Esta es la versión HTML de un fichero adjunto a una solicitud de acceso a la información 'European Commission's legal service opinion(s) on the drafts of the copyright directive'.


Ref. Ares(2016)4876233 - 30/08/2016
 
 
EUROPEAN 
  COMMISSION 
 
Brussels, XXX  
[…](2016) XXX draft 
  
Proposal for a 
DIRECTIVE OF THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND OF THE COUNCIL 
on copyright in the Digital Single Market 
 
(Text with EEA relevance) 
 
EN 
 
   EN 

EXPLANATORY MEMORANDUM 
1. 
CONTEXT OF THE PROPOSAL 
• 
Reasons for and objectives of the proposal 
The evolution of digital technologies has changed the way works and other protected subject-
matter  are  created,  produced,  distributed  and  exploited.  New  uses  have  emerged  as  well  as 
new actors and new business models. In the digital environment, cross-border uses have also 
intensified  and  new  opportunities  for  consumers  to  access  copyright-protected  content  have 
materialised.  Even  though  the  objectives  and  principles  laid  down  by  the  EU  copyright 
framework remain sound, there is a need to adapt it to these new realities. Intervention at EU 
level  is  also  needed  to  avoid  fragmentation  in  the  internal  market.  Against  this  background, 
the  Digital  Single  Market  Strategy1  adopted  in  May  2015  identified  the  need  “to  reduce  the 
differences between national copyright regimes and allow for wider online access to works by 
users  across  the  EU”.  This  Communication  highlighted  the  importance  to  enhance  cross-
border  access  to  copyright-protected  content  services,  facilitate  new  uses  in  the  fields  of 
research and education, and clarify the role of online services in the distribution of works and 
other subject-matter. In December 2015, the Commission issued a Communication ‘Towards 
a  modern,  more  European  copyright  framework’2.  This  Communication  outlined  targeted 
actions and a long-term vision to modernise EU copyright rules. This proposal is one of the 
measures aiming at addressing specific issues identified in that Communication. 
Exceptions and limitations to copyright and neighbouring rights are harmonised at EU level. 
Some  of  these  exceptions  aim  at  achieving  public  policy  objectives,  such  as  research  or 
education.  However,  as  new  types  of  uses  have  recently  emerged,  it  remains  uncertain 
whether  these  exceptions  are  still  adapted  to  achieve  a  fair  balance  between  the  rights  and 
interests  of  authors  and  other  rightholders  on  the  one  hand,  and  of  users  on  the  other.  In 
addition, these exceptions remain national and legal certainty around cross-border uses is not 
guaranteed. In this context, the Commission has identified three areas of intervention: digital 
and cross-border uses in the field of education, text and data mining in the field of scientific 
research  and  preservation  of  cultural  heritage.  The  objective  is  to  guarantee  the  legality  of 
certain  types  of  uses  in  these  fields,  including  across  borders.  As  a  result  of  a  modernised 
framework of exceptions and limitations, researchers will benefit from a clearer legal space to 
use innovative text and data mining research tools, teachers and students will be able to take 
advantage from digital technology in education and cultural heritage institutions (i.e. publicly 
accessible  libraries  or  museums,  archives  or  film  or  audio  heritage  institutions)  will  be 
supported  in  their  efforts  to  preserve  the  cultural  heritage,  to  the  ultimate  advantage  of  EU 
citizens.  
Despite  the  fact  that  digital  technologies  should  facilitate  cross-border  access  to  works  and 
other  subject-matter,  obstacles  remain,  in  particular  for  uses  and  works  where  clearance  of 
rights is complex. This is the case for cultural heritage institutions wanting to provide online 
access, including across borders, to out-of-commerce works contained in their catalogues. As 
a  consequence  of  these  obstacles  European  citizens  miss  opportunities  to  access  cultural 
heritage.  The  proposal  addresses  these  problems  by  introducing  a  specific  mechanism  to 
facilitate  the  conclusion  of  licences  for  the  dissemination  of  out-of-commerce  works  by 
cultural heritage institutions. As regards audiovisual works, despite the growing importance of 
video-on-demand  platforms,  EU  audiovisual  works  only  constitute  one  third  of  works 
                                                 

COM(2015) 192 final. 

COM(2015) 626 final. 
EN 

   EN 

available to consumers on those platforms. Again, this lack of availability partly derives from 
a  complex  clearance  process.  This  proposal  provides  for  measures  aiming  at  facilitating  the 
licensing  and  clearance  of  rights  process.  This  would  ultimately  facilitate  consumers'  cross-
border access to copyright-protected content.  
Evolution  of  digital  technologies  has  led  to  the  emergence  of  new  business  models  and 
reinforced the role of the Internet as the main marketplace for the distribution and access to 
copyright-protected  content.  In  this  new  framework,  rightholders  face  difficulties  when 
seeking  to  license  their  rights  and  be  remunerated  for  the  online  distribution  of  their  works. 
This  could  put  at  risk  the  development  of  European  creativity  and  production  of  creative 
content. It is therefore necessary to guarantee that authors and rightholders receive a fair share 
of the value that is generated by the use of their works and other subject-matter. Against this 
background,  this  proposal  provides  for  measures  aiming  at  improving  the  position  of 
rightholders  to  negotiate  and  be  remunerated  for  the  exploitation  of  their  content  by  online 
services  giving  access  to  user-uploaded  content.  A  fair  sharing  of  value  is  also  necessary  to 
ensure  the  sustainability  of  the  news  publications  sector.  News  publishers  are  facing 
difficulties in licensing  their  publications  online and obtaining a fair  share of the value they 
generate. This could ultimately affect citizens' access to information. This proposal provides 
for a new right for news publishers aiming at facilitating online licensing of their publications, 
the  recoupment  of  their  investment  and  the  online  enforcement  of  their  rights.  It  also 
addresses  existing  legal  uncertainty  as  regards  the  possibility  for  all  publishers  to  receive  a 
share  in  the  compensation  for  uses  of  works  under  an  exception.  Finally,  authors  and 
performers  often  have  a  weak  bargaining  position  in  their  contractual  relationships,  when 
licensing their rights. In addition, transparency on the revenues generated by the use of their 
works or performances often remains limited. This ultimately affects the remuneration of the 
authors and performers. This proposal includes measures to improve transparency and better 
balanced  contractual  relationships  between  authors  and  performers  and  those  to  whom  they 
assign  their  rights.  Overall,  the  measures  proposed  in  title  IV  of  the  proposal  aiming  at 
achieving a well-functioning market place for copyright are expected to have in the medium 
term a positive impact on the production and availability of content and on media pluralism, 
to the ultimate benefit of consumers.   
• 
Consistency with existing policy provisions in the policy area 
The  Digital  Single  Market  Strategy  puts  forward  a  range  of  initiatives  with  the  objective  of 
creating an internal market for digital content and services. In December 2015, a first step has 
been  undertaken  by  the  adoption  by  the  Commission  of  a  proposal  for  a  Regulation  of  the 
European  Parliament  and  of  the  Council  on  ensuring  the  cross-border  portability  of  online 
content services in the internal market3.  
The  present  proposal  aims  at  addressing  several  of  the  targeted  actions  identified  in  the 
Communication  ‘Towards  a  modern,  more  European  copyright  framework’.  Other  actions 
identified  in  this  Communication  are  covered  by  the  ‘Proposal  for  a  Regulation  of  the 
European Parliament and of the Council laying down rules on the exercise of copyright and 
related  rights  applicable  to  certain  online  transmissions  of  broadcasting  organisations  and 
retransmissions of television and radio programmes’4, the ‘Proposal for a Regulation of the 
European Parliament and of the Council on the cross-border exchange between the Union and 
third countries of accessible format copies of certain works and other subject-matter protected 
by copyright and related rights for the benefit of persons who are blind, visually impaired or 
                                                 

COM(2015) 627 final. 

[Reference to be included] 
EN 

   EN 

otherwise print disabled’5 and the ‘Proposal for a Directive of the European Parliament and of 
the  Council  on  certain  permitted  uses  of  works  and  other  subject-matter  protected  by 
copyright  and  related  rights  for  the  benefit  of  persons  who  are  blind,  visually  impaired  or 
otherwise print disabled and amending Directive 2001/29/EC on the harmonisation of certain 
aspects of copyright and related rights in the information society’6, adopted on the same date 
of this proposal for a Directive. 
This proposal is consistent with the existing EU copyright legal framework. This proposal is 
based  upon,  and  complements  the  rules  laid  down  in  Directive  96/9/EC7,  Directive 
2001/29/EC8,  Directive  2006/115/EC9,  Directive  2009/24/EC10,  Directive  2012/28/EU11  and 
Directive  2014/26/EU12.  Those  Directives,  as  well  as  this  proposal,  contribute  to  the 
functioning  of  the  internal  market,  ensure  a  high  level  of  protection  for  right  holders  and 
facilitate the clearance of rights. 
This proposal complements Directive 2010/13/EU13 and the proposal14 amending it. 
• 
Consistency with other Union policies 
This  proposal  would  facilitate  education  and  research,  improve  dissemination  of  European 
cultures  and  positively  impact  cultural  diversity.  This  Directive  is  therefore  consistent  with 
Articles 165, 167 and 179 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU). 
Furthermore, this proposal contributes to promoting the interests of consumers, in accordance 
with the EU policies in the field of consumer protection and Article 169 TFEU, by allowing a 
wider access to and use of copyright-protected content. 
2. 
LEGAL BASIS, SUBSIDIARITY AND PROPORTIONALITY 
• 
Legal basis 
The  proposal  is  based  on  Article  114  TFEU.  This  Article  confers  on  the  EU  the  power  to 
adopt  measures  which  have  as  their  object  the  establishment  and  functioning  of  the  internal 
market. 
                                                 

[Reference to be included] 

[Reference to be included] 

Directive  96/9/EC  of  the  European  Parliament  and  of  the  Council  of  11  March  1996  on  the  legal 
protection of databases (OJ L 077, 27.03.1996, p. 20-28). 

