Esta es la versión HTML de un fichero adjunto a una solicitud de acceso a la información 'Contacts on MiFID II (January 2014-'.


 
Date: 27 March 2014 
ESMA/2014/SMSC/15 
AGENDA 
Meeting of the SMSC’s Consultative Working Group (CWG)  
 
Date: 
04 April 2014 
Time: 
09:00 – 12:00 CET 
Location: 
ESMA, 103 Rue de Grenelle, 75007 Paris
Contact: 
[correo electrónico]; [correo electrónico]; Nu-
[correo electrónico]; Catherine [correo electrónico]  
 
1.  Welcome and opening remarks by the Chair 
2.  Bond Market Transparency  
Discussion of Liquidity Analysis prepared by ESMA  
3.  Derivatives Markets Transparency  
Scope of MiFID II and Potential Solutions 
4.  Microstructural issues: 
 
a.  Market-making Obligations: under Articles 17 and 51 MiFID II, firms performing 
market making strategies should enter into agreements with the trading venues where 
such strategies are pursued and trading venues should have a scheme to ensure that a 
sufficient number of firms participate in those agreements.  
 
Views from CWG members are welcome regarding the circumstances in which having 
those schemes in place would not be appropriate (i.e. cases where it could be consid-
ered that there are sufficient liquidity providers in a market segment).  
 
b.  Fee structures: under Article 51 MiFID II, ESMA has to determine in which cases fee 
structures would create incentives for disorderly trading conditions or market abuse. 
Views from CWG members are welcome in relation to: 
 
a.  Which types of fee structures could contribute to disorderly trading condi-
tions; and 
b.  How fee structures in relation to market making (e.g. reduced fees for market 
makers reaching certain requirements) and order-to-trade ratios (e.g. charg-
 
ESMA • 103 rue de Grenelle, 75007, Paris • France • Tel. +33 (0) 1 58 36 43 21 • www.esma.europa.eu


 
ing additional fees to members surpassing pre-determined OTRs) could con-
tribute to the orderliness of the market.   
 
5.  Renewal of the CWG 
6.  AOB 
 
 
 


 
Date: 04 June 2014 
ESMA/2014/SMSC/21 
AGENDA 
Meeting of the SMSC’s Consultative Working Group (CWG)  
 
Date: 
12 June 2014 
Time: 
09:30 – 12:30 CET 
Location: 
ESMA, 103 Rue de Grenelle, 75007 Paris
Contact: 
[correo electrónico]; [correo electrónico];  
[correo electrónico]; [correo electrónico]  
 
1.  Welcome and opening remarks by the Chair 
2.  Non-equity transparency with a focus on the definition of a liquid market and pre- and post-trade 
rules for different asset classes (Sections 3.5-3.10 Discussion Paper (DP)) 
3.  Systematic internalisation; definition and obligations (Sections 3.3-3.8 Consultation Paper (CP); 
Section 3.3 DP)  
4.  Market making strategies, agreements and schemes (Section 4.4 DP)  
5.  Tick sizes (Section 4.8 DP) 
6.  Access to benchmarks (Section 5.8 DP) 
 
7.  Renewal of the CWG 
8.  AOB 
 
 
 
 
ESMA • 103 rue de Grenelle, 75007, Paris • France • Tel. +33 (0) 1 58 36 43 21 • www.esma.europa.eu


 
INTERNAL 
USE ONLY 
Date: July 2014 
AGENDA 
Market Data Reporting Working Group and Consultative Working Group 
meeting 

 
Date / Time:  23 July, 13h-18h 
Location: 
ESMA, 103 rue de Grenelle, 75007 Paris 
Edison entrance, 5th floor, Berlin and Rome meeting room 
 
Contact: 
[correo electrónico] 
[correo electrónico]  
 
1.  Welcome/Introduction    
 
 
 
 
 
 
13:00 – 13:20 
2.  Obligation to report transactions (DP pages 438 – 479)    13:20 
– 
15:00 
a.  What constitutes a transaction and execution of a transaction 
b.  Client identification 
c.  The designation to identify short sales 
d.  Reporting by branches 
e.  Annex 8.1.1 Table of fields 
3.  Obligation to supply financial instrument data (DP pages 480 – 494)  
15:00 – 15:30 
a.  Reasons and frequency of updates 
b.  Timelines for submitting information 
Coffee break 15:30 – 16:00 
4.  Obligation to maintain records of orders (DP pages 496 – 515) 
  16:00 
– 
16:45 
a.  The three approaches regarding the level of harmonisation 
b.  Relevant data constituting characteristics of the order  
5.  Requirements to maintain records of orders for HFT (DP pages 516 – 519)  16:45 – 17:15 
6.  Synchronisation of business clocks (DP pages 520 – 523) 
  17:15 
– 
17:30 
7.  UTI construction and generation between two CPs   
 
 
17:30 – 18:00 
8.  AOB 


 
Date for the next meeting: 
a.  8 October 2014, 13:00 – 18:00, Paris – please note the change of timing to the afternoon ses-
sion instead of previously announced morning session 


 
Date: 18 August 2014 
ESMA/2014/SMSC/31 
AGENDA 
Meeting of the Consultative Working Group of the Secondary Markets 
Standing Committee 

Date: 
10th September 2014 
Time: 
9:00 – 12:00 CET 
Location: 
ESMA, 103 Rue de Grenelle, 75007 Paris
Contact: 
[correo electrónico]; [correo electrónico]; Cathe-
[correo electrónico]; [correo electrónico] 
 
 
No Items 
1.  Welcome and opening remarks by the Chair 
2.  Tour de table  
3.  Discussion on non-equity transparency: 
a.  Definition of systematic internaliser, 
b.  Definition of ‘liquid instruments’, 
c.  Calibration of the large in scale and size-specific-to-the-instrument thresholds. 
4.  AOB 
 
ESMA • 103 Rue de Grenelle • 75007 Paris • France • Tel. +33 (0) 1 58 36 43 21 • www.esma.europa.eu 


 
INTERNAL 
USE ONLY 
Date: October 2014 
AGENDA 
Market Data Reporting Working Group and Consultative Working Group 
meeting 

 
Date / Time:  8 October, 13h-18h 
Location: 
ESMA, 103 rue de Grenelle, 75007 Paris 
Edison entrance, 5th floor, Madrid and Rome meeting rooms 
 
Contact: 
[correo electrónico] 
[correo electrónico] 
 
1.  Introduction  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
13:00 – 13:20 
2.  EMIR related topics 
 
 
 
 
   13:20 
– 
15:00 
a.  Mark to market value of the contract (Table 1 field 17) 
b.  Underlying (Table 2 field4) 
c.  Data quality improvement 
Coffee break 15:00 – 15:30 
3.  MiFIR 
related 
topics 
       15:30 
– 
18:00 
a.  Principal and Agent capacities 
b.  Population of Counterparty and Client fields 
c.  Validation of LEIs 
d.  Identification of a group of aggregated orders 
e.  Identification of order books 
f.  Routing of order 
g.  Strategy orders 
4.  AOB 


 
ESMA REGULAR USE
 
Date: 28 January 2015 
 
 
AGENDA  
MDRWG CWG 
 
 
Date: 
03 February 2015 
Time: 
11:00 – 18:00h  
Location: 
ESMA, 103, rue de Grenelle, Paris 
Edison entrance, 5th floor, Berlin, Madrid and Rome meeting rooms 
 
 
 
1.  Welcome/Introduction    
 
 
 
 
 
11:00 – 11:15 
2.  EMIR 
Level 

validations      11:15 
– 
12:30 
a.  Dependencies between fields  
b.  Timeline for the implementation 
3.  EMIR review of the reporting TS (Ref. ESMA/2014/1352) 
 
12:30 – 14:00 
a.  Clarifications 
b.  Adaptions 
i.  Underlying field 
c.  Introductions 
i.  Collateral reporting fields 
ii.  Valuation reporting fields 
iii.  Action types 
d.  Strategies  
e.  Timeline for implementation 
Lunch break 14:00 – 15:00 
4.  MiFIR reporting TS (Ref. ESMA/2014/1570 Annex B Chapter 8 of the CP) 
 
  15:00 – 17:30 
a.  New approach to reporting – would introduction of the buyer/seller fields pose 
reporting challenges? 
ESMA • CS 60747 – 103 rue de Grenelle • 75345 Paris Cedex 07 • France • Tel. +33 (0) 1 58 36 43 21 • www.esma.europa.eu  


 
 
 
 
 
 
b.  The three trading capacities (p. 411) – are the three concepts sufficiently 
straightforward? 
c.  Execution/Transaction/Transmission (p. 412 – 416) – accuracy and clarity of the 
definition 
d.  Implementation challenges for the Client ID (p. 416 – 417 and 443 –  444) 
e.  Operational challenges for reporting the trading activity of non-EU branches 
f.  Instrument reference data fields (p. 452 – 463) – what further additions are needed to 
adequately describe complex instruments? 
g.  Clock synchronisation (p. 503 – 506) 
i.  What is the minimum divergence from UTC that trading venues and 
investment firms would be able to achieve? Please specify how the divergence 
is measured. 
ii.  Synchronisation of internal clocks within an entity 
iii.  Calibration of the accuracy requirements proposed in Table 1 Annex 1 of the 
draft RTS on clock synchronisation (p. 508 of Annex B of the MiFID II CP) 
5.  Future guidance on transaction reporting scenarios  
 
17:30 – 17:45 
6.  AOB 
Date for the next meeting: 
a.  8 April, ESMA premises, Paris – 11:00 – 18:00  
b.  16 September, ESMA premises, Paris – 11:00 – 18:00  
c.  11 November, ESMA premises, Paris – 11:00 – 18:00 
 



