 40 years and life sentences 
have been counted as equivalents of 40 years.

14 |
   TE-SAT 2011

5. Islamist terrorism
•  3 Islamist terrorist attacks carried out in the Mem-
in the preparation of an attack and the ability to adapt  
ber States
security measures, as wel  as a high degree of creativity in 
•  179 individuals arrested for Islamist terrorist 
circumventing them. This incident could have caused se-
offences
rious damage and possible loss of life for a large number 
•  89 individuals arrested for the preparation of at-
of EU citizens. 
tacks in the EU
•  Terrorist recruitment and support networks are ac-
The number of Islamist terrorist attacks actual y carried 
tive in many EU Member States 
out in the EU was limited to three attacks in 2010. They 
•  The security situation outside the EU impacts on 
caused minimal damage to the intended targets. Poten-
Islamist terrorist activities inside the EU
tial y, however, at least two of these attacks could have 
caused  mass  casualties  and  multiple  fatalities.  The  at-
tacks  shared  some  characteristics  of  motive,  location 
5.1. Terrorist attacks and
and, fortunately, lack of familiarity with explosives: 
 
arrested suspects
•  On 1 January 2010, a 28-year-old Somali, linked to the 
In line with previous years, Member States reported that 
radical Islamist organisation al-Shabab, attempted to 
the  threat  of  Islamist  terrorism  by  Al-Qaeda  inspired 
kil  the Danish cartoonist Kurt Westergaard. The car-
groups and affiliates is high - although the threat level is 
toonist has been living under police protection since 
not the same in al  Member States. Moreover, a diverse 
his  caricature  of  the  Muslim  Prophet  Muhammad, 
spectrum of actors poses a risk, from organised terrorist 
first published in a Danish newspaper in 2005, caused 
groups to radicalised individuals, inspired by extremist 
agitation in Islamist circles. On the occasion of this at-
ideologies. These latter individuals are often hard to iden-
tack, Westergaard managed to save his life by locking 
tify as they act alone and their activities can be unpredict-
himself in a panic room in his house until the police 
able and difficult to prevent. 
arrived. On 4 February 2011, the defendant was sen-
tenced to nine years imprisonment. 
In  November  2010,  two  packages  containing  explosive  •  On 10 September 2010, a minor and apparently pre-
devices, sent on 29 October by airfreight from Yemen to 
mature explosion was caused by a Russian national of 
the US, were intercepted. One of the two packages was 
Chechen origin in a hotel toilet in Copenhagen, close 
intercepted at East Midlands Airport in the UK, the oth-
to  the  offices  of  the Jylands  Posten  newspaper  that 
er in Dubai. Both devices originated in Sanaa and were 
published  the  cartoons  some  years  previously.  The 
addressed  to  synagogues  in  Chicago.  Highly-explosive 
suspect used a Belgian passport with a false name. 
PETN was hidden in printer toner cartridges in the pack- •  On  11  December,  an  attack  took  place  in  Sweden, 
ages. Al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP) claimed 
consisting of two separate explosions in the centre of 
credit  for  this  attempted  attack.  As  the  two  packages 
Stockholm. The first explosion occurred in a vehicle re-
were not addressed to European destinations, it would be 
portedly registered to the originator of several audio-
misleading to claim that the EU, as such, was targeted. 
file threats e-mailed to the Swedish TT news agency, 
However, one of these explosive devices could very well 
and addressed to the Swedish Security Service, from 
have exploded on the ground during the stopover in the 
a  Hotmail  account  moments  before  the  attack.  In 
UK,  or  somewhere  in  the  air  above  European  territory. 
the audio-file, the perpetrator claimed to be carrying 
This incident demonstrated a high level of sophistication 
out a terrorist attack in retaliation for cartoons of the 
TE-SAT 2011  | 15 



In common with previous years, individuals born in North  The  boundaries  between  networks,  media  outlets  and 
Africa  (Algeria,  Egypt,  Morocco, Tunisia)  represent  one  Islamist  terrorist  organisations  appear  increasingly  po-
third of al  arrested suspects. The proportion of persons  rous. Some media outlets have been specifical y created 
with EU citizenship or born in the EU is further increas- to  authenticate  statements  from  a  particular  terrorist 
ing. This suggests that home-grown terrorism and the  organisation. Occasional y,  they  also  relay  communica-
extreme radicalisation of EU citizens is an ongoing source  tions from other groups; an example is AQIM’s media arm 
of concern. 
al-Andalus, which published a statement from a Nigerian 
Boko Haram leader in October. 
Member States on the Eastern borders of the EU have, 
so far, been less of a target for Islamist terrorists. Howev- In July 2010, AQAP launched its first English-language on-
er, a number of arrests in Romania indicate that some EU  line magazine, cal ed ‘Inspire’. Denmark, the Netherlands 
Member States may be used as transit countries to other  and the UK were mentioned as potential targets in the 
parts of Europe. Also, the possibility cannot be ruled out  October  issue  of  this  magazine. Other  European  coun-
that those countries serve as operational rear bases from  tries specifical y mentioned in Islamist terrorist propagan-
which terrorist groups can develop their logistical and fi- da in 2010 included Belgium, Bulgaria, France, Germany, 
nancial capabilities. 
Italy, Spain and Sweden. 
5.2. Terrorist activities
The internet and online jihadist forums are a major con-
tributing  factor  to  the  radicalisation  of  vulnerable  indi-
Propaganda, radicalisation, incitement 
viduals. Social networks are also considered useful com-
and recruitment
munication channels for Islamists. In addition, organised 
Islamist propaganda on the internet is distributed by 10  meetings in private homes or mosques provide personal 
to 20 wel  established major forums that have thousands  contacts. These are often essential to the radicalisation 
of regular members worldwide. These forums are run by  and recruitment processes.
several administrators and spread over various web serv-
ers  located  in  countries  where  internet  regulations  are  The EU remains the focus of a propaganda campaign, in 
not applied as in Europe. Therefore, the arrest of one ad- which videos featuring EU nationals are broadcast on the 
ministrator would not significantly impact the activities  internet.  In April  2010,  the German Taleban  Mujahideen 
of  the  forum.  Administrators  exchange  instructions  on  released a video showing German- and English-speaking 
procedures to fol ow if one of them is arrested, to ensure  members inciting individuals to travel to Afghanistan to 
‘business continuity’ for each forum. 
join the jihad. Such publications in the media are consid-
ered  powerful  tools  for  mobilisation  and  radicalisation, 
Parts  of  forums  are  usual y  made  accessible  to  non- thereby increasing the pool of potential activists in the EU.
registered  visitors. The  rest  of  the  forum  has  restricted 
access to ensure anonymity of the users and to protect  In  many  Member States  there  is  evidence  of  the  exist-
against infiltration. Islamist terrorist organisations claim  ence  of  wel -organised  recruitment  and  logistical  sup-
that their ‘official’ statements are released only through  port networks. Volunteers are recruited in the EU to sup-
specific forums, indicating that other sources are not con- port Islamist terrorist activities in Afghanistan, Pakistan, 
sidered trustworthy.
the  Northern  Caucasus,  Somalia  and  Yemen,  to  men-
tion  the  most  important  conflict  zones.  In  May  2010,  a  
TE-SAT 2011  | 17 