Directive  2001/29/EC  of  the  European  Parliament  and  of  the  Council  of  22  May  2001  on  the 
harmonisation  of  certain  aspects  of  copyright  and  related  rights  in  the  information  society  (OJ  L  167, 
22.6.2001, p. 10–19). 

Directive 2006/115/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 12 December 2006 on rental 
right and lending right and on certain rights related to copyright in the field of intellectual property (OJ 
L 376, 27.12.2006, p. 28–35). 
10 
Directive  2009/24/EC  of  the  European  Parliament  and  of  the  Council  of  23  April  2009  on  the  legal 
protection of computer programs (OJ L 111, 5.5.2009, p. 16–22). 
11 
Directive  2012/28/EU  of  the  European  Parliament  and  of  the  Council  of  25  October  2012  on  certain 
permitted uses of orphan works (OJ L 299, 27.10.2012, p. 5–12). 
12 
Directive 2014/26/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 26 February 2014 on collective 
management of copyright and related rights and multi-territorial licensing of rights in musical works for 
online use in the internal market (OJ L 84, 20.3.2014, p. 72–98). 
13 
Directive  2010/13/EU  of  the  European  Parliament  and  of  the  Council  of  10  March  2010  on  the 
coordination  of  certain  provisions  laid  down  by  law,  regulation  or  administrative  action  in  Member 
States concerning the provision of audiovisual media services (Audiovisual Media Services Directive) 
(OJ L 95, 15.4.2010, p. 1–24). 
14 
COM(2016) 287 final. 
EN 

   EN 

• 
Subsidiarity (for non-exclusive competence) 
Since exceptions and  limitations  to copyright  and related rights  are harmonised at EU level, 
the  margin  of  manoeuver  of  Member  States  in  creating  or  adapting  them  is  limited.  In 
addition,  intervention  at  national  level  would  not  be  sufficient  in  view  of  the  cross-border 
nature  of  the  identified  issues.  EU  intervention  is  therefore  needed  to  achieve  full  legal 
certainty as regards cross-border uses in the fields of research, education and cultural heritage. 
Some  national  initiatives  have  already  been  developed  to  facilitate  dissemination  of  and 
access  to  out-of-commerce  works.  However,  these  initiatives  only  exist  in  some  Member 
States and are only applicable on the national territory. EU intervention is therefore necessary 
to  ensure  that  licensing  mechanisms  for  the  access  and  dissemination  of  out-of-commerce 
works  are  in  place  in  all  Member  States  and  to  ensure  their  cross-border  effect.  As  regards 
online  exploitation  of  audiovisual  works,  to  foster  the  availability  of  European  works  on 
video-on-demand  platforms  across  the  EU,  there  is  a  need  to  facilitate  negotiations  of 
licensing agreements in all Member States. 
Online  distribution  of  copyright-protected  content  is  by  essence  cross-border.  Only 
mechanisms  decided  at  European  level  could  ensure  a  well-functioning  marketplace  for  the 
distribution  of  works  and  other  subject-matter  and  to  ensure  the  sustainability  of  the 
publishing sector in the face of the challenges of the digital environment. Finally, authors and 
performers should enjoy in all Member States the high level of protection established by EU 
legislation.  In  order  to  do  so  and  to  prevent  discrepancies  across  Member  States,  it  is 
necessary  to  set  an  EU  common  approach  to  transparency  requirements  and  mechanisms 
allowing  for  the  adjustment  of  contracts  in  certain  cases  as  well  as  for  the  resolution  of 
disputes. 
• 
Proportionality 
The  proposal  provides  for  mandatory  exceptions  for  Member  States  to  implement.  These 
exceptions  target  key  public  policy  objectives  and  uses  with  a  cross-border  dimension. 
Exceptions  also  contain  conditions  that  ensure  the  preservation  of  functioning  markets  and 
rightholders'  interests  and  incentives  to  create  and  invest.  When  relevant,  room  for  national 
decision  has  been  preserved.LS:  to  be  reviewed  in  line  with  LS  comments  in  note:  "  When 
possible without endangering the aim of the directive , room for national approaches has been 
preserved" or some such wording 
The  proposal  requires  Member  States  to  establish  mechanisms  aiming  at  facilitating  the 
clearance  of  copyright  and  related  rights  in  the  fields  of  out-of-commerce  works  and  online 
exploitation of audiovisual works. Whereas the proposal aims at ensuring a wider access and 
dissemination  of  content,  it  does  so  while  preserving  the  rights  of  authors  and  other 
rightholders.  Several  conditions=?  out-out  possibilities  are  not  conditions  and  generally:  see 
above  comment  are  put  in  place  to  that  effect  (e.g.  opt-out  possibilities,  preservation  of 
licensing  possibilities,  participation  in  the  negotiation  forum  on  a  voluntary  basis).  The 
proposal  leaves  sufficient  room=  sufficient  room?  If  at  all  (but  see  LS  general  issue  on  this 
matter)    turn  round  and  say  something  along  the  lines  of  "the  proposal  does  not  go  further 
than  necessary  for  achieving  the  intended  aim,  leaving  MS  a  degree  room.."  for  Member 
States  to  make  decisions  as  regards  the  specifics  of  these  mechanisms  and  does  not  impose 
disproportionate costs. 
The  proposal  imposes  obligations  on  some  information  society  services.  However,  these 
obligations  remain  reasonable  in  view  of  the  nature  of  the  services  covered,  the  significant 
impact  of  these  services  on  the  online  content  market  and  the  large  amounts  of  copyright-
protected  content  stored  by  these  services.  The  introduction  of  a  related  right  for  news 
EN 

   EN 

publishers would improve legal certainty and their bargaining position, which is the pursued 
objective. The proposal is proportionate as it only covers news publications and digital uses. 
The  transparency  obligation  contained  in  the  proposal  only  aims  at  rebalancing  contractual 
relationships between creators and their contractual counterparts while respecting contractual 
freedom. 
• 
Choice of the instrument 
The  proposal  relates  to,  and  in  some  instances  modifies,  existing  Directives.  It  also  leaves, 
when  appropriate  and  taking  into  accou8nthe  aim  to  be  achieved,  margin  of  manoeuver  for 
Member States while ensuring that the objective of a functioning internal market is met. The 
choice of a Directive is therefore adequate. 
3. 
RESULTS 
OF 
EX-POST 
EVALUATIONS, 
STAKEHOLDER 
CONSULTATIONS AND IMPACT ASSESSMENTS 
• 
Ex-post evaluations/fitness checks of existing legislation 
The Commission carried out a review of the existing copyright rules between 2013 and 2016 
with the objective to “ensure that copyright and copyright-related practices stay fit for purpose 
in the new digital context”15. Even if it started before the adoption of the Commission's Better 
Regulation  Agenda  in  May  201516,  this  review  process  was  carried  out  in  the  spirit  of  the 
Better Regulation guidelines. The review process highlighted, in particular, problems with the 
implementation of certain exceptions and their lack of cross-border effect17 and pointed out to 
difficulties  in  the  use  of  copyright-protected  content,  notably  in  the  digital  and  cross-border 
context that have emerged in recent years. 
• 
Stakeholder consultations 
Several public consultations were held by the Commission. The consultation on the review of 
the EU copyright rules carried out between 5 December 2013  and 5 March 201418 provided 
the Commission with an overview of stakeholders' views on the review of the EU copyright 
rules,  including  on  exceptions  and  limitations  and  on  the  remuneration  of  authors  and 
performers.  The  public  consultation  carried  out  between  24  September  2015  and  6  January 
2016  on  the  regulatory  environment  for  platforms,  online  intermediaries,  data  and  cloud 
computing  and  the  collaborative  economy19  provided  evidence  and  views  from  all 
stakeholders  on  the  role  of  intermediaries  in  the  online  distribution  of  works  and  other 
subject-matter.  Finally,  a  public  consultation  was  held  between  the  23  March  2016  and  15 
June  2016  on  the  role  of  publishers  in  the  copyright  value  chain  and  on  the  'panorama 
exception'. This consultation allowed collecting views notably on the possible introduction in 
EU law of a new related right for publishers. 
In  addition,  between  2014  and  2016,  the  Commission  had  discussions  with  the  relevant 
stakeholders on the different topics addressed by the proposal. 
                                                 
15 
COM(2012) 789 final. 
16 
COM(2015) 215 final. 
17 
Covering, respectively, the exception on illustration for teaching and research (as it relates to text and 
data mining) and on specific acts of reproduction (as it relates to preservation). 
18 
Reports on the responses to the consultation available on: 
http://ec.europa.eu/internal market/consultations/2013/copyright-rules/docs/contributions/consultation-
report en.pdf  
19 
First  results  available  on  https://ec.europa.eu/digital-single-market/news/first-brief-results-public-
consultation-regulatory-environment-platforms-online-intermediaries  
EN 