 
Date: 29 January 2015 
ESMA/2015/SMSC/3 
AGENDA 
Meeting of the Consultative Working Group of the Secondary Markets 
Standing Committee 

Date: 
6 February 2015 
Time: 
10:30 – 13:30 CET 
Location: 
ESMA, 103 Rue de Grenelle, 75007 Paris
Contact: 
[correo electrónico]; [correo electrónico]; Alber-
[correo electrónico]; [correo electrónico];   
 
 
No Items 
1.  Welcome and opening remarks by the Chair 
2.  Tour de table  
3.  Discussion on non-equity transparency: 
a.  Definition of ‘liquid instruments’ 
b.  Calibration of the large in scale and size-specific-to-the-instrument thresholds  
4.  Access provisions: 
a.  Criteria for assessing when a benchmark is new  
b.  Grounds for denying access by a CCP or trading venue  
5.  Algorithmic trading:  
 
a.  Market making  
 
b.  Tick sizes 
 
c.  Testing requirements 
 
 
6.  AOB 
 
ESMA • 103 Rue de Grenelle • 75007 Paris • France • Tel. +33 (0) 1 58 36 43 21 • www.esma.europa.eu 


 
Date:18 February 2015 
ESMA/2015/PTSC/27 
ANNOTATED AGENDA 
Post-Trading Consultative Working Group 
Date: 
20 February 2015 
Time: 
09:30 – 12:00 (The meeting can end before 12:00)  
Location: 
ESMA, 103 rue de Grenelle, 75007 Paris – Room Berlin + Rome (Floor 5)
Contacts: 
Fabrizio Planta, [correo electrónico], T: +33 1 583 642 70 
 
No.  Items 
1.  Welcome 
2. CSDR 
A.  Settlement discipline 
Penalties 
Many stakeholders raised the problem that penalties should be proportionate to liquidity and not disincen-
tivise trading in small caps which are not available for borrowing. Our mandate imposes that penalties 
should have a deterrent effect to cure the fail. 

1.  How to set a level of penalties with a deterrent effect for securities that are not available for borrowing? 
Buy-in 
Some stakeholders mentioned the fact that the buy-in should occur at trading level not at settlement level. 
For transactions executed on a trading venue or via a CCP the standards already take this into account.  

2.  What should the role of the CSD be in a buy-in regime for OTC transactions? What should the process 
be for ensuring that information reaches the trading members level and that buy-ins can be executed? 
Monitoring of Settlement Fails and Record Keeping 
Some stakeholders mentioned the need to further adapt the information required for the purpose of moni-
toring and reporting settlement fails, as well as for record keeping, by taking into account the ISO stand-
ards. 

3.  For the purposes of the system of monitoring settlement fails, should the following information also 
be provided, if available in the settlement instructions: 


 
a) Place of trading (to be provided if the transaction has been concluded on a trading venue)  - pop-
ulated by the MIC (ISO Market Identification Code) (ISO 10383) if the instruction is resulting from a 
trade concluded on a trading venue or blank if the field in the settlement instruction does not contain 
a MIC or is not filled in; 
b) Place of clearing (to be provided if the transaction has been cleared by a CCP) - BIC (or convert-
ed LEI) of CCP if transaction is cleared by a CCP or blank if the field does not contain a valid BIC or 
is not filled in? 
4.  As part of the settlement fails reports, should information also be provided on which types of secu-
rities accounts are connected to the fails (to see whether the fails are due to lack of securities of 
the CSD participant or of its clients)? 
 
B. CSD requirements 
CSD Participations 
In order to ensure the viability of CSDs, ESMA considers prohibiting participations that would lead to an 
unlimited liability of the CSD. For this purpose, guarantees can be admitted under the condition that they 
are fully capitalised. 

5.  What would be the impact of requiring the full capitalisation of CSD guarantees, for the CSDs and the 
guarantee beneficiaries? In particular, what are the risks of a CSD participating in financing vehicles is-
suing debt (e.g. subordinated perpetual securities) guaranteed by the CSD or a subsidiary or affiliated 
or sister company of that CSD? 
 
CSD Investment Policy 
ESMA does not consider that derivatives other than FX should be considered as highly liquid, with minimal 
credit and market risk– and those under certain circumstances.
  There was a call from stakeholders to 
allow CSDs to enter into in interest rate swaps for hedging purposes. 

6.  What are the cases in which CSDs enter into IRS and the risks in allowing it? How could hedging be 
clearly defined in this context?  
C.  Internalised settlement 
In order to provide a good overview of the scope and of the extent of internalised settlement, ESMA is 
considering that the reports on internalised settlement should cover the aggregated volume (by number of 
transfer orders) and value (EUR) of transfer orders settled by settlement internalisers outside a securities 
settlement, split by asset class, type of securities transactions, type of clients, and country where the se-
curities have been issued. 

7.  What are your views on the proposed requirements mentioned above? 

 


 
 
3.  MiFID/MiFIR 
A.  Indirect Clearing 
The MiFIR consultation paper introduces potential alternative requirements on indirect clearing for ETD 
compared to the requirements under EMIR for OTC derivatives. Respondents to the previous consultation 
with regard to ETD (MiFIR discussion paper) have flagged issues affecting the development of indirect 
clearing services for OTC derivatives.  We believe it is important that the final requirements address the 
ability for indirect clearing services to be offered for both ETD and OTC derivatives. 

8.  What  are  your  views  on  the  proposed  requirements  with  regards  to  both  ETD  and  OTC  deriva-
tives? Within the mandate defined in EMIR and MiFIR, what would ensure the development of in-
direct clearing services for OTC derivatives? 
 
B.  Straight Through Processing 
The MiFIR consultation paper introduces requirements for Trading venues, CCPs and Clearing Members 
to ensure the quick submission and acceptance for clearing of ETD and OTC derivatives. For OTC deriva-
tives, there is a difference of treatment between OTC derivatives transactions subject to the clearing obli-
gation and OTC derivatives transactions voluntarily cleared.
 
9.  What  are  your  views  on  the  difference  of  treatment?  Do  you  think  the  distinction  should  not  be 
between mandatorily cleared and voluntarily cleared but instead between executed with the intent 
to clear, so with a cleared price, and executed without the intent to clear however submitted for 
clearing later on? 
 
C.  Access to CCPs and Trading Venues 
 
The MiFIR consultation paper introduces requirements for CCPs regarding the non-discriminatory treat-
ment in terms of how contracts traded on that trading venue are treated in terms of collateral requirements 
and netting of economically equivalent contracts and cross-margining with correlated contracts cleared by 
the same CCP. 
 
10. What  are  your  views  on  the  approach  that  CCPs  shall  apply  to  economically  equivalent  con-
tracts  the  same  margin  and  collateral  methodologies,  netting  process  and  portfolio  margining 
approach,  irrespective  of  where  the  contracts  are  executed,  unless  risk  considerations  would 
require specific changes to models and parameters to mitigate any uncovered risk?  
 
4.  AOB 
 

 


 
Date: 16 February 2015 
ESMA/2015/CDTF/6 
AGENDA 
Meeting of the Consultative Working Group of the Commodity 
Derivatives Task Force 

Date: 
26 February 2015 
Time: 
10:30 – 13:30 CET 
Location: 
ESMA, 103 Rue de Grenelle, 75007 Paris
Contact: 
[correo electrónico]; [correo electrónico];  
 
 
No Items 
1.  Welcome and opening remarks by the Chair 
2.  Ancillary activity 
Presentation by Karl-Peter 
Comments by Tony Ricci 
  Definition of Economically Equivalent OTC contracts: how does ESMA envisage this working in 
practice with examples of what would be considered in and out. Further questions I have 
include: 
  Will ESMA/NCA be publishing a list?  
  Will there be an element of self regulation i.e. if a list is published it cannot be conclusive  
  How will the netting happen in practice? Have ESMA considered the situation whereby an EE 
OTC contract is used to offset a number of different listed contracts?  
  Third Country Exchanges – my understanding is that since these are not recognised as trading 
venues under MiFID II that they could be considered as OTC and therefore potentially included 
in the list of EE OTC? E.g. Nymex WTI is used as an offset for ICE Brent. The ability to treat 
third country exchange listed contracts in this way will be beneficial. 

 
a.  Draft cost-benefit-analysis questionnaire 
b.  Other comments 
3.  Position limits and position reporting 
Olav Houben 
  Deliverable supply: not be an appropriate factor in determining commodity derivatives 
position limits for non-spot month contracts 
 
ESMA • 103 Rue de Grenelle • 75007 Paris • France • Tel. +33 (0) 1 58 36 43 21 • www.esma.europa.eu 


 
  Aggregation: urge ESMA to draw up a more exhaustive list of considerations that are to 
be taken into account for the purpose of establishing the need for aggregation of posi-
tions. 

 
a.  Draft cost-benefit-analysis questionnaire 
b.  Other comments 
4.  AOB 


 
ESMA REGULAR USE
 
Date: 01 April 2015 
 
ESMA/yyyy/xx/xxx 
AGENDA 
 
MDRWG+CWG 
 
 
Date: 
08 April 2015 
Time: 
11:00 – 17:00h  
Location: 
ESMA, 103, rue de Grenelle, Paris 
Edison entrance, 5th floor, Berlin, Madrid and Rome meeting rooms 
 
 
 
No  Item 
 
1.  Welcome/introduction 
 
2.  Feedback on MiFiR transaction reporting business cases   
 
3.  Tour de table on other MiFIR implementation issues that need to be considered 
 
4.  AOB 
ESMA • CS 60747 – 103 rue de Grenelle • 75345 Paris Cedex 07 • France • Tel. +33 (0) 1 58 36 43 21 • www.esma.europa.eu  