logistical support and recruitment network was disman- 5.3.1.  Threats to the EU from abroad
tled in France. That network was responsible for the re- EU  Member  States  are  mentioned  in  terrorist  publica-
cruitment  and  travel  of  nine  French  and Tunisian  men  tions as potential targets with varying emphasis. Reasons 
who left France between July 2008 and April 2009 to join  include al eged European support for the ‘occupation’ of 
the fight against the coalition forces in Afghanistan. They  Palestine,  the  American  ‘invasion’  in  Afghanistan  and, 
were likely to be recruited and trained to commit terrorist  previously, in Iraq, playing a part in the al eged blasphemy 
actions upon their return to France. Manuals to avoid de- of the Prophet Muhammad, and the banning of the veil. 
tection by law enforcement authorities and intel igence  These  ‘justifications’  for  terrorist  attacks  mainly  serve 
services were found during these investigations.
to create a semblance of legitimacy. They also apply to 
Member States who have not been targeted until now. 
It  is  clear  that,  should  other  regional  conflicts  become 
‘marketed’  as  ‘jihadist  theatres’,  additional  volunteers  5.3.2   EU citizens and interests targeted abroad
may be recruited in the EU to support them. The current  A number of EU nationals became victims of Islamist ter-
number of Europeans in jihadist theatres is estimated to  rorist activities outside the EU in 2010. 
be in the low hundreds – a smal  number but nevertheless 
potential y very dangerous.  
North Africa and the Sahel region
In al-Qaeda propaganda in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM), 
5.3. The situation outside
the struggle against the Algerian government, and more 
 
the EU
recently the Mauritanian government, remains the pre-
dominant topic to which the group has added elements 
The phenomenon of Islamist terrorism in the EU cannot  of  al-Qaeda’s  ideology  of  ‘global  jihad’  and  solidarity 
be put into perspective without taking into account the  messages  to  the  al-Qaeda  senior  leadership  and  other 
international security environment. 
al-Qaeda  affiliates. AQIM  is  considered  a  major  source 
of concern, in particular for both Spain and France. Spain 
The security situation of EU Member States can be influ- is often referred to in AQIM statements on the internet. 
enced in many ways - from direct attacks carried out from  Under the pretext of its ‘occupation’ of Ceuta and Melil a, 
the outside on EU Member States, to funding and facili- Spain is criticised, threatened, and confronted with cal s 
tating the radicalisation of EU citizens to undermine soci- to  “take  back Ceuta  and  Melil a  by  force,  because  they 
ety from the inside. The targeting of EU citizens and inter- were  taken  by  force”. AQIM  has  not  specifical y  threat-
ests abroad is also a source of major concern. Anger over  ened an attack on French or Spanish soil, but this possibil-
the cartoon of the Prophet Muhammad, after its re-issue  ity has to be taken into consideration.
in 2008, inspired one of Indonesia’s most wanted terror 
suspects to plan a 2010 attack on the Danish embassy in  The  growing  number  of Western  nationals  abducted  in 
Jakarta,6 identifying not only the cartoonist, but Denmark  Mali,  Mauritania  and  Niger  in  recent  years  underlines 
and Danish interests abroad as targets for ‘retaliation’. 
AQIM’s  enlargement  strategy  and  permanent  presence 
in the Sahel region. 
The fol owing paragraphs describe some developments 
and events relating to terrorism in regions outside the EU  AQIM is being held responsible for kidnapping several EU 
that could have a possible impact on Member States or  citizens.  In  2010,  five  French  nationals  were  kidnapped 
their interests abroad. 
in Niger and a 79-year-old French hostage was kil ed in 
6  “Indonesia foils plot on Danish Embassy: report”, Associated Press, 25 June 2010.
18 |
   TE-SAT 2011

Mali. Fol owing the first incident, Osama bin Laden him- also capable of chal enging legitimate Western interests 
self made a statement to the effect that the kidnapping of  outside the EU. The instability of state security forces may 
the five French nationals had been prompted by “France’s  weaken the ability of states such as Algeria to effectively 
unjust treatment of Muslims”, linking the kidnapping to  tackle a group such as AQIM. Furthermore, such organi-
France’s presence in Afghanistan. It appears that AQIM is  sations may be able to take advantage of the temporary 
increasing its threats to French interests and French na- reduction of state control for terrorist purposes. 
tionals in West Africa.  
On the other hand, the absence of terrorist organisations 
Yemen  has  become  an  area  for  terrorist  activities  and  amongst the protesting mass of Arabs across the region 
is the home to AQAP fol owing its expulsion from Saudi  has  left  the  al-Qaeda  core  and  its  affiliates  struggling 
Arabia. AQAP leadership declared that the group would  for a response. To a large degree, organisations such as 
free  the  host  country  of  “crusaders  and  their  apostate  AQIM have been reduced to observers, incapable of in-
agents”, that they are “in [the] early stages” and would  fluencing  events  in  any  significant  fashion.    Moreover, 
conduct  a  “war  of  attrition”  against  the Yemeni  army.7   the failure of terrorist organisations in North Africa to re-
Several attacks have been carried out in the country, pri- move dictatorial regimes through decades of bombings 
marily targeting the military, tourism and oil industries.  and assassinations contrasts significantly with the rapid 
Attacks affecting Western interests involved the U.S. Em- success of peaceful mass protests. Such clear contradic-
bassy and the UK Consul’s vehicle. In June 2009, a German  tion to what al-Qaeda has insisted is the only means of 
family of five, together with four other foreign nationals,  defeating entrenched regimes is likely to result in a nota-
were taken hostage by unidentified militants in Yemen.  ble setback for terrorist organisations in terms of support  
Two of the children of the family were rescued almost a  and recruitment. 
year later, in May 2010.
Pakistan  is  home  to  the  Lashkar  e Taiba  (LeT),  which 
Although Iraq is no longer a major theatre of conflict, a  is  thought  to  have  become  a  more  global  terrorist  or-
number of attacks were stil  executed over the reporting  ganisation. The exact size of the group is unknown, but 
year, some also targeting EU interests. On 4 April 2010,  estimates  cite  several  thousand  members.  The  LeT  is 
suicide  bombers  detonated  their  explosives-laden  vehi- accused of numerous terrorist attacks, including the No-
cles outside the Egyptian, German, Iranian and Spanish  vember  2008  assault  in  Mumbai  that  kil ed  nearly  two 
embassies  in  Baghdad,  kil ing  41  people  and  wounding  hundred  people  and  injured  more  than  three  hundred. 
more than 200. 
In May 2010, the founder and leader of the LeT criticised 
the intention of France and Belgium to ban the wearing 
Recent political developments in countries such as Tunisia  of burqas, and explained this as a move by the West to 
and Egypt show that peaceful demonstrations by ordinary  split Muslims. The issue of burqas has caused controversy 
people  may  be  more  effective  than  terrorist  attacks  in  in several EU countries.
overthrowing autocratic regimes. Such mass actions may, 
however,  create  a  democratic  space  for  organisations  In early September, the senior commander of the Tehrik-
with  similar  objectives  as  those  of AQIM  in Algeria  and  e-Taliban  Pakistan  (TTP)  announced  that  the  organi-
AQAP in Yemen, al owing them to expand their activities  sation  was  planning  terrorist  strikes  against  targets  in  
and develop into forces wil ing and, perhaps in the future,  Europe and the US, in response to drone attacks aimed 
7  “AQAP leader announces formation of ‘Aden-Abyan Army’ in Yemen”, Jane’s Terrorism Watch Report - Daily Update, 12 October 2010.
TE-SAT 2011  | 19 


