Esta es la versión HTML de un fichero adjunto a una solicitud de acceso a la información 'Stakeholder contacts and internal correspondence on the Multilateral Investment Court (MIC)'.



 
Ref. Ares(2018)6087220 - 28/11/2018
EUROPEAN COMMISSION 
Directorate-General for Trade 
 
 
  The Director-General 
 
Brussels 
 
By registered letter with acknowledgment of 
receipt 

Bart-Jaap Verbeek  
Centre for Research on Multinational 
Corporations (SOMO) 
Sarphatistraat 30 
1018 GL Amsterdam 
The Netherlands 
 
Advance copy by email:  
[Dirección de correo de la solicitud #5793] 
 
Subject: 
Your application for access to documents – Ref. GestDem No 2018/4448 
Dear Mr Verbeek, 
I refer to  your application of  1 August  2018 in which  you make a request for access  to 
documents in accordance with Regulation (EC) No 1049/20011 (hereinafter ‘Regulation 
1049/2001’), registered on 20 August 2018 under the above mentioned reference number. 
Please accept our apologies for the delay in answering your request, which is mainly due 
to the high number of requests for access to documents being processed at the same time 
by the Directorate-General for Trade (hereinafter ‘DG TRADE’). 
1.  
SCOPE OF YOUR REQUEST 
You would like to receive access to documents which contain the following information: 
"1) 
a  list  of  meetings  between  DG  Trade  officials  and/or  representatives  (including 
the  Commissioner  and  the  Cabinet)  and  stakeholders,  including  trade  unions, 
civil society groups, as well as representatives of individual companies, industry 
associations, law firms, academics, public consultancies and think tanks in which 
the  Multilateral  Investment  Court  (MIC)  was  discussed  (between  January  2017 
and today); 

                                                 
1   Regulation  (EC)  No  1049/2001  of  the  European  Parliament  and  of  the  Council  of  20  May  2001 
regarding  public  access  to  European  Parliament,  Council  and  Commission  documents,  OJ  L  145, 
31.5.2001, p. 43. 
Commission européenne, B-1049 Bruxelles / Europese Commissie, B-1049 Brussel - Belgium. Telephone: (32-2) 299 11 11. 
 

 
2)  
minutes and other reports of these meetings;  
3)  
all correspondence  (including  emails, letters, faxes) between DG Trade officials 
and/or  representatives  (including  the  Commissioner  and  the  Cabinet)  and 
stakeholders,  including  trade  unions,  civil  society  groups,  as  well  as 
representatives  of  individual  companies,  industry  associations,  law  firms, 
academics, public consultancies as well as think tanks regarding the Multilateral 
Investment Court (MIC) (between January 2017 and today); 

4)  
all  correspondence  (including  emails,  letters,  faxes)  and  documents  (including 
briefings,  memo's,  non-papers)  shared  between  DG  Trade  officials  and/or  the 
Commissioner and the Cabinet in which the Multilateral Investment Court (MIC) 
was discussed (between January 2017 and today).
" 
My  services  originally  identified  over  51  documents  falling  within  the  scope  of  your 
request,  some  of  which  include  annexes.  In  view  of  the  significantly  long  list  of 
documents  covered  by  your  original  request,  the  scope  was  narrowed  down  to  the  24 
documents you identified as a priority, as per the correspondence of 13 and 19 September 
2018.  This  was  done  in  accordance  with  Article  6(3)  of  Regulation  1049/2001  which 
provides that in the event of an application relating to a very long document or to a very 
large  number  of  documents,  the  institution  concerned  may  confer  with  the  applicant 
informally, with a view to finding a fair solution. We are grateful for your cooperation in 
this regard. 
Please note that two of those 24 documents were found on closer scrutiny to be outside 
the scope of your request, as they were dated prior to 1 January 20172. Considering that 
your  request  focused  on  documents  dated  later  than  1  January  2017,  we  have  instead 
assessed two other documents which fall under the scope of your original request. 
We  enclose  for  ease  of  reference  a  list  of  the  24  relevant  main  documents  in  Annex  I. 
Eight  of  these  documents  include  annexes,  which  amounts  to  a  total  of  45  documents. 
For each of them, the list provides a description and indicates whether parts are withheld 
and  if  so,  under  which  ground  pursuant  to  Regulation  1049/2001.  Copies  of  the 
accessible documents are enclosed. 
2. 
ASSESSMENT AND CONCLUSIONS UNDER REGULATION 1049/2001 
In accordance with settled case law,3 when an institution is asked to disclose a document, it 
must assess, in each individual case, whether that document falls within the exceptions to 
the right of public access to documents set out in Article 4 of Regulation 1049/2001. Such 
assessment  is  carried  out  in  a  multi-step  approach.  First,  the  institution  must  satisfy  itself 
that  the  document  relates  to  one  of the  exceptions,  and  if  so,  decide  which  parts  of  it  are 
                                                 
2   The right date of document 47 in the list sent to you on 13 September 2018 is 22 December 2016. 
3   Judgment  in  Sweden  and  Maurizio  Turco  v  Council,  Joined  cases  C-39/05  P  and  C-52/05  P, 
EU:C:2008:374, paragraph 35. 