 
ESMA REGULAR USE
 
Date: 25 March 2015 
 
ESMA/2015/IPISC/xxx 
AGENDA [Draft] 
 
IPISC 
 
 
 
Date: 
10 April 2015 
Time: 
10:00 – 13:00  
Location: 
ESMA – 103, rue de Grenelle, Paris 
Contact: 
[correo electrónico] 
 
 
1.  MiFID II - Consultation paper on draft Guidelines on complex debt securities and structured 
deposits  
2.  Supervisory convergence - Identification of direction and possible topics for IPISC work  
3.  AOB. 
a.  Tour  de  table  on  relevant  trends  for  investors  and  possible  topics  requiring  investor 
warning  
ESMA • CS 60747 – 103 rue de Grenelle • 75345 Paris Cedex 07 • France • Tel. +33 (0) 1 58 36 43 21 • www.esma.europa.eu  


 
INTERNAL 
USE ONLY 
Date: 13 May 2015 
ESMA/2015/CDTF/16 
AGENDA 
 
Consultative Working Group for the Commodity Derivatives Task
Force 
 

Date: 
21 May 2015 
Time: 
10:30 – 13.30 
Place: 
ESMA premises, 103 Rue de Grenelle, Paris, 75007
Contact:  [correo electrónico]
 
 Topic 
1.    Welcome and opening remarks by the Chair 
2.    Ancillary Activity 

Overview  

Alternative measures for the capital employed test 

Other comments 
3.    Position limits and reporting 

Overview 

Application of position limits to ‘exotic’ and securitised commodity derivatives 
(please see next page) 

Aggregation of positions across a group and funds 

Other comments 
4.    Future Meetings 
 
 
 

 


 
Application of position limits to ‘exotic’ and securitised derivatives 
 
Background 
1. 
The definition of “commodity derivative” under Article 4(1)(50) of MiFID II cross refers to the defini-
tion of “commodity derivative under Article 2(1)(30) of MiFIR which states “’commodity derivative’ 
means those financial instruments defined [under Article 4(1)(44)(c) of MiFID II]; which relate to a 
commodity or an underlying referred to in Section C(10) of Annex I [of MiFID II]; or in points (5), 
(6), (7) and (10) of Section C of Annex I thereto [of MiFID II]”. 

2.  Article 4(1)(44)(c) of MiFID II defines transferable securities as instruments of payment, such as “any 
other securities giving the right to acquire or sell any such transferable securities or giving rise to a 
cash settlement determined by reference to transferable securities, currencies, interest rates or 
yields, commodities or other indices measures
.” Thus MiFID II captures securities on commodity 
underlyings, such as exchange traded funds, within its definition of commodity derivative. 
3.  Broadly speaking, definition Annex I, Section C (5) relates to cash settled derivatives, definition (6) to 
physically settled derivatives traded on trading venues, definition (7) to physically settled derivatives 
traded outside trading venues and definition (10) to cash settled derivatives with what ESMA loosely 
called for these purposes more “exotic” underlyings such as climatic variables, freight rates or infla-
tion rates or other. 
4.  Feedback to ESMA’s consultation paper broadly supported basing the spot month limits on delivera-
ble supply and the other months limits on open interest.  
5.  The CDTF would like to discuss with the CWG how the position limits regime might apply, and what 
would be the appropriate bases, for setting limits:  
i. 
Securitised derivatives to which the concepts of open interest, deliverable supply and maturity do 
not apply; and  
ii.  Cash settled commodity derivatives with non-deliverable underlyings. 

 


 
ESMA REGULAR USE
 
Date: 02 September 2015 
 
ESMA/yyyy/xx/xxx 
AGENDA 
 
MDRWG+CWG 
 
 
Date: 
08 September 2015 
Time: 
13:00 – 17:15h  
Location: 
ESMA, 103, rue de Grenelle, Paris 
Edison entrance, -1 floor, Auditorium meeting room 
 
 
 
No  Item 
 
1.  Welcome/introduction 
 
 
 
 
 
13:00 – 13:10 
 
2.  Feedback on MiFiR transaction reporting scenarios 
 
13:10 – 15:30 
Break 15.30 – 15.45 
3.  Feedback on MiFiR transaction reporting scenarios 
 
15:30 – 17:00 
 
4.  AOB   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
17:00 – 17:15 
 
ESMA • CS 60747 – 103 rue de Grenelle • 75345 Paris Cedex 07 • France • Tel. +33 (0) 1 58 36 43 21 • www.esma.europa.eu  


 
ESMA REGULAR USE
 
Date: 5 October 2015 
 
ESMA35/36/155 
AGENDA [Draft] 
 
IPISC CWG 
 
 
 
Date: 
15 October 2015 
Time: 
10:00 – 12:45  
Location: 
ESMA, 103 Rue de Grenelle, Paris 
Versailles meeting room (1st floor) 
Contact: 
[correo electrónico] 
 
[correo electrónico] 
 
 
1.  Welcome 
2.  Tour de table – Introduction of CWG members 
3.  MiFID II – IPISC supervisory convergence work  
4.  MiFID II – Guidelines on knowledge and competence of staff  
5.  Exchange  of  views  on  potential  issues  arising  from  the  sale  of  “bail-inable”  financial 
instruments to investors. 
6.  AOB 
 
 
ESMA • CS 60747 – 103 rue de Grenelle • 75345 Paris Cedex 07 • France • Tel. +33 (0) 1 58 36 43 21 • www.esma.europa.eu  


 
INTERNAL 
USE ONLY 
Date: 2 October 2015 
ESMA/2015/SMSC/36 
AGENDA 
 
Consultative Working Group for the Commodity Derivatives Task
Force 

Date: 
30 October 2015 
Time: 
10:30 – 13.30 
Place: 
ESMA premises, 103 Rue de Grenelle, Paris, 75007
Contact:  [correo electrónico]
 Topic 
1.    Welcome and opening remarks by the Chair 
2.    Comments on the position limits and ancillary activity published by ESMA with a focus 
on identifying implementation issues 
3.    Position reporting – update on the remaining Level 2 standards and implementation 
issues 
 
 

 


 
Date: 11 November
2015 
ESMA/2015/SMSC/43 
AGENDA 
Meeting of the Consultative Working Group of the Secondary Markets Standing 
Committee 

Date: 
24 November 2015 
Time: 
09:30 – 12:30 CET 
Location: 
ESMA, 103 Rue de Grenelle, 75007 Paris 
Contact: 
[correo electrónico] 
 
No  Items 
1.  Welcome and opening remarks by the Chair 
2.  Discussions about a potential delay of MiFID II 
3.  Quick  overview  of  the  remaining  Level  2  topics  on  the  ESMA  side  and  the  way  forward 
regarding the Level 2 package of September 
a.  ITS package 
b.  trading obligation for derivatives 
c.  scope of the non-equity tape 
4.  Main  issues  regarding  the  implementation  of  MiFID  II  (ESMA  tools,  priorities  of  ESMA 
and any issues identified by CWG members) 
a.  Transparency 
i.  transitional calculations 
ii.  processes for putting waivers in place 
iii.  the systematic internaliser regime 
b.  The OTF definition 
c.  Non-discriminatory  access  to  trading  venues  (regulated  markets,  MTFs  and 
OTFs) (Presentation by Remco Lenterman) 
 
ESMA • 103 Rue de Grenelle • 75007 Paris • France • Tel. +33 (0) 1 58 36 43 21 • www.esma.europa.eu 


 
d.  Any other issues identified by CWG members 


 
 
 
INTERNAL 
USE ONLY 
Date: 10 April 2014 
ESMA/2014/SMSC/x 
Summary of Conclusions 
Task Force on Commodity Derivatives  
 
Date: 
25 March 2014 
Time: 
9.30 to 17.30 
Location: 
ESMA Offices, Paris  
Contact: 
[correo electrónico] 
[correo electrónico]   
 
 
CDTF Attendees:  
 
 

Name 
Organisation 
1. 
 David Lawton (Chair) 
FCA  
2. 
 Paul Willis 
FCA 
3. 
 Alan Barnes 
FCA 
4. 
 José Manuel Portero   
CNMV 
5. 
 José Luis Pablos de Dios  
CNMV 
6. 
 Stefan Punkl 
FMA  
7. 
 Birgit Ortkemper 
BaFin  
8. 
 Stephanie Kirchmeier 
BaFin 
9. 
 Peter Ohrlander 
European Commission  
10. 
 Elio Zammuto 
ACER 
11. 
 Vincent Derbali 
AMF 
12. 
 Jasper Jorritsma 
AFM 
13. 
 Ulle Jakobson 
Finansinspektionen 
14. 
 Adrianna Fabijanska 
KNF (by phone) 
15. 
 Catherine Sutcliffe 
ESMA staff 
16. 
 Carsten Ostermann 
ESMA staff 
 
 
1.  Discussion with the consultative working group 
2.   

(a) Position limits and position reporting regime 
Paul Willis (PW-FCA) introduced the ESMA empowerments under the MiFID II position report-
ing  and  limits  regime,  focusing  on  the  hedging  exemption,  what  is  meant  by  “economically 
equivalent”,  aggregation  and  netting,  and  deliverable  supply.  The  CWG  made  the  following 
key points: 

 
 


 
 