at its leadership. The failed bomb attempt in New York’s  Caucasus in 2010 have had an impact on North Caucasian 
Times Square on 1 May was al egedly directed, and also  communities in Europe. Suggestions that North Cauca-
possibly financed, by the Tehrik-e-Taliban (TTP) in Paki- sian networks in Europe are developing activities to facili-
stan. The American-Pakistani perpetrator held responsi- tate, fund and support Islamist insurgency in the North 
ble for the failed attack had just returned to the US from  Caucasus appear to have been confirmed by arrests made 
Pakistan.
in 2010. The possibility that radicalised North Caucasians 
could attack non-Russian targets in the EU is a matter of 
concern.
5.3.3.  Returning jihadists
Of  ongoing  concern  is  the  number  of  predominantly 
young EU nationals travel ing to conflict areas that in-
clude the Afghan/Pakistani border, Somalia and Yemen
with the intent to take part in armed combat or join train-
ing camps. Those individuals pose a serious risk, because 
of the contacts, skil s and modi operandi used in combat 
zones and the potential intent to apply these on EU soil.
In a video posted on the internet, the Islamic Movement 
of  Uzbekistan  (IMU)  praised  the  five  German  jihadists 
who were kil ed by a drone attack in Pakistan. The video 
Al Shabab,  Somalia,  now  poses  an  imminent  threat  to  showed  a  member  of  the  IMU  speaking  in German  for 
East  African  countries  and  is  also  a  serious  concern  to  30  minutes  in  front  of  a  video  montage  of  violent  im-
Western  interests  in  the  region. The  group  has  the  re- ages. Another recruiting video in German, produced by 
solve to attack East African countries and has developed  the IMU, was posted on an Al Qaeda website. The video 
the operational capability to carry out substantial attacks  shows  how  European  Jihadists  are  joining  combatants 
outside Somalia, as demonstrated by the bomb attacks  fighting in Pakistan’s mountainous tribal areas. It includes 
in Kampala, Uganda, in July 2010, for which they claimed  a cal  to arms, exhorting young sympathisers to join them 
responsibility.  At  least  64  people  were  kil ed  as  they  in their fight against Pakistan and its American al y. These 
watched coverage of the World Cup final in South Africa. 
and other video messages, posted online by Islamist ter-
rorist groups, play an important role in radicalising sus-
If Al-Shabab were to become involved in piracy, such a  ceptible individuals. 
move could affect the overal  dynamic of the conflict in 
Somalia, and increase the risk of terrorism in the Gulf of 
Aden, posing an immediate threat to Western and Asian 
interests.
Investigations  in  several  Member  States  underline  the 
hypothesis that some North Caucasian networks estab-
lished in Europe appear to be linked to Islamist extrem-
ist circles, and that the increased tensions in the North 
20 |
   TE-SAT 2011


6. Separatist terrorism
•  160 separatist attacks occurred in 2010, mainly in 
France and Spain
•  A police officer was kil ed by ETA in France
•  349 individuals arrested for separatist terrorist 

related offences
•  Most of the separatist groups finance their 
activities through extortion
•  Increased international cooperation between sepa-
ratist terrorist groups inside and outside the EU
•  Ethno-nationalist and separatist terrorist groups, 
such as ETA (Euskadi ta Askatasuna)8  and the PKK/
KONGRA-GEL, continue to seek international rec-
ognition and political self-determination. They are 
motivated by nationalism, ethnicity and/or religion 

6.1. Terrorist attacks and
Figure  6:  Number  of  failed,  foiled  or  completed 
 
arrested suspects
attacks  and  number  of  suspects  arrested  for  
separatist terrorism in Member States in 2010

In 2010, 160 attacks were claimed or attributed to separa-
tist terrorist organisations in Austria, France, Italy, Northern  No attacks were carried out by ETA itself in Spain. Howev-
Ireland (UK) and Spain. Ten percent of the attacks failed.
er, SEGI (and its Taldes Y)9 carried out a total of 55 attacks 
in Spain. This represents a decrease of 56% compared to 
In France and the UK, the number of separatist terrorist  2009. Incendiary and home-made explosive devices were 
attacks increased, while in Spain the number of attacks  used in the SEGI attacks. In 2010, 104 individuals were ar-
decreased. 
rested for separatist terrorist related offences in Spain; 
the vast majority of these were linked to ETA. 
The majority of individuals held responsible for terrorist 
attacks were arrested in France (123), Spain (104), and the  Of  those  arrested,  22%  were  female  -  a  high  percent-
Republic of Ireland (57). Of these, 75% of the individuals  age in comparison to other types of terrorism. The vast  
were linked to organisations that executed attacks in the  majority of these women were arrested for membership 
EU during 2010.
of a terrorist organisation or for facilitation. ETA and SEGI 
members  were  also  arrested  in  other  European  states, 
Separatist terrorism continues to target government of- such as Belgium, France, Italy, Portugal and the UK. 
ficials. In France a police officer was kil ed by ETA. 
8  The  names  of  groups/organisations  will  be  in  the  original  language  in  the  body  of  the  document.  For  translations  and  an  explanation  of  acronyms,  
please see Annex 1.

9  SEGI is the youth organisation of ETA, responsible for street violence (or low intensity terrorism). The attacks, mainly by incendiary devices, are executed by 
SEGI’s Taldes Y. ETA is responsible for the command and control of SEGI and other organisations, such as BATASUNA.

TE-SAT 2011  | 21 

In  the  Galicia  region,  the  number  of  attacks  increased  In January 2010, a parcel bomb was sent to the Indian Em-
(nine in 2009 and nineteen in 2010), but these should be  bassy in Italy and claimed by LTTE. In 2010, 27 individuals 
classified into two different categories: four of them can  were arrested for terrorist offences linked to the financing 
be attributed with certainty to the terrorist group Resist- of LTTE in France, Germany and the Netherlands. 
encia Galega,10 whereas the other fifteen could have been 
committed by individuals or smal  groups whose actions  6.2. Terrorist activities 
appear to be an answer to Resistencia Galega’s separatist 
cal , but whose membership of the organisation cannot  The  main  source  of  income  for  separatist  terrorist 
be ascertained. 
groups  in  Europe  is  extortion.  It  is  estimated  that,  in 
the  first  semester  of  2010  alone,  ETA  col ected  3.1  mil-
In  2009,  France  saw  a  historical  decrease  in  violent  ac- lion  euros  from  businessmen  from  the  Basque  region 
tions  by Corsican  separatist  groups.  2010  saw  a  signifi- and  Navarra.  Some  extortion  letters  demanded  up  to  
cant increase: 83 attacks were reported and 42 individuals  400 000 euros.11 
arrested. More than half of the attacks were on private 
properties, bearing resemblance to criminal extortion  
The  PKK/KONGRA-GEL  and  LTTE  also  col ect  money 
attempts. 
from  their  members,  using  labels  like  ‘donations’  and 
‘membership  fees’,  but  are  in  fact  extortion  and  il egal 
The  violent  campaign  by  ‘Irrintzi’  in  the  French  Basque  taxation.  In  addition  to  organised  extortion  campaigns, 
country,  targeting  the  tourism  and  real  estate  sectors,  there  are  indications  that  the  PKK/KONGRA-GEL  and 
has significantly decreased in intensity: in 2010 there was  the LTTE are actively involved in money laundering, il icit 
only one attempted attack. 
drugs and human trafficking, as wel  as il egal immigra-
tion inside and outside the EU. In March 2010, a simulta-
A total of 40 attacks were carried out by Northern Irish  neous and joint operation against the PKK/KONGRA-GEL 
and Republican terrorist groups. As a result, 57 individu- was carried out in Belgium, France, the Netherlands and 
als were arrested in the Republic of Ireland, some for of- Turkey. Investigations into the PKK/KONGRA-GEL were 
fences directly connected to attacks in Northern Ireland.  also  conducted  in  Italy,  Romania  and  Slovakia.  These 
The majority were members of the Real IRA (RIRA). 
investigations  into  PKK/KONGRA-GEL  activities  were 
linked to recruitment, financing, logistical support, prop-
Republican terrorist groups (RTG), notably the Real IRA  aganda and training camps. 
(RIRA) and the Continuity IRA (CIRA), continue to pose a 
threat in the UK. The size and capability of these terror- The likelihood that the ceasefire declarations by various 
ist  groups  has  increased  in  recent  years.  Attacks  were  separatist terrorist groups real y mark the end of terrorist 
principal y on law enforcement personnel and premises,  attacks or activities must, based on previous experience, 
and they involved attack methods such as vehicle-borne  be considered low. 
improvised explosive devices (VBIEDs) using home made 
explosives (HMEs). 
10  Resistencia Galega is an embryonic terrorist group in the Galicia region of Spain which made its first public appearance in July 2005. Its main goals are self-
determination for Galicia, independence from Spain, and the establishment of a socialist state. Their main targets are: banks, (national) political parties, security 
and armed forces, energy companies, real estate and temporary job agencies, (national) mass media.