   EN 

• 
Collection and use of expertise 
Legal20  and  economic21  studies  have  been  conducted  on  the  application  of  Directive 
2001/29/EC,  on  the  economic  impacts  of  adapting  some  exceptions  and  limitations,  on  the 
legal framework of text and data mining and on the remuneration of authors and performers. 
• 
Impact assessment 
An  impact  assessment  was  carried  out  for  this  proposal22.  On  22  July  2016,  the  Regulatory 
Scrutiny Board gave a positive opinion on the understanding that the impact assessment will 
be further improved.23 The final Impact Assessment takes into account comments contained in 
that opinion. 
The Impact Assessment examines the baseline scenarios, policy options and their impacts for 
eight topics regrouped under three chapters, namely (i) ensuring wider access to content, (ii) 
adapting  exceptions  to  digital  and  cross-border  environment  and  (iii)  achieving  a  well-
functioning marketplace for copyright. The impact on the different stakeholders was analysed 
for  each  policy  option;  taking  in  particular  into  account  the  predominance  of  SMEs  in  the 
creative  industries  the  analysis  concludes  that  introducing  a  special  regime  would  not  be 
appropriate  as  it  would  defeat  the  purpose  of  the  intervention.  The  policy  options  of  each 
topic are shortly presented below.  
Access  and  availability  of  audiovisual  works  on  video-on-demand  platforms:  A  non-
legislative  option  (Option  1),  consisting  in  the  organisation  of  a  stakeholder  dialogue  on 
licensing issues, was not retained as it was deemed insufficient to address individual cases of 
blockages. The chosen option (Option 2) combines the organisation of a stakeholder dialogue 
with the obligation for Member States to set up a negotiation mechanism. 
Out-of-commerce works: Option 1 required Member States to put in place legal mechanisms, 
with  cross-border  effect,  to  facilitate  licensing  agreements  for  out-of-commerce  books  and 
learned  journals  and  to  organise  a  stakeholder  dialogue  at  national  level  to  facilitate  the 
implementation of that mechanism. Option 2 went further since it applied to all types of out-
of-commerce works. This extension was deemed necessary to address the licensing of out-of-
commerce works in all sectors. Option 2 was therefore chosen. 
                                                 
20 
Study  on  the  application  of  Directive  2001/29/EC  on  copyright  and  related  rights  in  the  information 
society:  http://ec.europa.eu/internal market/copyright/studies/index en htm;  Study  on  the  legal 
framework 
of 
text 
and 
data 
mining: 
http://ec.europa.eu/internal market/copyright/docs/studies/1403 study2 en.pdf;  Study  on  the  making 
available  right  and  its  relationship  with  the  reproduction  right  in  cross-border  digital  transmissions: 
http://ec.europa.eu/internal market/copyright/docs/studies/141219-study en.pdf; 
Study 
on 
the 
remuneration  of  authors  and  performers  for  the  use  of  their  works  and  the  fixation  of  their 
performances: 
https://ec.europa.eu/digital-single-market/en/news/commission-gathers-evidence-
remuneration-authors-and-performers-use-their-works-and-fixations;  Study  on  the  remuneration  of 
authors  of  books  and  scientific  journals,  translators,  journalists  and  visual  artists  for  the  use  of  their 
works: [hyperlink to be included – publication pending] 
21 
Study “Assessing the economic impacts of adapting certain limitations and exceptions to copyright and 
related  rights  in  the  EU” :  http://ec.europa.eu/internal market/copyright/docs/studies/131001-
study en.pdf  and  “Assessing  the  economic  impacts  of  adapting  certain  limitations  and  exceptions  to 
copyright 
and 
related 
rights 
in 
the 
EU – Analysis 
of 
specific 
policy 
options”: 
http://ec.europa.eu/internal market/copyright/docs/studies/140623-limitations-economic-impacts-
study en.pdf  
22 
Add link to IA and Executive Summary. 
23 
Add link to RSB opinion. 
EN 

   EN 

Use of works and other subject-matter in digital and cross-border teaching activities: Option 1 
consisted in providing guidance to Member States on the application of the existing teaching 
exception in the digital environment and the organisation of a stakeholder dialogue. This was 
considered not sufficient to ensure legal certainty, in particular as regards cross-border uses. 
Option  2  required  the  introduction  of  a  mandatory  exception  with  a  cross-border  effect 
covering digital and online uses. Option 3 is similar to Option 2 but leaves some flexibility to 
Member  States  that  can  decide  to  apply  the  exception  depending  on  the  availability  of 
licences. This option was deemed to be the most proportionate one. 
Text  and  data  mining:  Option  1  consisted  in  self-regulation  initiatives  from  the  industry. 
Other options consisted in the  introduction of a  mandatory exception  covering text  and data 
mining.  In  Option  2,  the  exception  only  covered  uses  pursuing  a  non-commercial  scientific 
research  purpose.  Option  3  allowed  uses  for  commercial  scientific  research  purpose  but 
limited the benefit of the exception to some beneficiaries. Option 4 went further as it did not 
restrict beneficiaries. Option 3 was deemed to be the most proportionate one. 
Preservation of cultural heritage: Option 1 consisted in the provision of guidance to Member 
States on the implementation of the exception on specific acts of reproduction for preservation 
purposes. This Option was rejected as it was deemed insufficient to achieve legal certainty in 
the field. Option 2, consisting in a mandatory exception for preservation purposes by cultural 
heritage institutions, was chosen. 
Use of copyright-protected content by information society services storing and giving access 
to  large  amounts  of  works  and  other  subject-matter  uploaded  by  their  users:  Option  1 
consisted in the organisation of a stakeholder dialogue. This approach was rejected as it would 
have a limited impact on the possibility for rightholders to determine the conditions of use of 
their works and other subject-matter. The chosen option (Option 2) goes further and provides 
for  an  obligation  for  certain  service  providers  to  put  in  place  appropriate  technologies  and 
fosters the conclusion of agreements with rightholders. 
Rights in publications: Option 1 consisted in the organisation of a stakeholder dialogue to find 
solutions  for  the  dissemination  of  news  publishers'  content.  This  option  was  deemed 
insufficient to ensure legal certainty across the EU. Option 2 consisted in the introduction of a 
related right covering online uses of news publications. In addition to this, Option 3 leaves the 
option  for  Member  States  to  enable  publishers,  to  which  rights  have  been  transferred  by  an 
author, to claim a share in the compensation for uses under an exception. This last option was 
the one retained as it addressed all relevant problems. 
Fair  remuneration  in  contracts  of  authors  and performers:  Option  1  consisted  in  providing  a 
recommendation  to  Member  States  and  organising  a  stakeholder  dialogue.  This  option  was 
rejected  since  it  would  not  be  efficient  enough.  Option  2  foresaw  the  introduction  of 
transparency obligations on the contractual counterparts of creators. On top of that, Option 3 
proposed  the  introduction  of  a  contract  adjustment  mechanism  and  a  dispute  resolution 
mechanism.  This  option  was  the  one  retained  since  Option  2  would  not  have  provided 
enforcement means to creators to support the transparency obligation. 
• 
Regulatory fitness and simplification 
For  the  uses  covered  by  the  exceptions,  the  proposal  will  allow  educational  establishments, 
public-interest  research  institutions  and  cultural  heritage  institutions  to  reduce  transaction 
costs.  This  reduction  of  transaction  costs  does  not  necessarily  mean  that  rightholders  would 
suffer  a  loss  of  income  or  licensing  revenues:  the  scope  and  conditions  of  the  exceptions 
EN 

   EN 

ensure that rightholders would suffer minimal harm. The impact on SMEs in these fields (in 
particular scientific and educational publishers) and on their business models should therefore 
be limited. 
Mechanisms aiming to improve licensing practices are likely to reduce transaction costs and 
increase  licensing  revenues  for  rightholders.  SMEs  in  the  fields  (producers,  distributors, 
publishers,  etc.)  would  be  positively  affected.  Other  stakeholders,  such  as  VoD  platforms, 
would also be positively affected. The proposal also includes several measures (transparency 
obligation on rightholders' counterparts, introduction of a new right for news publishers and 
obligation  on  some  online  services)  that  would  improve  the  bargaining  position  of 
rightholders and the control they have on the use of their works and other subject-matter. It is 
expected to have a positive impact on rightholders' revenues. 
The proposal includes new obligations on some online services and on those to which authors 
and performers transfer their rights. These obligations may impose additional costs. However, 
the proposal ensures that the costs will remain proportionate and that, when necessary, some 
actors  would  not  be  subject  to  the  obligation.  For  instance,  the  transparency  obligation  will 
not  apply  when  the  administrative  costs  it  implies  are  disproportionate  in  view  of  the 
generated  revenues.  As  for  the  obligation  on  online  services,  it  only  applies  to  information 
society  services  storing  and  giving  access  to  large  amounts  of  copyright-protected  content 
uploaded by their users. 
The proposal foresees the obligation for Member States to implement negotiation and dispute 
resolution  mechanisms.  This  implies  compliance  costs  for  Member  States.  However,  they 
could  rely  in  most  cases  on  existing  structures,  which  would  limit  the  costs.  The  teaching 
exception can  also  entail some  costs for  Member States linked  to  the measures ensuring  the 
availability and visibility of licences for educational establishments. 
New  technological  developments  have  been  carefully  examined.  The  proposal  includes 
several  exceptions  that  aim  at  facilitating  the  use  of  copyright-protected  content  via  new 
technologies.  This  proposal  also  includes  measures  to  facilitate  access  to  content,  including 
via  digital  networks.  Finally, it  ensures  a  balanced  bargaining  position  between  all  actors  in 
the digital environment. 
• 
Fundamental rights 
By improving the bargaining position of authors and performers and the control rightholders 
have on the use of their copyright-protected content, the proposal will have a positive impact 
on  copyright  as  a  property  right,  protected  under  Article  17  of  the  Charter  of  Fundamental 
Rights of the European Union (‘the Charter’). This positive impact will be reinforced by the 
measures  to  improve  licensing  practices,  and  ultimately  rightholders'  revenues.  New 
exceptions that reduce to some extent the rightholders' monopoly are justified by other public 
interest  objectives.  These  exceptions  are  likely  to  have  a  positive  impact  on  the  right  to 
education and on cultural diversity. Finally, the Directive has a limited impact on the freedom 
to  conduct  a  business  and  on  the  freedom  of  expression  and  information,  as  recognised 
respectively by Articles 16 and 11 of the Charter, due to the mitigation measures put in place 
and a balanced approach to the obligations set on the relevant stakeholders. 
4. 
BUDGETARY IMPLICATIONS 
The proposal has no impact on the European Union budget. 
EN 