 

 
covered by that exception. Second, it must examine whether disclosure of the parts of the 
document in question poses a "reasonably foreseeable and not purely hypothetical" risk of 
undermining  the  protection  of  the  interest  covered  by  the  exception.  Third,  if  it  takes  the 
view that disclosure would undermine the protection of any of the  interests defined under 
Articles  4(2)  and  4(3)  of  Regulation  1049/2001,  the  institution  is  required  "to  ascertain 
whether  there  is  any  overriding  public  interest  justifying  disclosure
".4  In  view  of  the 
objectives pursued by Regulation 1049/2001, notably to give the public the widest possible 
right  of  access  to  documents,5  "the  exceptions  to  that  right  […]  must  be  interpreted  and 
applied strictly
".6 
Having  examined  the  requested  documents  under  the  applicable  legal  framework,  full 
access is granted to
: annex 1 to document 2; annex 2 to document 3; annexes 3, 7 and 8  
to  document  6;  annex  2  to  document  16;  annex  1  to  document  19;  and  annex  1  to 
document 21. 
In addition, partial access is granted to documents 1 to 5, 7 to 19, 21, 23, 24 and annex 
1 to document 3 as well as annexes 2, 4, 5 and 6 to document 6. 
In  particular,  personal  data  have  been  redacted  from  all  documents  that  are  partially 
released, pursuant to Article 4(1)(b) of Regulation 1049/2001 concerning the protection 
of the privacy  and protection of  the individual  and in  accordance with  Regulation (EC) 
No 45/2001 (hereinafter, ‘Regulation 45/2001’).7  
In documents 1, 2, 16, 17, 18, 19 and 21, additional information to personal data has been 
redacted  pursuant  to  Article  4(1)(a)  third  indent  of  Regulation  1049/2001  concerning  the 
protection of the public interest as regards international relations. In documents 16, 17, 18, 
19  and  21,  this  information  has  been  also  protected  pursuant  to  Article  4(3)  first 
subparagraph  of  Regulation  1049/2001  concerning  the  protection  of  the  institution’s 
decision-making process. 
In  documents  3,  4,  9,  13  and  24,  other  information  than personal  data  has been  protected  
pursuant  to  Article  4(2)  first  indent  of  Regulation  1049/2001  concerning  the  commercial 
interests of a natural or legal person.  
Please note that information that does not relate to the Multilateral Investment Court has 
been marked as falling outside the scope of your request. 
I regret to inform you that access is not granted to a number of documents and annexes. 
The  exception  in  Article  4(1)(a)  third  indent  of  Regulation  1049/2001  concerning  the 
                                                 
  Id., paragraphs 37-43. See also judgment in Council v Sophie in’t Veld, C-350/12 P, EU:C:2014:2039, 
paragraphs 52 and 64. 
5   Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001, recital (4). 
6   Judgment in Sweden v Commission, C-64/05 P, EU:C:2007:802, paragraph 66. 
7   Regulation (EC) No 45/2001 of the European Parliament and the of the Council of 18 December 2000 
on  the  protection  of  individuals  with  regard  to  the  processing  of  personal  data  by  the  Community 
institutions and bodies and on the free movement of such data, OJ L 8, 12.1.2001, p. 1. 

 