Hedging exemption:  
-  Agreement that the hedging definition in EMIR should be used as a basis for the hedging 
definition for position limits. It was noted, however, that  even risk reducting  positions 
could  still  have some  relevance  for  position  limits  i.e.  a  firm  could  reduce  its price  risk 
(through hedging) but the size of its position could still put pressure on the delivery pro-
cess. 
-  It is not clear how the hedging exemption would apply if a non-financial firm hedges its 
position with a financial firm. 
Economically equivalent: views varied with the key points made being: 
-  “economically equivalent” should mean “substitutable” 
-  if the definition of what is “economically equivalent” determines on what basis a firm can 
net its position, the definition will be crucial as many firms do not offset their risk with 
similar  contracts:  this  would  imply  a  broader  definition  of  what  “economically  equiva-
lent” means but on the other side, it would mean that the position limits regime would 
have a wider scope 
-  tying an economically equivalent contract to a trading venue contract with one limit ap-
plying to both is not feasible. 
Aggregation and netting 
-  Suggestion to look at the CFTC approach and aim for equivalency as much as possible 
Deliverable supply 
-  there will be significant gaps regarding information on the level of deliverable supply as 
data is limited 
-  for spot months, consider warehouse stock levels: further down the curve, the amount of 
deliverable supply is larger 
-  consideration should be given to the US definition of “deliverable supply” 
-  oil  markets  are  global,  not  regional,  in  comparison  to  energy  when  considering  supply 
levels 
 
(b) Further  specification  of  financial  instruments  definitions  in  sections  C6,  7 
and C10 
Carsten Ostermann (CO-ESMA) introduced the ESMA empowerments regarding further de-
fining commodity derivatives under C6, C7 and C10. 
-  Oil: Limiting the scope of oil contracts which would not be subject to EMIR is a signifi-
cant decision because of the costs of margining. Oil should be construed broadly: not lim-
ited to crude oil but include refined products; the FCA handbook has a definition of “oil” 
that has worked well;   
-  the commercial purposes test for C7, to be further defined under level 2, should include a 
specific reference to the agricultural markets (in the current level 2 it is limited to energy) 
-  CWG members voiced concern regarding what is meant by “physically settled forwards” 
given that if regarded as a financial instrument they will count towards the EMIR clearing 
threshold. 
 
(c) Notion of “ancillary activity”  

 

 


 
 
Birgit Ortkemper (BaFIN) gave an explanation of the ancillary activity exemption and its interac-
tion with other MiFID II exemptions. The CWG were mindful of the implications should firms 
fall into scope and noted further reflection was required. 
 
(d) Renewal of the CWG 
The Chair informed the group that the CWG had been in place for 2 years: under the terms of 
reference, ESMA was now obliged to issue a new, public call for candidates. However, he not-
ed the CDTF would welcome the current members reapplying to sit on the CWG and thanked 
them for their contributions and work over the last 2 years.  
  
3.  Approval of the agenda  
The  agenda  was  approved.  Given  time  available,  it  was  agreed  that  the  items  on  the  ancillary 
activity paper and the definition of C6, C7 and C10 paper would be discussed at the next meeting. 
 
4.  Approval of the summary of conclusions for 25 March 2014  
The summary of conclusions was approved. 
    
5.  Update of March Board of Supervisors meeting 
The Chair gave an update, noting that most of the Board’s comments on the MiFID item were in 
relation  to  the  investor protection  work,  given  this  area  has  more  concrete  proposals  (because 
the majority of the empowerments are in delegated acts and so draft legal text has been prepared 
whereas substantial empowerments for the CDTF and SMSC are technical standards where first 
a number of options are being laid forth for the discussion paper). The Board was made aware of 
the substantial work required to implement the position limits and reporting regime by 2017. He 
also noted that ESMA staff were asked to consider over the following two months how resources 
could best be used and how to implement MiFID II, for discussion at the May Board. 
 
6.  Significant developments in the commodity derivatives markets 
PW-FCA noted that JP Morgan’s commodity business had been sold to Mecuria, a Swiss based 
firm  which today  is  outside  EU  regulation.  This is  in  line  with  the  current  trend  of  authorised 
commodity  firms  being  sold  to  unauthorised  firms.  The  CDTF  discussed  how  the  rules  would 
affect a non-EU firm based outside the EU but traded on own account in the EU and it was noted 
that  most  Swiss  commodity  firms  are  clients  of  a  trading  member  or  broker,  not  members  of 
trading venues themselves. 
 
7.  Position reporting and limits discussion papers 
The  discussion  started  with  a  review  of  the  empowerments  and  how  the  position  limits  and 
reporting regime would work in practice e.g. who would set the limits and who would report the 
positions  and  to  whom.  The  CDTF  then  discussed  the  recent  drafts  of  the  papers  prepared  by 
PW-FCA and Alan Barnes (AB-FCA). 
 
The Chair noted that at the next meeting, he would like the CDTF to focus on  
-  The definition of economically equivalent 
-  How the operations of MTFs and OTFs interlink with the reporting  
-  How the position limits and reporting regime apply to non-EU clients 
-  The methodology for applying position limits   
 
 

 


 
 
8.  AOB 
  It was agreed to hold a further CDTF meeting on 14 April, in Paris. 
  Catherine Sutcliffe (CS-ESMA) informed the CDTF that the European Commission had 
responded  to  ESMA’s  letter  stating the  importance  of  providing  further  clarification on 
what  is  meant  by  physically  settled  forwards  and  FX  forwards.  The  Commission  has 
asked ESMA to draft guidelines for the former and will itself prepare standards for the 
latter.  
 
9.  Future Meetings 
  30 April, London  
  11 June (with CWG), Paris 
  23 July, London 
  4 September (with CWG), Paris  
 

 


 
 
 
INTERNAL 
USE ONLY 
Date:  2014 
ESMA/2014/SMSC/20 
Summary of Conclusions 
Standing Committee on Secondary Markets 
 
Date: 
4 April 2014 
Time: 
9h00-17h00 
Location: 
ESMA’s premises, 103 Rue de Grenelle, Paris 
Contact: 
[correo electrónico] [correo electrónico]  
[correo electrónico] [correo electrónico]  
 
 
Attendees:  
 
 
Name 
Authority / Organisation /  
Attendance 
Department (if internal) 

David Lawton 
Chair (FCA) 
 

Tim Rowe 
FCA 
 

Edina Farkas 
Central Bank of Hungary 
 

Isabelle-Julie Schmit 
CSSF 
 

An De Pauw 
FSMA 
 

Hans Wolters 
AFM 
 

Andrea Lackova 
NBSK 
 

Bryan Friel 
CBI 
 

Philippe Guillot 
AMF 
 
 

 
 


 
 
10 
Sonia Cattarinussi 
AMF 
 
11 
Philippe Guillot 
AMF 
 
13 
Juergen Oberfrank 
BaFin 
 
14 
Raoul Jacobs 
BaFin 
 
15 
Helmut Jagsch  
FMA 
 
16 
Rodrigo Buenaventura 
ESMA 
 
17 
Erica Conter 
ESMA 
By conference call 
18 
Nuno Casal 
ESMA 
 
19 
Carsten Ostermann  
ESMA 
 
20 
Alberto Garcia 
ESMA 
 
21 
Catherine Sutcliffe 
ESMA 
 
22 
Benjamin Burlat 
ESMA 
 
23 
Jan Axelsson 
Finansinspektionen 
 
24 
Raúl Navarro Lozano  
CNMV 
 
26 
Maria Joao Teixeira 
CMVM  
 
27 
Valerie Ledure 
European Commission  
 
28  
Manolis Arvanitis  
HCMC 
 
29 
Romet Tepper 
Estonian FSA 
 
 

 


 
 
30 
Leena Savolainen 
FIVA 
 
 
1.  Meeting with the CWG 
Carsten Ostermann (CO-ESMA) presented the results of the bond liquidity analysis exercise to 
the CWG for comment. Comments included noting that the analysis is based on the market pre-
regulatory change and the market may well be different post-regulatory change, data from MTFs 
and other platforms should be included, that ESMA should discuss with the Debt Management 
Agencies about how the market works. In summary the main points from CWG-members were: 
query whether the regulation aims to bring more transparency to illiquid bonds or to encourage 
liquidity and the data covers ex ante type of liquidity and at some stage should take into account 
that a change of the regulatory structure may bring changes to the market.  
Catherine Sutcliffe (CS-ESMA) presented a table setting out the a proposed way in which deriva-
tives could be split into sub-asset classes (for the purposes of applying transparency and liquidity 
thresholds) and sought views on whether this was an appropriate starting place. Broadly, the 
CWG agreed with the the proposed categorisation.  
 
2. Adoption of the agenda 
The agenda was adopted. 
 
3.  Summary of Conclusions of the March 4th meeting 
The Summary of Conclusions of the March meeting was approved after an amendment suggested 
by Raul Navarro (RN-CNMV).  
 
4.  Main conclusions from the discussion with the CWG 
The discussion with the CWG suggested that the ESMA analysis regarding bond market trans-
parency was complete, there being, however, a need to include an explanation of the differences 
between MiFID and the CRR regulatory aims and perspectives. 
The Chair (David Lawton-FCA) noted that the paper should properly state the policy goals of the 
transparency regime for bonds, i.e., enhancing transparency for liquid bonds and liquidity of the 
broader market and the difference between pre-trade and post-trade transparency criteria. Ro-
drigo  Buenaventura  (RB-ESMA)  made  the  point  that  the  quality  of  data  on  the  issuance  size 
suffers from data quality issues. 
Regarding the design of the transparency calibration mechanism, the Chair pointed out the need 
for it to be easy to run and Valerie Ledure, (VL-European Commission) the need for it to effec-
tively increase transparency. 
The Chair further summarised the discussion with the CWG on the following questions: (i) iden-
tification of the policy goal (i.e., bringing transparency to small illiquid bonds or to the broader 
market?);  (ii)  identification  regarding  what  is  our  degree  of  ambition  (i.e.,  what  proportion  of 
bonds and volume should be captured); and (iii) does the use of different criteria lead to a differ-
ent  selection  of  bonds?  If  the  selected  universe  varies  considerably  when  different  criteria  are 
applied, we may need to revisit the chosen criteria. 
Alberto Garcia (ESMA), on behalf of the coordinator of the MSI task force, summarised the main 
points of the discussion at the CWG. The main points raised were in relation to a potential con-
 

 


 
 
tradiction between the market making obligations under Articles 17 and 50 MiFID and banking 
regulation, favouring a principle-based approach developed by the trading venues and the need 
for clarity in Level 1 regarding what is to be achieved by these provisions.  
The discussion afterwards underlined the need to clarify as much as possible in the Discussion 
Paper the regulatory goal to be achieved by ESMA’s regulatory technical standards.  
 
