This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Correspondence on corporate liability'.

 
 
A/HRC/34/47 
 
Advance edited version 
Distr.: General 
4 January 2017 
 
Original: English 
Human Rights Council 
Thirty-fourth session 
27 February-24 March 2017 
Agenda item 3 
Promotion and protection of all human rights, civil, 
political, economic, social and cultural rights, 
including the right to development 

 
  Report on the second session of the open-ended 
intergovernmental working group on 
transnational corporations and other business 
enterprises with respect to human rights
* 
Chair-Rapporteur: María Fernanda Espinosa 
 
 
 
*  The annexes to the present report are circulated as received, in the language of submission only. 

A/HRC/34/47 
Contents 
 
Page 
 
I. 
Introduction ...................................................................................................................................  

 
II. 
Organization of the session ...........................................................................................................  

 
 
A. 
Election of the Chair-Rapporteur ..........................................................................................  

 
 
B. 
Attendance ............................................................................................................................  

 
 
C. 
Documentation ......................................................................................................................  

 
 
D. 
Adoption of the agenda and programme of work .................................................................  

 
III. 
General statements ........................................................................................................................  

 
IV. 
Panel discussions ...........................................................................................................................  

 
 
A. 
Panel I. Overview of the social, economic and environmental impacts related to  
 
 
 
transnational corporations and other business enterprises and human rights,  
 
 
 
and their legal challenges ......................................................................................................  

 
 
B. 
Panel II. Primary obligations of States, including extraterritorial obligations  
 
 
 
related to transnational corporations and other business enterprises with  
 
 
 
respect to protecting human rights ........................................................................................  

 
 
C. 
Panel III. Obligations and responsibilities of transnational corporations and  
 
 
 
other business enterprises with respect to human rights .......................................................  
12 
 
 
D. 
Panel IV. Open debate on different approaches and criteria for the future definition 
 
 
 
of the scope of the international legally binding instrument .................................................  
16 
 
 
E. 
Panel V. Strengthening cooperation with regard to prevention, remedy and 
 
 
 
accountability and access to justice at the national and international levels .........................  
17 
 
 
F. 
Panel VI. Lessons learned and challenges to access to remedy (selected cases from 
 
 
 
different sectors and regions) ................................................................................................  
20 
 
V. 
Recommendations of the Chair-Rapporteur and conclusions of the working group .....................  
22 
 
 
A. 
Recommendations of the Chair-Rapporteur .........................................................................  
22 
 
 
B. 
Conclusions of the working group ........................................................................................  
22 
 
VI. 
Adoption of the report ...................................................................................................................  
23 
Annexes 
 
I.  List of participants .........................................................................................................................  
24 
 
II.  List of panellists and moderators...................................................................................................  
26 
2 
 

A/HRC/34/47 
 
I.  Introduction 
1. 
The open-ended intergovernmental working group on transnational corporations and 
other  business  enterprises  with  respect  to  human  rights  was  established  by  the  Human 
Rights  Council  in  its  resolution  26/9  of  26  June  2014,  and  mandated  to  elaborate  an 
international  legally  binding  instrument  to  regulate,  in  international  human  rights  law,  the 
activities of transnational corporations and other business enterprises with respect to human 
rights.  In  the  resolution,  the  Council  decided  that  the  first  two  sessions  of  the  working 
group  should  be  dedicated  to  conducting  constructive  deliberations  on  the  content,  scope, 
nature and form of the future international instrument. Following its first session, held from 
6 to 10 July 2015, the working group presented its first progress report to the Council at its 
thirty-first session (A/HRC/31/50).  
2. 
The  second  session,  which  took  place  from  24  to  28  October  2016,  opened  with  a 
video  message  by  the  United  Nations  High  Commissioner  for  Human  Rights.  The  High 
Commissioner  congratulated  the  Chair-Rapporteur  and  stated  that  business  entities  had  a 
vast and growing impact on peoples’ lives, including on gender relations, the environment, 
neighbourhoods and access to land and other resources. When businesses paid insufficient 
attention,  they  often  infringed  on  people’s  human  rights.  The  High  Commissioner 
underlined  the  importance  of  preventing  and  redressing  business-related  human  rights 
abuses and of ensuring greater accountability and access to remedy for victims. He referred 
to  the  outcomes  of  the  accountability  and  remedy  project  of  the  Office  of  the  United 
Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) (see A/HRC/32/19), suggesting 
that  the  project  could  provide  some  guidance  for  the  working  group  discussions.  He 
welcomed  the  embrace  of  civil  society  voices  and  the  constructive  involvement  of  States 
and other stakeholders in the working group discussions, reiterating the full support of his 
Office and wishing the working group success in its deliberations.  
3. 
The High Commissioner’s message was reinforced by the remarks of the Director of 
the  Thematic  Engagement,  Special  Procedures  and  Right  to  Development  Division,  who 
emphasized the need for improved mechanisms of accountability with respect to corporate 
human rights abuses.  
 
II.  Organization of the session 
 
A. 
Election of the Chair-Rapporteur 
4. 
The  working  group  elected  María  Fernanda  Espinosa  Garcés,  Permanent 
Representative  of  Ecuador,  as  Chair-Rapporteur  by  acclamation  following  her  nomination 
by the representative of Honduras on behalf of the Group of Latin American and Caribbean 
States.  
 
B. 
Attendance 
5. 
The  list  of  participants  and  the  list  of  panellists  and  moderators  are  contained  in 
annexes I and II, respectively.  
 


A/HRC/34/47 
 
C. 
Documentation 
6. 
The working group had before it the following documents: 
 
(a) 
Human Rights Council resolution 26/9;  
 
(b) 
The provisional agenda of the working group (A/HRC/WG.16/2/1); 
 
(c) 
Other  documents,  including  a  concept  note,  a  programme  of  work,  a  list  of 
panellists and their curricula vitae, a list of participants, and contributions from States and 
other  relevant  stakeholders,  which  were  made  available  to  the  working  group  through  its 
website.1  
 
D. 
Adoption of the agenda and programme of work 
7. 
In her opening statement, the Chair-Rapporteur expressed gratitude for the renewed 
trust placed in her as Chair-Rapporteur and pledged to maintain transparency and openness 
to  dialogue.  In  a  context  of  large-scale  outsourcing  of  production  and  global  value  chains 
spanning  different  jurisdictions,  international  human  rights  must  play  a  central  role.  The 
initiative of a binding instrument was based on respect for the principles of fairness, legality 
and justice, which should prevail for the benefit of all in the international context, and the 
objective of the process was to fill gaps in the international system of human rights and to 
provide better elements for access to justice and remedy for victims of human rights abuses 
related  to  transnational  corporations.  That  objective  was  in  no  way  aimed  at  undermining 
host States or the business sector, but was intended to level the playing field with regard to 
respect for human rights.  
8. 
The  Chair-Rapporteur  presented  the  draft  programme  of  work,  which  was  adopted 
as proposed.  
9. 
Jeffrey Sachs delivered a keynote message via videoconference, expressing support 
for an international legally binding instrument under which transnational corporations could 
be held accountable and their compliance  with human rights standards could be promoted 
and enforced. Noting that the most important locations for the enforcement of human rights 
and access to remedy for victims were national judicial systems, he underlined the need to 
incorporate  international  human  rights  into  national  legislation  and  to  facilitate  access  to 
justice. Citing  weak enforcement of judgments as the biggest obstacle to achieving access 
to  justice,  he  stressed  the  international  responsibility  to  honour  judgments  rendered, 
including  in  developing  countries,  which  were  often  hosts  to  transnational  corporations. 
Transnational  corporations  were  more  powerful  than  many  Governments;  therefore  they 
should  be  accountable  and  comply  with  human  rights  for  the  decent  development  of  the 
world  economy.  An  international  treaty  could  strengthen  the  capacity  of  Governments  to 
ensure remediation.  
 
III.  General statements 
10. 
State  delegations  acknowledged  the  work  of  the  Chair-Rapporteur  and  the 
transparent and inclusive process of consultation, as well as the flexibility demonstrated by 
States and other relevant  stakeholders in the preparation of the programme of  work. They 
recalled that many actors had struggled for more than 40 years to develop effective global 
standards to hold companies accountable with respect to human rights. 
 
 
 
1  www.ohchr.org/EN/HRBodies/HRC/WGTransCorp/Session2/Pages/Session2.aspx. 
4 
 

A/HRC/34/47 
11. 
One  regional  group  emphasized  that  transnational  corporations  and  other  business 
enterprises, through the global reach of their operational activities, had social and political 
impacts disproportionate to their legal and social obligations, nationally and internationally. 
While  recognizing  that  some  positive  measures  had  been  implemented  nationally  and 
regionally,  the  group  posited  that  in  order  to  promote  global  compliance  with  a  uniform 
standard,  action  must  be  initiated  to  develop  an  international  legally  binding  instrument. 
That  would  be  an  effective  response  to  many  of  the  issues  arising  in  the  context  of  the 
widely  perceived  inequality  in  rights  and  obligations  that  existed  between  transnational 
corporations  and  other  business  enterprises  and  victims  of  business-related  human  rights 
abuses;  the  same  point  was  subsequently  reiterated  by  other  delegations  and  non-
governmental  organizations  (NGOs).  Violations  of  human  rights  by  such  entities,  for 
example  in  the  areas  of  child  labour,  environmental  degradation  and  decent  work  and 
wages, affected marginalized and impoverished groups disproportionately and exacerbated 
existing  human  rights  concerns.  The  group  stated  that  it  remained  committed  to  the  letter 
and  spirit  of  Council  resolution  26/9  and  encouraged  the  Chair-Rapporteur  to  prepare  a 
draft negotiating text for the next session, based on the deliberations carried out to date and 
her own initiatives in that regard. 
12. 
Some delegations asserted that a legally binding instrument was needed in order to 
redress  the  current  imbalance  between  the  progressive  recognition  of  rights  on  the  one 
hand, and the economic and  political guarantees extended to transnational corporations on 
the  other.  Without  corresponding  obligations  for  corporations  to  respect  human  rights, 
rights were being undermined.  
13. 
Many delegations stressed that business enterprises could support the economy and 
contribute to development while respecting human rights, such as the right to development, 
including  access  to  public  services.  It  was  noted  that  constructive  dialogue  in  the  process 
towards  an  international  legally  binding  instrument  was  essential.  Some  delegations 
expressed  support  for  the  Guiding  Principles  on  Business  and  Human  Rights  and  their 
implementation  through  national  action  plans.  Many  delegations  recognized  that  the 
Guiding Principles and the mandate of the working group were mutually reinforcing, both 
representing  positive  steps  towards  the  protection  of  human  rights.  Some  delegations 
mentioned  that  the  working  group’s  mandate  did  not  duplicate  other  efforts  at  the 
international level.  
14. 
The  European  Union  noted  with  appreciation  that  the  programme  of  work,  which 
was a result of compromise and flexibility, provided the reassurance that the process did not 
undermine  the  much  needed  continued  implementation  of  the  Guiding  Principles.  The 
programme  of  work  widened  the  scope  of  the  working  group  beyond  transnational 
corporations  so  that  the  discussion  could  also  cover  all  other  enterprises.  The  European 
Union  also  noted  with  appreciation  that  agreement  had  been  found  on  the  programme  of 
work  for  the  second  session,  allowing  it  to  participate.  It  stressed  the  importance  of 
including  civil  society  organizations,  trade  unions  and  the  private  sector  in  the 
deliberations. The representative reminded the international community that more remained 
to be done to prevent abuses in connection with activities by transnational corporations and 
other  business  enterprises  and  to  enable  access  to  remedy  when  abuses  occurred,  and 
referred  to  the  mobilization  carried  out  by  civil  society  and  human  rights  defenders 
worldwide  on  those  issues.  In  line  with  the  earlier  concern  expressed  by  the  European 
Union that the working group had been established without other options, including the use 
of existing United Nations forums, having been considered, the representative emphasized 
that the international community needed to respond in a responsible and effective manner. 
In that connection, one State delegation called for the implementation of the guidelines for 
multinational  enterprises  published  by  the  Organization  for  Economic  Cooperation  and 
Development (OECD). 
 