 
protection of the public interest as regards international relations applies with regards to the 
decision not to disclose documents 6, 20 and 22, as well as annex 1 to document 6, annex 
1 to document 16, annex 1 to document 17, annexes 1 and 2 to document 18, annex 2 to 
document 19 and annexes 2 and 3 to document 21.  
Documents  6,  20,  22,  annex  1  to  document  16,  annex  1  to  document  17,  annex  1  to 
document  18,  annex  2  to  document  19  and  annexes  2  and  3  to  document  21  are  also 
protected  from  disclosure  under  the  exception  set  out  in  Article  4(3)  first  subparagraph 
concerning the protection of the institution’s decision-making process. 
In  addition,  some  personal  data  in  documents  6,  20  and  22,  as  well  as  in  annex  1  to 
document 6, annex 1 to document 16, annex 1 to document 17 and annex 1 to document 
18 is protected Article 4(1)(b) of Regulation 1049/2001. 
The reasons justifying the application of each of the exceptions are set out below in sections 
2.1, 2.2, 2.3 and 2.4. Section 3 contains an assessment of whether there exists an overriding 
public  interest  in  the  disclosure  and  section  4  considered  whether  partial  access  could  be 
granted to the documents withheld. 
2.1 
Protection of the public interest as regards international relations 
Article 4(1)(a) third indent of Regulation 1049/2001 provides that "[t]he institutions shall 
refuse  access  to  a  document  where  disclosure  would  undermine  the  protection  of:  the 
public interest as regards: […] international relations
". 
According  to  settled  case-law,  "the  particularly  sensitive  and  essential  nature  of  the 
interests protected by Article 4(1)(a) of Regulation No 1049/2001, combined with the fact 
that  access  must  be  refused  by  the  institution,  under  that  provision,  if  disclosure  of  a 
document  to  the  public  would  undermine  those  interests,  confers  on  the  decision  which 
must thus be adopted by the institution a complex and delicate nature which calls for the 
exercise  of  particular  care.  Such  a  decision  therefore  requires  a  margin  of 
appreciation
".8 In this context, the Court of Justice of the EU has acknowledged that the 
institutions  enjoy  "a  wide  discretion  for  the  purpose  of  determining  whether  the 
disclosure of documents relating to the fields covered by [the] exceptions [under Article 
4(1)(a)] could undermine the public interest
".9 
The  General  Court  found  that  "it  is  possible  that  the  disclosure  of  European  Union 
positions in international negotiations could damage the protection of the public interest 
as  regards  international  relations
"  and  "have  a  negative  effect  on  the  negotiating 
position of the European Union
" as well as "reveal, indirectly, those of other parties to 
the  negotiations
".10  Moreover,  "the  positions  taken  by  the  Union  are,  by  definition, 
subject to change depending on the course of those negotiations and on concessions and 

                                                 
8   Judgment in Sison v Council, C-266/05 P, EU:C:2007:75, paragraph 36. 
9   Judgment in Council v Sophie in’t Veld, C-350/12 P, EU:C:2014:2039, paragraph 63. 
10      Judgment in Sophie in’t Veld v Commission, T-301/10, EU:T:2013:135, paragraphs 123-125. 

 

 
compromises  made  in  that  context  by  the  various  stakeholders.  The  formulation  of 
negotiating positions may involve a number of tactical considerations on the part of the 
negotiators,  including  the  Union  itself.  In  that  context,  it  cannot  be  precluded  that 
disclosure  by  the  Union,  to  the  public,  of  its  own  negotiating  positions,  when  the 
negotiating  positions  of  the  other  parties  remain  secret,  could,  in  practice,  have  a 
negative effect on the negotiating capacity of the Union
".11   
The European Commission has started to elaborate negotiating positions and strategies to 
be  implemented  in  the  context  of  ongoing  discussions  and  upcoming  negotiations  in 
Working Group III of UNCITRAL (United Nations Commission on International Trade 
Law),  tasked  with  the  mandate  of  exploring  a  possible  multilateral  reform  of  ISDS 
(Investor-State  Dispute  Settlement).  Negotiations  for  the  establishment  of  a  multilateral 
solution, possibly a permanent investment court, can be expected to formally start when 
the  Working  Group  starts  to  discuss  possible  solutions  to  the  problems  of  ISDS  under 
step  3  of  its  mandate.12  On  20  March  2018,  the  Council  adopted  the  negotiating 
directives  authorising  the  Commission  to  negotiate,  on  behalf  of  the  EU,  a  multilateral 
investment  court.13  Considering  the  abovementioned  EU  case-law  on  the  sensitivity  of 
EU  positions  in  ongoing  negotiating  processes  and  the  need  to  keep  certain  aspects 
thereof  confidential,  it  is  considered  that  a  number  of  documents  that  fall  within  the 
scope of your request cannot be disclosed or can be disclosed only partially. 
Some  passages  have  been  redacted  in  a  number  of  documents  that  include  information 
relevant  for  the  protection  of  public  interests  as  regards  international  relations.  In 
particular,  some  sentences  in  documents  1  and  2  have  been  redacted  insofar  as  they 
contain information relating to positions of third countries in relation to the multilateral 
investment  court  initiative  that,  where  disclosed,  risks  affecting  international  relations 
between  the  EU  and  such  countries.  These  documents  embody  minutes  and  reports  of 
meetings with a range of stakeholders representing a number of interests. Releasing that 
information would  pose a  significant  risk to the good  relations  between the  EU  and the 
concerned third countries.  
Partial access on grounds of the same exception is granted to documents 16, 17, 18 and 
19,  which  relate  to  specific  meetings  of  UNCITRAL  Working  Group  III  discussing  a 
possible multilateral reform of ISDS. Documents 18 and 19 concern the first meeting of 
the  Working  Group  (meeting  report  and  meeting  preparation  note)  while  documents  16 
and  17  embody  the  report  and  preparation  note  of  the  second  meeting  of  the  Working 
Group.  The  redacted  paragraphs  in  documents  16,  17,  18  and  19  contain  sensitive 
information  on  the  reading  of  discussions  at  UNCITRAL  Working  Group  III  and  the 
                                                 
11 
Id., paragraph 125. 
12   According to the  mandate  given by the UNCITRAL Commission, the Working Group must proceed 
to:  first,  identify  and  consider  concerns  regarding  ISDS;  second,  consider  whether  reform  was 
desirable  in  light  of  any  identified  concerns;  and  third,  if  the  Working  Group  were  to  conclude  that 
reform was desirable, develop any relevant solutions to be recommended to the Commission. 
13   See http://data.consilium.europa.eu/doc/document/ST-12981-2017-ADD-1-DCL-1/en/pdf.  