5.  Planning: timeline for consultations 
Catherine  Sutcliffe  (CS-ESMA)  explained  the  slide  illustrating  the  timeline.  Raoul  Jakobs  (RJ-
BaFIN) argued for a longer consultation period in view of the magnitude of the  task. The Chair 
noted  that  enlarging  the  consultation  period  from  2  to  3  months  would  mean  extending  the 
consultation period over the month of August which would not be extremely beneficial for the 
respondents and would severely impact ESMA timelines.  
 
6.  Task Force on Transparency and Trading Obligation for Derivatives  
Hans Wolters (HW-AFM), as coordinator of the Task Force on Transparency and Trading Obli-
gation  for  Derivatives  reported  to  the  SMSC  on  the  TTF’s  progress.  In  particular,  HW-AMF 
noted ESMA staff was in the process of preparing a ‘battle plan’ regarding collection of analysis 
and data for derivatives; 
The following TTF papers were presented for comment to the SMSC: 
  CP definition SI equity/non-equity: The Chair asked the TTF to (i) consider further 
the proposal regarding how frequently an investment firm should calculate whether it is 
in or out of the SI regime and (ii) to include in the paper tentative figures for thresholds 
for non-equity SIs, given this will only be subject to one round of consultation. 
  DP pre-post-trade equity: Some members raised concerns regarding the inclusion of 
pre-trade LIS thresholds in the DP and preferred that the DP consulted on the proposed 
new ADT classes only and asked an open question on where to set the thresholds.   
  SI equity DP: The SMSC requested that some rationale be included in the DP for the 
three options proposed regarding standard market size as two of the options did not, on 
the surface, seem to fit with the analysis included in the paper. 
  Trading obligation for shares: The SMSC discussed the list of proposed trade types 
which would not be subject to the trading obligation, with a request to clarify that the list 
will be exhaustive. 
The Chair concluded that the SMSC is broadly happy with the four drafts and asked HW-AFM to 
submit the drafts again for the fatal flaw comments at the next SMSC. 
 
7.  Task Force on Organisational requirements for Trading Venues 
Carsten Ostermann (CO-ESMA) as coordinator of the Task Force gave an update on progress to 
the SMSC. 
The Chair proposed a way forward regarding the substantial importance of a trading venue in a 
host member state: the ITS to be developed by ESMA would cover the cases given as examples in 
the MiFID II recitals, noting them as examples and mentioning that the ITS  would not change 
the scope of Level 1. The matter would be dealt with only in the Consultation Paper (i.e., would 
not be included in the Discussion Paper). The SMSC agreed to this proposal. 
 

 


 
 
 
8.  Micro-structural issues 
Alberto  Garcia,  on  behalf  of  the  coordinator  of  the  task  force,  informed  the  SMSC  about  the 
confirmed  intention  of  the  European  Commission  to  request  technical  advice  regarding  the 
definitions  of  high  frequency  trading  and  direct electronic  access.  He  also  informed  the  SMSC 
that, following the meeting held on 20 March, the task force planned to have a round of written 
comments to the latest versions of the documents followed by a conference call. On that basis, 
his expectation was to circulate the final version of both documents to the SSMSC for approval 
by 16 April.  
  
9.  Task Force on Data Publication and Access  
Tim Rowe, coordinator of the Task Force on Data Publication and Access, gave a report on the 
activity of the TF over the last month. The TF had met on 19 March in Amsterdam and would 
meet again on 9 April in Paris with the intention of closing the papers on Access to Benchmarks, 
and the scope of the consolidated tape. The CRR empowerment (specification of main indices) is 
to be tackled immediately afterwards, with a view to submitting the DP to the June SMSC. 
 
10.  AOB 
The Chair shared with the SMSC that 28-29 April SMSC meeting was principally to discuss fatal 
flaws comments.  
 
11. Future Meetings 
  28-29 April, London 
  17 July, London 
  10 September (with CWG), Paris 
  16 October, London 
  21 November (with CWG), Paris 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 


 
 
 
INTERNAL 
USE ONLY 
Date: 15 September 2014 
ESMA/2014/SMSC/34 
Summary of Conclusions 
Task Force on Commodity Derivatives  
 
Date: 
4 and 5 September 2014 
Time: 
10.30 to 17.00 and 09.00 to 16.30 
Location: 
ESMA Offices, Paris  
Contact: 
[correo electrónico] 
[correo electrónico]   
 
 
CDTF Attendees:  
 
 

Name 
Organisation 
1. 
 David Lawton (Chair) 
FCA  
2. 
 Paul Willis 
FCA 
3. 
 Alan Barnes 
FCA 
4. 
 José Luis Pablos de Dios  
CNMV 
5. 
 José Manuel Portero 
CNMV 
6. 
 Stefan Punkl 
FMA 
7. 
 Birgit Ortkemper 
BaFin  
8. 
 Stephanie Kirchmeier 
BaFin 
9. 
 Vincent Derbali 
AMF 
10. 
 Ulle Jakobson 
Finansinspektionen 
11. 
 Adrianna Fabijanska 
KNF  
12. 
 Jasper Jorritsma 
AFM 
13. 
 Sine Brink Soberg 
Finanstylsinet (DK) 
14. 
 Knut Godager 
Finanstylsinet (NO) 
15. 
 Luca Amadei 
CONSOB 
16. 
 Giles Ward 
EC 
17. 
 Carsten Ostermann 
ESMA staff 
18. 
 Nuno Casal 
ESMA staff 
 
1.  Meeting with CWG 
The CDTF met with its new CWG in the morning of 4 September. The CWG after an initial Tour de Table 
engaged  in  a  lively  discussion  on  position  limits  and  reporting,  the  financial  instruments  definition  and 
ancillary activity after initial introductions by the main drafters (Paul Willis, PW-FCA, Carsten Ostermann, 
CO-ESMA and Birgit Ortkemper, BO-BaFin). The main points of note were the following: 
 
Position limits 
CWG  members  supported  a  CFTC  style  approach  on  economically  equivalent  contracts  and  considered 
that as much harmonisation as possible between Europe and the US were best for the industry. Members 

 
 


 
 
also checked if it was possible under the Level 1 text to just focus on certain contracts which was confirmed 
as unavailable by the CDTF.  
 
Position reporting 
CWG members were concerned about the feasibility of the approach taken in Level 1 and supported using 
trade  repositories  as  a  central  body  at  the  centre  of  a  position  reporting  regime.  They  also  agreed  that 
passing client details up a chain of firms poses a problem and that this must not be done by using plain 
text,  including  uncoded  details  of  clients.  Members  also  flagged  nominee  accounts  and  privacy  laws  in 
countries such as Singapore and Switzerland as issues.  
 
Financial instruments definition C6 
Members from utilities and trading venues had a discussion from opposing points of view about the scope 
of the C6 exemption and how it should be handled on Level 2 which replicated the stances known from the 
consultation responses.  
 
Ancillary activity 
Members agreed on the use of accounting capital but asked ESMA to issue guidance on how exactly this 
should be applied. Members were also concerned about freight as a separate category as it is a very small 
asset class and a large market share there (which would be small in relative terms) may lead firms to be 
caught unjustifiedly.   
 
2.  Approval of the agenda  
The agenda was approved.  
 
3.  Approval of the summary of conclusions for 23 July 2014  
The summary of conclusions was approved.  
    
4.  Discussion of meeting with CDTF CWG 
CDTF Members considered the discussion as useful but also noted that CWG members had a tendency of 
deflecting issues by questioning the Level 1 language and objectives.  
 
5.  Significant developments in the commodity derivatives markets 
PW-FCA  informed  the  CDTF  that  the  IOSCO  Report  on  the  effects  of  storage  warehouses  on  price  for-
mation was out for a consultation period of three months.  
 
6.  Follow up: practical and operational challenges of implementing the position limits and 

reporting regime 
David Lawton (DL-Chair) informed the CDTF about the latest developments regarding the Steering Group 
of  the  BoS  which  was  due  to  meet  on  9  September.  DL-Chair  proposed  a  CDTF  conference  call  in  the 
second half of September to discuss this issue further.  
 
7.  Guidelines on C6 and C7 under MiFID I 
CO-ESMA informed the CDTF that we are back to a combined paper with the PTSC, including the issue of 
FX forwards and others. However it remained unclear whether a combined paper would also be presented 
to the BoS on 25 September as PTSC was still to discuss and approve its part of the paper.  
 
After confirmation from Giles Ward that the Commission is not intending to tackle the C6 and 7 issues via 
MiFID II delegated acts, the CDTF decided to go ahead with the consultation, subject to a version control 
check by CO-ESMA, correcting a number of issues agreed in the meeting (e.g. definition of physical set-
tlement) and a fatal flaws check by the CDTF. The CDTF agreed on a consultation period of eight weeks. 
 