A/HRC/34/47 
15. 
Another  political  group  referred  to  the  recommendation  on  human  rights  and 
business  recently  adopted  by  its  Committee  of  Ministers,  which  built  on  the  Guiding 
Principles, incorporating access to remedy and including additional guidance in relation to 
particular vulnerable groups.  
16. 
One  delegation  noted  that  any  legally  binding  instrument  on  transnational 
corporations  and  human  rights  should  address  the  challenges  posed  by  conflict  areas  and 
areas under occupation. The delegation indicated that its members were looking forward to 
the results of the data-based project on businesses operating in the occupied territories (see 
Human Rights Council resolution 31/36).  
17. 
Several delegations stressed the importance of a victim-centred approach and a focus 
on access to remedies and reparations. Even if there were positive measures at the national 
level  to  protect  victims  from  human  rights  violations  by  transnational  corporations,  there 
must  also  be  measures,  standards  and  mechanisms  in  a  binding  instrument  at  the 
international  level.  Additionally,  transnational  corporations  must  fulfil  existing  binding 
obligations relating to human rights in accordance with international law.  
18. 
One  delegation  noted  that  different  national  circumstances  might  need  to  be  taken 
into account while respecting and protecting human rights.  
19. 
Most  NGOs  concurred  that  any  binding  instrument  must  clearly  establish  the 
obligations of transnational corporations to comply  with environmental,  health and labour 
standards  and  international  humanitarian  law.  It  would  need  to  outline  the  right  of 
individuals  and  affected  communities  to  access  to  justice  and  include  provisions  for  the 
accountability  of  parent  companies,  protection  of  human  rights  defenders  and  the  right  to 
self-determination.  
20. 
Several  NGOs  advocated  that  any  treaty  proposed  should  provide  for  international 
implementation  mechanisms  and  possibly  an  international  tribunal.  Ultimately,  such  an 
instrument should allow States to regain policy space for the protection of human rights. 
21. 
NGOs  warned against corporate capture in the negotiation  of a binding instrument, 
with  States  having  the  responsibility  to  act  in  the  interests  of  their  people  and  not  in  the 
interests  of  transnational  corporations.  As  an  instructive  example,  reference  was  made  to 
the guidelines for the implementation of article 5 (3) of the WHO Framework Convention 
on Tobacco Control, on protecting against interference by transnational corporations. 
22. 
Some  NGOs  called  for  gender  perspectives  to  be  mainstreamed  in  the  instrument, 
since  human  rights  violations  by  transnational  corporations  might  exacerbate  pre-existing 
inequalities  and  exert  negative  gender  impacts.  Gender  perspectives  also  needed  to  be 
included  in  assessments  of  the  human  rights  impact  of  projects  and  activities  planned  by 
transnational corporations, including with regard to problems faced by those who defended 
the human rights of women. 
 
IV.  Panel discussions 
 
A. 
Panel I. Overview of the social, economic and environmental impacts 
related to transnational corporations and other business enterprises 
and human rights, and their legal challenges 

23. 
The first panellist noted that many transnational corporations had committed human 
rights violations  with impunity. Furthermore, international  investment treaties had granted 
rights  to  such  corporations  to  bring  claims  against  States  for  regulating  in  the  public 
interest.  The  situation  could  be  remedied  by  a  treaty  that  would  hold  transnational 
6 
 

A/HRC/34/47 
corporations  and  other  corporate  actors  accountable  for  human  rights  violations  resulting 
from their operations, including in their global value chains, and that  would allow  for the 
individual liability of leaders involved in the decision-making process. Such a treaty would 
be  tantamount  to  a  right  of  appeal  and  should  make  that  right  accessible  to  individuals, 
groups, trade unions and communities free of charge, with costs covered by a tax to be paid 
by  transnational  corporations.  In  addition  to  recognizing  the  standards  set  by  the 
International  Labour  Organization  (ILO)  and  by  the  World  Health  Organization  (WHO), 
those participating in the treaty process should recognize the need for an international court 
on climate issues.  
24. 
The  second  panellist  noted  that  the  working  group  process  was  relevant  to  the 
implementation  of  the  2030  Agenda  for  Sustainable  Development.  Modern  development 
had  seen  close  collusion  between  financial  and  corporate  actors,  since  investment  for 
delivering the 2030 Agenda was not based on credit, but on the reinvestment of corporate 
profits. While large companies had great potential for delivering social progress, they often 
contributed  to  a  race  to  the  bottom  with  regard  to  taxes  and  labour  costs.  Similarly,  free 
trade  agreements  carried  downstream  economic  risks  and  might  transfer  control  of  some 
factors  of  the  economy  from  the  public  sector  to  the  private  sector.  A  binding  instrument 
would  address  those  issues  and  provide  an  alternative  to  trade  agreements  negotiated 
behind closed doors. 
25. 
The  third  panellist  identified  the  need  to  address  the  structure  of  transnational 
corporations  and  their  supply  chains,  acknowledging  the  failure  of  soft  law  and  voluntary 
approaches and expressing support for the development of  an instrument that  would build 
on,  and  not  undermine,  the  Guiding  Principles.  Such  an  instrument  must  cover  workers’ 
rights,  particularly  those  set  out  in  the  ILO  Declaration  on  Fundamental  Principles  and 
Rights  at  Work,  and  should  be  applicable  to  transnational  corporations  but  not  exclude 
other  businesses,  in  order  to  avoid  accountability  gaps.  A  treaty  should  include  an 
obligation on States to adopt measures on human rights due diligence and clarify the steps 
that  companies  should  take  in  that  regard,  and  should  establish  legal  liability  and 
extraterritorial jurisdiction for human rights abuses.  
26. 
The  fourth  panellist  stressed  that  corporate  legal  structures  rendered  it  difficult  to 
hold  corporations  accountable.  She  pointed  to  the  problem  of  enhanced  protection  of 
investor  rights,  which  often  went  further  than  national  law  and  provided  investors  with  a 
right to have their claims settled by international arbitration rather than in national courts. 
Investment  treaties  could  clash  with  States’  obligations  to  protect  human  rights,  and  the 
threat of international investor-State dispute settlement proceedings had a chilling effect on 
developing  countries  in  terms  of  regulatory  measures.  Investor-State  dispute  settlement 
proceedings  resulted  in  an  imbalance  of  power  because  they  provided  a  remedy  only  for 
business  stakeholders.  One  solution  would  be  to  allow  victims  access  to  courts  of  the 
investors’  home  States,  which  was  often  where  assets  of  transnational  corporations  were 
located.  A  binding  instrument  could  provide  guidance  for  the  development  of  trade  and 
investment  instruments,  including  by  stipulating  the  requirement  of  ex  ante  and  ex  post 
facto  human  rights  impact  assessments  and  setting  out  appropriate  investor  obligations. 
Such  principles  were  reflected  in  the  Investment  Policy  Framework  for  Sustainable 
Development  of  the  United  Nations  Conference  on  Trade  and  Development  (UNCTAD) 
and in South African and Indian law.  
27. 
The  fifth  panellist  noted  that  the  corporate  law  principles  of  separate  legal  identity 
and limited responsibility were often applied together in relation to the acts of subsidiaries, 
allowing  the  mother  company  to  escape  responsibility.  Certain  legal  doctrines,  such  as 
piercing the corporate veil, were designed to resolve such problems. A binding instrument 
could set out standards for operationalizing such principles, and the identification of those 
standards did not require a unique  understanding of  what  a transnational corporation  was. 
 


