Esta es la versión HTML de un fichero adjunto a una solicitud de acceso a la información 'Stakeholder contacts and internal communication on the EU-Indonesia Free Trade Agreement'.



Ref. Ares(2018)6630700 - 21/12/2018
 
EUROPEAN COMMISSION 
Directorate-General for Trade 
 
 
 
The Director General 
 
                                                                    
Brussels, 21/12/2018                                                               
By registered letter with 
acknowledgment of receipt 

Mr Bart-Jaap Verbeek  
Centre for Research on Multinational 
Corporations (SOMO) 
Sarphatistraat 30 
018 GL Amsterdam 
The Netherlands 
 
Advance copy by email:  
ask+request-5808-
[correo electrónico] 
   
 
 
 
Subject: 
Your application for access to documents – Ref GestDem No 2018/4306 
 
Dear Mr Verbeek, 
I refer to your request of 6 August 2018 for access to documents under Regulation (EC) No 
1049/20011  ("Regulation  1049/2001"),  registered  under  the  above  mentioned  reference 
number. 
Please accept our apologies for the delay in answering your request, which is mainly due to 
the high number of requests for access to documents being processed at the same time by the 
Directorate-General for Trade (hereinafter ‘DG TRADE’). 
1. 
SCOPE OF YOUR REQUEST 
You requested access to: 
1)  a  list  of  meetings  between  DG  Trade  officials  and/or  representatives  (including  the 
Commissioner  and  the  Cabinet)  and  stakeholders,  including  trade  unions,  civil  society 
groups, as well as representatives of individual companies, industry associations, law firms, 
academics,  public  consultancies  and  think  tanks  in  which  the  EU-Indonesia  Free  Trade 
Agreement was discussed (between January 2016 and today); 
                                                 
1  
Regulation  (EC)  No  1049/2001  of  the  European  Parliament  and  of  the  Council  of  20  May  2001 
regarding  public  access  to  European  Parliament,  Council  and  Commission  documents,  OJ  L  145, 
31.5.2001, p. 43. 
Commission européenne/Europese Commissie, 1049 Bruxelles/Brussel, BELGIQUE/BELGIË - Tel. +32 229 91111 

 
2) minutes and other reports of these meetings; 
3)  all  correspondence  (including  emails,  letters, faxes)  between  DG  Trade  officials  and/or 
representatives  (including  the  Commissioner  and  the  Cabinet)  and  stakeholders,  including 
trade  unions,  civil  society  groups,  as  well  as  representatives  of  individual  companies, 
industry  associations,  law  firms,  academics,  public  consultancies  as  well  as  think  tanks 
regarding the EU-Indonesia Free Trade Agreement (between January 2016 and today); 

4) all correspondence (including emails, letters, faxes) and documents (including briefings, 
memo's, non-papers) shared between DG Trade officials and/or the Commissioner and the 
Cabinet in which the EU-Indonesia Free Trade Agreement was discussed (between January 
2016 and today). 

On  13  September  2018  we  informed  you  that  we  had  identified  a  very  large  number  of 
documents  falling  under  the  scope  of  your  request  and  that  we  could  only  deal  with  a 
maximum of 25 documents in your request. Hence, we asked you to narrow down the scope 
of  your  request,  in  accordance  with  Article  6(3)  of  Regulation  1049/2001.  This  article 
provides  that  in  the  event  of  an  application  relating  to  a  very  long  document  or  to  a  very 
large  number  of  documents,  the  institution  concerned  may  confer  with  the  applicant 
informally, with a view to finding a fair solution. 
In order to help you taking an informed decision to narrow down the scope of your request, 
we sent you, on 21 September 2018, a list of the 223 documents identified, including a title, 
the type of document and its date. 
You replied on 24 September by expressing your priority interest in obtaining access to the 
reports of meetings, i.e. documents 85 to 110. Please note that after closer reading, we have 
realised that some of the documents were erroneously identified and they do not fall within 
the scope of your request (as they actually do not relate to Indonesia) or they are duplicated. 
We  have  therefore  replaced  them  by  documents  111  to  114  of  the  list  sent  to  you  on  21 
September. The current batch of documents still includes, however, five reports of meetings 
that were not held with stakeholders as indicated in your original request, but with Indonesia 
(documents 85, 88, 95, 96 and 105). Given though that this was clearly indicated in the list 
we shared with  you, that they do cover the subject matter of interest to  you and you chose 
them from the list, we decided to include those documents in this reply rather than seeking 
to replace them.  
A list of the documents covered in this reply is accordingly enclosed in Annex 1. For each of 
the documents the list provides a description and indicates whether parts are withheld and if 
so,  under  which  ground  pursuant  to  Regulation  1049/2001.  Copies  of  the  accessible 
documents are enclosed. 
 