8.  Financial instruments definition – summary of responses and technical advice C6 
The CDTF went through the summaries of the C6 questions and agreed on a definition of oil as proposed, 
decided to stick to the wording of Recital 10 as closely as possible and to address operational netting by 
establishing a set of criteria while seeking a discussion with a number of TSO representatives. For C7 and 
10 the CDTF decided to mostly stick to the proposals made in the Consultation Paper but to think more 
 

 


 
 
about  the  commercial  purposes  test.  CO-ESMA  to  prepare  the  technical  advice  for  approval  in  the  next 
meeting and to invite ACER to join that meeting. 
 
9.  Ancillary activity – summary of responses 
The CDTF discussed the relevant responses received in respect of the ancillary activity test.  Main conclu-
sions drawn are that capital employed should be calculated based on the Accounting Directives, that the 
test  should  be  applied  by  dividing  the  ancillary  activity  in  the  EU  by  the  world-wide  group  activity,  to 
further  think  about  a  de  minimis  threshold,  that  a  centralised  calculation  and  publication  of  the  overall 
market trading activity in each asset class is necessary and to settle the final thresholds at a later stage. A 
small  drafting  group  consisting  of  BO-BaFin,  José  Luis  Pablos,  Stefan  Punkl  and  Jasper  Jorritsma  shall 
take this topic to the Consultation Paper stage. ESMA staff will distribute the template to be used.     
 
10. Position limits and reporting – summary of responses 
The CDTF went through the summaries of responses to a large number of questions. The views here were 
not that controversial and a drafting group led by UK-FCA and including Vincent Derbali, Adrianna Fabi-
janska,  Knut  Godager,  Luca  Amadei,  Stefan  Punkl  and  Ulle  Jakobsen  (the  CDTF  Members  drafting  the 
various summaries) will move this to the Consultation Paper stage (ESMA staff to supply the template).  
 
11.  ESMA position management powers – summary of responses 
The topic was postponed to give ESMA-staff a chance to reacquaint themselves with the topic and present 
the technical advice in the next meeting for approval.  
 
12. Future Meetings 
  9 October, London 
  13 November, Paris (with the CWG and with potentially extending the meeting to the 14th)  
 

 


 
 
 
INTERNAL 
USE ONLY 
Date: 15 September 2014 
ESMA/2014/SMSC/34 
Summary of Conclusions 
Task Force on Commodity Derivatives  
 
Date: 
12 and 13 November 2014 
Time: 
10.30 to 18.00 and 09.00 to 16.30 
Location: 
ESMA Offices, Paris  
Contact: 
Catherine.Sutcliffe@esma.europa,eu    
[correo electrónico] 
 
 
CDTF Attendees:  
 
 

Name 
Organisation 
1. 
 David Lawton (Chair) 
FCA  
2. 
 Paul Willis 
FCA 
3. 
 Alan Barnes 
FCA 
4. 
 Don Groves 
FCA 
5. 
 José Luis Pablos de Dios  
CNMV 
6. 
 José Manuel Portero 
CNMV 
7. 
 Stefan Punkl 
FMA 
8. 
 Birgit Ortkemper 
BaFin  
9. 
 Vincent Derbali 
AMF 
10. 
 Ulle Jakobson 
Finansinspektionen 
11. 
 Adrianna Fabijanska 
KNF  
12. 
 Jasper Jorritsma 
AFM 
13. 
 Mikkel 
Finanstylsinet (DK) (day 1 only) 
14. 
 Sine Brink Soberg 
Finanstylsinet (DK) 
15. 
 Knut Godager 
Finanstylsinet (NO) 
16. 
 Luca Amadei 
CONSOB 
17. 
 Stephane Amoyel 
European Commission 
18. 
 Carsten Ostermann 
ESMA staff 
19. 
 Catherine Sutcliffe 
ESMA staff 
20. 
 Nuno Casal 
ESMA staff (day 1 only) 
 
1.  Meeting with CWG 
The  CDTF  met  with  its  consultative  working  group  (CWG)  on  the  morning  of  12  November.  The  CWG 
discussed  the  financial  instruments  definition  for  C6,  position  limits  and  reporting,  and  the  scope  of 
ancillary activities after initial introductions by the main drafters  (Carsten Ostermann - CO-ESMA, Paul 
Willis - PW-FCA, and Birgit Ortkemper - BO-BaFin). The CWG had also been issued with short summary 
papers  and  questions  in  advance  for  the  financial  instruments  definition  for  C6  and  ancillary  activity 
sections. The main points of note were the following: 
 

 
 


 
 
Financial instruments definition C6 
As has been the case throughout discussions on this topic, members from utilities and trading venues had 
opposing points of view about the scope of the C6 exemption. 
 (KS -  Polish Power Ex-
change) gave a short presentation arguing that EMIR in combination with the C6 carve out would incen-
tivise trading away from trading venues and that the chain ratios of trading demonstrate that determining 
what  is  non-operational  netting  will  be  challenging.  Others  disagreed,  arguing  that  chain  ratios  indicate 
liquidity and trading would not necessarily move off venue. There was no consensus on how to define C6 
with key points raised being: 
  Everything nominated to a TSO should be considered ‘must be physically settled’. 
  Speculation could be equated with the chain ratio but this ignores the fact of the unpredictability 
of consumption where balancing is required the more or less is consumed. 
  Ownership of resource is less important in the determination of ‘must be physically settled’ than 
what is stated in the contract. 
 
  (A-LP–Coop  de  France)  raised  the  concern  that  all  physical  forwards  would  be 
within MiFID’s scope for agriculture as the spot market is small and the carve-out is for energy products 
only. She proposed a wider definition of ‘commercial purposes’ at Level 2 to avoid this issue arising.  
 
Position limits and reporting 
The CWG was particularly interested in the relationship between risk reducing positions (which will not 
count for NFCs towards the position limits) and the definition of economically equivalent as the wider this 
latter  definition,  the  greater  the  scope  for  netting  down  the  position  and  thus  not  meeting  the  position 
limit. However, on the other hand, a wide definition of economically equivalent would mean larger classes 
with one set of limits and therefore less liquidity. CWG members queried what regulators would consider a 
risk reducing position and how they would be expected to evidence such. 
 
PW-FCA clarified that the limits would apply intraday, not end of day and a number of members expressed 
concern e.g. a clearing bank would not have the full view of a client’s position. PW-FCA asked for views on 
how the criterion of volatility should be taken into account. The general view was that limits could create 
volatility and that volatility should be considered as a consequence of limits rather than an input factor. 
  
Ancillary activity 
Members agreed on the use of the definition of capital from the Accounting Directive and noted that the 
simpler the better for defining and calculating what is ancillary to the main business. There was general 
agreement that regarding obtaining data it was practical, in calculating the size of trading activity (test 2)to 
limit the scope to EU activities, but noted this would be difficult for global markets (e.g. oil). The members 
supported having a de minimis threshold and suggested this should be one absolute figure, rather than  a 
percentage, for simplicity.   
 
2.  Approval of the agenda  
The agenda was approved.  
 
3.  Approval of the summary of conclusions for 9 October 2014  
The summary of conclusions was approved.  
    
4.  Discussion of meeting with CDTF CWG 
CDTF Members considered the discussion as useful.  
 
5.  Guidelines on C6 and C7 under MiFID I 
xxx  
 
Offsetting 
The CDTF further discussed the issue of permitted netting under definition C6 on 13 November. Vincent 
Derbali (VD-AMF) presented a revised proposal which the CDTF discussed in detail. The CDTF agreed the 
following two guiding principles: 

It should be objectively verifiable ex ante whether a product falls under the C6 carve out; and 
 

 


 
 

The rules should not interfere with the existing regulatory microstructure of the energy market 
In summary, some members favoured an approach whereby an ex ante determination is made by (1) 
looking at the contractual terms to see if the commodity must be physically settled and (2) if the contract 
ensures both parties to the contract can make/take physically settlement at expiry. Some members were 
undecided. The Chair also noted that ESMA should consult with ACER on such a significant change. The 
following next steps were agreed: 

CO-ESMA would recirculate a draft early next week and organise a conference call with ACER 
which other CDTF members were welcome to join; 

Members must revert with their preferred approach on netting and provide an alternative ap-
proach is they disagree by the end of next week.  
6.  Position limits and reporting – summary of responses 
 
Risk reducing positions: The CDTF agreed with the proposals in this section of the paper. 
 
Non- financial entity definition:
  
The CDTF noted that because its proposal is that firms must aggregate on a whole position basis (i.e. 
although a firm may own a percentage of another firm it cannot pro rata the position held by that firm 
according to the percentage of its holding), this approach could lead to double counting. It was agreed to 
add in commentary in the CP. Catherine Sutcliffe (CS-ESMA) agreed to follow up with colleagues to find 
out how or if EMIR defines non-financial entities which are third parties. 
 
Economically equivalent definition: 
Following feedback from the CP, ESMA will follow the CFTC approach regarding the definition of econom-
ically equivalent (reference to the exchange traded contract). The CDTF noted economically equivalent 
contracts need to be on the list of contracts ESMA will publish but that currently, it is not clear who de-
clares a contract is economically equivalent or what the process will be and this needs to be added to the 
CP.  
 
The CDTF discussed how contracts in third countries that might be economically equivalent to an EU 
exchange traded contract would be treated e.g. could WTI Chicago and WTI London be netted? and if the 
WTI Chicago contract was traded on a RM recognised as ‘equivalent’ to an EU RM would that address the 
issue?  
 
Same contract definition 
A contract which is the ‘same’ will be defined as such where identical contracts, e.g. if a venue licenses its 
contract to be traded on another venue (ICE has done this for NYMEX), are traded on two venues and will 
be subject to the same limit: 
 
Hedging exemption notification process 
The CDTF noted that it would be very onerous to establish a contract by contract pre-approval process and 
that the text allows flexibility. Under EMIR there is a one off notification if an NFC intends to use the 
hedging exemption, therefore, it was agreed the MiFID II process should mirror this approach. However, 
supervision would be on a position by position basis. 
 