A/HRC/34/47 
The panellist suggested that the instrument should provide for mechanisms to facilitate the 
protection of human rights.  
28. 
The sixth panellist criticized the practice of tax evasion by companies and suggested 
country-by-country  tax  reporting.  The  belief  of  States  that  they  must  sign  bilateral 
investment treaties in order to attract foreign direct investment was seen as the source of the 
investor-State  dispute  settlement  system.  However,  such  bilateral  treaties  were  a  threat  to 
democracy,  removing  the  control  of  the  judiciary,  and  could  interfere  with  legislative 
processes.  
29. 
Most  delegations  concurred  that  voluntary  standards  were  insufficient  and  that  a 
binding instrument should affirm that human rights obligations prevailed over commercial 
law.  States  had  obligations  to  regulate  in  the  public  interest,  defend  the  rights  of  people 
against privatization, strengthen mechanisms for due diligence and ensure that transnational 
corporations did not use their influence to avoid accountability and payment of reparations 
to  victims.  One  delegation  suggested  that  maximum  deterrence  could  be  achieved  by 
imposing criminal liability.  
30. 
Several  delegations  referred  to  the  asymmetry  between  rights  and  obligations  of 
transnational  corporations  in  bilateral  investment  treaties  and  free  trade  agreements. 
Concern was expressed about the access by corporations to international arbitration against 
States,  where  there  were  no  corresponding  mechanisms  to  address  the  obligations  of 
corporations to respect human rights. 
31. 
A number of delegations referred to specific cases to demonstrate how transnational 
corporations had used bilateral and multilateral agreements to challenge measures taken by 
States  to  protect  human  rights.  One  delegation  referred  to  a  case  where  such  a  challenge 
had  failed,  highlighting  the  existence  of  tools  for  States  to  defend  themselves  properly 
before international arbitration tribunals. 
32. 
Another delegation reaffirmed the right of the State to regulate in the public interest 
and  referred  to  its  own  act  on  the  protection  of  investment,  aimed  at  securing  a  balance 
between the rights and responsibilities of investors. 
33. 
Some  delegations  claimed  that  it  was  not  feasible  to  compare  transnational 
corporations and local companies since domestic law could hold the latter accountable. 
34. 
Many  NGOs  stated  that  a  binding  instrument  should  not  be  conceived  of  as  an 
isolated  human  rights  instrument,  but  should  take  into  account  international  trade  and 
investment agreements. Furthermore, it should include a hierarchical clause establishing the 
primacy of human rights over trade and investment agreements and address critical gaps in 
assessing  and  monitoring  the  impact  of  such  agreements.  Calls  were  made  for  the 
establishment  of  an  international  tribunal  or  mechanism  to  investigate  and  ensure  the 
accountability of transnational corporations. 
35. 
One delegation raised the issue of unilateral economic sanctions and asked whether 
States could compel corporations to enforce such sanctions in the light of negative impacts 
on human rights.  
36. 
NGOs  enumerated  some  of  the  adverse  human  rights  impacts  caused  by 
transnational  corporations  and  requested  that  the  binding  instrument  guarantee  indigenous 
peoples’ rights, recognize the primacy of the human right to water over profit-seeking in the 
water sector and guarantee access to safe drinking water and other resources. Few countries 
had  adopted  national  laws  in  accordance  with  the  ILO  Indigenous  and  Tribal  Peoples 
Convention, 1989 (No. 169).  
8 
 

A/HRC/34/47 
 
B. 
Panel II. Primary obligations of States, including extraterritorial 
obligations related to transnational corporations and other business 
enterprises with respect to protecting human rights  

 
 
Subtheme 1. Implementing international human rights obligations: examples of 
national legislation and international instruments applicable to transnational 
corporations and other business enterprises with respect to human rights  

37. 
The first panellist pointed to the paradox of some States claiming that human rights 
interfered  with  their  sovereignty  while  remaining  willing  to  sign  investment  treaties  that 
protected  the  rights  of  transnational  corporations  and  directly  interfered  with  their 
sovereignty.  A  binding  treaty  must:  address  the  regulatory  shortfall  with  respect  to  the 
protection  of  human  rights  and  codify  and  develop  the  responsibility  of  States  to  protect 
human  rights;  build  capacity  and  help  States  to  adopt  effective  legislative  and 
administrative  measures  to  establish  the  criminal  and  civil  liability  of  corporations 
responsible  for  human  rights  abuses;  and  provide  standards  to  protect  public  policy  in 
bilateral investment treaties.  
38. 
The second panellist drew attention to the well-developed international human rights 
regime  and  recalled  the  obligation  of  States  to  protect,  respect  and  fulfil  human  rights, 
including  in  relation  to  the  activities  of  third  parties,  such  as  businesses,  while 
simultaneously noting the significant limitations to States’ compliance with such a regime. 
Any binding instrument should be developed in a way that addresses the causes of current 
enforcement gaps. 
39. 
The third panellist referred to relevant international standards that might be useful in 
developing  the  content  of  an  international  instrument,  citing,  for  example,  the  Maastricht 
Principles  on  Extraterritorial  Obligations  of  States  in  the  Area  of  Economic,  Social  and 
Cultural Rights, in particular principles 8, 9, 25, 26, 29, 36 and 37.  
40. 
The  fourth  panellist  noted  that  infringement  of  human  rights  by  transnational 
corporations  happened  in  the  context  of  an  overall  architecture  of  impunity.  A  binding 
instrument  could  change  that  state  of  play,  remedy  the  asymmetry  between  the  rights  and 
obligations  of  transnational  corporations,  allow  for  the  monitoring  of  human  rights 
compliance  of  transnational  corporations  by  home  and  host  States  as  well  as  by  citizens, 
and  extend  the  obligations  of  such  corporations  in  relation  to  contracting  with  suppliers. 
There  would  be  a  need  for  an  international  court  to  enforce  the  treaty,  as  well  as  for 
extraterritorial obligations and universal jurisdictional mechanisms.  
41. 
One delegation noted that States were expected to uphold human rights both at home 
and abroad and advocated for the implementation of the Guiding Principles.  
42. 
Several delegations recalled the primary obligation of States to protect human rights, 
including in relation to transnational corporations. Regional courts had acknowledged that 
corporate abuses could lead to States violating their obligations to exercise due diligence. A 
binding  instrument  would  allow  both  home  and  host  States  to  protect  human  rights  and 
redress violations committed by transnational corporations. 
43. 
Examples were given of domestic law that required companies to accept monitoring 
by  Government  and  members  of  the  public,  for  example  in  the  areas  of  labour, 
environmental  law  and  consumer  protection.  It  was  recommended  that  countries  should 
make human rights a key factor when considering international investment.  
44. 
One  delegation  cited  the  need  to  agree  on  clear  standards  to  prevent  transnational 
corporations  from  avoiding  extraterritorial  obligations  and  turning  to  international 
arbitration  to  protect  their  interests.  Another  delegation  observed  that  the  extraterritorial 
dimension  could  be  dealt  with  as  per  the  practice  of  treaty  bodies,  which  had  stated  that 
 


A/HRC/34/47 
home  States  had  duties  in  relation  to  the  extraterritorial  operations  of  transnational 
corporations and that such duties did not infringe on host States’ sovereignty.  
45. 
Another delegation advocated for a binding instrument to address the issue of State 
complicity,  pointing  out  that  the  corrupting  influence  of  corporations  might  take  many 
forms, including lobbies and unlimited resources. In the State represented by the delegation, 
human rights were an important pillar of domestic and foreign policies and enshrined in the 
Constitution,  which  had  enabled  the  judicial  system  to  hand  down  judgments  finding 
corporations responsible for human rights violations. However there had been enforcement 
challenges  following  the  closure  or  relocation  of  corporate  operations.  The  delegation 
referred to its Government’s guidelines on good practices for domestic companies operating 
abroad.  
46. 
Some  delegations  challenged  the  value  of  investor-State  dispute  settlement 
proceedings,  describing  how  unfair  arbitration  processes  could  lead  to  major  economic 
costs  for  States.  Victims  of  human  rights  violations  generally  did  not  have  access  to 
arbitration,  even  in  local  courts,  and  non-compliance  with  national  rulings  was  frequent. 
Other  questions  raised  included  how  to  reconcile  State  sovereignty  with  the  notion  of 
extraterritorial  and  universal  jurisdiction,  and  how  to  guarantee  the  implementation  of 
decisions  adopted  by  host  States  regarding  violations  of  human  rights  by  transnational 
corporations when the latter fled the jurisdiction. 
47. 
NGOs  conveyed  experiences  of  assisting  victims  and  highlighted  the  multiple 
procedural  and  legal  obstacles,  including  when  holding  parent  companies  accountable  for 
subsidiaries’  abuses.  A  binding  instrument  should  overcome  such  obstacles,  with  the 
Maastricht Principles providing key elements for defining extraterritorial scope.  
48. 
Reference  was  made  to  national  initiatives  by  which  States  sought  to  impose 
obligations  of  corporate  human  rights  due  diligence,  including  in  relation  to  operations 
abroad,  and  the  reversal  of  the  burden  of  proof  in  investigating  complaints  of  corporate 
abuse.  However,  it  was  reported  that  those  initiatives  faced  strong  resistance  from  the 
business community.  
49. 
Calls  were  made  for  the  creation  of  a  body  to  receive  and  investigate  complaints 
submitted by affected communities or their representatives. 
50. 
It was proposed that the Convention on Access to Information, Public Participation 
in Decision-Making and Access to Justice in Environmental Matters should form the basis 
for  participation,  access  to  justice  and  remedy  provisions  in  a  binding  instrument.  A 
reference  was  also  made  to  the  Committee  on  the  Elimination  of  Discrimination  against 
Women, which had set out extraterritorial obligations with regard to discrimination against 
women, extending to acts of national corporations operating extraterritorially.  
51. 
One panellist highlighted the need to provide the most vulnerable groups with legal 
tools  to  claim  their  rights,  including  through  capacity-building  in  host  countries. 
Cooperation  between  States  and  judicial  bodies  was  deemed  as  essential  to  ensure  the 
implementation of decisions.  
52. 
One  panellist  did  not  share  the  view  that  trade  agreements  could  result  in  adverse 
human rights impacts and that all investment arbitration tribunals aligned with the interests 
of investors. A State could denounce and withdraw from an investment treaty at any time. 
On the question of how power could be rebalanced vis-à-vis corporations, there were many 
positive initiatives, for example, the G7 CONNEX Initiative, as well as work carried out by 
UNCTAD.  Additionally,  the  panellist  warned  that  the  proposed  reversal  of  the  burden  of 
proof would not be in line with due process.  
10 
 

A/HRC/34/47 
 
 
Subtheme 2. Jurisprudential and practical approaches to elements of 
extraterritoriality and national sovereignty 

