Esta es la versión HTML de un fichero adjunto a una solicitud de acceso a la información 'Communication with AGA'.


 
EUROPEAN COMMISSION 
 
 
 
Brussels, 29.3.2017 
C(2017) 2209 final 
 
 
 
 
Mr Mathias SCHINDLER 
Bundestagsbüro Julia Reda, MdEP  
Unter den Linden 50  
11011 Berlin  
 
ask+request-3765-
[correo electrónico]
 

DECISION OF THE SECRETARY GENERAL ON BEHALF OF THE COMMISSION PURSUANT 
TO ARTICLE 4 OF THE IMPLEMENTING RULES TO REGULATION (EC) N° 1049/20011 
Subject:  
Your  confirmatory  application  for  access  to  documents  under 
Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001 - GESTDEM 2017/444 

Dear Mr Schindler, 
I refer to your e-mail of 16 February 2017, registered on 17 February 2017, in which you 
submit a confirmatory application in accordance with Article 7(2) of Regulation (EC) No 
1049/2001  regarding  public  access  to  European  Parliament,  Council  and  Commission 
documents2 (hereafter ‘Regulation 1049/2001’). 
1. 
SCOPE OF YOUR APPLICATION 
In your initial request of 25 January 2017, you requested access to: 
…  all information (including emails, drafts, memos, notes, recordings, tables, files, etc)  
a) by, 
b) to  OR  
c)  from  Günther  Oettinger,  Michael  Hager  and  the  person  whose  name  is 
redacted 
[from document ARES(2016)7049904] 
                                                 

Official Journal L 345 of 29.12.2001, p. 94. 

Official Journal L 145 of 31.5.2001, p. 43. 
 
Commission européenne/Europese Commissie, 1049 Bruxelles/Brussel, BELGIQUE/BELGIË - Tel. +32 22991111 
http://ec.europa.eu/dgs/secretariat_general/ 

that relates to the Hamburg event. The temporal scope of  these requests should contain 
both the time before as well as after the event3.   
You further request a copy of the data on the USB drive that was sent to Commissioner 
Oettinger4 by the AGA5. 
The  Commission's  Directorate-General  for  Communications  Networks,  Content  and 
Technology  (hereafter  'DG  CNECT')  have  not  provided  you  with  a  reply  within  the 
deadlines  set  out  in  Regulation  1049/2001.  You  have,  therefore,  submitted  a 
confirmatory application.  
I  understand  that  your  request  for  access  is  a  follow-up  of  your  request  GESTDEM 
2016/6031 and the Commission's confirmatory decision sent to you on 25 January 2017.  
2. 
ASSESSMENT AND CONCLUSIONS UNDER REGULATION 1049/2001 
Following your confirmatory application, the Commission carried out a thorough search 
for  documents  falling  under  the  scope  of  your  request.  Based  on  this  search,  the 
Commission identified two documents, namely:  
(1) An invitation letter of 8 July 2016 the AGA addressed to Commissioner Oettinger 
regarding his participation in EuropaAbend (ref. Ares(2016)3978692); and  
 
(2) a  letter  of  17  February  2017  the  AGA  addressed  to  Commissioner  Oettinger 
together with an enclosed AGA report (ref. Ares(2017)1193738). 
I  am  pleased  to  inform  you  that  wide  partial  access  is  granted  to  the  above-mentioned 
documents,  subject  only  to  the  redaction  of  personal  data,  based  on  the  exception  of 
Article  4(1)(b)  of  Regulation  1049/2001  (protection  of  privacy  and  the  integrity  of  the 
individual), as explained below. 
Concerning  your  specific  request  for  any  correspondence  between  the organisers  of  the 
event and the person whose name was redacted from document  ARES(2016)7049904, I 
would  like  to  clarify  that  the  person  in  question  performs  secretarial  functions  and  the 
exchanges  she  had  with  the  organisers  of  the  event  were  of  a  purely  logistical  nature, 
such  as  regards  the  organisational  issues  pertaining  to  the  event.  In  line  with  the 
Commission document management rules, such types of correspondence are considered 
unimportant  and  short-lived,  do  not  meet  the  registration  criteria  and  are  therefore  not 
stored  in  any  of  the  Commission's  document-management  systems.  Consequently,  such 
short-lived  messages  cannot  be  retrieved  and  assessed  in  the  context  of  access-to-
documents requests. 
 