   EN 

5. 
OTHER ELEMENTS 
• 
Implementation plans and monitoring, evaluation and reporting arrangements 
In accordance with Article 20, the Commission shall carry out an evaluation of the Directive 
no sooner than [five] years after the date of [transposition]. 
• 
Explanatory documents  
In compliance with recital 49 of the proposal, Member States will notify the Commission of 
their  transposition  measures  with  explanatory  documents.  This  is  necessary  given  the 
complexity  of  rules  laid  down  by  the  proposal  and  the  importance  to  keep  a  harmonised 
approach of rules applicable to the digital and cross-border environment. 
• 
Detailed explanation of the specific provisions of the proposal 
The first title contains general provisions which (i) specify the subject-matter and the scope of 
the Directive and (ii) provide definitions that will need to be interpreted in a uniform manner 
in the Union. 
The  second  title  concerns  measures  to  adapt  exceptions  and  limitations  to  the  digital  and 
cross-border  environment.  This  title  includes  three  articles  which  require  Member  States  to 
provide for mandatory exceptions or a limitation allowing (i) text and data mining carried out 
by research organisations for the purposes of scientific research (Article 3); (ii) digital uses of 
works and other subject-matter for the sole purpose of illustration for teaching (Article 4) and 
(iii)  cultural  heritage  institutions  to  make  copies  of  works  and  other  subject-matter  that  are 
permanently  in  their  collections  to  the  extent  necessary  for  their  preservation  (Article  5). 
Article 6 clarifies the link between the Directive and Directives 96/9/EC and 2001/29/EC. 
The  third  title  concerns  measures  to  improve  licensing  practices  and  ensure  wider  access  to 
content.  Article  7  requires  Member  States  to  put  in  place  a  legal  mechanism  to  facilitate 
licensing  agreements  of  out-of-commerce  works  and  other  subject-matter.  Article  8 
guarantees  the  cross-border  effect  of  such  licensing  agreements.  Article  9  requires  Member 
States to put in place a stakeholder dialogue on issues relating to Articles 7 and 8. Article 10 
creates an obligation for Member States to put in place a negotiation mechanism to facilitate 
negotiations on the online exploitation of audiovisual works. 
The  fourth  title  concerns  measures  to  achieve  a  well-functioning  marketplace  for  copyright. 
Articles  11  and  12(i)  extend  the  rights  provided  for  in  Articles  2  and  3(2)  of  Directive 
2001/29/EC to publishers of news publications for the online use of their publications and (ii) 
provide for the option for Member States to provide all publishers with the possibility to claim 
a  share  in  the  compensation  for  uses  made  under  an  exception.  Article  13  creates  an 
obligation  on  information  society  services  storing  and  giving  access  to  large  amounts  of 
works and other subject-matter uploaded by their users to take appropriate and proportionate 
measures to ensure the functioning of agreements concluded with rightholders and to prevent 
the availability on their services of content not covered by an agreement. Article 14 requires 
Member  States  to  include  transparency  obligations  to  the  benefit  of  authors  and  performers. 
Article 15 requires Member States to establish a contract adjustment mechanism, in support of 
the obligation provided for in Article 14. Article 16 requires Member States to set up a dispute 
resolution mechanism for issues arising from the application of Articles 14 and 15. 
The fifth title contains final provisions on the application in time, transitional provisions, the 
protection of personal data, the implementation, the evaluation, the expert group and the entry 
into force. 
EN 
10 
   EN 

Proposal for a 
DIRECTIVE OF THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND OF THE COUNCIL 
on copyright in the Digital Single Market 
 
(Text with EEA relevance) 
THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND THE COUNCIL OF THE EUROPEAN UNION, 
Having  regard  to  the  Treaty  on  the  Functioning  of  the  European  Union,  and  in  particular 
Article 114 thereof, 
Having regard to the proposal from the European Commission, 
After transmission of the draft legislative act to the national parliaments, 
Having regard to the opinion of the European Economic and Social Committee24, 
Having regard to the opinion of the Committee of the Regions25, 
Acting in accordance with the ordinary legislative procedure, 
Whereas: 
(1) 
[please remember to take these titles out in the final version]The Treaty provides for 
the  establishment  of  an  internal  market  and  the  institution  of  a  system  ensuring  that 
competition  in  the  internal  market  is  not  distorted.  Harmonisation  of  the  laws  of  the 
Member  States  on  copyright  and  related  rights  should  contribute  further  to  the 
achievement of those objectives. 
(2) 
[The    directives  which  have  been  adopted  in  the  area  of  copyright  and  related  rights 
provide for a high level of protection for right holders and create a framework wherein 
the  exploitation  of  works  and  other  protected  subject-matter  can  take  place.  This 
Directive  provides  a  harmonised  legal  framework  which  contributes  to  the  good 
functioning  of  the  internal  market  and  to  the  Union's  objective  of  respecting  and 
promoting  cultural  diversity  while  at  the  same  time  bringing  the  European  common 
cultural heritage to the fore.  
(3) 
[General – Background and aim – December communication] Rapid technological 
developments  continue  to  transform  the  way  works  and  other  subject-matter  are 
created,  produced,  distributed  and  exploited.  New  business  models  and  new  actors 
continue  to  emerge.  Althought  the  objectives  and  the  principles  laid  down  by  the 
Union  copyright  framework  are  sound  there  is  still  some  legal  uncertainty,  for  both 
rightholders and users, mainly as regards cross-border uses of works and other subject-
matter  in  the  digital  environment.  Therefore,    in  those  areas,  it  is  necessary  to  adapt 
and  supplement  the  current  Union  copyright  framework.  There  should  be  rules  to 
adapt  certain  exceptions  and  limitations  to  digital  and  cross-border  environments  as 
well as measures to facilitate certain licensing practices as regards the dissemination of 
                                                 
24 
OJ C […], […], p. […]. 
25 
OJ C […], […], p. […]. 
EN 
11 
   EN 

out-of commerce works and the online availability of audiovisual works on video-on-
demand platforms with a view to ensuring wider access to content. In order to achieve 
a well-functioning marketplace for copyright,  tthere should also be  rules on rights  in 
publications,  on  the  use  of  works  and  other  subject-matter  by  online  services  storing 
and  giving  access  to  user  uploaded  content  and  on  the  transparency  of  authors'  and 
performers' contracts. 
(4) 
[General – Current legal background – Not affected] This Directive is based upon, 
and complements, the rules laid down in the Directives currently in force in this area, 
in  particular  Directive  96/9/EC  of  the  European  Parliament  and  of  the  Council27, 
Directive  2001/29/EC  of  the  European  Parliament  and  of  the  Council28,  Directive 
2006/115/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council29, Directive 2009/24/EC 
of  the  European  Parliament  and  of  the  Council30,  Directive  2012/28/EU  of  the 
European Parliament and of the Council31 and Directive 2014/26/EU of the European 
Parliament and of the Council32.
 
(5) 
[Exceptions  –  Legal  uncertainty  as  regards  new  uses  –  Need  for  mandatory 
exceptions]
  In  the fields  of research, education and preservation  of cultural  heritage, 
digital  technologies  permit  new  types  of  uses  that  are  not  clearly  covered  by  the 
current  EU  rules  on  exceptions  and  limitations.  In  addition,  the  optional  nature  of 
exceptions  and  limitations  provided  for  in  Directives  2001/29/EC,  96/9/EC  and 
2009/24/EC  in  these  fields  may  negatively  impact  the  functioning  of  the  internal 
market. This is particularly relevant as regards cross-border uses, which are becoming 
increasingly important in the digital environment. Therefore, tThe existing exceptions 
and  limitations  in  Union  law  that  are  relevant  for  scientific  research,  teaching  and 
preservation  of  cultural  heritage  should  be  reassessed  in  the  light  of    new  uses  not 
covered  by  Union  legislation.  Namely    new  mandatory  exceptions  or  limitations  for 
uses of text and data mining technologies in the field of scientific research, illustration 
for teaching in the online environment and for preservation of cultural heritage should 
be introduced. For uses not covered by the exceptions or the limitation provided in this 
Directive, the exceptions and limitations existing in Union law will continue to apply. 
Directives 96/9/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council33 and 2001/29/EC 
should also be adapted.  
(6) 
[Exceptions  –  Fair  balance  of  rights]  The  exceptions  and  the  limitations  set  out  in 
this Directive seek to achieve a fair balance between the rights and interests of authors 
and other rightholders on the one hand, and of users on the other. They can be applied 
only in certain special cases which do not conflict with the normal exploitation of the 
works or other subject-matter and do not unreasonably prejudice
 
 the legitimate interests of the rightholders. 
(7) 
[TDM  –  Rationale]  New  technologies  have  made  the  automated  computational 
analysis of information in digital form, such as text, sounds, images or data, generally 
                                                 
 
 
 
 