53. 
The first panellist indicated that a binding instrument should clarify the home State’s 
responsibility to impose an obligation on transnational corporations to comply with certain 
norms  wherever  they  operated,  for  example,  due  diligence  requirements  for  prevention  of 
harm, disclosure and reporting requirements, as well as the courts’ jurisdiction in that State 
for  corporate  human  rights  abuses  committed  anywhere  the  business  concerned  operated. 
The International Court of Justice had clarified that a State’s obligations to respect human 
rights applied beyond the State’s territory when there was a link between the State and the 
activity taking place abroad. 
54. 
The  second  panellist  recalled  that  corporations  had  obligations  under  international 
law  and  asserted  the  need  to  close  legal  gaps.  While  States  had  obligations  to  protect 
citizens from corporate human rights violations, when they failed to meet those obligations 
or  were  too  weak  to  do  so,  there  was  often  no  liability  before  international  tribunals  or 
domestic  courts  of  other  countries.  Placing  obligations  on  States  to  create  national  legal 
frameworks could also risk undermining human rights by resulting in differential standards. 
In the race to the bottom, corporations could relocate their operations to States with lesser 
protections. 
55. 
The third panellist identified different levels for providing a reasonable opportunity 
for  victims  to  obtain  a  remedy  for  human  rights  abuses  committed  by  transnational 
corporations.  Level  1  would  comprise  national  and  subnational  legal  systems.  Level  2 
would  entail  the  engagement  of  an  international  or  regional  ombudsperson  who  could 
intervene  on  behalf  of  weaker  plaintiffs  against  more  powerful  corporations  or  States.  At 
level  3,  which  would  be  at  the  level  of  the  home  State  or  a  country  with  a  significant 
presence  of  assets  held  by  transnational  corporations,  there  would  be  a  specific  role  for 
extraterritorial application of law. Level 4 — the international level — would include a role 
for  an  international  court  on  transnational  corporations  and  human  rights.  Level  5  would 
comprise  a  register  of  all  pending  cases  concerning  transnational  corporations  and  human 
rights.  
56. 
The  fourth  panellist  suggested  drawing  lessons  from  the  implementation  of  two 
international  instruments  designed  to  protect  human  rights  from  abuses  by  transnational 
corporations,  namely,  the  International  Code  of  Marketing  of  Breast-milk  Substitutes  and 
the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, both developed under the auspices 
of WHO. First, it was important to have the data to support the treaty provisions, especially 
data  that  demonstrated  the  ways  Governments  bore  the  costs  of  repairing  the  damage 
caused by human rights abuses committed by transnational corporations, for example, costs 
related  to  health  care,  water  and  sanitation,  and  the  repair  of  environmental  damage. 
Second,  the  panellist  urged  the  use  of  the  precedents  set  through  the  Framework 
Convention  to  protect  the  working  group  process  from  conflicts  of  interest  and  corporate 
interference  (see  art.  5  (3)  of  the  Framework  Convention)  and  to  develop  a  civil  and 
criminal liability regime (see art. 19).  
57. 
The  fifth  panellist  stressed  the  importance  of  holding  transnational  corporations 
accountable  also  for  failure  to  prevent  harm.  The  Rome  Statute  of  the  International 
Criminal Court excluded the consideration of crimes linked to the economy. However, the 
experience  and  rulings  of  the  Permanent  Peoples’  Tribunal  demonstrated  that  crimes 
committed  by  transnational  corporations  could  be  adjudicated,  including  when  they 
constituted crimes against humanity.  
58. 
Some  delegations  stressed  the  importance  of  States  adopting  measures  to  protect 
human rights at the domestic level and noted that many were already regulating corporate 
 
11 

A/HRC/34/47 
behaviour in relation to issues such as workers’ health and safety. Some countries already 
had provisions for extraterritorial jurisdiction in place for certain issues. 
59. 
Delegations also noted that there was frequently a lack of cooperation between home 
and host States, which resulted in victims not having access to justice. A binding instrument 
must strengthen such cooperation, including by fortifying the legislation of home States to 
prevent cases from being rejected on jurisdictional grounds. 
60. 
Another  element  raised  by  delegations  was  the  establishment  of  a  national 
mechanism,  such  as  an  ombudsman’s  office,  that  could  receive  complaints  and  produce 
reports.  
61. 
Delegations  again  highlighted  the  issue  of  extraterritoriality,  noting  that  several 
treaty bodies had recognized the obligation of States to prevent third parties from violating 
human rights. It was suggested that treaty bodies, for example the Committee on Economic, 
Social  and  Cultural  Rights  and  the  Committee  on  the  Rights  of  the  Child,  could  also  be 
instructive  with  regard  to  preventative  measures.  The  need  for  States  to  take  measures  to 
ensure protection against human rights violations committed by companies abroad, as long 
as there was a reasonable link between a State and the company’s activities, was stressed.  
62. 
One  participant  drew  attention  to  a  number  of  successful  cases  brought  against 
corporate actors worldwide. Corporate actors were found to bear the primary responsibility 
for violations in approximately half of those cases; in the other half, the State or its agents 
were found to be the primary actor, with the company being complicit in the State’s action.  
63. 
Parties  to  a  future  instrument  should  cooperate  in  the  enforcement  of  judgments, 
thereby addressing some of the challenges faced in terms of access to remedy. One panellist 
referred to multiple models at the inter-American level and in the arbitration sphere where 
States had designed instruments for cooperation in that regard.  
64. 
Another  panellist  stressed  that  a  binding  instrument  would  need  to  clarify  that 
human rights are truly universal, and the fact that an entity was incorporated in a particular 
jurisdiction should not be used to avoid liability. There was a need to impose obligations on 
all  actors  with  capacity  to  violate  human  rights.  A  treaty  would  also  need  to  include 
provisions  for  dealing  with  jurisdictional  challenges  that  arose  in  the  context  of  complex 
investment flows, as well as address evidentiary and procedural obstacles.  
 
C. 
Panel III. Obligations and responsibilities of transnational corporations 
and other business enterprises with respect to human rights  

 
 
Subtheme 1. Examples of international instruments addressing obligations and 
responsibilities of private actors  

65. 
The  first  panellist  presented  the  example  of  the  WHO  Framework  Convention  on 
Tobacco Control, which provided a good opportunity to enhance public health and change 
business models, since it provided the possibility for mutual reinforcement among treaties, 
holding corporations accountable for products, policies and practices that were harmful, as 
well as for excluding corporations with conflicts of interest from policymaking at all levels.  
66. 
The second panellist referred to several instruments adopted over the previous four 
decades that directly addressed the responsibility of business enterprises, such as the OECD 
Guidelines  for  Multinational  Enterprises,  the  Tripartite  Declaration  of  Principles 
concerning Multinational Enterprises and Social Policy of ILO, the United Nations Global 
Compact  and  the  standard  of  the  International  Organization  for  Standardization  providing 
guidelines for social responsibility (ISO 26000), which were, or were intended to be, in line 
with the Guiding Principles.  
12 
 

A/HRC/34/47 
67. 
The  third  panellist  presented  the  work  and  experience  of  ILO,  focusing  on  three 
types  of  instruments,  namely,  international  labour  standards,  fundamental  principles  and 
rights at work and the Tripartite Declaration.  
68. 
The  fourth  panellist  referred  to  the  rapid  growth  of  corporate  social  responsibility 
and  sustainability  and  noted  the  still  limited  legislation  regulating  transnational 
corporations and the general opposition of corporations to such legislation. 
69. 
The  fifth  panellist  stated  that  there  was  no  legal  obstacle  to  international  law 
imposing  obligations  and  responsibilities  on  private  non-State  actors.  He  provided 
examples  of  several  treaties  and  other  instruments  that  did  so,  including  the  Guiding 
Principles.  He  agreed  that  States  could  impose  direct  obligations  on  non-State  actors  in  a 
treaty,  in  addition  to  the  obligations  imposed  on  States  themselves.  That  would  make  it 
easier for victims to seek remedy without the help of State agencies and to negotiate out-of-
court settlements.  
70. 
One delegation mentioned the existence of regional instruments, such as the Charter 
of  the  Organization  of  American  States  (art.  36),  in  which  general  principles  on  the 
responsibility of businesses were recognized. 
71. 
Another delegation noted that there was no comprehensive international instrument 
addressing  global  corporate  accountability,  leaving  the  door  open  to  a  legal  vacuum  and 
potential  violations.  Moreover,  voluntary  mechanisms  could  not  be  compared  to  legally 
binding  rules  that  recognized  transnational  corporations  and  other  business  enterprises  as 
bearers of direct human rights obligations. 
72. 
Another  delegation  described  how  the  Universal  Declaration  of  Human  Rights 
imposed obligations to respect human rights on all actors of society, including transnational 
corporations.  The  legally  binding  instrument  proposed  must  include  provisions  to  protect 
public services of common interest, for example provisions relating to the right to water and 
respect  for  mother  earth;  provisions  to  protect  individual  and  collective  human  rights, 
including the rights of peasants; and a monitoring mechanism. 
73. 
According  to  another  delegation,  national  systems  of  justice  were  experiencing 
challenges  in  preventing  transnational  corporations  from  committing  human  rights 
violations, as well as in the areas of prosecuting perpetrators and compensating victims.  
74. 
Another  delegation  noted  that  the  Tripartite  Declaration  was  weak  in  human  rights 
language and was currently under review.  
75. 
Several  delegations  considered  that  a  binding  instrument  should  set  out  direct 
responsibilities  and  obligations  for  transnational  corporations  while  making  clear 
distinctions  between  obligations  borne  by  companies  and  those  borne  by  States.  No 
loopholes  should  allow  transnational  corporations  to  escape  their  responsibilities,  and  a 
mechanism should be established to evaluate corporate due diligence.  
76. 
Many  NGOs  expressed  the  view  that  voluntary  principles  were  not  effective  in 
ensuring  the  regulation  of  transnational  corporations,  for  example  food  corporations,  with 
respect to their impact and responsibilities in terms of public health.  
77. 
NGOs submitted that a binding instrument would also need to apply to international 
financial institutions and banks that provided corporate funding. One NGO drew attention 
to  the  so-called  Panama  Papers,  which  had  revealed  that  corporations  avoided  taxes  and 
obtained  fiscal  benefits  to  maximize  profits,  thereby  contributing  to  tax  fraud  and 
exacerbating inequality and poverty.  
78. 
It  would  be  important  for  the  working  group  to  replicate  article  5  (3) of  the  WHO 
Framework Convention on Tobacco Control to avoid undue influence from commercial and 
other vested interests.  
 