11  Source: Spanish media El Diario Vasco, ETA envió en agosto una remesa de cartas de extorsión a empresarios, 6 September 2010.
22 |
   TE-SAT 2011



  attempt by ETA’s political wing (BATASUNA) to partici-
pate in the upcoming local elections, which wil  take place 
in 2011.
The announcement, in June 2010, of the PKK/KONGRA-
GEL intention to enter a more violent period of its history 
was immediately fol owed by the declaration of a cease-
fire which was, in turn, belied by the bomb attack in Is-
tanbul in October 2010. No execution of attacks in the EU 
show the PKK/KONGRA-GEL’s double strategy of armed 
struggle in Turkey while at the same time seeking to gain 
a greater degree of legitimacy abroad. It is assumed that 
the organisation wil  continue to fol ow this double strate-
gy. The terrorism threat posed by the PKK/KONGRA-GEL 
to EU Member States and the intention can currently be 
considered as relatively low. However the large number 
of PKK/KONGRA-GEL militants living in the EU and the 
Although ETA is currently operating at one of its weakest  continuing support activities in the EU, like large demon-
moments ever - it announced in September 2010 it would  strations organised in the past, show that the PKK/KON-
stop its ‘offensive actions’ - it is stil  involved in recruit- GRA-GEL is in a position to mobilise its constituency at 
ing  new  members,  col ecting  money  via  extortion  and  any time and is an indication that it maintains the capabil-
looking for new caches to store explosives and weapons.  ity to execute attacks in the EU.
ETA has a long history of cal ing permanent cease fires 
only  to  resume  militant  activities  months  later.  Similar 
announcements were made in 1998 and 2006, after the 
terrorist group suffered organisational setbacks. The ar-
rests of prominent leaders in several Member States, the 
disruption  of  the  group’s  logistical  bases  and  moves  to 
other  locations  (mainly  Portugal),  and  the  dismantling 
of operational units, prevented ETA from committing at-
tacks and led the terrorist organisation to focus on its own 
re-organisation. 
While  ETA’s  power  decreased,  the  underlying  ideology 
has  al owed  the  separatist  movement  to  come  back 
under  different  leaderships  and  continue  its  use  of  vio-
lence for political purposes. This could mean that ETA is 
prepared to commit attacks again in the future - to show 
that it maintains some operational capabilities. The an-
nouncement  of  September  2010  could  be  seen  as  an   Precursors for home-made explosives, ETA, Portugal
TE-SAT 2011  | 23 

Separatist  terrorist  groups  are  becoming  increasingly 
self-reliant. ETA has resorted to homemade explosives
They  obtain  precursors,  either  by  buying  them  on  the 
market or stealing them from companies, inside or out-
side Spain,  who  specialise  in  the  production  or  storage 
of these precursors. These companies are general y less 
secure against theft than those that manufacture explo-
sives.  Portugal  and  France  remain  ETA’s  main  logistical 
bases  but  further  law  enforcement  operations  in  these 
countries could have an impact on ETA’s search for other 
logistical safe havens. 
Greater levels of cooperation have been observed be-
tween  separatist  terrorist  groups  inside  and  outside 
the  EU
.  Separatist  terrorist  groups  are  increasingly  ex-
changing  expertise  and  knowledge.  Contacts  between 
ETA and FARC members came to the notice of authorities 
in 2010. Frequent travel by ETA members to Venezuela 
indicates that there is a link between ETA and FARC. ETA 
trains FARC members to make explosives. 
Separatist  groups  use  international  propaganda  and 
their own media
 (TV and radio stations). Member States 
report  that  separatist  organisations,  such  as  the  LTTE, 
ETA  and  the  PKK/KONGRA-GEL,  spread  their  ideas  at 
cultural gatherings, during demonstrations and sporting 
events, and through television channels, such as the Tamil 
Television Network and ROJ TV.
ETA  also  maintained  its  propaganda  activities  in  2010, 
disseminating five statements and giving one interview, 
sometimes seeking interviews or coverage with foreign 
media
 in an attempt to attract international attention. 
24 |
   TE-SAT 2011


7. Left-wing and anarchist 
terrorism
•  45 left- wing and anarchist terrorist 
An increasing number of Member States are now making 
attacks occurred in 2010
a distinction between the activities of left-wing and anar-
•  6 fatalities including 1 Greek police officer 
chist groups. This distinction is reflected in the descriptive 
•  34 individuals arrested for left-wing and 
parts of this report, but does not show in the statistics. 
anarchist terrorist activities
A  number  of  incidents  which  occurred  in  the  EU  were 
•  Increased violence in attacks
claimed by anarchist groups, most often on the internet. 
•  Increased transnational coordination 
They were prosecuted as extremist attacks, as opposed 
between terrorist and extremist left-wing and  
to terrorist attacks, and therefore do not appear in the 
anarchist groups 
statistics since these cover terrorist attacks exclusively.
7.1. Terrorist attacks and 
 
arrested suspects
In  2010,  left-wing  and  anarchist  groups  remained  very 
active in Europe. More attacks occurred than in previous 
years and the increased use of violence in their actions 
led to six fatalities.
 
Traditional y, these groups are most active in Greece, Italy 
and Spain.  However,  a  number  of  other  countries  have 
also seen increased activity in 2010. Social unrest among 
the population, caused by the global economic downturn 
and  the  reduction  of  state  spending  on  social  welfare, 
may have influenced this development, which has been 
noticeable since 2007. The modus operandi in a number 
of  attacks  showed  signs  of  increased  internationalisa-
tion
  of  left-wing  and  anarchist  groups  –  although  both 
have historical y been international in outlook.
Figure  7:  Number  of  failed,  foiled  or  completed 
attacks and number of suspects arrested for left- 
In  2010,  a  total  of  45  terrorist  attacks  by  left-wing  and 
wing and anarchist terrorism in Member States in  anarchist  groups  were  reported  by  Austria,  the  Czech 
2010 
Republic, Greece, Italy and Spain. This represents an in-
crease of 12% compared to 2009. In Greece, five terrorist 
Left-wing terrorist groups seek to change the entire po- groups carried out a total of 20 attacks - an increase of 
litical, social and economic system of a state according  over 30% compared to 2009. 
to  an  extremist  left-wing  model.  Their  ideology  is  of-  
ten  Marxist-Leninist.  The  agenda  of  anarchist  terrorist 
groups is revolutionary and anti-capitalist but also anti- 
authoritarian.
TE-SAT 2011  | 25 


Anarchist groups in Spain are mainly active in Catalonia; 
they carried out 16 attacks in 2010. Most were arson at-
tacks,  targeting  business  and  governmental  interests, 
without causing injuries.
Although traditional y most attacks occur in Greece, Italy 
and Spain, in 2010, an arson attack damaged the Greek 
Embassy in the Czech Republic. A job centre in the Aus-
trian capital, Vienna, was also targeted. 
34 persons were arrested for left-wing and anarchist of-
fences in 2010. These arrests took place in five EU Mem-
ber  States:  Austria,  Germany,  Greece,  Italy  and  Spain. 
Parcel bomb, Greece
The majority of those arrested for left-wing and anarchist 
violence were suspected of membership of a terrorist or-
Increased  violence  in  left-wing  and  anarchist  attacks,  ganisation.
which  has  been  seen  since  2007,  persisted  in  2010.  In 
Greece,  attacks  claimed  the  lives  of  six  people  in  2010.  Successful law enforcement operations have led to a sig-
The explosion of a parcel bomb at the Ministry for Citizen  nificant  increase  in  the  number  of  suspects  arrested  in 
Protection on 24 June kil ed a police officer. On 19 July, a  Greece and have also led to the dismantling of one of the 
journalist was murdered outside his house. This particu- country’s main terrorist organisations. In March, the ter-
larly violent attack involving firearms was claimed by the  rorist organisation Epanastatikos Agonas was dismantled 
organisation Sekta Epanastaton and it could be linked to  after the arrest of six persons and the seizure of several 
the assassination of a police officer in 2009. Both of these  machine guns, a rocket launcher, hand grenades, and ex-
attacks were clearly designed to kil . Despite the fact that  plosive materials. The investigation into the parcel bomb 
left-wing and anarchist extremists general y try to avoid  campaign of November resulted in the arrest of 12 sus-
casualties in most of their attacks, a 15-year-old boy died  pected members of Synomosia Pyrinon Fotias.
on 28 March when he manipulated an explosive device 
ostensibly placed to carry out a terrorist attack; his moth- The downward trend in left-wing terrorism in Spain is il-
er and sister were injured. During a demonstration in Ath- lustrated by the decreasing number of arrests since 2007. 
ens on 5 May, anarchists caused a fire in a bank, which  The organisation Grupos Antifascistas Primer de Octubre 
resulted in the death of three employees.
(GRAPO) did not re-establish after it was dismantled in 
recent years. In Italy, no attacks were attributed to left-
The proportion of bomb attacks increased from 20% in  wing terrorist groups in 2010, as a result of a number of 
2009 to 51% in 2010, while arson attacks remained at the  successful investigations in 2009. 
same level of 42%. Since 2008, government targets have 
continued to be favoured over business targets. 
 