 
 


 
2. 
ASSESSMENT AND CONCLUSIONS UNDER REGULATION 1049/2001 
In  accordance  with  settled  case  law2,  when  an  institution  is  asked  to  disclose  a  document,  it 
must assess, in each individual case, whether that document falls within the exceptions to the 
right  of  public  access  to  documents  set  out  in  Article  4  of  Regulation  1049/2001.  Such 
assessment is carried out in a multi-step approach. First, the institution must satisfy itself that 
the document relates to one of the exceptions, and if so, decide which parts of it are covered by 
that  exception.  Second,  it  must  examine  whether  disclosure  of  the  parts  of  the  document  in 
question poses a “reasonably foreseeable and not purely hypothetical” risk of undermining the 
protection of the interest covered by the exception. Third, if the institution takes the view that 
disclosure would undermine the protection of any of the interests defined under Articles 4(2) 
and 4(3) of Regulation 1049/2001, the institution is required "to ascertain whether there is any 
overriding public interest justifying disclosure
"3.  
In  view  of  the  objectives  pursued  by  Regulation  1049/2001,  notably  to  give  the  public  the 
widest  possible  right  of  access  to  documents4,  "the  exceptions  to  that  right  […]  must  be 
interpreted and applied strictly"
5. 
Having  examined  the  requested  documents  under  the  applicable  legal  framework,  I  am 
pleased to  grant  you  full access to  annex 2  of document 97 and to  the annex of document 
111 and partial access to the remaining documents except to annex 3 of document 97. 
In documents 85, 86, 89, 92-97, annex 1 to document 97, 102-105, 107, 111, 112 and 114 
and its annexes,  only  names and other personal  data have been redacted pursuant  to  article 
4(1)(b)  of  Regulation  1049/2001  and  in  accordance  with  Regulation  (EC)  No  2018/1725. 
Hence, the main content of these documents is accessible. 
In  documents  88,  90,  91,  98,  100,  106,  and  110  in  addition  to  personal  data,  additional 
information was redacted as it is covered either by the exception set out in article 4(1)(a) third 
indent  of  Regulation  1049/2001  (protection  of  the  public  interest  as  regards  international 
relations)  or  by  the  exception  set  out  in  Article  4(2)  first  indent  of  Regulation  1049/2001 
(protection of the commercial interest of a natural or legal person). 
Please note that parts of documents that do not relate to your request have been redacted as 
falling out of scope. 
Access is not granted to the annex 3 to document 97, as its disclosure is prevented by  the 
exception  set  out  in  Article  4(2)  first  indent  of  Regulation  1049/2001  (protection  of  the 
commercial interest of a natural or legal person). Some information is also protected pursuant 
to article 4(1)(b) of Regulation 1049/2001.  
                                                 
2  
Judgment  in  Sweden  and  Maurizio  Turco  v  Council,  Joined  cases  C-39/05  P  and  C-52/05  P, 
EU:C:2008:374, paragraph 35. 
 
Id., paragraphs 37-43. See also judgment in Council v Sophie in’t Veld, C-350/12 P, EU:C:2014:2039, 
paragraphs 52 and 64. 
4  
Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001, recital (4). 
5  
Judgment in Sweden v Commission, C-64/05 P, EU:C:2007:802, paragraph 66. 