33 
Directive  96/9/EC  of  the  European  Parliament  and  of  the  Council  of  11  March  1996  on  the  legal 
protection of databases (OJ L 77, 27.3.1996, p. 20). 
33 
Directive  96/9/EC  of  the  European  Parliament  and  of  the  Council  of  11  March  1996  on  the  legal 
protection of databases (OJ L 77, 27.3.1996, p. 20). 
33 
Directive  96/9/EC  of  the  European  Parliament  and  of  the  Council  of  11  March  1996  on  the  legal 
protection of databases (OJ L 77, 27.3.1996, p. 20). 
EN 
12 
   EN 

known as text and data mining faster. Those technologies allow researchers to process 
large  amounts  of  information  to  gain  new  knowledge  and  discover  new  trends.  
However  there  is  still,  in  the  Union,  research  organisations  such  as  universities  and 
research institutes are confronted with legal uncertainty as to to  extend to which text 
and  data  mining  of  content  can  be  performed  without  impinging  on  copyright  and 
database  rights  That  legal  uncertainty  should  be  addressed  by  providing  for  a 
mandatory  exception  to  the  right  of  reproduction  and  also  to  the  right  to  prevent 
extraction  from  a  database  in  order  to  allow  data  mining  to  be  carried  out  even  if  it 
requires the reproduction of works, or other subject matter, or of parts thereof; or the 
extraction of the whole or a substantial part of the contents of a database protected by 
the sui generis right. Text and data mining may also be carried out in relation to mere 
facts data not protexcted by compyright an din such instacnes no authorisation would 
be required. Research organisations should also benefit from that exception when they 
engage in public-private partnerships.  
(8) 
[ 
(9) 
[TDM]  In  certain  instances,  text  and  data  mining  may  involve  acts  protected  by 
copyright and/or by the sui generis database right, notably the reproduction of works 
or other subject-matter and/or the extraction of contents from a database. Where there 
is  no  exception  or  limitation  which  applies,  an  authorisation  to  undertake  such  acts 
would be required from rightholders. Text and data mining may also be carried out in 
relation  to  mere  facts  or  data  which  are  not  protected  by  copyright  and  in  such 
instances  no  authorisation  would  be  required.This  legal  uncertainty  should  be 
addressed by providing for a mandatory exception to the right of reproduction and also 
to  the  right  to  prevent  extraction  from  a  database.  Such  an  exception  would  seek  to 
ensure that text and data mining can be carried out even if it requires the reproduction 
of works, or other subject matter, or of parts thereof; or the extraction of the whole or a 
substantial  part  of  the  contents  of  a  database  protected  by  the  sui  generis  right.  The 
new exception should be without prejudice[stands to reason] to the existing mandatory 
exception  on  temporary  acts  of  reproduction  laid  down  in  Article  5(1)  of  Directive 
2001/29, which should continue to apply to text and data mining techniques which do 
not involve the making of copies going beyond the scope of that exception.  
(10) 
[TDM – Scientific research] The term ‘scientific research’ within the meaning of this 
Directive  should  cover  both  the  natural  sciences  and  the  human  sciences
 
 

 
(11) 
[TDM  –  Beneficiaries]  Research  organisations  across  the  Union  encompass  a  wide 
variety of entities, irrespective of their legal status or way of financing whose primary 
goal  is  to  independently  conduct  scientific  research  and  to  widely  disseminate  the 
results of such research or together with the provision of educational services. Due to 
the  diversity  of  such  entities,  it  is  important  to  have  a  common  understanding  of  the 
beneficiaries  of  the  exception.  Despite  different  legal  forms  and  structures,  research 
organisations across Member States generally have in common that they act either on 
a  not  for  profit  basis  or  in  the  context  of  a  public-interest  mission  recognised  by  the 
State.  Such  a  public-interest  mission  may,  for  example,  be  reflected  through  public 
funding or through provisions in national laws or public contracts. At the same time, 
However,  organisations  upon  which  commercial  undertakings  have  a  decisive 
influence, notably because of structural situations such as their quality of shareholders 
or  members,  which  might  give them preferential access to  the results of the research 
EN 
13 
   EN 

should not be considered research organisations for the purposes of this Directive. To 
be adapted in line with LS comments in Note to new State Aid approach. 
(12) 
[TDM  –  Technical  safeguards]  In  view  of  a  potentially  high  number  of  access 
requests to and downloads of their works or other subject-matter, rightholders should 
be allowed to apply measures where there is risk that the security and integrity of the 
system  or  databases  where  the  works  or  other  subject-matter  are  hosted  would  be 
jeopardised.  Those  measures  should  not  exceed  what  is  necessary  to  pursue  the 
objective  of  ensuring  the  security  and  integrity  of  the  system  and  should  not 
undermine the effective application of the exception. 
(13) 
[TDM]  In view of its nature and scope, thetext and data mining  exception results in 
negligible  prejudice  to  the  rightholders,  therefore  compensation  should  not  be 
envisaged. 
(14) 
[Teaching  –  Rationale  for  introducing  a  mandatory  exception  for  digital  uses] 
While existing legislation already provides for an exception or limitation to the rights 
of reproduction, communication to the public and  making available to the public, as 
well as database extraction rights for the sole purpose of illustration for teaching,  In 
addition, Articles  6(2)(b)  and  9(b) of Directive 96/9/EC permit the use  of a database 
and the extraction or re-utilization of a substantial part of its contents for the purpose 
of illustration for teaching. The scope of these exceptions or limitations as they apply 
to  digital  uses  is  unclear.  In  addition,  there  is  a  lack  of  clarity  as  to  whether  those 
exceptions or limitations would apply where teaching is provided online and thereby at 
a  distance.  Moreover,  the  existing  framework  does  not  provide  for  a  cross-border 
effect. That can hamper the development of digitally-supported teaching activities and 
distance  learning.  Therefore,  the  introduction  of  a  new  mandatory  exception  or 
limitation is necessary to ensure that educational establishments benefit from full legal 
certainty  when  using  works  or  other  subject-matter  in  digital  teaching  activities, 
including online and cross-border. 
(15) 
[Teaching  –  Beneficiaries]  Digital  tools  and  resources  are  increasingly  used  at  all 
education levels, in particular to improve and enrich the learning experience, therefore 
the exception or limitation provided for in this Directive should  benefit all educational 
establishments  in  primary,  secondary,  vocational  and  higher  education  to  the  extent 
they  pursue  their  educational  activity  for  a  non-commercial  purpose. 
 
 
 
 
(16) 
[Teaching  –  Illustration for teaching] The use of the works or  other subject-matter 
under  the  exception  or  limitation  should  be  only  in  the  context  of  teaching  and 
learning  activities  carried  out  under  the  responsibility  of  educational  establishments, 
including  during  examinations.  The  exception  or  limitation  should  cover  both  uses 
through digital  (see above comment) means in the classroom and online uses through 
the educational establishment's secure electronic network, the access to which should 
be protected, notably by authentication procedures. The exception or limitation should 
be understood as covering the specific accessibility needs of persons with a disability 
in the context of illustration for teaching. 
(17) 
[Teaching – Flexibility for MS] Whereas it is essential to harmonise the scope of the 
new  mandatory  exception  or  limitation  in  relation  to  digital  uses  and  cross-border 
teaching  activities, the modalities of implementation  can  differ from a Member State 
to another, in order for them not to hamper the effective application of the exception or 
EN 
14 
   EN 

limitation  or  cross-border  uses.  That  should  allow  Member  States  to  build  on  the 
existing arrangements concluded at national level. In particular, Member States could 
decide to subject the application of the exception or limitation, fully or partially, to the 
availability  of  adequate  licences,  covering  the  same  uses  as  those  allowed  under  the 
exception.  This  mechanism  would,  for  example,  allow  giving  precedence  to  licences 
for  materials  which  are  primarily  intended  for  the  educational  market.  In  order  to 
avoid  that  such  mechanism  results  in  legal  uncertainty  or  administrative  burden  for 
educational  establishments,  Member  States  adopting  this  approach  should  take 
concrete measures to ensure that licensing schemes allowing digital uses of works or 
other subject-matter for the purpose of illustration for teaching are easily available and 
that educational establishments are aware of the existence of such licensing schemes  
 
 
 

 
(18) 
 
 
(19) 
[Preservation – Rationale for intervention] Cultural heritage institutions are engaged 
in the preservation of their collections for future generations. Digital technology offers 
new  ways  to  preserve  the  heritage  contained  in  those  but  they  also  create  new 
challenges.  An  act  of  preservation  would  require  a  reproduction  of  a  work  or  other 
subject-matter in the collection of a cultural heritage institution and consequently the 
authorisation  of  the  relevant  rightholders.  In  view  of  these  new  challenges,  it  is 
necessary to adapt the current legal framework by providing a mandatory exception to 
the right of reproduction in order to allow those acts of preservation. 
(20) 
[Preservation – Single market rationale] Different approaches in the Member States 
for  acts  of  preservation  by  cultural  heritage  institutions  hamper  cross-border 
cooperation  and  the  sharing  of  best  practice  including  the  means  of  preservation  by 
cultural  heritage  institutions  in  the  internal  market,  leading  to  an  infficient  use  of 
resources. 
(21) 
[Preservation  –  Better  qualification  of  the  exception  /  what  we  intend  for 
preservation]
 Member States should therefore be required to provide for an exception 
to  permit  cultural  heritage  institutions  to  reproduce  works  and  other  subject-matter 
permanently  in  their  collections  when  that  reproduction  is  solely  for  preservation 
purposes in situations of technological obsolescence or the degradation of the original. 
Such  an  exception  should  allow  for  the  making  of  copies  by  the  appropriate 
preservation tool, means or technology, in the required quantity and at any point in the 
life of a work or other subject-matter to the extent required in order to produce a copy 
for preservation purposes only. 
(22) 
[Preservation – Permanent collection] For the purposes of this Directive, works and 
other  subject-matter  should  be  considered  to  be  permanently  in  the  collection  of  a 
cultural heritage institution when copies are owned or permanently held by the cultural 
heritage  institution,  for  example  as  a  result  of  a  transfer  of  ownership  or  licence 
agreements. 
(23) 
[OoC – Main rationale for intervention] Cultural heritage institutions should benefit 
from  a  clear  framework  for  the  digitisation  and  dissemination,  including  across 
borders, of out-of-commerce works or other subject-matter. In view that obtaining the 
prior  consent  of  the  right  holders  of  out-of-commerce  works  might  not  always  be 
EN 
15 
   EN 