26 |
   TE-SAT 2011

7.2. Terrorist and 
slightly in 2010, there were a number of attacks against 
 
extremist activities
right-wing political opponents and violent confrontations 
between the two groups. In the run-up to the parliamen-
Some attacks in 2010 showed signs of increased trans- tary elections, a number of political parties were targeted 
national coordination between groups. A parcel bomb  by anarchist extremists. Most offences were in the form 
campaign in November targeted various embassies, for- of wilful damage and there were relatively few physical 
eign Heads of State, and European institutions. 
attacks  on  individuals.  The  Czech  Republic  reported  a 
decline in violent confrontations between left- and right-
It  is  the  first  time  that  the Greek  terrorist  organisation  wing groups. 
Synomosia  Pyrinon  Fotias  has  staged  such  a  large-scale 
synchronised attack, which attracted widespread media  Besides traditional ideological themes such as anti-capi-
coverage. The motive and selection of targets remain un- talism, anti-militarism and anti-fascism, in 2010 left-wing 
clear. It appears that the organisation has raised its profile  and anarchist extremists also focused on the global eco-
towards a more international dimension. An international  nomic recession. A number of EU Member States expe-
cal  for action was issued in a communiqué and promptly  rienced  large-scale  protests  against  austerity  measures 
caused similar actions in Italy and Argentina. 
taken  by  governments  to  reduce  the  debt  burden  and 
stem the impact of the economic crisis. The arson attack 
Two out of three parcel bombs, which were sent to the  against a job centre in Austria can also be placed in this 
Swiss, Chilean and Greek embassies in Rome on 23 and  context. 
27  December,  exploded  and  caused  minor  injuries. The 
attacks were claimed by FAI (Federazione Anarchica Infor- In some instances, the ranks of protesters were infiltrated 
male).
by  extremist  groups,  which  resulted  in  violent  clashes 
with police. However, attempts to gain ground amongst 
The Chilean  and Swiss  embassies  were  targeted  to  ex- the population are general y seen as unsuccessful in most 
press  solidarity  with  imprisoned  ‘comrades’  -  a  typical  Member States. 
motive for anarchist groups.
In  Belgium  and  Italy,  increased  activity  by  anarchist 
An important field of action for members of the left-wing  groups on topics such as anti-authority, anti-law enforce-
scene has remained the confrontation with right-wing  ment and anti-prison issues continued in 2010. The trend 
opponents. This  occurs  under  the  guise  of  discrediting  of using more violence in such attacks, which was already 
‘fascist’  campaigns,  targeted  attacks  on  individuals,  as- identified in last year’s report, persisted. Anarchist groups 
sets and property, and direct physical confrontation dur- do not hesitate to enter into direct confrontation with law 
ing demonstrations. 
enforcement personnel. This was seen in Belgium, where 
a police station was attacked, another one was the sub-
In January, the Danish police arrested a group of left-wing  ject of an arson attack, and several police vehicles were 
extremists. One of them is suspected of having planned  damaged.
and  organised  violent  attacks  against  various  radical 
right-wing  opponents.  An  increase  in  tensions  towards  Germany reported a considerable decrease in the number 
extreme right-wing groups was also noticed in Italy. Al- of offences related to left-wing and anarchist extremism. 
though  the  Swedish  anarchist  movement  weakened  Austria  also  observed  a  general  decrease  in  anarchist  
TE-SAT 2011  | 27 

activities,  except  in  the  capital Vienna.  Squatters,  who 
were rather active in 2009, only staged a few uncoordi-
nated actions.
The indications that international coordination is deve-
loping
, is exemplified by the choice of common targets 
in different cities or countries, as wel  as the use of similar 
modus operandi or series of initiatives by different groups 
in solidarity with imprisoned comrades. In this regard, the 
increase in arrests in Greece wil  result in some important 
court  cases  which  could  trigger  more  solidarity  attacks 
across Europe. Therefore, anarchist violence can be ex-
pected  to  continue  developing  in  the  European  Union  
in 2011. 
 
28 |
   TE-SAT 2011


8. Right-wing terrorism
•  No right-wing terrorist attacks occurred in the EU 
Such confrontations invariably result in physical violence. 
in 2010
In May 2010, a White Power supporter was assaulted and 
•  Right-wing extremist groups are becoming more 
knifed in Sweden during a demonstration staged by the 
professional in their manifestations 
White Power movement. An activist was arrested on sus-
picion of aggravated assault and attempted murder.
Traditional y, right-wing terrorist groups seek to change 
the political, social and economic system in a way that 
favours authoritarian, anti-Semitic and often racist ‘solu-
tions’ to social problems. The ideological roots of Euro-
pean right-wing extremism and terrorism can usual y be 
traced back to Fascism and National Socialism.
8.1. Terrorist activities 
Member States were not confronted with major acts of 
right-wing  terrorism  in  2010. There  were  almost  no  ar-
rests related to right-wing terrorism over the whole year. 
 
Lack of cohesion, a lower degree of overal  coordination  Right-wing extremists attempt to gain a political fol ow-
of right-wing terrorist and extremist groups, little public  ing and achieve publicity outside the traditional political 
support, and effective law enforcement operations lead- process through marches, ral ies, demonstrations and 
ing to arrests and prosecutions of prominent right-wing  concerts.  The  presence  of  like-minded  nationals  from 
terrorists  and  extremists,  went  a  long  way  towards  ac- other  EU  Member  States  at  right-wing  events,  such  as 
counting for the diminished impact of right-wing terror- White Power Music (WPM) concerts, suggests that indi-
ism and extremism in the EU.
viduals  drawn  to  right-wing  extremism  maintain  close 
contacts throughout the EU
. WPM concerts attract hun-
8.2. Right-wing extremist
dreds of people from al  over Europe. Concerts are only 
 
activities 
announced on the internet and take place at secret loca-
tions. Law enforcement activities directed against WPM 
Some incidents that occurred in 2010 could be classified  concerts  have  forced  extremist  groups  to  abstain  from 
as right-wing extremism. These raised public order con- public announcements and public performances. 
cerns, but have not in any way endangered the political, 
constitutional, economic or social structures of any of the  Right-wing  extremists  are  also  increasingly  active  in 
Member States. They can, however, present considerable  online  social  networking,  to  reach  out  to  a  younger 
chal enges to policing and seriously threaten community  generation. The internet is a cheap and effective way of 
cohesion. 
communicating with targeted audiences. This is adding a 
new dimension to the threat right-wing extremism may 
Public manifestations of right-wing extremism can often  present in the future. 
provoke counter activity by extreme left-wing groups. 
TE-SAT 2011  | 29 