 

 
EU's  strategy  as  the  process  goes  forward.  Releasing  this  information  would  seriously 
compromise not only the EU's position in the UNCITRAL process but also the EU and 
its  Member  States'  mutual  trust  relationship  with  third  countries,  and  therefore  their 
international relations. Please note that both the EU and Member States sit and intervene 
separately at the meetings of the Working Group. 
The sensitivity  of the information  in these documents justifies  that entire pages  have to 
be redacted.  In document 16, pages 2 to 4 are  entirely redacted under Article 4(1)(a) of 
Regulation  1049/2001  while  page  6  is  redacted  in  order  to  protect  the  privacy  and 
integrity  of  the  individual  under  Article  4(1)(b)  of  Regulation  1049/2001.  Page  5  is 
covered  under  both  exceptions.  Similar  considerations  apply  to  documents  17  (pages  3 
and 4 redacted under Article 4(1)(a) and page 4 also under Article 4(1)(b)); document 18 
(pages  2  and  3  redacted  under  Article  4(1)(a)  and  pages  3  and  4  under  Article  4.1(b)); 
and document 19 (pages 2 and 3 completely redacted pursuant to Article 4(1)(a) and page 
3 also under Article 4(1)(b)).  
The  substantial  amount  of  information  covered  under  Article  4(1)(a)  and  therefore  not 
susceptible of disclosure warrants that some documents not be disclosed at all, inasmuch 
as the information that the applicant would have access to would be meaningless. This is 
the  case  of  document  6,  which  contains  the  report  of  a  seminar  held  with  officials  of 
certain  countries  on  the  multilateral  investment  court  initiative.  The  report  includes 
sensitive information on the EU's and those countries' positions and views which cannot 
be  disclosed  without  jeopardising  the  good  working  relations  of  the  EU  with  the 
countries  concerned.  It  is  therefore  considered  that  the  entirety  of  the  document  is 
covered by the exception relating to the public interest as regards international relations 
in  Article  4(1)(a)  third  indent  of  Regulation  1049/2001  and  for  this  reason  it  is  not 
released.  The  same  considerations  apply  to  annex  1  to  document  6,  which  contains  the 
list of participants to the seminar.   
Similar  considerations  apply  to  annexes  1  to  document  16  and  18  respectively,  which 
contain a report of third countries' positions as per discussions in UNCITRAL Working 
Group  III.  Although  recordings  of  discussions  are  entirely  available  in  the  website  of 
UNCITRAL Working Group III,14 the documents at hand incorporate the EU's particular 
reading  of  the  interventions.  These  documents  were  elaborated  for  strictly  internal 
purposes  and  cannot  be  shared  without  seriously  hampering  the  EU's  international 
relations with those countries. Conversely, annex 2 to document 16 is entirely disclosed, 
to  the  extent  that  it  constitutes  a  public  report  put  together  by  UNCITRAL  Secretariat 
and validated by all members of Working Group III.15 In turn, annex 2 to document 18 is 
a  Secretariat  report  at  its  draft  stage  subject  to  validation  of  Working  Group  III. 
Disclosure  of  such  document,  to  the  extent  that  it  is  not  a  final  version,  would  hamper 
relations of the EU with UNCITRAL Secretariat, inasmuch as the document may contain 
                                                 
14  See http://www.uncitral.org/uncitral/audio/meetings.jsp  
15  This  document  is  also  publicly  available  in  the  website  of  Working  Group  III  – 
see http://www.uncitral.org/uncitral/en/commission/working_groups/3Investor_State.html  