 
                                                 
3   EuropaAbend, organised on 27 October 2016 in Hamburg. 
4   As mentioned in document ARES(2016)7049904, provided to you in the context of your request for 
access Gestdem 2016/6031. 
5   AGA Norddeutscher Unternehmensverband Großhandel, Außenhandel, Dienstleistung e. V 


Concerning  your  request  for  the  content  of  the  memory  stick  sent  by  AGA,  I  regret  to 
inform you that the memory stick does not contain any data. Following your request, the 
memory stick in question was sent for analysis to the Commission's Directorate-General 
for Informatics (DIGIT). The findings by DIGIT were that no files have ever been saved 
on the memory stick in question. 
Justifications for the redaction of personal data 
Article 4(1)(b) of Regulation 1049/2001 provides that the institutions shall refuse access 
to a document where disclosure would undermine the protection of (…) privacy and the 
integrity  of  the  individual,  in  particular  in  accordance  with  Community  legislation 
regarding the protection of personal data

The two documents in question contain personal name, emails, direct telephone lines and 
biometric data, such as handwritten signatures.  
In  this  respect,  Article  4(1)(b)  of  Regulation  1049/2001  provides  that  access  to 
documents  is  refused  where  disclosure  would  undermine  the  protection  of  privacy  and 
integrity  of  the  individual,  in  particular  in  accordance  with  Community  legislation 
regarding the protection of personal data
.  
In its judgment in the Bavarian Lager case, the Court of Justice ruled that when a request 
is made for access to documents containing personal data, Regulation (EC) No. 45/20016 
(hereafter 'Data Protection Regulation') becomes fully applicable7. 
Article  2(a)  of  the  Data  Protection  Regulation  provides  that  'personal  data'  shall  mean 
any  information  relating  to  an  identified  or  identifiable  person  (…);  an  identifiable 
person is one who can be identified, directly or indirectly, in particular by reference to 
an  identification  number  or  to  one  or  more  factors  specific  to  his  or  her  physical, 
physiological,  mental,  economic,  cultural  or  social  identity
.  According  to  the  Court  of 
Justice,  there  is  no  reason  of  principle  to  justify  excluding  activities  of  a  professional 
[…] nature from the notion of “private life"
8.  
The name of a person who is not the main legal representative of the entity in question, 
personal emails and direct telephone lines, as well as biometric data, such as handwritten 
signatures contained in the documents in question, undoubtedly constitute personal data 
in the meaning of Article 2(a) of the Data Protection Regulation. 
 
 
                                                 
6    Regulation (EC) No 45/2001 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 18 December 2000 on 
the  protection  of  individuals  with  regard  to  the  processing  of  personal  data  by  the  Community 
institutions  and  bodies  and  on  the  free  movement  of  such  data,  Official  Journal  L  8  of  12  January 
2001, page 1. 
7   Judgment of 29 June 2010, Commission v Bavarian Lager, C-28/08P, EU:C:2010:378, paragraph 63. 
8   Judgment  of  20  May  2003,  Rechnungshof  v  Österreichischer  Rundfunk  and  Others,  C-465/00,  C-
138/01 and C-139/01, EU:C:2003:294, paragraph 73. 