Right-wing  extremist  groups  are  becoming  more  pro-
fessional. A young audience is lured into the right-wing 
extremist  scene  with  imagery  and  rhetoric  from  youth 
culture.  Professional y  developed  websites  add  to  the 
impact of presentations of historical events and politics. 
Against  an  anti-Semitic  and  xenophobic  background, 
right-wing presentations focus on sensitive topics of pub-
lic debate such as immigration, corruption and the finan-
cial crisis. 
Propaganda offences, in line with the quantity and qual-
ity of the activities displayed in this field, account for a 
major part of criminal offences committed by right-wing 
extremists. 
Although  the  overal   threat  from  right-wing  extremism 
appears to be on the wane and the numbers of right-wing 
extremist criminal offences are relatively low, the profes-
sionalism  in  their  propaganda  and  organisation  shows 
that right-wing extremist groups have the wil  to en-
large and spread their ideology
 and stil  pose a threat in 
EU Member States. If the unrest in the Arab world, espe-
cial y in North Africa, leads to a major influx of immigrants 
into Europe, right-wing extremism and terrorism might 
gain a new lease of life by articulating more widespread 
public  apprehension  about  immigration  from  Muslim 
countries into Europe.
30 |
   TE-SAT 2011


9. Single-issue terrorism
•  Extremist environmental activities increased in 
2010
•  Single-issue terrorist and extremist groups mainly 
focused on the fur industry
9.1. Single-issue terrorist
 
and extremist activities
Single-issue terrorism is violence committed with the de-
sire to change a specific policy or practice within a target 
society. In Europe, the term is general y used to describe 
animal  rights  groups  and  environmental  eco-terrorist 
groups.
of  a  campaign  label ed  Stop  Huntingdon Animal Cruelty 
(SHAC)
.  Arson  and  paint  attacks  against  the  personal 
In 2010, one single issue terrorist attack was carried out  property  of  senior  employees  of  companies  connected 
in Greece, no arrests related to single issue terrorist of- with animal research, and the companies’ premises, were 
fences were reported by Member States. With regard to  claimed by a group cal ing itself ‘Militant Forces Against 
single-issue extremism, a large number of animal rights  Huntingdon Life Sciences’ (MFAH). 
extremism  (ARE)  related  incidents  and  an  increasing 
number of environmentalist activities
 were reported. 
Incidents  were  recorded  in  Belgium,  France,  Germany 
and Sweden. In France, two arson attacks were carried 
Animal rights extremist groups focus on four main  
out, targeting individuals wrongly identified as employ-
target areas: 
ees of a firm suspected of financing pharmaceutical test-
•  Companies and institutions involved in scientific 
ing on animals. These campaigns indicate a shift of activi-
  research and pharmaceutical testing on animals, 
ties towards the European mainland which was initiated 
•  The fur breeding industry,
in 2008 and continued through 2009-2010. 
•  The meat industry, and
•  Circuses and hunting.
To  reach  their  goals,  ARE  use  authorised  protests,  as 
wel   as  il egal  methods  of  protest  and  direct  action

In  2010,  more  than  200  single-issue  extremism  related  ARE  militants  do  not  hesitate  in  using  blackmail,  send-
incidents were recorded in the EU, including 24 arson at- ing threatening emails or making warning phone cal s to 
tacks using improvised incendiary or explosive devices.
their targets, often threatening their family and commit-
ting physical assault against their property (in so-cal ed 
A number of these were related to the ‘anti-vivisection  home visits). This has sometimes resulted in arson attacks 
campaign’, which targets scientific research and pharma- against  cars  or  property.  Single-issue  extremist  groups 
ceutical testing on animals. 
are also actively targeting the fur trade industry and the 
fur-breeding animal industry. This has resulted mainly in 
In the past, the majority of il egal activities by single-issue  the mass release of animals or the destruction of feeding 
extremist groups took place in the UK, in the framework  or water instal ations for the animals. In Belgium, activists 
TE-SAT 2011  | 31 

released 300 minks; in Greece, more than 45 000 minks  ticipated in protests and attacks al  over Europe, uniting 
were released by extremists, with the unintended result  their  forces  in  common  initiatives.  In  some  cases,  this 
that a large number of the animals died on the streets.  interaction  between  different  groups  and  nationalities 
Both activities were carried out by groups whose mem- led to escalation from peaceful protest to violent destruc-
bers were of mixed nationality. 
tion. Single-issue extremist groups are becoming increas-
ingly network-based. They use various methods of com-
In addition to such attacks, ARE activists also use disin- munication in order to prioritise, coordinate and support 
formation  methods  in  order  to  discredit  their  targets  direct action - in addition to general social networking. 
and weaken their public acceptance. Images of sick and  The internet is a vital tool in this process. Campaign web-
abused  animals  are  embedded  in  video  footage  and  sites, social networking sites and mailing lists al  play an 
made public. 
important role in making it possible for extremists to be 
informed on the upcoming (international) agenda in their 
Environmental  extremism  is  increasing  and  gaining  area of concern.
support  from  other  extremist  groups.  Some  anarchist 
groups  appear  to  be  attracted  to  environmental  and 
ecological causes. This is demonstrated by a number of 
incidents related to the oil industry, accused of pol uting 
the environment. Another target is the nuclear industry. 
Activists oppose the construction of new nuclear power 
stations and attempt to prevent the transportation of nu-
clear waste for re-processing.
Three members of environmental anarchist groups – two 
Italian nationals and a Swiss national - were identified in 
a  regular  traffic  check  at  which  the  suspects’  rental  car 
was discovered to be transporting industrial explosives, 
gas  cylinders  and  detonators. They  intended  to  attack 
a  research  laboratory  working  on  nanotechnologies.  It 
should  be  noted  that  the  parcel  bombs  targeting  the 
Swiss  embassies  in Athens  and  Rome  were  apparently 
support actions to free the three anarchists arrested. It 
can be expected that other incidents in support of fel ow 
prisoners wil  occur in the near future. Trials and sentenc-
ing wil  be used as opportunities to stage violent protests 
against the authorities and trigger solidarity action in dif-
ferent countries.
There is a dynamic interaction between groups and in-
dividuals
 in different countries, with language or nation-
ality forming no barrier to cooperation. Extremist groups 
and individuals from different countries and groups par-
32 |
   TE-SAT 2011

TE-SAT 2011  | 33 

Annex 1: Acronyms and translations
ALF 
Animal Liberation Front
AMISOM 
African Union Mission in Somalia
ANTIFA 
Anti-fascist groups
ANV 
Acción Nacionalista Vasca
 
Basque Nationalist Action
AQAP 
al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula
 
Tanzim qa’idat al-jihad fi jazirat al-‘arab
AQIM 
al-Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb
 
Tanzim al-qa’ida bi-bilad al-Maghrib al-Islami
AQSL 
Al-Qaeda Senior Leadership
ARE 
Animal rights extremism
Brigate Rosse 
Red Brigades
CAV 
Comité d’Action Viticole
 
Committee for Viticultural Action
CCTF 
Comité de Coordination Tamoul France
 
Tamil Coordinating Committee France
CFSP 
Common Foreign and Security Policy
CIE 
Centro di Identificazione ed Espulsione
 
(formerly CPT: Centro di Permanenza Temporanea)
 
Identification and Expulsion Centre
CIRA 
Continuity Irish Republican Army
DHKP-C 
Devrimci Halk Kurtuluş Partisi/Cephesi
 
Revolutionary People’s Liberation Party/Front
ETA 
Euskadi ta Askatasuna
 
Basque Fatherland and Liberty 
EU 
European Union
EU SITCEN 
European Union Situation Centre
FAI 
Federazione Anarchica Informale
 
Informal Anarchist Federation
FARC 
Fuerzas Armadas Revolucionarias Colombianas
 
Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia
FLNC 
Front de Libération Nationale de la Corse 
 
National Front for the Liberation of Corsica 
GRAPO 
Grupo de Resistencia Anti-Fascista Primero de Octubre
 