13 

A/HRC/34/47 
 
 
Subtheme 2. Jurisprudential and other approaches to clarify standards of civil, 
administrative and criminal liability of transnational corporations and other business 
enterprises  

79. 
The  first  panellist  stated  that  a  binding  instrument  would  not  have  to  specify  each 
individual  human  rights  obligation  of  corporations,  but  should  provide  an  analytical 
framework for how treaty bodies or domestic courts could further develop those obligations 
in  a  particular  context.  The  approach  of  the  Constitutional  Court  of  South  Africa,  which 
provided  for  the  direct  application  of  constitutional  rights  obligations  on  private  actors, 
could be instructive in that regard.  
80. 
The  second  panellist  outlined  standards  of  civil  liability  for  human  rights  abuses 
applicable  to  multinational  parent  companies  in  English  tort  law  and  their  potential 
implications.  The  common  law  requirement  of  reasonable  steps  to  avoid  harm  to  those  to 
whom  a  duty  of  care  was  owed  overlapped  largely  with  the  human  rights  due  diligence 
obligation.  Therefore,  he  suggested  a  tort  law  approach  for  achieving  corporate 
accountability,  particularly  in  respect  of  parent  companies  and  their  potential  negligence, 
but with some modifications to make it more universally applicable.  
81. 
The  third  panellist  noted  that  the  global  economy  and  corporations  continued  to 
operate  in  a  system  of  segregation,  racism,  exploitation  and  inequality,  in  which  human 
rights were violated without any  actor being held accountable. Therefore, the philosophies 
of  decolonization,  feminism,  rights  of  the  child  and  the  elderly,  fairness,  equality  and 
security  should  be  part  of  the  framework  of  principles  used  in  the  treaty.  The  panellist 
identified  evidence  of  corporate  civil  and  criminal  liability  in  domestic  and  international 
law, such as in the constitutions of the Gambia, Ghana, Kenya, Malawi and South Africa, 
which provided for the horizontal application of human rights, including with regard to the 
activities  of  corporations.  Further  guidance  could  be  found  in  the  criminal  codes  of 
Australia,  South  Africa  and  the  United  Kingdom  of  Great  Britain  and  Northern  Ireland, 
which included provisions on corporate criminal liabilities, and in the African Union draft 
protocol on amendments to the Protocol on the Statute of the African Court of Justice and 
Human Rights. 
82. 
The fourth panellist stressed that any discussion of a treaty should include the issue 
of  its  ratification  by  certain  countries,  and  the  ability  to  effectively  enforce  any  corporate 
liability  under that treaty. The treaty should be focused on clarifying liability standards to 
judge  corporate  conduct  with  respect  to  human  rights.  In  that  connection,  he  recalled  the 
importance of the application of the standards of knowledge and purpose as components of 
mens rea in order to determine corporate liability or negligence.  
83. 
The  fifth  panellist  proposed  basic  principles  that  should  inform  the  treaty: 
corporations  should  be  subject  to  private  civil  liability  as  well  as  to  administrative  or 
criminal  enforcement  sanctions  by  the  State,  in  the  same  way  as  a  natural  person;  certain 
principles,  such  as  the  legal  liability  of  corporations  for  abuses  within  their  sphere  of 
influence,  when  they  have  caused,  profited  from,  contributed  to  or  failed  to  prevent  the 
harm,  were common to all legal systems and therefore should be used in a treaty; victims 
should have the right to hold transnational corporations liable either in the place where the 
subsidiaries operated and where the harm occurred, or in other places  where the company 
was  present;  the  treaty  should  provide  for  the  elimination  of  the  doctrine  of  forum  non 
conveniens
  and  the  concept  of  the  corporate  veil  in  human  rights  cases;  and  the  treaty 
should  provide  for  the  liberalization  of  the  rule  of  discovery  and  the  enhancement  of 
international cooperation. The relevant European Union regulations and the United Nations 
Convention against Corruption were good models for, among other things, the exchange of 
technical expertise and information among States and the shifting of the burden of proof.  
14 
 

A/HRC/34/47 
84. 
The sixth panellist presented  the health and environmental impacts of shipbreaking 
in  Bangladesh  to  demonstrate  issues  related  to  liability  and  how  corporations  escaped 
accountability as a result of the lack of a binding standard.  
85. 
Delegations  stressed  the  need  for  clear  regulations  to  prevent  corporations  from 
committing abuse and to hold corporations accountable for any abuse, since administrative 
liability and sanctions did not provide victims with redress. While civil liability could be a 
possible  avenue  to  secure  accountability,  it  often  involved  complex,  lengthy  and  costly 
procedures, particularly when transnational corporations were domiciled in third countries. 
Regarding  criminal  liability,  a  binding  instrument  could  correct  a  historical  failure  by 
making  legal  persons  liable,  as  was  expected  for  article  25  of  the  Rome  Statute,  and  by 
attributing criminal responsibility to corporations.  
86. 
Questions  were  raised  in  relation  to  the  identification  of  the  competent  court;  the 
definition  of  liability  standards,  including  the  criteria  for  establishing  liability;  and  the 
implications  for  the  principles  of  universality,  interdependence  and  interrelatedness  of  all 
human rights. Also raised were questions on how to address damage that affected an entire 
population or several generations and on the elements of criminal liability that would apply 
to the company itself and possibly its managers.  
87. 
One  delegation  mentioned  the  2016  report  of  the  International  Law  Commission, 
which included a section in which the Commission’s Special Rapporteur on crimes against 
humanity outlined arguments to support the international criminal liability of legal entities. 
88. 
Given  that  corporations  operated  increasingly  in  conflict-affected  areas,  another 
delegation raised the issue of corporate liability for breaches of international humanitarian 
law  and  the  need  to  incorporate  into  the  legally  binding  instrument  references  to 
international humanitarian law as part of the corporate due diligence in such areas.  
89. 
Some delegations were of the view that transnational corporations also had positive 
obligations to take active steps to realize human rights for all, including by contributing to 
the mobilization of resources for the realization of the right to development and economic, 
social and cultural rights globally, with a view to ending poverty.  
90. 
One  delegation  reiterated  that,  in  addition  to  liability  standards,  the  treaty  should 
include  references  to  international  cooperation  for  investigations  and  enforcement,  as  was 
the case in the Convention against Corruption. 
91. 
Some  NGOs  recalled  the  legal  obstacles  to  establishing  the  civil  liability  of 
transnational  corporations  at  the  national  level.  Self-regulation  and  regulation  without 
monitoring by a third party did not  work, thus there had to be a binding instrument and  a 
court  to  enforce  it.  Other  proposals  for  elements  to  be  covered  by  a  treaty  included  the 
compulsory  disclosure  of,  inter  alia,  the  compositions,  subsidiaries  and  supply  chains  of 
companies.  
92. 
One  participant  noted  that  the  OECD  guidelines  and  national  contact  points  had 
been essential in establishing what expectations States have of companies, and had helped 
to  change  behaviour  regarding  human  rights,  facilitating  faster  access  to  justice  through 
mediation,  as  opposed  to  litigation.  It  was  also  asserted  that  there  had  been  progress  by 
companies in integrating the Guiding Principles throughout their activities and operations; 
the principles should be the basis of the working group’s work.  
 
15 

A/HRC/34/47 
 
D. 
Panel IV. Open debate on different approaches and criteria for the 
future definition of the scope of the international legally binding 
instrument 

93. 
The  first  panellist  argued  that  the  changing  character  of  transnational  corporations 
made  it  difficult  to  define  them.  While  he  cited  the  pragmatic  approach  of  the  OECD 
guidelines,  he  considered  that  a  precise  definition  of  transnational  corporations  or  other 
business  enterprises  was  not  required.  According  to  UNCTAD,  from  a  universe  of  200 
million  enterprises  registered  worldwide,  only  3,200  had  operations  of  a  transnational 
character,  accounting  for  less  than  1  per  cent  of  all  enterprises.  According  to  OECD,  the 
remaining  99  per  cent  were  domestic  small  and  medium-sized  enterprises.  Thus 
transnational  corporations  were  clearly  a  distinct  group  within  the  universe  of  business 
enterprises.  The  treaty  should  be  complementary  to  the  Guiding  Principles,  committing 
States,  transnational  corporations  and  other  business  enterprises  to  put  the  principles  into 
practice,  with  a  view  to,  among  other  things,  supporting  the  implementation  of  the 
Sustainable Development Goals and creating new models of business and investment.  
94. 
The second panellist, referring to a call for the treaty to cover all businesses, recalled 
that the scope used for certain national and regional laws was much more narrowly defined, 
citing, for example, the draft law on duty of care in France and the non-financial reporting 
initiative of the European Union, which covered only companies with over 500 employees. 
Nevertheless,  the  priority  focus  of  the  treaty  should  be  on  transnational  corporations, 
applying to all their subsidiaries and business relationships, as well as to all  the companies 
in their global supply chains, including subcontractors and financers, and eventually to all 
companies  that  perpetrated,  or  were  complicit  in,  human  rights  violations.  Many 
transnational  corporations  were  more  wealthy  and  powerful  than  the  States  trying  to 
regulate  them.  They  could  influence  judicial  institutions  or  block  binding  regulation 
through  heavy  lobbying,  or  simply  relocate  to  other  countries,  leaving  victims  without 
redress.  The  panellist  defended  the  need  to  address  the  role  of  public  finance  and  foreign 
investment, as well as investor-State dispute settlement proceedings.  
95. 
The  third  panellist  made  reference  to  the  Guiding  Principles  as  a  step  in  the  right 
direction. However, he deplored the fact that they were voluntary, including with respect to 
issues  such  as  the  obligation  of  transnational  corporations  to  pay  their  fair  share  of  taxes, 
which could be interpreted as part of due diligence, but nevertheless was not included in the 
Guiding  Principles.  With  respect  to  promoting  the  right  of  access  to  information,  the 
panellist  recalled  his  recommendation  to  the  General  Assembly  for  States  to  provide 
protection for whistle-blowers. He also invited States to put teeth in the Guiding Principles, 
to  develop  monitoring  mechanisms  and  to  prohibit  aggressive  tax  avoidance  and  tax 
havens, in order to ensure transparency and accountability.  
96. 
The  fourth  panellist  recalled  OECD  and  ILO  efforts  to  define  transnational 
corporations;  the  subjective  scope  of  the  treaty  was  clearly  defined  in  the  footnote  in 
resolution  26/9.  He  criticized the  arguments  against  such  a  footnote,  quoting  the  common 
practice  in  the  jurisprudence  of  the  World  Trade  Organization  and  other  frameworks  that 
assigned footnotes the same legal weight as the paragraphs of an instrument, resolution or 
decision. He posited that focusing the treaty on transnational corporations would not entail 
any discrimination, as local companies were already subject to regulation and did not have 
the possibility to evade their responsibilities in the same way as transnational corporations. 
In  terms  of  which  human  rights  should  be  included,  he  had  observed  an  emerging 
consensus around the core human rights covenants and the need to ensure broad coverage. 
97. 
The  fifth  panellist  claimed  that  the  Guiding  Principles  did  not  provide  robust 
remedies in cases of human rights abuses by transnational corporations, and mentioned the 
plurilateral  agreements  of  the  World  Trade  Organization  as  an  example  of  relevant 
16 
 