 
In addition, access is not granted to document 108, as very large parts fall outside the scope 
of your request and the remaining parts are either covered by the exceptions set out in article 
4(1)(a)  third  indent  and  4(1)(b)  of  Regulation  1049/2001  or  considered  meaningless  for 
disclosure. 
The reasons justifying the application of the exceptions are set out below in Sections 2.1, 2.2 
and 2.3. Section 3 contains an assessment of whether there exists an overriding public interest 
in  the  disclosure  and  section  4  considered  whether  partial  access  could  be  granted  to  the 
documents withheld. 
2.1 
Protection of the public interest as regards international relations  
Article 4(1)(a) third indent, of Regulation 1049/2001 provides that  “[t]he institutions shall 
refuse access to a document where disclosure would undermine the protection of: the public 
interest as regards: […] international relations
”. 
According  to  settled  case-law,  "the  particularly  sensitive  and  essential  nature  of  the 
interests  protected  by  Article  4(1)(a)  of  Regulation  No  1049/2001,  combined  with  the  fact 
that  access  must  be  refused  by  the  institution,  under  that  provision,  if  disclosure  of  a 
document to the public would undermine those interests, confers on the decision which must 
thus be adopted by the institution a complex and delicate nature which calls for the exercise 
of  particular  care.  Such  a  decision  therefore  requires  a  margin  of  appreciation".
6  In  this 
context, the Court of Justice has acknowledged that the institutions enjoy "a wide discretion 
for  the  purpose  of  determining  whether  the  disclosure  of  documents  relating  to  the  fields 
covered by [the] exceptions [under Article 4(1)(a)] could undermine the public interest"
7.  
The General Court found that "it is possible that the disclosure of European Union positions 
in  international negotiations  could  damage the protection of  the public interest  as regards 
international  relations"
  and  "have  a  negative  effect  on  the  negotiating  position  of  the 
European Union"
 as well as "reveal, indirectly, those of other parties to the negotiations".
Moreover, "the positions taken by the Union are, by definition, subject to change depending 
on  the  course  of  those  negotiations  and  on  concessions  and  compromises  made  in  that 
context by the various stakeholders. The formulation of negotiating positions may involve a 
number of tactical considerations on the part of the negotiators, including the Union itself. 
In that context, it cannot be precluded that disclosure by the Union, to the public, of its own 
negotiating  positions,  when  the  negotiating  positions  of  the  other  parties  remain  secret, 
could, in practice, have a negative effect on the negotiating capacity of the Union".

The EU and Indonesia are currently negotiating a free trade agreement. 
Document 88 is the report of a meeting between Commissioner Malmström and the Minister 
of  Trade  of  Indonesia.  Certain  passages  have  been  redacted  as  they  reveal  internal  views 
                                                 
6  
Judgment in Sison v Council, C-266/05 P, EU:C:2007:75, paragraph 36. 
7  
Judgment in Council v Sophie in’t Veld, C-350/12 P, EU:C:2014:2039, paragraph 63. 
8  
Judgment in Sophie in’t Veld v Commission, T-301/10, EU:T:2013:135, paragraphs 123-125. 
9  
Id., paragraph 125. 