First of October Antifascist Resistance Group
HANLA 
Hungarian Arrows National Liberation Army
IED 
Improvised explosive device
I D 
Improvised incendiary device
34 |
   TE-SAT 2011

INLA 
Irish National Liberation Army 
ISAF 
International Security Assistance Force
JHA 
Justice and Home Affairs
KONGRA-GEL 
Kongra Gelê Kurdistan
 
People’s Congress of Kurdistan
LTTE 
Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam
MFAH 
Militant Forces Against Huntingdon Life Science
Nardodni odpor 
National Resistance
NGO 
Non-governmental organisation
PCTV 
Partido Comunista de las Tierras Vascas
 
Basque Nationalist Action
PKK 
Partiya Karkeren Kurdistan
 
Kurdistan Workers’ Party
RIRA 
Real Irish Republican Army
SHAC 
Stop Huntingdon Animal Cruelty
Synomosia Pyrinon 
Conspiracy of Fire Cel s Athens-Thessalonica
Fotias Athina-Thessaloniki
TE-SAT 
European Union Terrorism Situation and Trend Report
TWP 
Terrorism Working Party of the EU Council
VBIED 
Vehicle-Borne Improvised Explosive Device
WPM 
White power music
TE-SAT 2011  | 35 

Annex 2: Failed, foiled and completed attacks in 2010, 
per member state and per affiliation
Member       Islamist
Separatist
Left-
Right-
Single-
Not 
Total
State
wing
wing
issue
specified
2010
Austria
0
1
1
0
0
0
2
Czech  
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
Republic
Denmark

2
0
0
0
0
0
2
France
0
84
0
0
0
0
84
Greece
0
0
20
0
1
0
21
Italy
0
1
7
0
0
0
8
Spain
0
74
16
0
0
0
90
Sweden
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
United 
-
-
-
-
-
40
40
Kingdom
Total

3
160
45
0
1
40
249
36 |
   TE-SAT 2011

Annex  3:  Arrests  in  2010  per  member  state  and  per  
affiliation12
Member State
Islamist Separatist
Left-
Right-
Single-
Not 
Total 
wing
wing
issue
specified
2010
Austria
1
1
3
0
0
0
5
Belgium
11
9
0
0
0
0
20
Denmark
6
0
0
0
0
0
6
France
94
123
0
0
0
2
219
Germany
9
14
2
0
0
0
25
Greece
0
0
18
0
0
0
18
Ireland (Republic of)
5
57
0
0
0
0
62
Italy
4
16
8
1
0
0
29
The Netherlands
19
19
0
0
0
1
39
Portugal
0
3
0
0
0
0
3
Romania
14
2
0
0
0
0
16
Slovenia
2
0
0
0
0
0
2
Spain
11
104
3
0
0
0
118
Sweden
3
1
0
0
0
0
4
United Kingdom
-
-
-
-
-
45
45
Total
179
349
34
1
0
48
611
12  For the UK, the figures represent the number of charges for 2009 and 2010, to provide a more accurate comparison with the number of judicial arrests in 
other Member States. However, at this stage in the criminal justice process it is not possible to assign an affiliation to individual cases.

TE-SAT 2011  | 37 

Annex 4: Data convictions and  penalties (Eurojust)
Member State
2008
2009
2010
Austria
0
2
0
Belgium
12
713
10
Denmark
16
10
1
France
75
76
40
Germany
10
7
12
Ireland (Republic of)
9
15
18
Italy
25
24
22
The Netherlands
12
2
8
Spain
141
217
173
Sweden
1
1
4
United Kingdom
59
37
19
Total
360
398
307
1. Number of individuals tried in 2010 for terrorism charges, by Member State14
Member State
Islamist
Left-
Right-
Separatist
Not 
Total
wing
wing
specified
Belgium
9
1
10
Denmark
1
1
France
14
26
40
Germany
10
2
12
Ireland (republic of)
18
18
Italy
5
17
22
The Netherlands
8
8
Spain
24
18
155
1
198
Sweden
2
2
4
UK
12
4
2
1
19
Total
84
37
4
201
6
332
2. Number of convictions/acquittals for terrorism charges in 2010, per Member State and  
group type15
13  Verdicts received by the drafting team after the deadline for collecting information for TE-SAT 2011 could not be included.
14  According to the information provided by national authorities, in 2010 one person appeared in five different court proceedings, three other persons were 
tried three times for terrorist offences, whilst another fifteen individuals each appeared in two different proceedings. These cases all originated from Spain.

15  Figure 2 connects the reported verdicts in the Member States to the group type. It should be noted that ten individuals (the majority of them separatists) 
received more than one verdict and they have therefore been counted more than once in the calculation.

38 |
   TE-SAT 2011

Member  State
Convicted
Acquitted
Total verdicts
Acquitted %
Belgium
9
1
10
10%
Denmark
1
1
0%
France
40
40
0%
Germany
12
12
0%
Ireland (Republic of)
15
3
18
17%
Italy
16
6
22
27%
The Netherlands
8
8
0%
Spain
122
76
198
38%
Sweden
4
4
0%
United Kingdom
14
5
19
26%
Total
241
91
332
27%
3. Number of verdicts, convictions and acquittals per Member State in 2010
Member State
Final
Pending judicial  
Total verdicts
remedy
Belgium
9
1
10
Denmark
1
1
France
29
11
40
Germany
8
4
12
Ireland (Republic of)
17
1
18
Italy
1
21
22
The Netherlands
8
8
Spain
87
111
198
Sweden
2
2
4
United Kingdom
13
6
19
Total
175
157
332
4. Number of final and not final verdicts per Member State in 201016
16  Some verdicts are pending appeal or recourse. In those cases, where no confirmation was received on the finality of the decision, they have been considered 
as not final.

TE-SAT 2011  | 39 

Annex 5: Methodology
The TE-SAT is both a situation and a trend report. A trend  With the approval of the TE-SAT Advisory Board, neigh-
can be defined as ‘a general or new tendency in the way  bouring countries of the EU that have a Liaison Bureau 
a situation is changing or developing’. The TE-SAT 2011  at Europol, and other non-EU states with which Europol 
presents trends analysis and new developments for the  has signed cooperation agreements, were approached to 
period 2007 to 2010.
provide qualitative data for the TE-SAT 2011, when their 
information could shed light on a certain situation or phe-
Data collection
nomenon in the EU. Colombia, Croatia, Iceland, Norway, 
The EU Council Decision on the exchange of information  Switzerland, Turkey,  and  the  United  States  of  America 
and cooperation concerning terrorist offences, of 20 Sep- reported information relevant to the security situation in 
tember 2005 (2005/671/JHA), obliges Member States to  the EU.
col ect al  relevant information concerning and resulting 
from criminal investigations conducted by their law en- TE-SAT data analysis 
forcement authorities with respect to terrorist offences,  The  TE-SAT  categorises  terrorist  organisations  accord-
and  sets  out  the  conditions  under  which  this  informa- ing to their source of motivation. However, many groups 
tion  should  be  sent  to  Europol.  Europol  processed  the  have a mixture of motivating ideologies, although usual y 
data and the results were cross-checked with the Mem- one ideology or motivation dominates. The choice of cat-
ber States and, in case of divergences or gaps, corrected  egories used in the TE-SAT reflects the current situation 
and complemented, and then validated by the Member  in the EU, as reported by Member States. The categories 
States.
are not necessarily mutual y exclusive.
Eurojust  also  col ected  data  on  the  basis  of  the  afore- Although EU Member States continue to report on terror-
mentioned EU Council Decision, according to which the  ist attacks and arrests with varying degrees of depth, it 
Member States are equal y obliged to col ect al  relevant  can general y be stated that the data contributed by the 
information concerning prosecutions and convictions for  Member States for 2010 was of high quality. 
terrorist offences and send the data to Eurojust. Eurojust  Gaps in the data col ected by Europol may be due to the 
cross-checked the col ected data with the Member States  fact that the investigations into the terrorist attacks or ac-
and, in case of divergences or gaps, this data was also cor- tivities in question are stil  ongoing. In addition, a number 
rected, complemented and then validated. 
of criminal offences committed in support of terrorist ac-
tivities are not systematical y prosecuted under terrorism 
legislation.
40 |
   TE-SAT 2011