Position reporting thresholds:  
The CDTF agreed the following changes to the paper:  
  Include in the CP the rationale regarding the reason for choosing the proposed levels. 
  Add into the position report format whether the spot month or all month is being reported. 
  Amend the format of the COTS report so that it is split between risk reducing and other posi-
tions 
 

 


 
 
  In the preamble of the CP, note ESMA has no mandate to specify the position reporting format 
for trading venues but considers it is in the broader interest that everyone uses the same for-
mat. 
  Include in the CP the suggestion that investment firms report their ETD positions to trading 
venues rather than to the NCA, otherwise, ETD positions will be reported to the NCAs via both 
TVs and Investment firms. 
  Include in the CP that ESMA is aware there are a number of other implementing issues to ad-
dress following the drafting of the RTS. 
PW-FCA would check with MDRWG on the identifiers proposed in the CP.  
 
 
Timing of weekly (COTS) position reports  
CO-ESMA noted this requirement is an ITS and therefore, will be drafted and consulted on later, following 
discussion with ESMA IT staff. 
 
7.  Ancillary activity  
The CDTF agreed the calculation for Test 1 (capital used by firm for MiFID II business) would be: the 
capital used for MiFID II activity at group level in the EU divided by the capital used for business at group 
level globally. The CP would propose a threshold of 5%, above which a firm would need to be authorised 
under MiFID. It was also agreed to ask a question in the CP regarding how the capital used in a MiFID II 
authorised entity of a group should be treated. CS-ESMA would look into how this issue is addressed 
under EMIR. 
 
The CDTF agreed the calculation for Test 2 (size of trading activity) would be: size of trading activity of 
group in EU compared to the size of trading activity in the EU market per commodity class. The CP would 
propose a threshold of 0.5% above which a firm would need to be authorised under MiFID  and the 
threshold would be the same for each asset class. 
 
It was agreed that if a firm passes either Test 1 or Test 2 only, it will be required to become authorised 
under MiFID.  
 
The CDTF also agreed to propose a de minimis threshold of EUR 1million gross notional per annum. If a 
firm is below this threshold it will not be required to do the calculations for the two tests or report annually 
to the NCA that it is using this exemption. SA-EC noted he was not sure this was permitted under the Level 
1 text. 
 
CS-ESMA stated it is not clear to which NCA a firm not incorporated in the EU would report that it is using 
the exemption and would ask what is done under EMIR? 
 
 
8.  AOB 
No other business. 
 
9.  Future Meetings 
  It was agreed that drafters would circulate revised papers early next week and CDTF members 
could provide fatal flaw written comments only by end of next week. 
  ESMA staff would arrange a conference call to discuss any remaining issues on basis of written 
comments on circulated papers. 
  CS-ESMA noted he had circulated a paper with dates for the CDTF in 2015. 
 
 
 

 


 
 
 
INTERNAL 
USE ONLY 
Date: 23 March 2015 
ESMA/2015/SMSC/x 
Summary of Conclusions 
Task Force on Commodity Derivatives  
 
Date: 
26 February 2015 
Time: 
10.30 to 17.00  
Location: 
ESMA Offices, Paris  
Contact: 
Catherine.Sutcliffe@esma.europa,eu    
[correo electrónico] 
 
 
 
Attendees - CDTF 
 
 
Name 
Organisation 
 

David Lawton (Chair) 
FCA  
 

Paul Willis 
FCA 
 

Alan Barnes 
FCA 
 

Don Groves 
FCA 
 

Sine Brink Soberg 
FTnet 
 

Mikkel Steen Madsen (FT)  
FTnet 
 

Ludvig Sandhagen 
Finansinspektionen 
 

José Manuel Portero   
CNMV 
 

José Luis Pablos de Dios  
CNMV 
 
10 
Birgit Ortkemper 
BaFin  
 
11 
Stephane Amoyel 
European Commission  
 
12 
Vincent Derbali 
 AMF 
 
13 
Luca Amadei  
CONSOB 
By conference call 
14 
Knut Godager 
Finanstilsynet 
 
15 
Jasper Jorritsma 
AFM 
 
16 
Carsten Ostermann 
ESMA staff 
 
17 
Catherine Sutcliffe 
ESMA staff 
 
18 
Montserrat Farina  
ESMA staff 
 
 
Attendees - CWG 
 

Organisation 
 
Last Name and First Name 
 
 
1. 
 
 

 
 


 
 
2. 
 
 
 
3. 
 
 
 
4. 
 
 
5. 
 
 
 
6. 
 
 
 
7. 
 
 
 
8. 
 
 
 
9. 
 
 
 
10. 
 
 
 
11. 
 
 
 
12. 
 
 
 
13. 
 
 
 
14. 
 
 
 
15. 
 
 
 
16. 
 
 
 
 
17. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 


 
 
Meeting with CDTF CWG 
 
ESMA provided the CDTF CWG with four draft cost-benefit-analysis (CBA) questionnaires (one for firms 
and one for trading venues on each of ancillary activity and position limits) and asked for comments 
regarding the structure and questions. CWG members had very few comments on these apart from noting 
the difficulty in sizing the deliverable supply and querying the accuracy of the data which would ultimately 
be returned to ESMA for the CBA.   
 
, in collaboration with 
 and 
, gave a presenta-
tion on the potential impacts of energy firms being required to become authorised under MiFID II due to 
the narrowing of the ancillary activity exemption. The key points propounded were: 

The two thresholds proposed by ESMA of 5% and 0.5% render the exemption effectively useless; 

The combined impact of having to be authorised under MiFID II and meeting as yet unknown cap-
ital requirements under CRD4 will decrease firms’ capital further with the consequence that there 
will be less liquidity, trading will move to bilateral agreements and bid-ask spreads will widen; 

They estimate that the consequence will be to increase the energy bill by  EUR 20 per household; 
and 

Instead, they proposed that a firm must exceed both thresholds (rather than just one) before being 
subject to MiFID II and that the thresholds should be raised substantially to 20% for capital em-
ployed and 15% for trading activity. Further they argued that volumes traded and cleared on Regu-
lated Markets in commodity derivatives should not be fully counted in calculating ancillary activi-
ties of a non-financial firm due to there being less risk in these transactions. 
 
The other members of the CWG representing commodity firms also raised concerns about the exemption, 
in particular, that the hedging exemption is too narrowly framed. They also commented that they believed 
that it would take approximately two years to become authorised given the need to review and build IT 
systems to collect and analyse data and the lengthy, complex process involved; hence starting as a regulat-
ed firm on 3 January 2017 as required under MiFID II was not feasible.  
 
Representatives of financial firms highlighted the need for clarity about, and a wide interpretation of, what 
is an economically equivalent OTC contract given they cannot benefit from the hedging exemption.   
 
The CWG joined the CDTF for lunch then departed.  The afternoon session of the meeting was of the CDTF 
alone. 
 
1.  Adoption of the Agenda 
The agenda was agreed. 
 
2.  Summary of Conclusions for 12 and 13 November meeting 
The SoCs for 12 and 13 November had not been circulated in advance of the meeting, therefore it was 
agreed to discuss this at the next meeting. 
 
3.  Discussion of meeting with CDTF CWG 
CDTF  members  considered  that  the  meeting  had  been  useful  but  noted  most  points  had  been  raised  by 
industry before. The current key challenge facing both the industry and the regulators is the lack of  pre-
existing data e.g. denominator for size of EU market per asset class.   
 
4.  Report from the December Board of Supervisors 
Carsten Ostermann gave an update from the December Board of Supervisors meeting where the MiFID II 
consultation paper had been discussed and approved for subsequent publication. 
 
5.  Summary of key points from the ESMA MiFID II Open Hearing 
The Chair summarised the key points from the Open Hearing, noting that transparency for non-equities 
and commodity derivatives were the two sections which received most attention. The comments made 
were largely in line with the feedback received from the CWG in the morning.   
 
 

 


 
 
6.   Guidelines on C6 and C7 under MiFID I 
Following the close of the consultation and amendment of the guidelines accordingly, the CDTF agreed to 
submit the guidelines to the March Board of Supervisors for approval. 
 
7.  Update on AMF work regarding French position limits regime for agricultural sector 
Vincent Derbali provided an overview of recent AMF work regarding a new French position limits regime 
for the agricultural sector. Vincent explained:  

Putting in place a legal framework for position limits was first discussed in France in 2013 to an-
ticipate MiFID II and MAR;  

AMF rules are codifying, in a regulatory framework, the existing exchange and CCP position limits 
so in practice there are no changes to existing position limit levels but they give the AMF enforce-
ment powers in addition to those of the trading venue; and 

The rules are not as granular as they will be under MiFID II as they do not reach down to the end 
client. 
 
8.  Position limits and reporting  and ancillary activity  
 
CBAs: Members acknowledged the challenge of this exercise but raised concern regarding the size of the 
questionnaires and whether it would be possible to narrow down some of the options in the questions e.g. 
specify what type of proxies firms could use in calculating the ancillary activity threshold for capital em-
ployed if they could not use accounting capital.  ESMA staff agreed to try to further refine the question-
naires and asked for CDTF members to send any further comments they had by end of the week. 
 
Next steps: The Chair noted that the CDTF’s immediate focus would be on finalising the RTS by 3 July 
2015 and it was agreed that the ITS (on position reporting) would be put on hold and finalised in the 
second half of the year. The CDTF also agreed that in summarising the responses to the consultation paper 
questions (which would close on 2 March) members should note: 

Issues which relate to finalising the RTS; 

Issues which do not require finalising before the RTS but do need answering before the start date; 
and 

Issues relating to national implementation where there may be benefit in NCAs discussing togeth-
er how they take forward certain issues. 
 