 

 
inaccuracies  that  are  meant  to  be  flagged  by  UNCITRAL  members  prior  to  its  release. 
For these reasons annex 2 to document 18 is withheld. The final report of the meeting as 
adopted  by  the  Working  Group  is  available  on  UNCITRAL  Working  Group  III 
website16. 
Annex 1 to document 17 constitutes an early draft EU non-paper that was put together to 
trigger specific discussions on a number of points. This paper therefore contains delicate 
information  on  the  EU's  negotiating  position  and  strategy  which  would  be  seriously 
hampered  in  the  event  that  it  was  released.  It  is  therefore  considered  justified  not  to 
disclose  annex  1  to  document  17  on  grounds  of  protection  of  the  public  interest  as 
regards international relations.  
Annex 2 to document 19 contains information on the EU's and Member States' positions 
relevant  for  the  first  meeting  of  the  Working  Group.  The  document  was  drafted  to 
coordinate  the  position  of  the  EU  and  its  Member  States,  as  they  sit  and  intervene 
separately  at  the  meetings  of  the  Working  Group.  Disclosure  of  the  document,  even 
partially,  would  undermine  and  weaken  the  position  of  the  EU  at  this  stage  of  the 
process. In order to ensure the best possible outcome in the public interest, the EU needs 
to  retain  a  certain  margin  of  manoeuvre  to  shape  and  adjust  its  tactics,  options  and 
positions in function of how the discussions evolve.  
Document  20  does  not  relate  to  any  particular  meeting  but  it  embodies  DG  TRADE's 
considerations  and  proposals  on  future  discussions  at  UNCITRAL  Working  Group  III. 
The information contained therein builds on the expectations of third countries' positions 
based  on  informal  preliminary  discussions  and  is  therefore  extremely  sensitive. 
Disclosure of such document would seriously hamper the mutual trust relationship built 
with the concerned third countries at the technical level which is key to move forward in 
this project and for this reason cannot disclosed on the basis of the same exception.  
Document 21 constitutes the full report of the informal ministerial meeting held in Davos 
on  21  January  2017.  It  contains  sensitive  information  on  third  countries'  views  on  the 
multilateral  investment  court  initiative. Such  views,  which  were  expressed  freely  in  the 
context  of  a  ministerial  meeting,  cannot  be  disclosed  without  seriously  hampering  the 
good relations of the EU with such countries. For the reasons highlighted above, access is 
granted to the parts of the report that are not covered by the exception on public interest 
as regards international relations. Annexes 1, 2 and 3 to document 21 constitute the EU's 
discussion  paper,  verbatim  notes  and  list  of  participants  to  the  ministerial  meeting. 
Access is granted to the EU's discussion paper.17 Conversely, the verbatim notes and the 
list of participants to the meeting are in their entirety covered by the exception relating to 
international relations and for this reason access thereto is denied. Both documents were 
                                                 
16   See https://uncitral.un.org/en/working_groups/3/investor-state 
17   The  discussion  paper  co-sponsored  by  the  European  Commission  and  the  Government  of  Canada  is 
publicly 
available 
at 
the 
EU's 
multilateral 
investment 
court 
dedicated 
website: 
http://trade.ec.europa.eu/doclib/docs/2017/january/tradoc_155264.pdf  

 

 
put  together  for  internal  purposes  only  and  based  on  the  reasons  outlined  above  it  is 
considered that their confidentiality must be preserved. 
Similarly, document 22 which contains the flash report of the ministerial meeting is also 
covered  by  the  exception  relating  to  international  relations.  For  the  reasons  explained 
above,  this  document  which  was  intended  to  give  key  DG  TRADE  colleagues  a  quick 
update  on  the  outcome  of  the  meeting,  must  not  be  disclosed.  The  flash  report  is  also 
partially  covered by  the exception related to the protection of privacy  of individuals, as 
explained below. Coverage under both of these exceptions justifies that the document not 
be released.  
2.2  
Protection of privacy and integrity of the individual 
Article  4(1)(b)  of  Regulation  1049/2001  provides  that  "[t]he  institutions  shall  refuse 
access to a document where disclosure would undermine the protection of: […] privacy 
and  the  integrity  of  the  individual,  in  particular  in  accordance  with  Community 
legislation regarding the protection of personal data
". 
The applicable legislation in this field is Regulation 45/2001. In this respect, the Court of 
Justice  of  the  EU  has  ruled  that  "the  provisions  of  Regulation  45/2001,  of  which  Articles 
8(b)  and  18  constitute  essential  provisions,  become  applicable  in  their  entirety  where  an 
application based on Regulation 1049/2001 seeks to obtain access to documents containing 
personal data
".18 19 
Article  2(a)  of  Regulation  45/2001  provides  that  "'personal  data'  shall  mean  any 
information  relating  to  an  identified  or  identifiable  natural  person  […]
".  The  Court  of 
Justice  of  the  EU  has  confirmed  that  "there  is  no  reason  of  principle  to  justify  excluding 
activities of a professional […] nature from the notion of 'private life'
"20 and that "surnames 
and  forenames  may  be  regarded  as  personal  data
"21,  including  names  of  the  staff  of  the 
institutions.22 
According  to  Article  8(b)  of  this  Regulation,  personal  data  shall  only  be  transferred  to 
recipients if they establish "the necessity of having the data transferred" and additionally "if 
there  is  no  reason  to  assume  that  the  legitimate  interests  of  the  data  subjects  might  be 
                                                 