Annex 6: Implementation of the eu framework decision 
on combating terrorism in the member states – changes 
in member states during 201017
Listed below are countries where there have been changes in legislation or legislative initiatives in the fight 
against terrorism. 
Greece
the use of the financial system for the purpose of money 
In Greece, law 3875/2010 which incorporates the United  laundering and terrorist financing; it provides for: the reg-
Nations  Convention  against  Transnational  Organized  istration of persons directing private members’ clubs; the 
Crime  (Palermo Convention  of  2000)  and  its  Protocols,  amendment of the Central Bank Act 1942 and the Courts 
among them the Protocol against the Il icit Manufactur- (supplemental provisions) Act 1961; the consequential re-
ing of and Trafficking in Firearms, their Parts and Compo- peal of certain provisions of the criminal justice Act 1994 
nents and Ammunition, brought amendments to article  and the consequential amendment of certain enactments 
187  of  the  Penal Code. The  most  significant  one  is  the  and the revocation of certain statutory instruments.
criminalisation of advertising and financial support of ter-
rorist organisations. A penalty of up to 10 years imprison-
ment is foreseen. 
     Luxembourg 
In  Luxembourg,  new  legislation  directed  at  reinforcing 
In  the  same  article,  there  are  some  changes  regarding  the fight against money laundering and financing of ter-
criminal procedures, identification of terms and differen- rorism  was  passed  on  27 October  2010.  It  refers  to  the 
tiation of penalties. Final y, the same amendment made  organisation  of  controls  of  the  physical  transportation 
“delictum  sui  generis”  the  manufacturing  of  weapons,  of cash entering, transiting or exiting the territory of the 
chemicals,  biological  materials  or  harmful  radiation  for  Grand Duchy of Luxembourg.
terrorist purposes. 
The new piece of legislation amends a series of legislative 
Acts, including the Penal Code, the Criminal Procedural 
Republic of Ireland 
Code,  the  12  November  2004  law  regarding  the  fight 
On 5 May 2010, the Third Anti Money Laundering Direc- against  money  laundering  and  financing  of  terrorism, 
tive (2005/60/EC) was transposed in Ireland by the Crimi- the 20 June 2001 law regarding extradition, the 17 March 
nal  Justice  (Money  Laundering  and Terrorist  Financing)  2004 law on the European Arrest Warrant and the 8 Au-
Act 2010 (number 6 of 2010). The aim of the Third Anti  gust 2000 law on international mutual legal assistance in 
Money  Laundering  Directive  is  to  widen  the  scope  of  criminal matters. 
previous  anti-money  laundering  and  terrorist  financing 
legislation based on the revised recommendations of the  The Act is also meant to transpose, into Luxembourg law, 
Financial Action Task Force.
the United  Nations Security Council  resolutions  and  the 
normative Acts adopted by the European Union regarding 
Act number 6 of 2010 provides for offences of, and related  interdictions and restrictive measures of a financial nature 
to, money laundering in and outside the state; gives effect  taken against certain persons, entities and groups within 
to directive 2005/60/EC of the European Parliament and  the context of combating the financing of terrorism.
of the Council of 26 October 2005 on the prevention of 
17  Contribution to the TE-SAT 2011: Eurojust.
TE-SAT 2011  | 41 




On the same date, Luxembourg passed a law which ap- Criminal Code. The current definition is more specific in 
proves the Rome 10 March 1988 Convention for the Sup- describing  the  ways  of  committing  the  offence,  e.g.  it 
pression of Unlawful Acts against the Safety of Maritime  covers situations when a person gathers financial or other 
Navigation and Protocol for the Suppression of Unlawful  means with the intention to use them for terrorism pur-
Acts against the Safety of Fixed Platforms Located on the  poses, provides his knowledge about biological or chemi-
Continental Shelf. The aforementioned law modifies the  cal weapons with the same purpose, publicly incites the 
14 April 1992 law regarding the adoption of a disciplinary  commission of a crime of terrorism.
and criminal code for the marine.
Spain 
Spain introduced a new law (Organic law 5/2010) in June 
    Netherlands 
2010,  which  entered  into  force  on  23  December  2010. 
On 4 March 2010, the Netherlands confirmed the ratifica- This change of law implements the Framework Decision 
tion of the Council of Europe Convention on the Preven- 2008/919/JHA  of  28  November  2008,  as  wel   as United 
tion of Terrorism, adopted in Warsaw in May 2005, which  Nations instruments. 
requires Member States to establish ‘training for terror-
ism’  as  a  criminal  offence  under  its  domestic  law. The  The new law declares that the statute of limitations is not 
participation and cooperation in terrorist training camps  applicable when terrorist acts result in fatalities - a provi-
are both criminal offences that carry a maximum prison  sion included upon request of terrorism victims organisa-
sentence of eight years.
tions.
The new law includes a more comprehensive definition 
Slovakia 
of conduct related to membership of a terrorist organi-
In Slovakia, amendments of the Slovak criminal Code re- sation/group, adapting to the new regulation of the par-
lated to terrorism were adopted by the Act 576/2009 col .  ticipation in a criminal organisation/group devoted to the 
and came into force on 1 January 2010. 
perpetration of any criminal activities. Given the serious-
ness and danger of terrorism, no difference is being made 
Section 129 of the Criminal Code was amended to incrimi- between  stable  terrorist  organisations  and  temporary 
nate the financial support of a terrorist group. According- terrorist organisations, set up with the sole aim of com-
ly, the new wording of part 7 of this section is:
mitting specific attacks. 
“Support of criminal group or terrorist group means the 
intentional  acting  consisting  in  providing  financial  or  There are two levels of seriousness of these conducts:
other means, services, cooperation, or creation of other  -  Promotion, establishment, organisation or leadership  
conditions for the purpose of:
  of a terrorist organisation/group,
a) Forming or maintenance of existence of such a group,  -  Participation or membership in the organisation.
or
b) Commission of criminal offences as referred to in para- The crime of financing of terrorist activities is now pun-
graph 4 or 5 by such a group.”
ishable, going beyond facilitation and giving economical 
support, but also making negligent behaviour punishable. 
Furthermore, this Act changed the wording of the crime  If  negligent  behaviour  consists  of  not  taking  sufficient 
of terrorism. This offence is defined in section 419 of the  measures to prevent money laundering, so that the con-
42 |
   TE-SAT 2011


duct facilitates or unwil ingly supports the terrorist activi-
ties financial y, this conduct can be prosecuted.  
Although previously punishable, the activities of recruit-
ment and training with a view to joining a terrorist organi-
sation/group are specifical y described in order to facili-
tate the prosecution and mutual legal assistance. 
 
Final y,  the  distribution,  or  otherwise  public  dissemina-
tion, of messages or slogans aimed at inciting or favour-
ing the perpetration of terrorist conducts has been crimi-
nalised. 
Sweden 
In Sweden, a new law on punishment for public provoca-
tion, recruitment and training for terrorist offences and 
other particularly serious criminal offences was passed on 
29 April 2010 and entered into force on 1 December 2010. 
This Act has been adopted in order to comply with the 16 
May 2005 Council of Europe Convention on the Preven-
tion  of Terrorism  and  the  Council  Framework  Decision 
2008/919/JHA  of  28  November  2008  amending  Frame-
work Decision 2002/475/JHA on combating terrorism. 
According to paragraphs 3, 4 and 5, public provocation, 
recruitment  and  training  for  terrorism  are  punishable 
with maximum imprisonment of 2 years. In the case of 
serious offences, the imprisonment shal  be imposed for 
a minimum of 6 months and a maximum of 6 years.
TE-SAT 2011  | 43 

44 |
   TE-SAT 2011