possible,  there  should  be  measures  to  facilitate  the  licensing  of  rights  in  out-of-
commerce works that are in the collections of cultural heritage institutions and thereby 
to allow the conclusion of agreements with cross-border effect in the internal market. 
(24) 
[OoC  –  Mechanism,  flexibility  for  MS  in  type  of  technique  to  be  used]  Member 
States should, within the framework provided for in this Directive, have flexibility in 
choosing  the  specific  type  of  mechanism  allowing  for  licences  for  out-of-commerce 
works to extend to the rights of rightholders that are not represented by the collective 
management  organisation,  in  accordance  to  their  legal  traditions,  practices  or 
circumstances.  Such  mechanisms  can  include  extended  collective  licensing  and 
presumptions of representation. 
(25) 
[OoC – Importance of compliance with CRM Directive and additional measures] 
For  the  purpose  of  those  licensing  mechanisms,  a  rigorous  and  well-functioning 
collective  management  system  is  important.  That  system  should  include  in  particular 
rules of good governance, transparency and reporting, as well as the regular, diligent 
and  accurate  distribution  and  payment  of  amounts  due  to  individual  right  holders,  as 
provided  for  by  Directive  2014/26/EU  of  the  European  Parliament  and  of  the 
Council37.  [no  need  to  state  what  the  other  directive  covers]  Additional  appropriate 
safeguards  should  be  available  for  all  rightholders,  who  should  be  given  the 
opportunity  to  exclude  the  application  of  such  mechanisms  to  their  works  or  other 
subject-matter.  Conditions  attached  to  those  mechanisms  should  not  affect  their 
practical relevance for cultural heritage institutions. 
(26) 
[OoC  –  Recognition  of  specificities  of  different  categories  of  works]  Given  the 
variety  of  works  and  other  subject-matter  in  the  collections  of  cultural  heritage 
institutions, it is important that mechanisms are available and can be used in practice 
for  different  types  of  works  and  other  subject-matter,  including  photographs,  sound 
recordings  and  audiovisual  works.  In  order  to  reflect  the  specificities  of  different 
categories  of  works  and  other  subject-matter  as  regards  modes  of  publication  and 
distribution,  it  is  appropriate  that  Member  States  are  allowed  to  establish  criteria  at 
national level, in consultation with rightholders and users, for works or other subject-
matter to qualify as out-of-commerce in that country. 
(27) 
[OoC  –  Third  countries]  For  reasons  of  international  comity,  the  licensing 
mechanisms  for  the  digitisation  and  dissemination  of  out-of-commerce  works 
provided  for  in  this  Directive  should  not  apply  to  works  or  other  subject-matter  that 
are first published or, in the absence of publication, first broadcast in a third country 
or,  in  the  case  of  cinematographic  or  audiovisual  works,  to  works  the  producer  of 
which  has  his  headquarters  or  habitual  residence  in  a  third  country.  
Those  mechanisms  should  also  not  apply  to  works  or  other  subject-matter  of  third 
country  nationals  except  when  they  are  first  published  or,  in  the  absence  of 
publication,  first  broadcast  in  the  territory  of  a  Member  State  or,  in  the  case  of 
cinematographic or audiovisual works, to works of which producer's   headquarters or 
habitual residence is in a Member State. 
(28) 
[OoC  –  Possibility  to  recoup  costs]  As  mass  digitisation  projects  can  entail 
significant investments by cultural heritage institutions, any licences granted under the 
mechanisms  provided  for  in  this  Directive  should  not  prevent  them  from  generating 
                                                 
37  
Directive 2014/26/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 26 February 2014 on collective 
management of copyright and related rights and multi-territorial licensing of rights in musical works for 
online use in the internal market (OJ L 84, 20.3.2014, p. 72.) 
EN 
16 
   EN 

reasonable revenues in order to cover the costs of the licence and the costs of digitising 
and disseminating the works and other subject-matter covered by the licence. 
(29) 
[OoC  –  EUIPO  register]  Information  regarding  the  future  and  ongoing    by  cultural 
heritage  institutions  on  the  basis  of  the  licensing  mechanisms  provided  for  in  this 
Directive and the arrangements in place for all rightholders to exclude the application 
of licences to their works or other subject-matter should be adequately publicised. This 
is particularly important when uses take place across borders in the internal market. In 
order to make information about the use of out-of-commerce works and other subject-
matter  by  cultural  heritage  institutions  publicly  accessible,  it  is  appropriate  to  make 
provision  for  the  creation  of  a  single  publicly  accessible  online  portal  for  the  Union  
for  a  reasonable  period  of  time  before  the  cross-border  use  takes  place.  Under 
Regulation  (EU)  No  386/2012  of  the  European  Parliament  and  of  the  Council38,  the 
European  Union  Intellectual  Property  Office  is  entrusted  with  certain  tasks  and 
activities,  financed  by  making  use  of  its  own  budgetary  measures,  aiming  at 
facilitating and supporting the activities of national authorities, the private sector and 
Union  institutions  in  the  fight  against,  including  the  prevention  of,  infringement  of 
intellectual property rights. It is therefore appropriate to rely on that Office to establish 
and manage the European portal making such information available. 
(30) 
[VoD – Background] However, agreements on the online exploitation of on-demand 
servicescan  face  difficulties  related  to  the  licensing  of  rightsin  the  form  of  lack  of 
interest of the holder of the rights for a given territory in the online exploitation of the 
work  [elsewhere?]  or  issues  linked  to  the  windows  of  exploitation[is  this  clear 
enough?]. 
(31) 
[VoD  –  Room  of  manoeuver  for  MS]  To  facilitate  the  licensing  of  rights  in 
audiovisual  works  to  video-on-demand  platforms,  this  Directive  requires  Member 
States  to  set  up  a  negotiation  mechanism  allowingparties  willing  to  conclude  an 
agreement  to  rely  on  the  assistance  of  an  impartial  body.  The  participation  in  the 
negotiation  mechanism  should  be  voluntary.  The  body  should  meet  with  the  parties 
and help with the negotiations by providing professional and external advice. Against 
that background, Member States should decide on the conditions of the functioning of 
the  negotiation  mechanism,  including  the  timing  and  duration  of  the  assistance  to 
negotiations  and  the  bearing  of  the  costs.  Member  States  should  ensure  that 
administrative and financial burdens remain proportionate to guarantee the efficiency 
of the negotiation forum. 
(32) 
[Publishers]  A  free  and  pluralist  press  is  essential  to  ensure  quality  journalism  and 
citizens' access to information. It provides a fundamental contribution to public debate 
and  the  proper  functioning  of  a  democratic  society.  In  the  transition  from  print  to 
digital, publishers of news publications are facing problems in licensing the online use 
of  their  news  publications  and  recouping  their  investments.  In  the  absence  of 
recognition of publishers of news publications as rightholders, licensing in the digital 
environment and online enforcement is often complex and inefficient. 
(33) 
[Publishers] In the transition from print to digital, publishers of news publications are 
facing  problems  in  licensing  the  online  use  of  their  news  publications  and  recouping 
                                                 
38 
Regulation  (EU)  No  386/2012  of  the  European  Parliament  and  of  the  Council  of  19  April  2012  on 
entrusting  the  Office  for  Harmonization  in  the  Internal  Market (Trade Marks  and  Designs)  with  tasks 
related  to  the  enforcement  of  intellectual  property  rights,  including  the  assembling  of  public  and 
private-sector  representatives  as  a  European  Observatory  on  Infringements  of  Intellectual  Property 
Rights (OJ L 129, 16.5.2012, p. 1). 
EN 
17 
   EN 

their  investments.    The  organisational  and  financial  contribution  of  publishers  in 
producing news publications needs to be recognised and further encouraged to ensure 
the  sustainability  of  the  publishing  industry.  It  is  therefore  necessary  to  provide  a 
harmonised legal protection for news publications in respect of online uses within the 
Union.  Such  protection  should  be  effectively  guaranteed  through  the  introduction,  in 
Union law, of rights related to copyright for the reproduction and making available to 
the public of news publications in respect of online uses. 
(34) 
[Publishers] For the purposes of this Directive, it is necessary to define the concept of 
news publication, in particular digital online publications, in a way that embraces only 
journalistic  publications,  published  by  a  service  provider,  periodically  or  regularly 
updated  in  any  media,  for  the  purpose  of  informing  the  general  public.  Such 
publications  would  include,  for  instance,  daily  newspapers,  weekly  magazines  and 
news websites. Periodical publications which are published for scientific or academic 
purposes,  such  as  scientific  journals,  should  not  (why  not  scientific?)  be  covered  by 
the protection granted to news publications under this Directive. The protection should 
not extend to news of the day as such or to miscellaneous facts having the character of 
mere  items  of  press  information  which  do  not  constitute  the  expression  of  the 
intellectual creation of their authors. 
(35) 
[Publishers]  The  rights  granted  to  the  publishers  of  news  publications  under  this 
Directive  should  have  the  same  scope  as  the  rights  of  reproduction  and  making 
available  to  the  public  provided  for  in  Directive  2001/29/EC  of  the  European 
Parliament  and  of  the  Council39,  insofar  as  online  uses  are  concerned.  They  should 
also  be  subject  to  the  same  provisions  on  exceptions  and  limitations  as  those 
applicable to the rights provided for in Directive 2001/29/EC including the exception 
on quotation for purposes such as criticism or review laid down in Article 5(3)(d) of 
that Directive. 
(36) 
[Publishers]  The  protection  granted  to  publishers  of  news  publications  under  this 
Directive should not affect the rights of the authors and other rightholders in the works 
and other subject-matter incorporated therein, including as regards the extent to which 
authors  and  other  rightholders  can  exploit  their  works  or  other  subject-matter 
independently  from  the  news  publication  in  which  they  are  incorporated.  Therefore, 
publishers of news publications should not be able to  bring up the protection granted 
to them against authors and other rightholders. This is without prejudice to contractual 
arrangements concluded between the publishers of news publications, on the one side, 
and authors and other rightholders, on the other side. 
(37) 
[Publishers  –  Reprobel]  Publishers,  including  those  of  news  publications,  books  or 
scientific  publications,  often  operate  on  the  basis  of  the  transfer  of  authors'  rights  by 
means of contractual agreements or statutory provisions.   In order to take account of 
this situation, 