18   Article 8(b) and 18 of said Regulation relate to the transfer of personal data to recipients other than the 
EU Institutions and the subject's right to object to the transfer of its data, respectively. 
19   Judgment  in  Guido  Strack  v  Commission,  C-127/13  P,  EU:C:2014:2250,  paragraph  101;  see  also 
judgment in Commission v Bavarian Lager, C-28/08 P, EU:C:2010:378, paragraphs 63 and 64. 
20   Judgment in Rechnungshof v Rundfunk and Others, Joined cases C-465/00, C-138/01 and C-139/01, 
EU:C:2003:294, paragraph 73. 
21   Judgment in Commission v Bavarian Lager, C-28/08 P, EU:C:2010:378, paragraph 68. 
22   Judgment in Guido Strack v Commission, C-127/13 P, EU:C:2014:2250, paragraph 111. 

 

 
prejudiced". The Court of Justice has clarified that "it is for the person applying for access 
to establish the necessity of transferring that data
".23  
All  documents  identified  –except  annex  1  to  document  17,  annex  1  and  2  to  document 
18,  annex  2  to  document  19,  and  annexes  2  and  3  to  document  21,  contain  personal 
information  such  as  names,  e-mail  addresses  or  telephone  numbers  that  is  necessary  to 
protect the concerned natural persons' identity and privacy.  
We  consider  that,  with  the  information  available,  the  necessity  of  disclosing  the 
aforementioned  personal  data  to  you  has  not  been  established  and/or  that  it  cannot  be 
assumed  that  such  disclosure  would  not  prejudice  the  legitimate  rights  of  the  persons 
concerned.  Therefore,  we  are  disclosing  the  documents  requested  without  including  these 
personal data. 
For  the  documents  partially  disclosed,  a  disclaimer  that,  unless  otherwise  specified, 
redactions are made pursuant to this exception, has been included at the top left hand corner 
of each partially released document. 
In line with the Commission's commitment to ensure transparency and accountability, the 
names of the senior management of the Commission (i.e. Members of the Cabinets and 
Director level and above) are disclosed.  
Concerning  documents  3  and  12,  we  would  like  to  draw  your  attention  to  the  dedicated 
website  on  the  multilateral  investment  court  initiative,  which  contains  additional 
information  which  may  be  of  its  interest,  in  particular  links  to  video  recording  of  the 
meetings that are described in such documents.24 
2.3 
Protection of commercial interests 
Article  4(2)  first  indent  of  Regulation  1049/2001  provides  that  "[t]he  institutions  shall 
refuse  access  to  a  document  where  disclosure  would  undermine  the  protection  of:  […] 
commercial interests of a natural or legal person […] unless there is an overriding public 
interest in disclosure
". 
While not all information concerning a company and its business relations can be regarded 
as  falling  under  the  exception  of  Article  4(2)  first  indent,25  it  appears  that  the  type  of 
information covered by the notion of commercial interests would generally be of the kind 
protected  under  the  obligation  of  professional  secrecy.26  Accordingly,  it  must  be 
information that is "known only to a limited number of persons", "whose disclosure is liable 
                                                 
23   Id., paragraph 107; see also judgment in Commission v Bavarian Lager, C-28/08 P, EU:C:2010:378, 
paragraph 77. 
24   The  dedicated  website can be consulted at:  http://trade.ec.europa.eu/doclib/press/index.cfm?id=1608. 
The links to both stakeholder meetings of April 2018 and November 2017 are available therein. 
25   Judgment in Terezakis v Commission, T-380/04, EU:T:2008:19, paragraph 93. 
26   See Article 339 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union. 

 

 
to cause serious harm to the person who has provided it or to third parties" and for which 
"the interests liable to be harmed by disclosure must, objectively, be worthy of protection".27 
Some  passages  in  documents  4,  9  and  24  have  been  redacted  to  protect  the  commercial 
information of some organisations.  These  documents  constitute  reports  of meetings  with 
stakeholders  where  sensitive  information  of  a  commercial  nature  was  expressed  in 
support  of  the  views  and  arguments  of  these  stakeholders.  Disclosing  such  information 
could  harm  the  competitive  position  of  the  stakeholders  concerned  and  as  such  is 
considered  to  be  covered  by  the  exception  on  the  protection  of  commercial  interests. 
Accordingly, such pieces of information are redacted.  
In  addition,  the  redactions  in  document  3  concern  the  identity  of  the  stakeholders  that 
intervened in the stakeholder meeting on the multilateral investment court. As document 
3 reflects the interpretation that DG TRADE has made of the questions or comments by 
the  different  stakeholders  and  might  not  fully  represent  their  complete  assessment,  the 
identity of the stakeholders has been redacted28. 
The  redactions  in  document  13  correspond  to  discussions  on  the  stakeholder's  specific 
answers  to  the  public  consultation  on  a  multilateral  reform  of  ISDS.29  Where 
stakeholders  consented,  replies  were  made  publicly  available.  However,  the  concerned 
stakeholder is  not  among those that specifically  allowed the Commission to  publish  the 
replies  with  its  name.  It  is  therefore  considered  appropriate  not  to  disclose  the  specific 
answers of this stakeholder in order to protect its commercial interests. 
2.4 
Protection of the institution's decision-making process 
Article  4(3)  first  subparagraph  of  Regulation  1049/2001  provides  that  “[a]ccess  to  a 
document drawn up by an institution for internal use or received by an institution, which 
relates  to  a  matter  where  the  decision  has  not  been  taken  by  the  institution,  shall  be 
refused  if  disclosure  of  the  document  would  seriously  undermine  the  institution’s 
decision-making process, unless there is an overriding public interest in disclosure”.
  