 
either from the EU or from Indonesia. These views cannot be disclosed without undermining 
the  mutual  trust  and  hence  the  negotiations  between  the  EU  and  Indonesia  as  these  views 
could reveal strategic considerations of either side.  
Documents 100 and 108 are reports of meetings with external stakeholders. Certain passages 
of  these  documents  have  been  withheld  as  their  disclosure  would  reveal  strategic  interests, 
priorities  and  business  concerns  of  the  EU.  As  such,  this  information  could  indirectly  reveal 
negotiating priorities, strategic objectives and tactics, which the EU could consider pursuing in 
its trade negotiations.  
More  generally,  it  remains  important  for  the  EU  when  negotiating  with  its  counterpart  to 
retain a certain margin of manoeuvre to shape and adjust its tactics, options and positions in 
order  to  safeguard  the  EU's  interests.  Exposing  internal  views  and  considerations  would 
weaken  the  negotiating  capacity  of  the  EU  and  consequently,  the  protection  of  the  public 
interest as regards international relations. 
There is a reasonably foreseeable risk that the public disclosure of the protected information 
would undermine and weaken the position of the EU in its ongoing trade negotiations with 
Indonesia.  Indeed,  the  information  contained  in  these  documents  would  allow  the  EU’s 
trading  partner  to  draw  conclusions  with  respect  to  certain  detailed  positions,  concerns, 
views  and  strategies  of  the  Commission  and  of  its  Member  States.  This  in  turn  may  allow 
the  counterpart  to  extract  specific  concessions  from  the  EU  in  the  context  the  ongoing 
negotiations, thus to the disadvantage of the EU’s international relations, and the interests of 
its citizens, consumers and economic operators. 
The  EU,  when  negotiating  with  its  counterpart  -  in  this  case  Indonesia  -  needs  to  retain  a 
certain margin of manoeuvre to shape and adjust its tactics, options and positions in order to 
safeguard the EU's interests. Exposing internal views and considerations would weaken the 
negotiating  capacity  of  the  EU  and  consequently,  the  protection  of  the  public  interest  as 
regards international relations.  
Furthermore,  some  of  the  withheld  passages  reveal  the  position  of  Indonesia.  Such 
disclosure  is  likely  to  upset  the  mutual  trust  between  the  EU  and  Indonesia  and  thus 
undermine their relations. It may also jeopardise the mutual trust between the EU and other 
trading partners as they may fear that in the future their positions would be exposed and they 
may as a result refrain from engaging with the EU. Negotiating partners need to be able to 
confide  in  each  other's  discretion  and  to  trust  that  they  can  engage  in  open  and  frank 
exchanges of views without having to fear that these views and positions may in the future 
be  publicly  revealed.  As  the  Court  recognised  in  Case  T-301/10  in’t  Veld  v  Commission
“[…]  establishing  and  protecting  a  sphere  of  mutual  trust  in  the  context  of  international 
relations is a very delicate exercise"
10 
The abovementioned passages must, therefore, remain protected. 
 
                                                 
10    
Judgment in Sophie in’t Veld v European Commission, T-301/10, EU:T:2013:135, paragraph 126. 


 
 2.2  
Protection of privacy and integrity of the individual 
Pursuant to Article 4(1)(b) of Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001, access to a document has to be 
refused  if  its  disclosure  would  undermine  the  protection  of  privacy  and  the  integrity  of  the 
individual, in particular in accordance with European Union legislation regarding the protection 
of personal data.  
 
The  applicable  legislation  in  this  field  is  Regulation  (EC)  No  2018/1725  of  the  European 
Parliament and of the Council of 23 October 2018  on the protection of natural persons with 
regard to the processing of personal data by the Union institutions, bodies, offices and agencies 
and  on  the  free  movement  of  such  data,  and  repealing  Regulation  (EC)  No  45/2001  and 
Decision No 1247/2002/EC11 (‘Regulation 2018/1725’). 
 
All  the  documents  partially  released  as  well  as  annex  3  to  document  97  contain  personal 
information,  such  as  names,  e-mail  addresses,  telephone  numbers  that  allow  the 
identification of natural persons, as well as other personal information like signatures.  
 
Indeed,  Article  3(1)  of  Regulation  2018/1725  provides  that  personal  data  "means  any 
information relating to an identified or identifiable natural person […]
". The Court of Justice 
has specified that any information, which by reason of its content, purpose or effect, is linked 
to a particular person is to be considered as personal data.12 Please note in this respect that the 
names, signatures, functions, telephone numbers and/or initials pertaining to staff members of 
an institution are to be considered personal data.13 
 
In its judgment in Case C-28/08 P (Bavarian Lager)14, the Court of Justice ruled that when a 
request  is  made  for  access  to  documents  containing  personal  data,  the  Data  Protection 
Regulation becomes fully applicable15 
 