A/HRC/34/47 
instruments  for  remedy.  The  Montreal  Protocol  on  Substances  that  Deplete  the  Ozone 
Layer set out general principles followed by articles on procedural aspects and included an 
annex that could be expanded and modified at the meeting of the parties to ensure precision 
and flexibility. The treaty could include a section on enhanced compliance, a section on due 
diligence and a functional legal platform to provide support for national legal systems.  
98. 
The  sixth  panellist  focused  on  the  potential  form  of  the  treaty,  suggesting  several 
possibilities: a detailed treaty setting out substantive and procedural matters, similar to the 
Rome  Statute;  a  framework  treaty  setting  out  key  principles  and  approaches,  such  as  the 
United  Nations  Framework  Convention  on  Climate  Change;  a  core  treaty  with  a  series  of 
annexes  to  deal  with  supervisory  mechanisms  and  developments,  such  as  the  Vienna 
Convention  for  the  Protection  of  the  Ozone  Layer;  or  an  optional  protocol  to  existing 
human rights treaties. The treaty should expressly cover enterprises owned or controlled by 
the State; it should also define the responsibilities of international organizations.  
99. 
One  delegation  expressed  the  need  to  agree  on  a  definition  of  transnational 
corporations  before  drafting  a  treaty  and  suggested  using  ILO  or  OECD  definitions. 
Another  delegation  objected,  referring  to  concepts  such  as  terrorism  or  violent  extremism 
that were not universally defined but were addressed in binding instruments.  
100.  Another delegation advocated for a clear reference to existing principles, including 
the Guiding Principles, but also to instruments relating to the environment, social security 
and transparency, among others.  
101.  Regarding  the  scope  of  the  instrument,  some  delegations  noted  that  the  binding 
instrument  would  need  to  be  adaptive  to  ensure  that  transnational  corporations  were 
prevented from evading their responsibilities. Some delegations pointed out that companies 
with  domestic  dimensions  that  were  subject  to  national  regulations  did  not  have  the  same 
possibility  to  evade  their  responsibilities  and  could  not  be  treated  equally  as  compared  to 
transnational  corporations,  thus  an  instrument  regulating  transnational  corporations, 
including  their  subsidiaries,  decision-making  bodies  and  supply  chain,  would  place 
transnational corporations and domestic business enterprises on a more equal footing. 
102.  It was observed that there appeared to be a consensus that the treaty should cover all 
human  rights,  including  the  right  to  development,  as  well  as  principles  of  universality, 
indivisibility,  interdependence,  equality  and  non-discrimination.  One  NGO  noted  that  the 
experience of national truth commissions should also be considered in that context. 
 
E. 
Panel V. Strengthening cooperation with regard to prevention, remedy 
and accountability and access to justice at the national and 
international levels 

103.  The  panel  discussion  opened  with  a  video  message  by  Nils  Muižnieks,  Council  of 
Europe Commissioner for Human Rights. Mr. Muižnieks recognized that business practices 
could  have  a  negative  impact  on  a  variety  of  human  rights,  citing  several  examples  of 
concern in that regard and expressing support for the Guiding Principles, which had formed 
the  basis  for  a  recommendation  on  human  rights  and  business  adopted  recently  by  the 
Committee of Ministers of the Council of Europe. He recalled that the European Union had 
also recognized the Guiding Principles as the authoritative policy framework in promoting 
corporate  social  responsibility,  and  the  European  Commission  had  encouraged  the 
development  of  national  action  plans  for  the  implementation  of  the  Guiding  Principles. 
However, much remained to be done, including ensuring broad and inclusive participation 
in  the  process  of  implementation,  all  of  which  would  feed  into  the  work  of  the  working 
group in elaborating an international legally binding instrument.  
 
17 

A/HRC/34/47 
 
 
Subtheme 1. Moving forward in the implementation of the United Nations Guiding 
Principles 

104.  The  first  panellist  noted  that  the  Guiding  Principles  had  led  to  some  progress  with 
regard to business and human rights but also recognized that the extent of their influence in 
national  legislation  was  limited.  She  stressed  the  need  to  reflect  and  act,  in  order  to  offer 
genuine  remedy  and  accountability.  In  France,  the  first  initiative  built  on  the  Guiding 
Principles,  which  would  have  imposed  civil  and  commercial,  as  well  as  criminal,  liability 
on companies with over 500 salaried employees for human rights abuse, had been rejected 
in  2015.  A  less  ambitious  draft  legislation  was  subsequently  presented  to  the  parliament, 
aimed at ensuring that no human rights were violated and no serious environmental damage 
or  health  risks  resulted  from  corporate  activities.  It  also  contained  specific  provisions  to 
prevent active or passive corruption; non-compliance would result in accountability for the 
company,  including  sanctions.  The  panellist  expressed  the  hope  that  the  draft  proposal 
would  be  adopted  soon,  and  also  expressed  hope  for  the  “green  card”  initiative,  through 
which  national  parliaments  could  jointly  propose  to  the  European  Commission  new 
legislative  or  non-legislative  actions,  or  changes  to  existing  legislation,  in  the  interest  of 
sustainability. 
105.  The  second  panellist  presented  the  OHCHR  accountability  and  remedy  project, 
describing how it might be relevant to the discussion of the working group. The project had 
been initiated in May 2013 to support a more effective implementation of the third pillar of 
the Guiding Principles and ensure effective accountability and remedy for business-related 
human rights abuses. The project was aimed at identifying solutions to the legal, practical 
and  financial  barriers  victims  faced,  and  was  based  on  an  extensive  multi-stakeholder 
process and on data and information  from  more than 60 jurisdictions. The outcome of the 
project was presented to the Human Rights Council, which had taken note of the work in its 
resolution  32/10.  The  guidance  that  emerged  from  the  project  covered  public  and  private 
law, included provisions for addressing challenges appearing in cross-border contexts, and 
could  be  implemented  through  national  processes,  for  example,  national  action  plans  or 
legal review processes, or through subregional, regional or international processes, such as 
the working group. Civil society and national human rights institutions could also draw on 
the guidance in terms of their advocacy at the national level and in forums such as the one 
provided by the working group. 
106.  Another  panellist  underlined  that  national  action  plans  were  one  of  the  most 
important tools for implementing the Guiding Principles and that States needed to develop 
them  as  a  matter  of  urgency.  The  Working  Group  on  the  issue  of  human  rights  and 
transnational corporations and other business enterprises (Working Group on business and 
human  rights)  had  produced  guidance  on  how  to  develop  such  plans.  The  binding 
instrument should strengthen the state of play in four areas: States’ enactment of laws and 
policies  for  mandatory  human  rights  due  diligence  in  connection  with  business  in  their 
territory  and  jurisdiction;  the  inclusion  of  human  rights  provisions  in  bilateral  investment 
treaties; the conduct of human rights evaluations; and efforts to ensure investor compliance 
with  human  rights  norms.  In  drafting  the  binding  instrument,  attention  should  be  paid  to 
those  most  at  risk  of  vulnerability  or  marginalization,  including  women,  persons  with 
disabilities  and  migrant  workers.  Consideration  should  be  given  to  including  in  the 
instrument  references  to  other  human  rights  instruments,  such  as  the  Convention  on  the 
Rights  of  the  Child,  the  Convention  on  the  Elimination  of  All  Forms  of  Discrimination 
against Women and the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.  
107.  The  European  Union  expressed  support  for  the  recommendation  on  human  rights 
and business adopted by the  Committee of Ministers of the Council of Europe, as  well as 
for  the  accountability  and  remedy  project  and  the  recommendations  emerging  therefrom, 
including  on  improved  cooperation  between  States  on  cross-border  cases,  and  for  the 
18 
 

A/HRC/34/47 
activities  carried  out  by  the  Working  Group  on  business  and  human  rights,  including  its 
annual  forum.  The  European  Union  shared  its  latest  policy  developments  relating  to  the 
Guiding Principles, aimed at implementing the principles through a smart mix of voluntary 
and regulatory measures. The representative expressed the European Union’s commitment 
to  developing  peer  learning,  including  across  different  geographic  regions.  The 
representative referred to the High Commissioner’s report (A/HRC/32/19) and guidance, in 
which  the  High  Commissioner  indicated  that  business  enterprises  needed  to  have  clear 
frameworks  that  could  act  as  an  effective  deterrent.  Some  leading  enterprises  had  shown 
remarkable progress, while others still needed to see the full benefit of ensuring respect for 
human rights. 
108.  Other delegations also expressed support for the Guiding Principles and referred to 
action  taken  at  the  national  level  to  support  their  implementation.  The  need  for 
complementarity between the Guiding Principles and a binding instrument was reiterated.  
 
 
Subtheme 2. Relation between the United Nations Guiding Principles and the 
elaboration of an international legally binding instrument on transnational 
corporations and other business enterprises 

109.  The first panellist stressed that for any binding treaty to be meaningful, it needed to 
improve victims’ access to both a court and effective legal  representation. Legal remedies 
and  procedures  must  be  effective  in  practice,  particularly  to  address  all  of  the  interrelated 
financial,  legal,  procedural  and  practical  barriers  that  existed,  including  issues  of 
jurisdiction  in  home  courts,  the  corporate  veil,  reversal  of  the  burden  of  proof,  access  to 
documents  and  information,  the  absence  of  class  action  mechanisms,  legal  representation 
and funding, costs and levels of damages.  
110.  The  second  panellist  referred  to  existing  general  obligations  for  international 
cooperation under international law, as contained in Articles 55 and 56 of the Charter of the 
United  Nations,  and  the  opportunity  that  a  treaty  would  offer  for  international  legal  and 
judicial cooperation. In relation to access to justice in cross-border cases, the panellist noted 
that  effective  investigation  of  complaints  of  human  rights  violations  in  another  country 
required cooperation by police and judicial authorities of the host country and the collection 
of  evidence.  In  that  connection,  he  suggested  that  the  following  be  considered:  State 
obligations to enter into bilateral and multilateral agreements to facilitate requests for legal 
assistance  and  to  ensure  cross-border  investigations;  the  establishment  of  mechanisms  for 
exchange  of  information;  and  the  provision  of  adequate  training,  information  and  support 
for law enforcement.  
111.  Some  delegations  noted  that  a  binding  instrument  would  be  complementary  to  the 
Guiding  Principles  with  regard  to  both  fundamental  and  operational  principles.  Such  an 
instrument would strengthen the State duty to protect, in particular with regard to effective 
compensation,  while  reaffirming  States’  regulatory  capacity  and  accountability.  One 
delegation  observed  that  the  Guiding  Principles  had  not  been  negotiated  through  an 
intergovernmental process and therefore did not constitute codified international law.  
112.  The  European  Union  and  other  delegations  insisted  that  any  further  steps  must  be 
inclusive,  rooted  in  the  Guiding  Principles  and  applicable  to  all  types  of  companies.  The 
European  Union  insisted  that  the  motto  should  remain  to  implement  existing  obligations. 
Efforts should also be made to achieve broad international consensus and awareness among 
transnational  corporations  about  a  new  instrument,  to  ensure  impact  and  implementation. 
Civil  society  organizations  and  human  rights  defenders  must  also  be  involved  in  the 
process.  In  the  intergovernmental  process,  as  many  Governments  as  possible  must  be  on 
board in order to ensure a strong treaty.  
 
