Esta es la versión HTML de un fichero adjunto a una solicitud de acceso a la información 'correspondence with DG trade'.


 
 
 
 
European Union 
 
UNITED NATIONS  
HUMAN RIGHTS COUNCIL 
 
 
 
 
 
Open-ended intergovernmental working group on transnational 
corporations and other business enterprises with respect to human rights 
3rd session (23-27 October 2017) 
 
 
 
 
"Panel: the voice of the victims" 
Intervention by the European Union 
 
 
Geneva, 27 October 2017 
 
- CHECK AGAINST DELIVERY -  

 

UNITED NATIONS  
 
HUMAN RIGHTS COUNCIL 
 
Open-ended intergovernmental working group on transnational 
corporations and other business enterprises with respect to human rights 
3rd session (23-27 October 2017) 
Mr. Chairperson-Rapporteur, 
 
I have the honour to speak on behalf of the European Union.  
 
All victims need to be heard.  Those who have suffered human rights violations by States as 
well as those that are victims of abuses by non-state actors have a right to access justice and a 
right  to  effective  remedy.  There  are  more  and  more  voices  calling  for  the  need  to  address 
abuses connected to the activities of business enterprises both of domestic enterprises as well 
as  companies  headquartered  abroad.  Civil  society  organisations,  human  rights  defenders, 
independent media and national human rights institutions have an important role in enabling 
the voices of victims of human rights violations and abuses to be heard. It is unacceptable that 
any of those speaking out on behalf of the victims become subject to harassment, persecution 
and retaliation, and have to risk their own lives as they work for the promotion and protection 
of  human  rights.  Human  rights  defenders  indeed  face  specific  risks  when  they  try  to  help 
victims  of  abuses  connected  to  activities  of  enterprises.  During  the  last  Forum  on  Business 
and  Human  Rights,  we  were  particularly  touched  by  the  testimony  of  the  daughter  of 
murdered human rights defender Berta Carceres. The EU calls for a thorough, transparent and 
expedite investigation into this and all other killings.  
 
The  testimonies  given  by  victims  remind  us  that  much  more  remains  to  be  done  across  all 
regions to implement existing human rights obligations. Current discussions  should not serve 
as an excuse to avoid providing  remedy for victims waiting for justice now  The provision of 
effective  remedy  cannot  wait.  Let  me  quote  the  commentary  to  UN  Guiding  Principles  on 
Business and Human Rights number 26. States "should ensure that the provision of justice is 
not prevented by corruption of the judicial process, that courts are independent of economic 
or  political  pressures  from  other  State  agents  and  from  business  actors,  and  that  the 

 

legitimate and peaceful activities of human rights defenders are not obstructed."1 This is one 
of the several  provisions  in  the UN Guiding Principles recalling the duties of States and the 
responsibilities of business.  
 
We cannot emphasise enough that States must implement existing obligations and this week's 
discussion raises some legitimate questions. How can victims expect to have access to justice 
and to remedy in cases of abuses related to business activities in a State where the legislation 
fails  to  comply  with  existing  international  human  rights  law?  In  a  State  where  the  judiciary 
system is not independent?  In a State where corruption impacts negatively on the fulfilment 
of all human rights?  If a new legal instrument was to be created why  would victims believe 
that those States currently failing to protect human rights would implement new obligations?  
 
Mr Chairperson-Rapporteur,  
Commitment  to  the  promotion  and  the  protection  of  human  rights  at  home  and  abroad  is  a 
priority for the European Union and we are committed to mainstreaming human rights into all 
external aspects of EU policies in order to ensure better policy coherence2. The Business and 
Human Rights agenda is indeed one of the areas requiring coherence between what we do at 
home and abroad. Much is being done to strengthen regulation and guidance at the EU level 
and by EU Member States level; much is being done to work with States from across regions. 
At  the  heart  of  our  efforts  is  our  call  on  "all  business  enterprises,  both  transnational  and 
domestic, to comply with the UN Guiding Principles, the ILO Tripartite Declaration and the 
OECD Guidelines, inter alia by integrating human rights due diligence into their operations to 
better identify, prevent and mitigate human rights risks"3. We also recognize the potential for 
improved  cooperation  between  States  in  cross-border  cases.  At  the  UN  level,  we  see 
meaningful  progress  in  the  directions  of  work  set  out  by  UN  Human  Rights  Council 
resolution  32/10  on  "Business  and  Human  Rights:  improving  accountability  and  access  to 
remedy":    this  resolution  presented  by  the  core  group  on  Business  and  Human  Rights 
(Argentina, Ghana, Norway, the Russian Federation) sent the needed signal and commitment 
from  all  States  that  effective  and  pragmatic  steps  can  be  taken  without  delay  to  ensure 
accountability and access to remedy. It is now for all of us to make the best possible use of the 
                                                           