Pursuant to Article 9(1)(b) of Regulation 2018/1725, personal data shall only be transmitted to 
recipients established in the Union other than Union institutions and bodies if  "[t]he recipient 
establishes that it is necessary to have the data transmitted for a specific purpose in the public 
interest  and  the  controller,  where  there  is  any  reason  to  assume  that  the  data  subject’s 
legitimate  interests  might  be  prejudiced,  establishes  that  it  is  proportionate  to  transmit  the 
personal  data  for  that  specific  purpose  after  having  demonstrably  weighed  the  various 
competing interests"
. Only if these conditions are fulfilled and the processing constitutes lawful 
                                                 
11 Official Journal L 205 of 21.11.2018, p. 39. 
12 Judgment of the Court of Justice of the European Union of 20 December 2017 in Case C-434/16, Peter 
Novak v Data Protection Commissioner
, request for a preliminary ruling, paragraphs 33-35, 
ECLI:EU:T:2018:560.    
13 Judgment of the General Court of 19 September 2018 in case T-39/17, Port de Brest v Commission, 
paragraphs 43-44, ECLI:EU:T:2018:560. 
14 Judgment of 29 June 2010 in Case C-28/08 P, European Commission v The Bavarian Lager Co. Ltd
EU:C:2010:378, paragraph 59.  
15 Whereas this judgment specifically related to Regulation (EC) No 45/2001 of the European Parliament and 
of the Council of 18 December 2000 on the protection of individuals with regard to the processing of personal 
data by the Community institutions and bodies and on the free movement of such data, the principles set out 
therein are also applicable under the new data protection regime established by Regulation 2018/1725.  


 
processing in accordance with the requirements of Article 5 of Regulation 2018/1725, can the 
transmission of personal data occur. 
 
According  to  Article  9(1)(b)  of  Regulation  2018/1725,  the  European  Commission  has  to 
examine  the  further  conditions  for  a  lawful  processing  of  personal  data  only  if  the  first 
condition is fulfilled, namely if the recipient has established that it is necessary to have the data 
transmitted for a specific purpose in the public interest. It is only in this case that the European 
Commission  has  to  examine  whether  there  is  a  reason  to  assume  that  the  data  subject’s 
legitimate interests might be prejudiced and, in the affirmative, establish the proportionality of 
the  transmission  of  the  personal  data  for  that  specific  purpose  after  having  demonstrably 
weighed the various competing interests. 
 
 
In your application, you do not put forward any arguments to establish the necessity to have the 
data  transmitted  for  a  specific  purpose  in  the  public  interest.  Therefore,  we  do  not  have  to 
examine whether there is a reason to assume that the data subject’s legitimate interests might be 
prejudiced.  
 
2.3 
Protection of commercial interests 
Article 4(2) first indent, of Regulation 1049/2001 provides that “[t]he institutions shall refuse 
access to a document where disclosure would undermine the protection of: […] commercial 
interests  of  a  natural  or  legal  person,  including  intellectual  property  […]  unless  there  is  an 
overriding public interest in disclosure"

While not all information concerning a company and its business relations can be regarded as 
falling under the exception of Article 4(2) first indent16, it appears that the type of information 
covered by the notion of commercial interests would generally be of the kind protected under 
the  obligation  of  professional  secrecy17.  Accordingly,  it  must  be  information  that  is  "known 
only to a limited number of persons"
"whose disclosure is liable to cause serious harm to the 
person who has provided it or to third parties"
 and for which "the interests liable to be harmed 
by disclosure must, objectively, be worthy of protection
 "18. 
Annex 3 to document 97 and some passages in documents 90, 91, 98, 106 and 110 have been 
withheld  because  they  contain  business  sensitive  information  pertaining  to  an  organisation,  a 
company  or  group  of  companies,  including  details  about  commercial  priorities,  objectives, 
strategies, concerns and interests that they pursue in their respective domains.  
All  this  information  was  shared  with  the  Commission  in  order  to  provide  useful  input  and 
support  for  the  EU’s  objectives  in  its  trade  negotiations.  Operators  typically  share 
information with the Commission so that the latter can determine how to best position itself 
in the negotiations in order to protect its strategic interests and those of its industry, workers 
and citizens.  Ensuring that  the Commission  continues to  receive access  to this information 
                                                 
