Esta es la versión HTML de un fichero adjunto a una solicitud de acceso a la información 'correspondence with DG trade'.


 
 
 
 
European Union 
 
UNITED NATIONS  
HUMAN RIGHTS COUNCIL 
 
 
 
 
 
Open-ended intergovernmental working group on transnational corporations  
 
and other business enterprises with respect to human rights 
3rd session (23-27 October 2017) 
 
 
Debate on the implementation of the UN Guiding Principles 
Remarks by the European Union 
 
 
 
Geneva, 23 October 2017 
 
- CHECK AGAINST DELIVERY -  
 

UNITED NATIONS  
 
HUMAN RIGHTS COUNCIL 
 
Open-ended intergovernmental working group on transnational corporations  
 
and other business enterprises with respect to human rights 
3rd session (23-27 October 2017) 
The UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights  endorsed by consensus  in  the Human 
Rights Council remain the authoritative framework for preventing and addressing the risk of adverse 
impacts  on  human  rights  linked  to  business  activity.  It  is  encouraging  that  six  years  after  their 
adoption, we already have numerous examples of how these Guiding Principles have been integrated 
into  the  policies  of  international  and  regional  organisations,  Governments’  national  action  plans, 
policies  and  regulations,  and  how  these  have  been  being  applied  by  many  businesses  around  the 
world.  
 
A sign of our commitment and to set a clear direction of work, the European Union adopted in June 
2016 Council Conclusions on Business and Human Rights outlining clear steps towards the further 
implementation of the UN Guiding Principles. Council Conclusions have also been adopted on related 
issues such as Responsible Global Value Chains or Child Labour.  
 
As one of the means to implement the provisions of the first pillar ("The state duty to protect human 
rights") and to implement existing obligations, we have taken the lead internationally on developing 
and adopting National Action Plans (NAPs) to implement the Guiding Principles or integrating the 
UN Guiding Principles into national CSR Strategies. We are pleased to see National Action Plans 
being developed and adopted across regions. In addition, the EU has adopted  legislative instruments 
such as on a Directive on the disclosure of non-financial and diversity information: under EU law, 
beginning in 2018, companies will be required to disclose information on policies, risks and outcomes 
as regards environmental matters, social and employee-related aspects, respect for human rights, anti-
corruption and bribery issues.  
 

 

The smart mix of regulatory and voluntary measures at the level of the European Union is articulated 
to see further progress also under the second pillar ("The corporate responsibility to respect"). We 
continue to call on all business enterprises, both transnational and domestic, to comply with the UN 
Guiding Principles, the ILO Tripartite Declaration and the OECD Guidelines, inter alia by integrating 
human rights due diligence into their operations to better identify, prevent and mitigate human rights 
risks. It is encouraging to see the number of business enterprises leading by example on due diligence, 
reporting and setting up grievance mechanisms. It is encouraging to see that, increasingly, business 
and civil society work together for concrete progress. It is encouraging to see States, business and 
civil society working together. As an international organisation member of the Group of Friends of 
the Montreux Document Forum, the EU is for instance pleased to see the operationalisation of the 
International Code of Conduct Association in Geneva as an oversight mechanism for Private Security 
Companies.  
 
The  EU  welcomes  the  efforts  underway  to  allow  for  pragmatic  and  tangible  progress  in  the 
implementation of the provision on "Access to remedy", the third pillar of the UN Guiding Principles. 
We  commend  the  leadership  of  the  High  Commissioner  for  Human  Rights  and  his  office  for  the 
progress achieved in a limited time period with the Accountability and Remedy Project. Improving 
cooperation between States in cross-border cases is an essential component to ensure that victims or 
their relatives have access to remedy, and to allow for accountability.  
 
The EU and EU Member States have a robust system in place, including regarding access to courts 
for  human  rights  abuses  occurring  outside  the  EU.  The  Brussels  I  Regulation  establishes  rules 
regulating  the  allocation  of  jurisdiction  in  civil  or  commercial  disputes  of  a  cross  border  nature, 
including civil liability disputes concerning the violation of human rights. We are taking steps towards 
further  progress.  Following  on  the  request  made  by  the  Council,  the  European  Union  Agency  for 
Fundamental Rights (FRA) published in April 2017, an opinion on "Improving access to remedy in 
the area of business and human rights at the EU level". As a follow up to the Agency's opinion, the 
European  Commission  has  already  requested  that  this  Agency  collect  information  on  judicial  and 
non-judicial mechanisms in the Member States concerning access to remedy for victims of business 
related violations". 
 

 

We would like to conclude with this key message: victims and relatives and human rights defenders 
at  risk  cannot  wait  for  the  outcome  of  complicated  discussion  on  further  legalization  at  the 
international level. There is urgency to take all necessary measures to implement existing obligations 
to prevent abuses and ensure access to remedy. We are making progress and stand ready to continue 
working closely with States and other stakeholders worldwide to realize this shared objective.