Esta es la versión HTML de un fichero adjunto a una solicitud de acceso a la información 'EU Anti-Corruption Report'.




 
Ref. Ares(2017)617150 - 03/02/2017
Ref. Ares(2017)3410468 - 06/07/2017
EUROPEAN COMMISSION 
DIRECTORATE-GENERAL MIGRATION and HOME AFFAIRS 
 
 
  The Director General 
 
Brussels,  
 
Note to the attention of the National Contact Points on corruption on the EU Anti-
corruption report 
Dear colleagues, 
First, I would like to thank you for the fruitful exchange with the Commission throughout 
the past years. I am particularly grateful for your positive contribution to the follow-up of 
the 2014 EU Anti-Corruption report, to the data collection exercise on criminal statistics 
on corruption, and for the active participation of your country in the workshops under our 
Experience-Sharing Programme.  
Over the past years the Commission has strengthened the EU anti-corruption framework, 
including through Member State-by-Member State analysis of the challenges experienced 
and  the  actions  taken.  The  EU  anti-corruption  report  published  in  2014  pulled  these 
threads together and has served as the basis for dialogues with individual Member States 
and  as  a  useful  background  for  wider  debate  on  the  issue  both  at  EU  level  and  in 
individual Member States.  
This  work  has  been  deepened  and  evolved  further,  for  instance  through  the  anti-
corruption  experience-sharing  programme for Member States  experts  launched in  2015. 
In  2015  and  2016,  with  your  valuable  help  in  sharing  information  in  the  relevant  fora 
about  this  initiative,  over  200  national  experts  participated  in  a  total  of  six  such 
workshops  on  asset  disclosure,  whistle-blower  protection,  healthcare  corruption,  local 
public  procurement,  private  sector  corruption,  and  political  immunities.    Further 
workshops  are  planned  for  2017  and  beyond;  they  will  continue  provide  a  forum  for 
exchanging information on the implementation of anti-corruption policies.  In 2017, we 
plan  to  start  with  a  workshop  on  corruption  indicators,  to  be  held  in  Brussels  on  23 
March. You will receive an invitation shortly. 
The  fruits  of  the  anti-corruption  work  in  Europe  can  be  seen  in  concrete  examples  of 
Member States taking legislative or other action to prevent and counter corruption. The 
Commission has also been providing financing for projects in the area of anti-corruption 
as an important element in administrative capacity building. 
During  this period the wider policy framework at EU level has  evolved in  a number of 
ways. Most importantly, fighting corruption has become a key element of the European 
semester  process  of  economic  governance,  where  a  number  of  the  country  reports  now 
include specific analysis of corruption risks and associated challenges. In relevant cases, 
these  issues  have  also  been  reflected  in  country  specific  recommendations  under  the 
Semester; recommendations which have been endorsed by the European Council. Taking 
up anti-corruption matters in the context of the main economic policy dialogue between 
the  Member  States  and  EU  institutions  is  in  line  with  the  general  approach  of  this 
Commission to streamline processes and focus on key issues in the relevant fora.  
 
Commission européenne/Europese Commissie, 1049 Bruxelles/Brussel, BELGIQUE/BELGIË - Tel. +32 22991111 
Office: LX46 06/105 - Tel. direct line +32 229-+32 229-50734 

 
Corruption  is  a  key  issue  in  several  Member  States,  and  its  economic  and  social 
significance  makes  it  essential  that  this  is  properly  reflected  in  the  European  semester 
process.  At  the  same  time,  this  raises  the  question  of  whether  the  anti-corruption 
reporting  format  adopted  in  2014  is  still  necessary  today.  While  the  first  report  was 
useful in providing an analytical overview and creating a basis for further work, this does 
not necessarily mean that a continued succession of similar reports in the future would be 
the best way to proceed.  
Given  the  complexity  and  evolving  nature  of  corruption  and  its  prevention,  the 
Commission  prefers  to  rely  on  a  more  efficient  and  versatile  approach  that  will 
complement  the  continued  focus  given  to  corruption  issues  in  the  European  semester 
with operational activities to share experience and best practices among Member States' 
authorities and actively working in a wider context alongside international organisations 
such  as  the  UN,  Council  of  Europe,  the  OECD,  G7  and  others  who  are  engaged  in 
valuable  anti-corruption  work,  as  well  as  private  stakeholders  and  civil  society 
organisations.  
This work goes hand in hand with action at EU level in targeted areas where the EU can 
make  a  difference.  For  example,  the  Commission  is  currently  assessing  the  need  for 
further steps on whistle-blower protection at EU level. European legislation in other areas 
such  as  anti-money  laundering  and  public  procurement  also  makes  an  important 
contribution  to  the  fight  against  corruption.  Various  measures  have  been  taken  or  are 
under discussion to increase transparency, for example as concerns beneficial ownership 
and corporate tax transparency, or the contacts between EU decision-makers and interest 
representatives.  Finally,  I  would  like  to  mention  the  work  to  fight  fraud  and  corruption 
risks  in  the  implementation  of  EU  funds.  In  this  context,  legislative  action  is  also 
relevant,  notable  examples  being  the  work  to  establish  a  European  Public  Prosecutor's 
Office and the recently agreed directive on the protection of the financial interests of the 
EU.  
To conclude, I would like to stress that the Commission remains fully convinced of the 
need  to  combat  and  prevent  corruption  and  is  committed  to  continuing  its  work  in  this 
field.  It  is  in  the  common  interest  to  ensure  that  all  Member  States  have  effective  anti-
corruption  policies  and  that  the  EU  supports  the  Member  States  in  pursuing  this  work. 
An effective fight against corruption within the EU remains essential – delivered through 
the  right  vehicle.  The  Commission  will  also  continue  to  be  fully  engaged  in  order  to 
ensure the integrity of our institutions and policies as well as the protection of taxpayer 
money flowing through the EU budget.  
I  am  therefore  looking  forward  to  continuing  our  dialogue  on  ways  to  strengthen  our 
common anti-corruption work. The network of National Contact Points on corruption has 
proven  a  valuable  forum  for  our  common  work  and  I  would  welcome  your  continued 
engagement and participation.  
Matthias RUETE