1 http://www.ohchr.org/Documents/Publications/GuidingPrinciplesBusinessHR_EN.pdf  
2 http://www.consilium.europa.eu/en/press/press-releases/2015/07/20-fac-human-rights/  
3 http://www.consilium.europa.eu/en/press/press-releases/2015/07/20-fac-human-rights/  

 

OHCHR-led  Accountability  and  Remedy  Project  and  several  work  streams  of  the  Working 
Group on Business and Human Rights.  
 
The  Business  and  Human  Rights  agenda  is  also  one  such  area,  which  requires  coherence 
across  our  policies  in  various  areas.  We  have  set  out  clear  objectives  for  ourselves  to 
incorporate  human  rights  in  impact  assessments  for  EU  sectoral  policies  such  as  trade  and 
development cooperation; to address our responsibilities as commercial actors (e.g. in public 
procurement) and when supporting or partnering with businesses (e.g. through export credit, 
trade promotion, or subsidies for the private sector). We are also supportive that International 
Financial Institutions (IFIs) ensure human rights compliance in their programme support and 
that their grievance mechanisms operate in line with the UN Guiding Principles on Business 
and Human Rights4. 
 
Much has been said this week regarding rights and obligations of investors. These legitimate 
issues are being discussed in other forum, but it may be worth recalling two important points: 
Nothing  precludes  a  sovereign  State  from  imposing  obligations  an  investor  in  its  territory. 
Fully aware of concerns raised by some investment  disputes in  the past, we  have been fully 
engaged  in  a  comprehensive  process  of  reforming  investment  agreements.  We  are  actively 
participating in in-depth discussions in this respect at the multilateral level, more precisely in 
UNCTAD and UNCITRAL. 
 
Mr Chairperson-rapporteur,  
 
Discussions  this  week  have  shown  that  many  have  come  to  support  this  process  out  of 
concern about the negative impact of globalization; concerns that States will not live up to the 
ambitious objectives as set out in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Indeed, an 
ambitious  goal:  "Transforming  our  world"5.  We  are  fully  aware  of  these  concerns  and  they 
must be ways to alleviate them. One such way is to ensure that the UN Guiding Principles are 
fully  implemented  as  part  of  the  implementation  of  the  2030  Agenda.  At  the  Forum  on 
Business and Human Rights in 2016, former UNSRSG John Ruggie invited business, and all 
of  us,  to  focus  on  the  relationship  between  the  Sustainable  Development  Goals  and  the  UN 
Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights. His proposition to business as well as to 
                                                           
4 http://www.consilium.europa.eu/en/press/press-releases/2015/07/20-fac-human-rights/ 
5 https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/post2015/transformingourworld   

 

all other actors is that "respect for human rights, respect for the dignity of every person, is at 
the  very  core  of  the  people  part  of  sustainable  development  […]  and  is  also  the  key  to 
ensuring  a  socially  sustainable  globalization,  from  which  business  stands  to  be  a  major 
beneficiary"6. Some business enterprises, including European companies, lead by example in 
the way they identify, prevent  and mitigate human rights  risks. Needless to say,  much more 
remains to be done by all enterprises worldwide to meet their responsibility to respect human 
rights. This is a positive and forward looking agenda.  
 
In  closing,  we  need  to  respond  to  the  legitimate  expectations  of  victims  of  business  related 
activities.  This  requires  a  collective  endeavour  to  ensure  access  to  justice  and  effective 
remedy;  and  a  collective  endeavour  to  effectively  prevent  further  abuses  connected  to 
business-related activities. The European Union stands ready to continue working to confront 
this  global  challenge  together  with  all  States,  enterprises,  civil  society  organisations  and 
human rights defenders.  
 
I thank you Mr. Chairperson-Rapporteur.  
 
 
                                                           
6http://www.ohchr.org/Documents/Issues/Business/ForumSession5/Statements/JohnRuggie.pdf