Public  disclosure  of  the  above-mentioned  information  would  constitute  processing 
(transfer)  of  personal  data  within  the  meaning  of  Article  8(b)  of  Regulation  45/2001. 
According  to  Article  8(b)  of  that  Regulation,  personal  data  shall  only  be  transferred  to 
recipients  if  the  recipient  establishes  the  necessity  of  having  the  data  transferred  and  if 
there  is  no  reason  to  assume  that  the  data  subject's  legitimate  interests  might  be 
prejudiced. Those two conditions are cumulative.9  
Only if both  conditions are  fulfilled and the processing  constitutes lawful  processing in 
accordance with the requirements of Article 5 of  Regulation 45/2001, can the processing 
(transfer) of personal data occur.  
In  the  recent  judgment  in  the  ClientEarth  case,  the  Court  of  Justice  ruled  that  whoever 
requests such a transfer must first establish that it is necessary. If it is demonstrated to be 
necessary, it is then for the institution concerned to determine that there is no reason to 
assume  that  that  transfer  might  prejudice  the  legitimate  interests  of  the  data  subject.  If 
there is no such reason, the transfer requested must be made, whereas, if there is such a 
reason, the institution concerned must weigh the various competing interests in order to 
decide  on  the  request  for  access
10.  I  refer  also  to  the  Strack  case,  where  the  Court  of 
Justice ruled that the Institution does not have to examine by itself the existence of a need 
for transferring personal data11. 
In your initial request, you do not establish the necessity of having the data in question 
transferred  to  you.  Therefore,  I  have  to  conclude  that  the  transfer  of  personal  data 
through  its disclosure  cannot  be  considered as  fulfilling  the  requirements  of  Regulation 
45/2001. 
The  fact  that,  contrary  to  the  exceptions  of  Article  4(2)  and  (3),  Article  4(1)(b)  of 
Regulation 1049/2001 is an absolute exception which does not require the institution to 
balance the exception defined therein against a possible public interest in disclosure, only 
reinforces this conclusion. 
Therefore,  the  use  of  the  exception  under  Article  4(1)(b)  of  Regulation  1049/2001  is 
justified,  as  there  is  no  need  to  publicly  disclose  the  personal  data  in  question,  and  it 
cannot be assumed that the legitimate rights of the data subjects concerned would not be 
prejudiced by such disclosure.  
For  the  sake  of  completeness,  I  would  like  to  point  out  that  the  names  of  high-level 
politicians  who  are  public  figures  were  not  redacted  from  document  112.  Likewise,  the 
name  of  the  official  legal  representative  of  AGA  is  disclosed  in  the  two  documents  in 
question and is also publicly available on-line. 
                                                 
9   Judgment in Commission v Bavarian Lager, cited above, EU:C:2010:378, paragraphs 77-78. 
10   Judgment of 16 July 2015, ClientEarth v EFSA, C-615/13P, EU:C:2015:489, paragraph 47. 
11   Judgment of 2 October 2014, Strack v Commission, C-127/13 P, EU:C:2014:2250, paragraph 106. 
12   The  names  and  photos  of  these  politicians  are  also  available  on  the  website  of  the  event: 
www.europaabend.de 



Finally, the enclosure to document 2, which is the AGA annual report for 2016 has been 
made  publicly  available  on  the  Internet  by  AGA13,  therefore  no  redactions  of  personal 
data have been made there either. 
3. 
OVERRIDING PUBLIC INTEREST IN DISCLOSURE 
Article 4(1)(b) of Regulation 1049/2001 is an absolute exception which does not require 
the institution to balance the exception defined therein against a  possible public interest 
in disclosure. 
4. 
MEANS OF REDRESS 
Finally,  I  would  like  to  draw  your  attention  to  the  means  of  redress  that  are  available 
against  this  decision,  that  is,  judicial  proceedings  and  complaints  to  the  Ombudsman 
under the conditions specified respectively in Articles 263 and 228 of the Treaty on the 
Functioning of the European Union. 
Yours sincerely, 
 
 
 
 
 
 

For the Commission 
 
Alexander ITALIANER 
 
Secretary-General 
 
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
 
Annexes (2) 
                                                 
13   See: http://leistungsbilanz.aga.de/2017 


Document Outline