19 

A/HRC/34/47 
113.  Another  delegation  expressed  support  for  the  work  of  OHCHR  and  the  Working 
Group  on  business  and  human  rights,  noting  that  national  action  plans  would  be  essential 
for  the  implementation  of  the  Guiding  Principles  and  emphasizing  that  civil  society  and 
private actors must be involved in the process.  
114.  Some  NGOs  noted  that  national  action  plans  needed  to  meet  certain  requirements, 
needed  to  ensure  dialogue  and  transparency  and  needed  to  be  based  on  the  Guiding 
Principles, adapted to the national context and revised periodically. Some processes related 
to national action plans had revealed serious faults and were not necessarily delivering the 
required results. A legally binding treaty might be the best way to ensure appropriate access 
to justice and to create a common standard.  
115.  Other  NGOs  raised  the  issue  of  human  rights  defenders  who,  when  opposing 
activities  of  transnational  corporations,  could  face  harassment,  discrimination  and  even 
racism.  Indigenous  communities  faced  particular  barriers  in  terms  of  access  to  justice. 
Some  NGOs  noted  that  efforts  to  strengthen  the  international  normative  framework  were 
interdependent with efforts to strengthen national and regional frameworks. 
 
F. 
Panel VI. Lessons learned and challenges to access to remedy (selected 
cases from different sections and regions) 

116.  The  first  panellist  discussed  practical  challenges  and  opportunities  that  a  binding 
instrument could address. A case study from a State emerging from conflict provided some 
specificities  for  addressing  the  need  for  effective  remedies  and  redress  in  a  post-conflict 
country.  A  binding  instrument  should  codify  and  develop  provisions  for  access  to  an 
effective remedy for wrongful conduct by both States and business enterprises, and would 
help to redress the inequality between corporate rights and obligations. 
117.  The  second  panellist  exposed  barriers  to  access  to  justice.  She  referred  to  her 
experience in supporting communities affected by large-scale projects for natural resource 
extraction,  including  challenges  related  to  the  lack  of  the  following:  transparency  on  the 
part of the entities and companies that had interests in the territories; access to information; 
spaces for participation; and the free prior informed consent of the affected population. She 
described  other  challenges  related  to  the  licensing  and  operational  stages.  A  binding 
instrument would need to prevent violations and provide for mitigation of and remedy for 
negative  impacts,  addressing  the  multidimensional  nature  and  effects  of  large-scale 
extractive projects.  
118.  A third panellist noted the importance of access to remedy, particularly for the most 
vulnerable  and  marginalized.  She  put  forward  several  examples  of  cases  to  illustrate  the 
lack of legal standing in the requested courts and the need for a broader definition of legal 
standing  based  on  contextualized  understanding  of  human  rights  violations  and  the 
possibility  for  representative,  class  and  group  actions.  The  panellist  emphasized  the  need 
for  a  shift  in  the  burden  of  proof,  taking  into  account  that  even  public  prosecution 
authorities  were  at  times  reluctant  to  investigate  cases  involving  corporate  human  rights 
violations.  In  situations  of  foreseeable  risk,  due  diligence  served  as  an  analytical  tool  for 
managing risks relating to human rights, but liability standards should include strict liability 
and precautionary principles and be secured, for example through the reversal of the burden 
of  proof  and  rebuttable  presumptions.  Jurisdictions  should  be  allowed  to  consider  the 
complementary responsibility of various corporate actors, even when the places of domicile 
of the actors were different.  
119.  A fourth panellist gave an overview of the Alien Tort Statute, by which courts in the 
United  States  of  America  were  granted  jurisdiction  over  claims  made  by  a  non-citizen  of 
the United States physically present in the United States for violation of international law. 
20 
 

A/HRC/34/47 
The  overview  included  examples  of  how  corporate  defendant  litigation  under  the  Statute 
had  held  corporations  accountable  and  provided  remedies  to  survivors  who  had  no  other 
means of redress. However, over the previous few years the Supreme Court of the United 
States  had  severely  limited  such  litigation,  particularly  in  corporate  defendant  cases, 
restricting  the  extraterritorial  scope  of  the  Statute.  Nonetheless,  the  Statute  demonstrated 
that  a  robust  system  of  litigation  could  lead  corporations  to  pay  closer  attention  to  the 
adverse  impacts  of  their  operations  and  provide  an  opportunity  for  victims  to  expose 
abusive corporate behaviour and obtain meaningful monetary compensation.  
120.  One delegation asked whether it would be relevant for a treaty to mention not only 
legal,  but  also  non-legal,  complaint  mechanisms,  such  as  those  of  national  human  rights 
institutions,  and  enquired  about  the  added  value  of  such  a  wide  range  of  formal  and 
informal redress avenues.  
121.  Another  delegation  acknowledged  that  there  had  not  been  much  progress  in  the 
implementation of the third pillar of the Guiding Principles. It offered to share information 
about an in-depth study that had been conducted on how to hold the national corporations 
of  the  delegation’s  country  accountable  even  when  they  operated  abroad,  which  had 
revealed ample opportunities in terms of access to justice, including through criminal laws.  
122.  In  response  to  one  delegation’s  question  about  different  levels  of  access  across 
nations  to  scientific  evidence  and  the  use  of  specific  technologies  to  prove  human  rights 
violations,  one  panellist  recalled  the  international  obligation  of  scientific  cooperation  in 
environmental law and the need for a binding instrument to shift the burden of proof, while 
pointing  to  the  need  to  increase  education  for  judiciary  and  legal  professionals  on 
international human rights law. 
123.  One  member  of  the  Working  Group  on  business  and  human  rights  stated  that  the 
Working  Group  would  focus  on  the  third  pillar  of  the  Guiding  Principles  in  its  upcoming 
reports  and  at  its  forum  in  2017.  He  encouraged  all  stakeholders  to  use  the  Working 
Group’s communication procedures.  
124.  In  response  to  questions  raised  by  several  delegations  on  types  of  remedies,  one 
panellist  indicated  that  a  wide  range  of  options  could  be  established  through  a  treaty,  but 
that  all  would  need  to  fulfil  the  requirements  of  accessibility,  independence,  effectiveness 
and  affordability.  Local  non-judicial  bodies,  such  as  corporate  grievance  mechanisms, 
national  human  rights  institutions,  ombudspersons  and  national  contact  points,  were 
important since they were often more accessible. They could not, however, replace judicial 
mechanisms  and  thus  were  only  complementary.  They  also  required  a  lesser  burden  of 
proof and might allow for more creativity in the types of remedies granted, but procedural 
guarantees should be put in place for establishing such agreements.  
125.  In  response  to  a  question  posed  by  some  delegations  on  the  type  of  international 
mechanism that could be established, one panellist indicated that he would prefer to use the 
monitoring  system  set  up  by  human  rights  treaty  bodies,  which  could  receive  complaints 
and authoritatively interpret the standards in the treaty through general recommendations.  
126.  Several NGOs reiterated the need to include the right to development as a founding 
and enforceable right in the treaty, as  well as the rights to access to land,  water and other 
resources, and the rights of migrant workers.  
127.  One  organization  reiterated  that  the  utmost  priority  should  be  given  to  access  to 
remedy on a domestic level through promotion of the rule of law, as such remedy was the 
most efficient in terms of cost and time.  
 
21 

A/HRC/34/47 
128.  Some  NGOs  noted  that  the  binding  instrument  must  remove  obstacles  blocking 
access to remedy in host and home States and should require States to abolish the corporate 
veil.  The  treaty  should  further  oblige  States  to  provide  for  civil  and  criminal  liability  and 
for appropriate redress in cases of corporate abuse of human rights. In such cases, the treaty 
should  require  a  comprehensive  approach  to  redress,  and  remedies  should  be  culturally 
appropriate  and  gender  sensitive.  Some  NGOs  suggested  drawing  on  existing  sources  of 
analysis  of  regional  and  international  mechanisms,  including  the  Special  Rapporteur  on 
violence  against  women,  its  causes  and  consequences  and  the  Special  Rapporteur  on  the 
rights of indigenous peoples. Finally, the binding instrument should also include an explicit 
guarantee that the application of any agreement or non-judicial mechanism did not interfere 
with the right to judicial remedies. 
 
V.  Recommendations of the Chair-Rapporteur and conclusions 
of the working group 
 
A. 
Recommendations of the Chair-Rapporteur 
129.  Following  the  discussions  held  during  the  session,  and  acknowledging  the 
different views and suggestions on the way forward, the Chair-Rapporteur makes the 
following recommendations: 

 
(a) 
A  third  session  of  the  working  group  should  be  held  in  2017,  in 
accordance with resolution 26/9, in particular operative paragraph 3; 
 
(b) 
Informal 
consultations 
with 
Governments, 
regional 
groups, 
intergovernmental organizations, United Nations  mechanisms, civil society and other 
relevant stakeholders should be held by the Chair-Rapporteur before the third session 
of the working group; 

 
(c) 
The Chair-Rapporteur should prepare a new programme of work on the 
basis of the discussions held during the first and second sessions of the working group 
and  the  informal  consultations  to  be  held,  and  present  that  text  before  the  third 
session of the working group for consideration and further discussion thereat. 

 
B. 
Conclusions of the working group 
130.  At  the  final  meeting  of  its  second  session,  on  28  October  2016,  the  working 
group  adopted  the  following  conclusions,  in  accordance  with  its  mandate  established 
by resolution 26/9: 

 
(a) 
The working group welcomed the opening message of the United Nations 
High Commissioner for Human Rights and thanked Mr. Sachs for serving as keynote 
speaker.  It  also  thanked  a  number  of  independent  experts  and  representatives  who 
took  part  in  panel  discussions,  and  took  note  of  the  inputs  received  from 
Governments,  regional  and  political  groups,  intergovernmental  organizations,  civil 
society, NGOs and all other relevant stakeholders; 

 
(b) 
The  working  group  welcomed  the  recommendations  of  the  Chair-
Rapporteur and looked forward to the informal consultations ahead of, and the new 
programme of work for, its third session. 

22 
 

A/HRC/34/47 
 
VI.  Adoption of the report 
131.  At  its  10th  meeting,  on  28  October  2016,  the  working  group  adopted  ad 
referendum
  the  draft  report  on  its  second  session  and  decided  to  entrust  the  Chair-
Rapporteur  with  its  finalization  and  submission  to  the  Human  Rights  Council  for 
consideration at its thirty-fourth session. 