16  
Judgment in Terezakis v Commission, T-380/04, EU:T:2008:19, paragraph 93. 
17  
See Article 339 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union. 
18  
Judgment in Bank Austria v Commission, T-198/03, EU:T:2006:136, paragraph 29. 


 
and that the industry engages  in  open and frank discussions with  the Commission,  are key 
elements for the success of the internal and external policies of the EU and its international 
negotiations.  Sharing  publicly  specific  business  related  information  that  companies  share 
with  the  Commission  may  prevent  the  Commission  from  receiving  access  to  such 
information in the future. 
3. 
OVERRIDING PUBLIC INTEREST IN DISCLOSURE 
The exception laid down in Article 4(2) first indent of Regulation 1049/2001 applies unless 
there is an overriding public interest in disclosure of the documents. Such an interest must, 
first,  be  public  and,  secondly,  outweigh  the  harm  caused  by  disclosure.  Accordingly,  we 
have  also  considered  whether  the  risks  attached  to  the  release  of  the  withheld  parts  of 
document 90, 91, 98, 106 and 110, as well as of the annex 3 to document 97, are outweighed 
by the public interest in accessing the requested documents. We have not been able to identify 
any  such  public  interest  capable  of  overriding  the  commercial  interests  of  the  companies 
concerned.  The  public  interest  in  this  specific  case  rather  lies  on  the  protection  of  the 
legitimate  confidentiality  interests  of  the  stakeholders  concerned  to  ensure  that  the 
Commission continues to receive useful contributions for its ongoing negotiations with third 
countries without undermining the commercial position of the entities involved. 
4. 
PARTIAL ACCESS 
Pursuant to Article 4(6) of Regulation 1049/2001 "[i]f only parts of the requested document 
are  covered  by  any  of  the  exceptions,  the  remaining  parts  of  the  document  shall  be 
released
". Accordingly, we have also considered whether partial access could be granted to 
annex 3 to document 97 and to document 108. However, and after a careful review, we have 
concluded that this is not possible. 
Annex 3 to document 97 is entirely covered by the exceptions described above and it is thus 
impossible to disclose any parts of these documents without undermining the protection of 
the interests identified in this reply.  
As regards document 108, we have come to the conclusion that its releasable content would 
be meaningless for disclosure. According to the General Court, the Commission is entitled 
"to  refuse  partial  access  in  cases  where  examination  of  the  documents  in  question  shows 
that partial access would be meaningless because the parts of the documents that could be 
disclosed  would  be  of  no  use  to  the  applicant
".19  Indeed,  large  parts  of  document  108  fall 
outside the scope of your request and most of the parts falling within the scope are protected 
by the exceptions described above. The little releasable information is also available in the 
title of the document provided in the list of documents in Annex 1. 
*** 
                                                 
19  
Judgment in Mattila v Council and Commission, T-204/99, EU:T:2001:190, paragraph 69. 



 
In  case  you  disagree  with  the  assessment  contained  in  this  reply  you  are  entitled,  in 
accordance with  Article 7(2) of Regulation  1049/2001,  to  make a confirmatory application 
requesting the Commission to review this position. 
Such a confirmatory application should be addressed within 15 working days upon receipt of 
this letter to the Secretary-General of the Commission at the following address: 
European Commission 
Secretary-General 
Transparency, Document Management & Access to Documents (SG.C1) 
BERL 5/282 
1049 Bruxelles 
 
or by email to: [correo electrónico]  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Yours sincerely, 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                  
 
 
 
 
Jean-Luc DEMARTY 
 
 
 
Encl.: 
  Annex 1: List of documents  
  Documents plus annexes including fully and partially released documents