Esta es la versión HTML de un fichero adjunto a una solicitud de acceso a la información 'EU Anti-Corruption Report'.


Ref. Ares(2017)1569040 - 23/03/2017
EU ANTI-CORRUPTION ACTIVITIES 
FOLLOW-UP TO THE FIRST REPORT AND WAY FORWARD  
Note prepared for the meeting between CAB President, CAB First Vice-
President, CAB Avramopoulos 
16/12/2016 
Chef de File: HOME/D3 
CONTEXT 
T
The  EU  Anti-Corruption  Report  (ACR)  was  set  up  in  2011  by  a  Commission  Decision 
Establishing  an  EU  anti-corruption  reporting  mechanism  for  periodic  assessment. 
Pursuant to article 4, the report, “accompanied by country analyses for each Member State 
including  tailor-made  recommendations  shall  be  published  by  the  Commission  every  two 

years.” 
In  February  2014,  the  first  EU  Anti-Corruption  Report  (ACR)  highlighted  challenges  and 
best practice, suggesting reforms tailored for each Member State.  
Pressure has been mounting to release the second edition (due in 2016) in the European 
Parliament: the European Parliament resolution on the fight against corruption and follow-up of 
the  CRIM  resolution  (2015/2110(INI))  was  adopted  on  the  25  October  2016  by  a  very  large 
majority  (545  in  favour,  91  against,  61  abstentions)  and  explicitly  asked  the  Commission  to 
submit  the  Anti-Corruption  Report  as  soon  as  possible  (point  9).  Many  Member  States, 
international  organisations  such  as  GRECO,  UNODC  and  OECD  and  civil  society 
organisations,  including  Transparency  International  have  also  inquired  about  the  next 
report.  
On  20  October,  FVP  Timmermans  told  the  LIBE  committee  that  the  Commission  was 
drawing  conclusions  and  working  on  the  implications  of  the  first  report,  and  that 
Parliament would be informed by the end of 2016 on the way forward. 
FOLLOW-UP TO THE FIRST ANTI-CORRUPTION REPORT 
The  June  2014  JHA  Council  conclusions  on  the  EU  Anti-corruption  report  (9969/14) 
stressed  that  the  report  is  a  valuable  tool  to  consolidate  anti-corruption  efforts  and 
promote high anti-corruption standards across the EU and that it should be seen as a next 
step  in  advancing  the  establishment  of  an  EU-wide  area  based  on  integrity  values.  They 
also called on the Commission to engage actively in close cooperation with the Member 
States  in  a  review  of  its  methodology  with  a  view  to  enhancing  its  political  weight  and 
value: "Particular attention should be given to the prior involvement of the Member States 
in the fact-finding stages of the procedure in order to collect objective and reliable data." 
The  conclusions  invited  Member  States  to  make  further  efforts  to  encourage  anti-
corruption prevention measures and effectively enforce anti-corruption laws and policies 
at national level, while noting that the situation varies from one Member State to the other.  
All  Member  States  have  engaged  constructively  in  the  follow-up  to  the  first  report.  They 
each  designated  a  national  contact  point  to  provide  updates  on  progress.  In  February 
2015,  the  Commission  organised  the  first  meeting  of  the  national  contact  points  on 
corruption  (all  28  MS  participated)  in  Brussels  and  engaged  in  a  dialogue  on  how  to 
improve  the  Report.  In  2015  and  2016,  the  Commission  carried  out  a  series  of  bilateral 


visits  to  Member  States,  gathering  information  about  progress  from  national  authorities 
and stakeholders. 
Several  Member  States  have  undertaken  significant  anti-corruption  reforms  in  areas 
identified  by  the  first  ACR.  For  example,  Ireland  adopted  a  cutting-edge  law  and  the 
Netherlands created an institution to protect whistleblowers; Spain enacted a wide-ranging 
anti-corruption legislative package; the Czech Republic and Malta adopted a political party 
financing  law  (where  there  was  previously  none);  Slovakia  adopted  a  rule-of-law  action 
plan, introducing a central registry of public contracts;  France set up an agency to  foster 
transparency  and  integrity  in  public  office,  and  introduced  online  asset  declarations  for 
elected  officials;  Germany  revised  its  Criminal  Code  and  ratified  the  United  Nations 
Convention  against  Corruption  (UNCAC);  Luxembourg  introduced  Codes  of  Conduct  for 
both members of Parliament  and members of government.  In addition, Member States are 
now  actively  transposing  EU  legislation  on  asset  recovery,  anti-money  laundering  and 
public procurement which improves anti-corruption capacity. 
Member States are also actively participating in a successful anti-corruption experience-
sharing programme organised by the Commission (DG HOME) as a follow-up to the first 
EU Anti-Corruption Report.  In 2015 and 2016, over 200 national experts participated in a 
total  of  six  workshops  on  asset  disclosure,  whistleblower  protection,  healthcare 
corruption,  local  public  procurement,  private  sector  corruption,  and  political  immunities. 
Discussions  in  the  workshops  were  constructive  and  open.  The  programme  is  meant  to 
offer anti-corruption practitioners a forum for exchanging views on challenges and policy 
levers to address these and possibly seek inspiration from legislative reforms  adopted or 
under preparation at Member States' level.  The next workshop in February 2017 will be on 
corruption indicators.   
There is increasing focus on the need for reliable quantitative data on corruption. Beyond 
the Eurobarometer surveys on corruption carried out every two years since 2007, Member 
States now participate, at the initiative of the Commission, in a unique data collection on 
criminal statistics on corruption
.  The collection reveals differences across countries in 
the definitions of offences, indicators available, and methods for recording data. Gathering 
credible data and measuring corruption remains a challenge, but using as many indicators 
as possible improves the reliability of estimates. 
 
 
Anti-corruption is an integral part of the European Semester. Key findings of the first EU 
Anti-Corruption Report have been taken up in European Semester country reports (HU, CY, 
CZ, BG, HR, IT, LV, LT, PT, RO, SK, SI, ES) and in the economic adjustment programme for 
EL. In 2016, the Council endorsed Country Specific Recommendations related to corruption 
and transparency for nine MS (HU, CZ, HR, IT, LV, PT, RO, SK, ES). This is another way the 
EU can exert pressure for targeted anti-corruption reforms. Anti-corruption is  also a key 
component  of  the  programming  of  EU  funding,  including  the  European  Structural  and 
Investment Funds, to help build institutional capacity and modernise public administration 
in the Member States. 
LOOKING AHEAD 
2016 is a year of increased societal, political and media attention to integrity issues. At the 
international level, OECD, UNODC and the Council of Europe, but also G7 and G20 continue 
efforts  on  countering  corruption.  The  EU  and  other  regional  and  international 
organisations  as  well  as  individual  Member  States  and  other  countries  made  a  series  of 
high level commitments at the London Anti-Corruption Summit in May. The Panama Papers 


prompted initiatives to enhance the legal framework for transparency. At the EU level, the 
European Parliament, Ombudsman, EESC, and Court of Auditors have kept anti-corruption 
high  on  the  agenda.  Member  States  themselves  have  undertaken  key  reforms  (as 
highlighted above).  
A consistent policy line needs to be agreed at political level in the Commission on the 
way forward on EU anti-corruption activities and the second EU ACR.
  As announced 
by the First Vice-President, a response to LIBE should be sent before the end of the year. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
   
On  the  basis  of  the  considerations  above,  Cabinets'  guidance  is  sought  on  the  following 
next steps