 
23 

A/HRC/34/47 
Annex I 
 
  List of participants 
 
 
States Members of the United Nations 
Algeria,  Argentina,  Australia,  Austria,  Bangladesh,  Belarus,  Belgium,  Bolivia 
(Plurinational  State  of),  Botswana,  Brazil,  Chile,  China,  Colombia,  Costa  Rica,  Cuba, 
Czechia,  Democratic  Republic  of  the  Congo,  Dominican  Republic,  Ecuador,  Egypt,  El 
Salvador, Ethiopia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guatemala, Haiti, 
Honduras,  India,  Indonesia,  Iran  (Islamic  Republic  of),  Iraq,  Ireland,  Italy,  Kenya,  Japan, 
Kazakhstan,  Libya,  Luxembourg,  Mauritania,  Mauritius,  Malaysia,  Mexico,  Mongolia, 
Morocco,  Myanmar,  Namibia  Nicaragua,  Netherlands,  Niger,  Norway,  the  Republic  of 
Korea,  Pakistan,  Panama,  Peru,  Portugal,  Qatar,  Romania,  Russian  Federation,  Rwanda, 
Saint  Kitts  and  Nevis,  Saudi  Arabia,  Serbia,  Slovakia,  Singapore,  South  Africa,  Spain, 
Switzerland, Tajikistan, Thailand, Tunisia, Turkey, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United 
Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, Uruguay, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic 
of). 
 
 
Non-member States represented by an observer 
Holy See; State of Palestine. 
 
 
United Nations funds, programmes, specialized agencies and related 
organizations 

International Labour Organization, United Nations Conference on Trade and Development, 
United Nations Environment. 
 
 
Intergovernmental organizations 
Council of Europe, European Union. 
 
 
Other entities 
International Committee of the Red Cross. 
 
 
Special procedures of the Human Rights Council 
Working Group on Business and Human Rights. 
 
 
National human rights institutions 
The National Human Rights Council of Morocco. 
24 
 

A/HRC/34/47 
 
 
Non-governmental organizations in consultative status with the 
Economic and Social Council 

American  Bar  Association,  Amnesty  International,  Asia  Pacific  Forum  on  Women,  Law 
and  Development  (APWLD),  BADIL  Resource  Centre  for  Palestinian  Residency  and 
Refugee  Rights,  Caritas  International,  Center  for  Accompaniment  of  Unemployed  Girls 
(CAFID),  Centre  Europe-Tiers  Monde  (CETIM),  Centro  de  Estudios  Legales  y  Sociales 
(CELS), Comité Catholique contre la faim et pour le developpement (CCFD), Coopération 
Internationale  pour  le  Développement  et  la  Solidarité  (CIDSE),  Corporación  Centro  de 
Estudios  de  Derecho  Justicia  y  Sociedad  (DEJUSTICIA),  Corporate  Accountability 
International (CAI), Dominicans for Justice and Peace, Earthrights International, Education 
International, Federation International des Droits de l’Homme, Fondation des Oeuvres pour 
la Solidarité et le Bien Etre Social (FOSBES), FoodFirst Information and Action Network 
(FIAN)  International,  Franciscans  International,  Friends  of  the  Earth  International,  Gifa 
Geneva  Infant  Feeding  Association,  Indian  Law  Resource  Center,  Institute  for  Policy 
Studies,  International  Baby  Food  Action  Network  (IBFAN),  International  Accountability 
Project,  International  Association  of  Democratic  Lawyers,  International  Chamber  of 
Commerce,  International  Commission  of  Jurists,  the  International  Federation  for  Human 
Rights  (FIDH),  International  Institute  of  Sustainable  Development,  International  NGO 
Forum  on  Indonesian  Development,  International  Service  for  Human  Rights  (ISHR), 
International  Organisation  of  Employers  (IOE),  International  Union  for  Conservation  of 
Nature  (IUCN),  Peace  Brigades  International,  Plataforma  Internacional  contra  la 
Impunidad,  Public  Services  International,  Réseau  International  des  Droits  de  l’Homme, 
(RIDH),  Society  for  International  Development,  South  Centre,  Women’s  International 
League for Peace and Freedom. 
 
25 

A/HRC/34/47 
Annex II 
 
  List of panellists and moderators 
 
 
Monday, 24 October 2016 
 
 
Keynote speaker 
•  Mr. Jeffrey Sachs, Columbia University (videoconference) 
Panel I 
(15:00-18:00)  
Overview  of  the  social,  economic  and  environmental  impacts  related  to  transnational 
corporations and other business enterprises and human rights, and their legal challenges 
•  Jean Luc Mélenchon, Member of the European Parliament 
•  Richard Kozul-Wright, Director of the Division on Globalization and Development 
Strategies, UNCTAD 
•  Christy Hoffman, Deputy Secretary General, UNI Global Union 
•  Natalie  Bernasconi-Osterwalder,  Group  Director,  Economic  Law  &  Policy 
programme, International Institute for Sustainable Development 
•  Carlos Correa, South Centre 
•  Susan George, Transnational Institute 
 
 
Tuesday, 25 October 2016 
 
 
Panel II 
(10h00-13h00) 
Primary obligations of  States, including extraterritorial obligations related to transnational 
corporations and other business enterprises with respect to protecting human rights 
 
 
Subtheme 1: Implementing international human rights obligations: Examples of 
national legislation and international instruments applicable to transnational 
corporations and other business enterprises with respect to human rights  

 
 
Moderator: Ambassador Negash Kebret Botora, Permanent Representative of Ethiopia to 
the United Nations 

•  Daniel Aguirre, International Commission of Jurists, Myanmar 
•  Ariel Meyerstein, US Council for International Business  
•  Ana María Suárez-Franco, FIAN International 
•  Juan Hernández-Zubizarreta, University of the Basque Country 
26 
 

A/HRC/34/47 
 
 
Panel II — cont’d  (15h00-18h00) 
 
 
Subtheme 2: Jurisprudential and practical approaches to elements of 
extraterritoriality and national sovereignty 

•  Kinda Mohamedieh, South Centre 
•  David  Bilchitz,  Professor,  University  of  Johannesburg,  Director  of  South  African 
Institute of Advanced Constitutional, Public, Human Rights and International Law 
•  Harris  Gleckmann,  Centre  for  Governance  and  Sustainability,  University  of 
Massachusetts, Boston  
•  Leah Margulies, Corporate Accountability International  
•  Gianni Tognoni, Secretary General, Permanent Peoples’ Tribunal  
 
 
Wednesday, 26 October 2016  
 
 
Panel III 
(10h00-13h00) 
Obligations and responsibilities of transnational corporations and other business enterprises 
with respect to human rights 
 
 
Subtheme 1: Examples of international instruments addressing obligations and 
responsibilities of private actors 

 
 
Moderator: Archbishop Ivan Jurkovic, Apostolic Nuncio, Permanent Representative of the 
Holy See to the United Nations 

•  Vera Luisa da Costa e Silva, Head of the Secretariat of the Framework Convention 
on Tobacco Control 
•  Linda Kromjong, Secretary General, International Organization of Employers 
•  Githa Roelans, Head of Multinational Enterprises and Enterprise Engagement Unit, 
ILO 
•  Michael Hopkins, CSR Finance Institute 
•  Surya  Deva,  Associate  Professor,  School  of  Law,  City  University  of  Hong  Kong, 
and Member of the UN Working Group on Business and Human Rights  
 
 
Panel III — cont’d  (15h00-18h00)  
 
 
Subtheme 2: Jurisprudential and other approaches to clarify standards of civil, 
administrative and criminal liability of transnational corporations and other business 
enterprises  

 
 
Moderator: Ambassador Nozipho Joyce Mxakato-Diseko, Permanent Representative of 
South Africa to the United Nations 

•  David Bilchitz, Professor, University of Johannesburg and Director of South African 
Institute of Advanced Constitutional, Public, Human Rights and International Law  
•  Nomonde  Nyembe,  Attorney,  Business  and  Human  Rights,  Centre  for  Applied 
Legal Studies 
•  Richard Meeran, Partner, Leigh Day & Co  
•  Michael Congiu, Shareholder, Littler Mendelson 
 
27 

A/HRC/34/47 
•  Michelle Harrison, Earth Rights International  
•  Rizwana Hassan, Friends of the Earth, Bangladesh 
 
 
Thursday, 27 October 2016 
 
 
Panel IV 
(10h00-13h00)  
Open debate on different approaches and criteria for the future definition of the scope of the 
international legally binding instrument 
 
 
Moderator: Ambassador Robert Matheus Michael Tene, Deputy Permanent Representative 
of Indonesia to the United Nations 

•  Khalil  Hamdani,  Visiting  Professor  at  the  Graduate  Institute  of  Development 
Studies, Lahore School of Economics, Pakistan 
•  Anne van Schaik, Friends of the Earth, Europe  
•  Alfred de Zayas, Independent Expert on the promotion of a democratic and equitable 
international order 
•  Carlos Correa, South Centre 
•  Harris  Gleckmann,  Centre  for  Governance  and  Sustainability,  University  of 
Massachusetts, Boston 
•  Robert  McCorquodale,  Director, British  Institute  of  International  and  Comparative 
Law  
 
 
Panel V 
(15h00-18h00)  
Strengthening cooperation with regard to prevention, remedy and accountability and access 
to justice at the national and international levels 
 
 
Moderator: Ambassador Beatriz Londoño Soto, Permanent Representative of Colombia to 
the United Nations 

 
 
Subtheme 1: Moving forward in the implementation of the United Nations Guiding 
Principles on Business and Human Rights  

•  Danielle Auroi, Member of the National Assembly of the French Republic 
•  Nils  Muižniekis,  Commissioner  for  Human  Rights,  Council  of  Europe  (video 
message) 
•  Lene Wendland, Adviser on Business and Human Rights, OHCHR 
•  Surya  Deva,  Associate  Professor,  School  of  Law,  City  University  of  Hong  Kong, 
and Member of the UN working group on Business and Human Rights 
28 
 

A/HRC/34/47 
 
 
Friday, 28 October 2016  
 
 
Panel VI 
(10h00-13h00)  
Lessons  learned  and  challenges  to  access  to remedy  (selected  cases  from  different  sectors 
and regions) 
 
 
Moderator: Ambassador Hernán Estrada Roman, Permanent Representative of Nicaragua 
to the United Nations 

•  Daniel Aguirre, International Commission of Jurists, Myanmar 
•  Elizabet Pèriz Fernández, Tierra Digna 
•  Claudia Müller-Hoff, European Center for Constitutional and Human Rights 
•  Beth Stephens, Professor, Rutgers-Camden Law School 
 
 
 
 
 
29