The jurisprudence of the EU Courts has also recognised that "the protection of the decision-
making  process  from  targeted  external  pressure  may  constitute  a  legitimate  ground  for 
restricting  access  to  documents  relating  to  the  decision-making  process"
30  and  that  the 
capacity of its staff to express their opinions freely must be preserved31 so as to avoid the 
risk that the disclosure would lead to future self-censorship. As the General Court put it, the 
result of such self-censorship "would be that the Commission could no longer benefit from 
                                                 
27   Judgment in Bank Austria v Commission, T-198/03, EU:T:2006:136, paragraph 29. 
28   To  watch  the  full  meeting,  see:  https://webcast.ec.europa.eu/stakeholder-meeting-on-a-multilateral-
investment-court  
29   See http://trade.ec.europa.eu/consultations/index.cfm?consul_id=233  
30   Judgment in MasterCard and Others v Commission, T-516/11, EU:T:2014:759, paragraph 71 
31   Judgment in Muñiz v Commission, T-144/05, EU:T:2008:596, paragraph 89. 
10 
 

 
the frankly-expressed and complete views required of its agents and officials and would be 
deprived of a constructive form of internal criticism, given free of all external constraints 
and pressures and designed to facilitate the taking of decisions […]"
32.  
As  explained  above,  the  European  Commission  has  started  to  elaborate  negotiating 
positions  and  strategies  to  be  implemented  in  the  context  of  ongoing  discussions  and 
upcoming negotiations in Working Group III of UNCITRAL, tasked with the mandate of 
exploring a possible multilateral reform of ISDS (Investor-State Dispute Settlement).  
The  decision-making  process  for  a  possible  multilateral  reform  of  ISDS  is  therefore  at  a 
very early stage.  
Documents 6, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, annex 1 to document 16, annex 1 to document 17, 
annex 1 to document 18, annex 2 to document 19 and annexes 2 and 3 to document 21 were 
drafted  in  relation  to  meetings  with  other  trading  partners  at  different  international  fora 
(ASEM, UNCITRAL, World Economic Forum) and contain information drafted for internal 
use  in  order  to  explore  or  to  consider  different  options  for  the  ongoing  discussions,  in  a 
subject-matter where a decision has not yet been taken. Those options are subject to changes 
after  discussions  with  the  negotiating  partners,  but  also  with  EU  Member  States,  external 
stakeholders or civil society. 
Disclosing  the  withheld  documents  and  redacted  passages  would  seriously  undermine  the 
decision-making process of the institution in this specific case, as it would reduce the free 
exchange  of  views  between  different  services  of  the  Commission  or  with  our  negotiating 
partners  by  exposing  internal  views  and  considerations  to  undue  pressure  and  unfounded 
conclusions  both  from  external  stakeholders  and  from  our  negotiating  partners,  at  a  time 
when  such  free  exchanges  of  views  are  particularly  important  given  the  early  stage  of 
discussions.  Protecting  the  confidentiality  of  internal  views  and  opinions  allows  for  the 
Commission  staff  involved  to  speak  freely  and  frankly  in  a  manner  that  is  vital  for  the 
process to move forward in a manner that EU interests are effectively advanced. Reducing 
this  degree  of  confidentiality  would  give  rise  to  a risk of  self-censorship,  which  would  in 
turn  undermine  the  quality  of  the  ongoing  decision-making  process.  Those  withheld 
documents and redacted passaged must therefore remain protected pursuant to Article 4(3) 
first subparagraph of Regulation 1049/2001. 
3. 
OVERRIDING PUBLIC INTEREST 
The  exceptions  laid  down  in  article  4(2)  first  indent  and  4(3)  first  subparagraph  of 
Regulation  1049/2001  appliy  unless  there  is  an  overriding  public  interest  in  the 
disclosure of the documents. Such an interest must, first, be public and, second, outweigh 
the harm caused by disclosure. The Court of Justice of the EU has acknowledged that it is 
for the institution concerned by the request for access to balance the particular interest to 
be protected by non-disclosure of the document against the public interest. In this respect, 
the  public  interest  is  of  particular  relevance  where  the  institution  "is  acting  in  its 
                                                 