(38) 
[Value  Gap  –  Rationale]  The  online  content  marketplace  has  become  complex. 
Online  services  providing  access  to  copyright  protected  content  uploaded  by  their 
users without the  authorisation of the right holders have flourished and have  become 
main  sources  of  access  to  content  online  affecting  the  rightholders'  possibilities  of 
determining whether, and under which conditions, their work and other subject-matter 
are used as well of receiving appropriate remuneration for it. 
                                                 
39  
Directive  2001/29/EC  of  the  European  Parliament  and  of  the  Council  of  22  May  2001  on  the 
harmonisation  of  certain  aspects  of  copyright and  related rights  in  the information society (OJ  L 167, 
22.6.2001, p. 10). 
EN 
18 
   EN 

(39) 
[Value Gap] Where online service providers store and provide access to the public to 
copyright  protected  works  or  other  subject-matter  uploaded  by  their  users  and  go  
beyond  the  mere  provision  of  physical  facilities  thereby  performing  an  act  of 
communication to the public, they are obliged to conclude licensing agreements with 
rightholders, unless they are eligible for the liability exemption provided in Article 14 
of Directive 2000/31/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council40
 
 
 
In  view  of  the  possible  obligation  to  conclude  a  licensing  agreement,  online  service 
providers  storing  and  providing  access  to  the  public  to  large  amounts  of  copyright 
protected  works  or  other  subject-matter  uploaded  by  their  users  should  take 
appropriate and proportionate measures to ensure protection of works or other subject-
matter,  such as  implementing effective technologies and a high  level of transparency 
towards  rights  holders,  including  when,  in  accordance  with  Article  15  of  Directive 
2000/31/EC, the online service providers do not have a general obligation to monitor 
the information which they transmit or store or to actively seek facts or circumstances 
indicating illegal activity. 
(40) 
[Value  Gap]  Collaboration  between  online  service  providers  storing  and  providing 
access  to  the  public  to  large  amounts  of  copyright  protected  works  or  other  subject-
matter uploaded by their users and rightholders is essential for the functioning of the 
technologies.  While  the  rightholders  should  provide  the  necessary  data  to  allow  the 
services  to  identify  their  content,  the  services  have  to  be  transparent  towards 
rightholders  with  regard  to  the  deployed  technologies,  to  allow  them  to  assess  the 
appropriateness  of  the  technologies.  The  services  should  in  particular  provide 
rightholders  with  information  on  the  type  of  technologies  used,  the  way  they  are 
operated  and  their  success  rate  for  the  identification  of  rightholders'  content.  Those 
technologies should also allow rightholders to get information from the services on the 
use of their content covered by an agreement. 
(41) 
[Remuneration  –  Rationale  for  intervention]  Certain  rightholders  such  as  authors 
and performers need information to assess the economic value of their rights which are 
harmonised under Union law. This is especially the case where such rightholders grant 
a licence or a transfer of rights in return for remuneration. As authors and performers 
tend to be in a weaker contractual position when they grant  licences or transfer their 
rights,  they  need  information  to  assess  the  continued  economic  value  of  their  rights, 
compared to the remuneration received for their licence or transfer, but they often face 
a  lack  of  transparency.  Therefore,  the  sharing  of  adequate  information  by  their 
contractual  counterparts  or  their  successors  in  title  is  important  for  the  transparency 
and balance in the system that governs the remuneration of authors and performers. 
(42) 
[Remuneration  –  Transparency  obligations]  When  implementing  transparency 
obligations, the specificities of different content sectors and of the rights of the authors 
and performers in each sector should be considered. Member States should consult all 
                                                 
41 
Directive  95/46/EC  of  the  European  Parliament  and  of  the  Council  of  24  October  1995  on  the 
protection  of  individuals  with  regard  to  the  processing  of  personal  data  and  on  the  free  movement  of 
such data (OJ L 281, 23.11.1995, p. 31). This Directive is repealed with effect from 25 May 2018 and 
shall  be  replaced  by  Regulation  (EU)  2016/679  of  the  European  Parliament  and  of  the  Council  of  27 
April 2016 on the protection of natural persons with regard to the processing of personal data and on the 
free  movement  of  such  data,  and  repealing  Directive  95/46/EC  (General  Data  Protection  Regulation) 
(OJ  L  119,  4.5.2016,  p.  1).  [please  replace  the  reference  to  Directive  95/46/EC  by  reference  to 
Regulation (EU) 2016/679 if the transposition date falls after 25 May 2018 .

EN 
19 
   EN 

relevant  stakeholders  as  that  should  help  determine  sector-specific  requirements. 
Collective  bargaining  should  be  considered  as  an  option  to  reach  an  agreement 
between the relevant stakeholders regarding transparency. To enable the adaptation of 
current reporting practices to the transparency obligations, a transitional period should 
be  provided  for.  The  transparency  obligations  do  not  need  to  apply  to  agreements 
concluded  with  collective  management  organisations  as  those  are  already  subject  to 
transparency obligations under Directive 2014/26/EU. 
(43) 
[Remuneration  –  Contract  adjustment  mechanism]  Certain  contracts  for  the 
exploitation  of  rights  harmonised  at  Union  level  are  of  long  duration  offering  few 
possibilities  for  authors  and  performers  to  renegotiate  them  with  their  contractual 
counterparts  or  their  successors  in  title.  Therefore,  without  prejudice  to  the  law 
applicable  to  contracts  in  Member  States,  there  should  be  a  contract  adjustment 
mechanism  for  cases  where  the  remuneration  agreed  under  a  licence  of  rights  is 
disproportionately  low  compared  to  the  revenues  and  the  benefits  derived  from  the 
exploitation  of  the  work  or  the  fixation  of  the  performance,  including  in  light  of  the 
transparency  ensured  by  this  Directive.  Where  the  parties  do  not  agree  on  the 
adjustment of the remuneration, the author or performer should be entitled to bring a 
claim before a court or other competent authority. 
(44) 
[Remuneration – Dispute resolution mechanism] Authors and performers are often 
reluctant  to  enforce  their  rights  against  their  contractual  partners  before  a  court  or 
tribunal. Member States should therefore provide for an alternative dispute resolution 
procedure that addresses claims related to obligations of transparency and the contract 
adjustment mechanism. 
(45) 
[General  –  Proportionality]  The  objectives  of  this  Directive,  namely  the 
modernisation of certain aspects of the Union copyright framework to take account of 
technological  developments  and  new  channels  of  distribution  of  protected  content  in 
the internal market, cannot be sufficiently achieved by Member States but can rather, 
by  reason  of  their  scale,  effects  and  cross-border  dimension,  be  better  achieved  at 
Union  level.  Therefore,  the  Union  may  adopt  measures,  in  accordance  with  the 
principle  of  subsidiarity  as  set  out  in  Article 5  of  the  Treaty  on  European  Union.  In 
accordance  with  the  principle  of  proportionality,  as  set  out  in  that  Article,  this 
Directive does not go beyond what is necessary in order to achieve those objectives. 
(46) 
[no need to state] 
[General  –  Data  protection]  Any  processing  of  personal  data  under  this  Directive  should 
respect  fundamental  rights,  including  the  right  to  respect  for  private  and  family  life  and  the 
right  to  protection  of  personal  data  under  Articles  7  and  8  of  the  Charter  of  Fundamental 
Rights  of  the  European  Union  and  must  be  in  compliance  with  Directive  95/46/EC  of  the 
European  Parliament  and  of  the  Council41  and  Directive  2002/58/EC  of  the  European 
                                                 
41 
Directive  95/46/EC  of  the  European  Parliament  and  of  the  Council  of  24  October  1995  on  the 
protection  of  individuals  with  regard  to  the  processing  of  personal  data  and  on  the  free  movement  of 
such data (OJ L 281, 23.11.1995, p. 31). This Directive is repealed with effect from 25 May 2018 and 
shall  be  replaced  by  Regulation  (EU)  2016/679  of  the  European  Parliament  and  of  the  Council  of  27 
April 2016 on the protection of natural persons with regard to the processing of personal data and on the 
free  movement  of  such  data,  and  repealing  Directive  95/46/EC  (General  Data  Protection  Regulation) 
(OJ  L  119,  4.5.2016,  p.  1).  [please  replace  the  reference  to  Directive  95/46/EC  by  reference  to 
Regulation (EU) 2016/679 if the transposition date falls after 25 May 2018 .

EN 
20 
   EN 

Parliament and of the Council42. 
 