9.  Implementation Issues 
Catherine Sutcliffe informed the CDTF that ESMA’s IT group had started to look at how it would build the 
system  to handle the weekly position report (i.e. where trading venues must send to ESMA the weekly 
report of aggregated information and ESMA must publish it). 
 
10. AOB 
No other business. 
 
11.  Future Meetings 
  25 March 2015, FCA London 
  22 April 2015, ESMA Paris 
  21-22 May 2015 (currently a meeting with the CWG is planned but that plan may have to be 
revised), ESMA Paris  
 
 
 

 


 
 
 
INTERNAL 
USE ONLY 
Date: 12 November 2015 
ESMA/2015/SMSC/44 
Summary of Conclusions 
Task Force on Commodity Derivatives  
Date: 
30 October 2015 
Time: 
09.00 to 17.00 (including meeting with the CWG) 
Location: 
ESMA Offices, Paris  
Contact: 
[correo electrónico] 
[correo electrónico] 
[correo electrónico] 
 
CDTF Attendees:  
 
 
Name 
Organisation 

Edwin Schooling Latter (Chair) 
FCA  

Paul Willis 
FCA 

Joe Mealing 
FCA 

José Luis Pablos de Dios  
CNMV 

José Manuel Portero Bujalance  
CNMV 

Birgitte Ortkemper 
BaFin 

Stefan Pankoke 
BaFin 

Robert Rybski 
KNF 

Vincent Derbali 
 
AMF 
10 
Klas Granlund 
Finansinspektionen 
11 
Knut Godager 
Finanstylsinet (NO) 
12 
Stefan Punkl  
Finanzmarktaufsicht 
13 
Jasper Jorritsma 
AFM 
14 
Sandra Lage 
CMVM 
15 
Eva Hunakova (By conference call) 
NBS 
16 
Luca Amadei 
By conf. call 
17 
Carsten Ostermann   
ESMA staff 
18 
Nuno Casal 
ESMA staff 
19 
Montserrat Farina 
ESMA staff 
 
1.  Adoption of the agenda 
The  new  CDTF  Chair  Edwin  Schooling  Latter  (FCA)  introduced  himself  and  the  agenda.  The 
agenda was adopted. 
 
2.  Supervisory convergence work program 2016 
Anne-Laurence  Semik  from  the  ESMA  Supervisory  Convergence  Unit  made  a  presentation  on 
EMA’s supervisory convergence work.  
 

 
 


 
 
3.  Approval of summary of conclusions 
The  summary  of  conclusions  for  the  7  September  2015  meeting  was  agreed,  with  a  small 
change to the  list  of attendees  and  also to  include  that  C6/C7 guidance  was  translated  into  all 
languages. 
 
4.  Reflections on the meeting with the CWG (main points raised) 
 
 presented a paper which posed several questions on the prac-
tical implementation issues of the ancillary activity tests. The main points raised were: 
  Main  business test:  Should the  numerator  be the  EU  and the  denominator  worldwide 
trading? ESMA responded that the  intention is for both to be consistent, so to have EU 
trading in the denominator as well. 
  Trading activity threshold test: In the denominator the RTS makes reference to ‘finan-
cial  instruments’,  does  that  include  all  financial  instruments  or  just  commodity  deriva-
tives? CO-ESMA responded that the intention is to include only commodity derivatives as 
per the Level 1 text which deals with other financial instruments under a different exemp-
tion.  
  Counting activity in licensed entities in the denominator
It was proposed to extend the scope of the denominator so that it would include trading 
conducted in licensed entities. CO-ESMA noted that the original intention was not to con-
sider trading in licensed entities anywhere.  
  How to compute GNV? Should it follow EMIR? Yes. 
  Does compliance with the limits need to be maintained at ‘all times’? Yes 
  Application  timeline  –  NCAs  are  expected  to  start  having  a  dialogue  with  firms  that 
could  be  captured  by  MiFID  II  and  provide  direction  on  whether  they  would  need  to  be 
regulated, this could start already as of April 2016. 
  Publication of market size. ESMA could publish data only after the end of the observa-
tion period, i.e. after 30 June 2016. 
 
In its authorities-only session after the CWG, the CDTF agreed to make the Commission aware 
of points 1-3 by email (done). There seems to be consensus in the CDTF regarding the first two 
points, whereas there was an opposing view from BaFin in relation to the third point.  
 
  presented a paper on transparency of EFPs. The Chair indicated we 
are  aware  of  the  issue,  however,  it  requires  a  change  to  Level  1  which  ESMA  has  made  the 
Commission aware of in its covering letter to the technical standards package. 
 
 distributed a document detailing the main issues identified with the RTS 
on position reporting. Main points made were: 
1.  Market participants are not equipped to report positions this way 
2.  There is a problem with the categorisation of non-EU entities and their positions 
3.  There is a risk of inconsistency across trading venues 
4.  There is an unclear relation between the hedging definition in RTS 21 and CoT cat-
egory of ‘risk reducing positions’ 
5.  The CoT position reporting for ‘previous calendar week’ is inaccurate. ICE proposed 
to publish a CoT on Monday for the Tuesday of the previous week 
6.  Detailed information is needed on: format of files and schemas, validations in place 
and available testing, connectivity, support and communication lines. 
 
  asked  questions  on  the  following:  aggregation  of 
open interest for other months, EEOTC contracts, do specs need to be identical? He stated that 
 

 


 
 
it  was  not  clear  how  group  level  aggregation  would  work  for  asset  managers,  a  point  that  was 
supported  by  BlackRock,  and  which  ESMA  followed  up  by  phone.  They have  requested  clarity 
on aggregation of positions for their funds. ESMA indicated this will follow at Level 3. 
 
In  terms  of  the  figure  of  open  interest  to  be  considered  to  apply  the  position  limit  for  non  spot 
months,  it  was  indicated  that  it  should  be  computed  by  adding  the  open  interest  of  every  out-
standing contract that is not the spot month, and it should be reviewed at least annually. 
 
5.  Report from the 24/25 September BOS meeting 
CO-ESMA indicated that the BoS meeting on these topics went smoothly, that the BoS noted the 
issues raised by the CDTF and agreed with the CDTF approach. The Commission’s only major 
legal issue was not including trading in licensed entities within the ancillary activity test.  
 
6.  Revision of the Terms of Reference (ToR) of the CDTF 
CO-ESMA indicated that the ToR would be incorporated into a standardised ESMA template and 
presented to the next meeting in London on 19 November 2015. The CDTF agreed on the con-
tent of the ToR as presented.  
 
7.  Position reporting 
ITS update 
The  CDTF  will  have  to  deliver  the  ITS  package  to  the  December  BoS  and  therefore  has  re-
sumed  work  on  both  position  reporting  ITS.  CO-ESMA  briefly  presented  where  we  are  on  the 
one  ITS  (weekly  CoT  reports)  consulted  upon.  Next  steps  are  to  distribute  the  responses,  to 
produce the summaries, complete the final report, amend the recitals and the draft standard text. 
 
Implementation calendars and identified issues 
There is a need to set the procedures and mechanisms for implementing the position reporting 
regime.  There  are  also  questions  raised  about  whether  ESMA  or  NCAs  should  take  the  lead, 
how validation of information received should take place at the NCA level, and whether a work-
shop was needed. More details will be covered on the 19 November meeting. 
 
8.  L3 planning/brainstorming of potential issues 
Some  of  the  issues  raised  were:  position  reporting  and  further  changes  to  the  template  pro-
posed, requirement for reporting of  all derivatives and treatment of retail customers for position 
reporting purposes. 
 
There was an idea raised not to impose position reporting for those securitised derivatives which 
have  an  issuance  below  the  number  of  2.5  million  securities  (imposed  as  the  default  position 
limit  for  securitised  derivatives  with  an  issuance  up  to  10  million).  As  positions  in  those  secu-
ritised  derivatives  could  never  exceed  the  statutory  position  limit,  and  more  generally  because 
such  securitised  derivatives  were  unlikely  to  represent  a  way  of  controlling  or  manipulating  a 
particular  derivative  market  and  were  instead  a  mechanism  aimed  at  facilitating  retail  invest-
ment,  the  rationale  for  exempting  them  would  be  that  position  reporting  to  ensure  compliance 
with the limits regime would serve no purpose and would appear as an unnecessary regulatory 
burden not commensurate with the intended policy objectives. It was also noted that retail inves-
tors  would anyway not fit within the reporting categories in Article 58(4). After the meeting,  the 
Commission  was  asked for  a  view  on  the  merits  of  and  exemption for  such  securitised  deriva-
tives, as it seems that the Commission could establish such under its empowerment for delegat-
ed acts in Article 58(6) of the Directive. 
 
 

 


 
 
A level 3 brainstorming, how the process will work (timeframes, inputs from NCAs, etc.) will be 
included  in  the  agenda  of  the  next  meeting  on  19  November,  including  what  could  be  part  of 
Q&A and Guidelines. 
 
9.  AOB 
The  Chair  raised  that  CEER  was  interested  in  a  meeting  with  ESMA  and  NCAs.  ESMA  and 
several  NCAs  expressed  interest  in  attending  a  meeting  with  the  different  energy  regulators.  It 
was  requested  to  indicate  what  issues  should  be  on  the  agenda  as  well  as  a  date  preference 
(Early/mid December tentatively). 
 
10. Future meetings 
Future meetings will be set by the new Chair of the CDTF. The next one scheduled is November 
19, 2015 in London. A meeting with the CWG is expected for the first half of January 2016. 
 
 
 

 

Document Outline