32   Judgment in MyTravel v Commission, T-403/05, EU:T:2008:316, paragraph 52. 
11 
 

 
legislative capacity"33 as transparency and openness of the legislative process strengthen 
the democratic right of European citizens to scrutinise the information which has formed 
the basis of a legislative act.34 
The pieces of information withheld under Article 4(2) first indent are all justified by the 
notion  of  commercial  interest.  The  Commission  has  not  been  able  to  identify  a  public 
interest  capable  of  overriding  the  relevant  commercial  interests  of  the  relevant 
stakeholders.  Therefore,  documents  3,  4,  9,  13  and  24  are  disclosed  except  for  the 
relevant parts covered under the exception.  
As  regards  the  documents  protected  under  Article  4(3)  first  subparagraph,  we  have 
concluded  that  on  balance,  preserving  the  Commission's  decision-making  prevails  over 
transparency in this specific case. In particular, disclosure at this stage would undermine 
the  possibility  of  achieving  the  best  possible  outcome  in  the  public  interest.  Disclosing 
the  withheld  documents  would  expose  the  EU  to  have  to  justify  preliminary  positions 
which eventually evolved in the decision-making process. 
4.  
PARTIAL ACCESS 
Pursuant  to  Article  4(6)  of  Regulation  1049/2001  "[i]f  only  parts  of  the  requested 
document  are  covered  by  any  of  the  exceptions,  the  remaining  parts  of  the  document 
shall  be  released
".  Accordingly,  the  Commission  has  also  considered  whether  partial 
access  could  be  granted  to  document  6  and  annex  1  thereto,  annex  1  to  document  16, 
annex  1  to  document  17,  annexes  1  and  2  to  document  18,  annex  2  to  document  19, 
document 20, annexes 2 and 3 to document 21 and document 22. After a careful review, 
it has concluded that such documents and annexes are entirely covered by the exceptions 
described  above  and  it  is  thus  impossible  to  disclose  any  parts  of  these  documents 
without  undermining  the  protection  of  the  interests  identified  in  this  reply.  Such 
determination  also  takes  account  of  the  General  Court  finding  that  the  Commission  is 
entitled  "to  refuse  partial  access  in  cases  where  examination  of  the  documents  in 
question  shows  that  partial  access  would  be  meaningless  because  the  parts  of  the 
documents that could be disclosed would be of no use to the applicant
".35  
*** 
Regarding annex 1 to document 2, annex 2 to document 3, annexes 3 and 7 to document 6, 
annex  1  to  document  19  and  annex  1  to  document  21,  you  may  reuse  the  documents 
requested  free  of  charge  for  non-commercial  and  commercial  purposes  provided  that  the 
source  is  acknowledged,  that  you  do  not  distort  the  original  meaning  or  message  of  the 
documents. Please note that the Commission does not assume liability stemming from the 
reuse.  
                                                 
33   Judgment  in  Sweden  and  Maurizio  Turco  v  Council,  Joined  cases  C-39/05  P  and  C-52/05  P, 
EU:C:2008:374, paragraph 46. 
34   Id., paragraph 67. 
35   Judgment in Mattila v Council and Commission, T-204/99, EU:T:2001:190, paragraph 69. 
12 
 



 
Regarding  annex  8  to  document  6  and  annex  2  to  document  16,  please  note  that  these 
documents  were  received  by  the  Commission  from  UNCITRAL.  They  are  disclosed  for 
information only and cannot be re-used without the agreement of the originator. They do not 
reflect the position of the Commission and cannot be quoted as such. 
Regarding annex 4, 5 and 6 to document 6, please note that these documents were received 
by the Commission from third-parties. They are disclosed for information only and cannot 
be re-used without the agreement of the originator. They do not reflect the position of the 
Commission and cannot be quoted as such. 
*** 
In case you would disagree with the assessment provided in this reply, you are entitled, in 
accordance with Article 7.2 of Regulation 1049/2001, to make a confirmatory application 
requesting the Commission to review this position. 
Such  a  confirmatory  application  should  be  addressed  within  15  working  days  upon 
receipt of this letter to the Secretary-General of the Commission at the following address: 
European Commission 
Secretary-General 
Transparency, Document Management & Access to Documents (SG.C1) 
BERL 5/282 
1049 Bruxelles 
 
or by email to: [correo electrónico] 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Yours sincerely, 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
    
Jean-Luc DEMARTY 
 
 
 
Encl.:   Annex 1 (list of documents) and (partially) released documents. 
13 
 
Electronically signed on 27/11/2018 10:07 (UTC+01) in accordance with article 4.2 (Validity of electronic documents) of Commission Decision 2004/563