 
 
 
 
 

  
 
 
 
 

  
(47) 
 
(48) 
In  accordance  with  the  Joint  Political  Declaration  of  28  September  2011  of  Member 
States  and  the  Commission  on  explanatory  documents43,  Member  States  have 
undertaken  to  accompany,  in  justified  cases,  the  notification  of  their  transposition 
measures  with  one  or  more  documents  explaining  the  relationship  between  the 
components  of  a  directive  and  the  corresponding  parts  of  national  transposition 
instruments. With regard to this Directive, the legislator considers the transmission of 
such documents to be justified. 
(49) 
In  order  to  ensure  a  level  playing  field  across  the  Union  for  [................]  in  the 
application of  the  relevant  rules,  this  Directive  should  enter  into  force  as  a  matter  of 
urgency, 
HAVE ADOPTED THIS DIRECTIVE: 
                                                 
42 
Directive  2002/58/EC  of  the  European Parliament and of the Council of 12 July 2002  concerning  the 
processing  of  personal  data  and  the  protection  of  privacy  in  the  electronic  communications  sector 
(Directive on privacy and electronic communications) (OJ L 201, 31.7.2002, p. 37). 
43 
OJ C 369, 17.12.2011, p. 14. 
EN 
21 
   EN 

TITLE I 
GENERAL PROVISIONS 
Article 1 
Subject matter and scope 
1. 
This  Directive  lays  down  rules  which  aim  at  further  harmonising  the  Union  law 
applicable  to  copyright  and  related  rights  in  the  framework  of  the  internal  market, 
taking into account, in particular, digital and cross-border uses of protected content. 
It also lays down rules on exceptions and limitations, on the facilitation of licences as 
well as rules aiming at ensuring a well-functioning marketplace for the exploitation 
of works and other subject matter[. 
2. 
Except in the cases referred to in Article 6, this Directive shall leave intact and shall 
in no way affect existing rules laid down in the Directives currently in force in this 
area,  in  particular  Directives  96/9/EC,  2001/29/EC,  2006/115/EC,  2009/24/EC, 
2012/28/EU and 2014/26/EU.[this is not a definition of scope and should be deleted 
or moved: aslo concerns comment in note on the  (general) need to clarify relation to 
other  Instruments:  better  to  have  in  a  separate  article  "relation  to  other 
Instruments
"to  have  separate.    Rather,  here  scope  should  be  defined  by  describing 
what and whom does the directive concern.] 
Article 2 
Definitions 
For the purposes of this Directive, the following definitions shall apply: 
(1) 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
(2) 
‘text and data mining’ means any automated analytical technique aiming to analyse 
text and data in digital form in order to generate information such as patterns, trends 
and correlations; 
(3) 
‘cultural heritage institution’ means a publicly accessible 
 
 library or museum, 
an archive or a film or audio heritage institution; 
(4) 
‘news publication’ means a fixation 
 
 of a  collection of literary works of a journalistic nature, even in 
digital  format,  which  may  also  comprise  other  works  or  subject-matter  and 
constitutes  an  individual  item  within  a  periodical  or  regularly-updated  publication 
under  a  single  title, such  as  a  newspaper  or  a  magazine, having  the  purpose  of 
EN 
22 
   EN 

providing information to the general public related to news or other general-interest 
topics  and  published  in  any  type  of  media  under  the  initiative,  responsibility  and 
control of a service provider. 
EN 
23 
   EN 



(b) 
is  accompanied,  wherever  possible,  by  the  indication  of  the  source,  including 
the author's name.  
2. 
Member States  may  provide 
 
 
 
 
 
   
Member  States  availing  themselves  of  the  provision  of  the  first  subparagraph  shall 
take  the  necessary  measures  to  ensure  appropriate  availability  and  visibility  of  the 
licences  authorising  the  acts  described  in  paragraph  1  for  educational 
establishments.
 
 
 
 
3. 
The  use  of  works  and  other  subject-matter  for  the  sole  purpose  of  illustration  for 
teaching  through  secure  electronic  networks  undertaken  in  compliance  with 
  this  Article  shall  be  deemed  to  occur  solely  in  the  Member 
State where the educational establishment is established.  
4. 
Member States may provide for fair compensation 
 
 
 
 
5. 
The  exception  or  limitation  referred  to  in  paragraph  1  shall  be  subject  to  the 
provisions of Article 5(5) and the first, third and fifth subparagraphs of Article 6(4) 
of Directive 2001/29/EC. 
 
Article 5 
Preservation of cultural heritage 
1. 
Member States shall provide for an exception to the reproduction rights provided for 
in Article 2 of Directive 2001/29/EC and point (a) of Article 5 of Directive 96/9/EC, 
the  right  for  the  maker  of  a  database  provided  for  in  Article  7(1)  of  Directive 
96/9/EC,  exclusive  rights  of  the  rightholder  provided  for  in  Article  4(1)(a)  of 
Directive 2009/24/EC and the rights in publications provided for in Article 11(1) of 
this Directive, in order for cultural heritage institutions to be able to make copies of 
any  works  or  other  subject-matter  that  are  permanently  in  their  collections,  in  any 
format  or  medium,  for  the  sole  purpose  of  the  preservation  of  such  works  or  other 
subject-matter and to the extent necessary for such preservation. 
2. 
The exception referred to in paragraph 1 shall be subject to the provisions of Article 
5(5)  and  the  first,  third  and  fifth  subparagraphs  of  Article  6(4)  of  Directive 
2001/29/EC. 
 
EN 
25 
   EN 



TITLE III 
MEASURES TO IMPROVE LICENSING PRACTICES 
AND ENSURE WIDER ACCESS TO CONTENT 
CHAPTER 1 
Out-of-commerce works 
Article 7 
Use of out-of-commerce works by cultural heritage institutions 
1. 
Member  States  shall  provide  that  when  a  collective  management  organisation,  on 
behalf  of  its  members,  concludes  a  non-exclusive  licence  for  non-commercial 
purposes  with  a  cultural  heritage  institution  for  the  digitisation,  distribution, 
communication to the public or making available of out-of-commerce works or other 
subject  matter  in  the  permanent  collection  of  the  institution,  such  a  non-exclusive 
licence may be extended or presumed to apply to right holders of the same category 
as  those  covered  by  the  licence  who  are  not  represented  by  the  collective 
management organisation, provided that: 
(a) 
the collective management organisation is, on the basis of mandates from right 
holders,  broadly  representative  of  right  holders  in  the  category  of  works  or 
other subject matter and of the rights which are the subject of the licence; 
(b) 
equal treatment is guaranteed to all right holders in relation to the terms of the 
licence;  
(c) 
all right holders may at any time object to their works or other subject matter 
being deemed to be out-of-commerce and exclude the application of the licence 
to their works or other subject matter. 
2. 
A  work  or  other  subject  matter  shall  be  deemed  to  be  out-of-commerce  when  the 
whole  work  or  other  subject  matter,  in  all  its  translations,  versions  and 
manifestations,  is  not  available  to  the  public  through  customary  channels  of 
commerce and cannot be reasonably expected to become so.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
3. 
Member  States  shall  provide,  in  sufficient  time  before  the  works  or  other  subject-
matter are digitised, distributed, communicated to the public or made available,  for 
appropriate publicity measures regarding: 
(a) 
works or other subject-matter deemed to be  out-of-commerce; 
(b) 
the  non-exclusive  licence,  and  in  particular  its  application  to  unrepresented 
rightholders; and 
(c) 
the right of rightholders to object, referred to in point (c) of paragraph 1; 
EN 
27 
   EN 



difficulties relating to the licensing of rights, they may rely on the assistance of an impartial 
body with relevant experience. That body shall provide assistance with negotiation and help 
reach agreements. 
Not  later  than  [date  mentioned  in  Article  20(1)]  Member  States  shall  notify  to  the 
Commission the body referred to in paragraph 1. 
EN 
29 
   EN 

TITLE IV 
MEASURES TO ACHIEVE A WELL-FUNCTIONING 
MARKETPLACE FOR COPYRIGHT 
CHAPTER 1 
Rights in publications 
Article 11 
Protection of news publications concerning online uses 
1. 
Member States shall provide publishers of news publications with the rights provided 
for  in  Article  2  and  Article  3(2) 
 
 
2. 
The rights referred to in paragraph 1 shall leave intact and shall in no way affect any 
rights provided for in Union law to authors and other rightholders, in respect of the 
works and other subject-matter incorporated in a news publication. Such rights may 
not  be  invoked  against  those  authors  and  other  rightholders  and,  in  particular,  may 
not  deprive  them  of  their  right  to  exploit  their  works  and  other  subject-matter 
independently from the news publication in which they are incorporated. 
3. 
Articles  5  to  8  of  Directive  2001/29/EC  and  Directive  2012/28/EU
 
  shall  apply  mutatis  mutandis  in 
respect of the rights referred to in paragraph 1. 
4. 
The  rights  referred  to  in  paragraph  1  shall  expire  20 
 
 after the publication of the news publication.  That time-limit shall 
be  calculated  from  the  first  day  of  January  of  the  year  following  the  year  of 
publication. 
LS : relation to existing rights – exclusion of double banking? 
Article 12 
Claims to fair compensation 
Member  States  shall 
  provide  that  where  an  author  has  transferred  a  right  to  a 
publisher, such a transfer constitutes a sufficient legal basis for the publisher to claim a share 
of  the  compensation  for  the  uses  of  the  work  made  under  an  exception  or  limitation  to  the 
transferred right. 
CHAPTER 2 
Use of protected content by online services 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

EN 
30 
   EN 



Article 15 
Contract adjustment mechanism 
Member  States  shall  ensure  that  authors  and  performers  are  entitled  to  claim  additional, 
appropriate  remuneration  from  the  party  with  whom  they  entered  into  a  contract  for  the 
exploitation of the rights when the agreed remuneration is disproportionately low compared to 
the  subsequent  revenues  and  benefits  derived  from  the  exploitation  of  the  works  or 
performances. 
Article 16 
Dispute resolution mechanism 
Member  States  shall  provide  that  disputes  concerning  the  transparency  obligation  under 
Article  14  and  the  contract  adjustment  mechanism  under  Article  15  may  be  submitted  to  a 
voluntary, alternative dispute resolution procedure. 
EN 
32 
   EN