Esta es la versión HTML de un fichero adjunto a una solicitud de acceso a la información 'Mission expenses Vera Jourova'.



 
Ref. Ares(2019)3652706 - 06/06/2019
 
EUROPEAN COMMISSION 
 
OFFICE FOR THE ADMINISTRATION AND PAYMENT OF INDIVIDUAL ENTITLEMENTS 
 
 
 The Acting Director 
 
 
 
 
 
Brussels,  
PMO/GS/ARES(2019) 
 
 
Mrs Martina Tombini 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Calle Cava de San Miguel, 8, 
                                                                                    4 centro 
28005 Madrid, Spain 
 
E-mail:ask+request-6894-
[correo electrónico] 

 
Subject: 
Your application for access to documents under Regulation (EC) No 
1049/2001 - GESTDEM 2019/2760 

Dear Mrs Tombini, 
We  refer  to  your  email  dated  10.5.2019,  in  which  you  make  a  request  for  access  to 
documents, registered on the same day under the above-mentioned reference number. 
You  request  access  to  documents  “summarising  the  mission  of  Commissioner  Vera 
Jourova to Avignon and Prague from 29th July to 29th August 2018.”
 More specifically, 
you would like to  obtain documents  which  “provide the justification  of  the expenses of 
mission  and  basis  and  rationale  for  the  commissioner’s  participation  in  “an  intensive 
week long French course”, a summary of the activities for the remainder of the month-
long mission, including the purposes of visits to each city
”. 
Firstly, I would like to note that, in accordance with the code of conduct for the Members of 
the  European  Commission1,  Commissioners  have  the  obligation  ‘to  conduct  missions  in 
compliance  with  the  rules  in  the  Financial  Regulation,  the  internal  rules  on  the 
implementation of the general budget of the European Union, the Guide to Missions and the 
rules set out in Annex 2. A mission is defined as travel in the exercise of his or her duties by 
a Member away from the Commission's place of work’ solely in the interests of the service, 
on the instructions of a line manager or the appointing authority. 
Moreover, the code of conduct for the Members of the European Commission provides that 
‘[f]or  reasons  of  transparency,  the  [European]  Commission  will  publish  an  overview  of 
mission  expenses  per Member  every  two  months covering  all missions undertaken  unless 
                                                 

Commission Decision of 31.1.2018, C(2018)700 final, Article 6(2). 
 
European Commission - B-1049 Brussels – Belgium - Telephone: (32-2) 299 11 11 
Office: MERO 09/P074- Telephone: direct line (32-2) 295 27 99   
 
E-mail: [correo electrónico] 

 
publication  of  this  information  would  undermine  the  protection  of  the  public  interest  as 
regards public security, defence and military matters, international relations or  the financial, 
monetary or economic policy of the Union or a Member State.’2  
Under the code of good administrative behaviour, I would like to note that pursuant to the 
regulatory  framework  for  mission  expenses,3  all  official  travel  is  undertaken  in  the  most 
cost-efficient way possible, according to the needs of the mission. For instance, officials are 
indeed required to book hotel rooms within strict price limits (per country or city) and the 
cheapest  transportation  option  available  on  the  market  at  the  time  of  the  purchase.  Any 
derogation from these guidelines can only be granted under exceptional and duly justified 
circumstances.  
The code of conduct entered into force on 1 February 2018. Accordingly, since 28 February 
2018, information pertaining to the mission costs of the Members of the Commission has 
been proactively published every two months.  
Against this background, the information pertaining to the mission costs of Commissioner 
Vera Jourova for the mentioned period is available under the link below: 
http://ec.europa.eu/transparencyinitiative/meetings/mission.do?host=cc463fab-bfff-4595-
bb45-6d0af96b5e83&missionsperiod=2018_3 
 
Secondly,  having  examined  your  request  under  the  provisions  of  Regulation  (EC)  No 
1049/2001 regarding public access to documents, I regret to inform you that access to the 
documents  requested  cannot be  granted,  as  disclosure  is  prevented  by  an  exception to the 
right of access laid down in Article 4 of this Regulation. 
Pursuant to Article 4(1)(b) of Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001, access to a document has to 
be refused if its disclosure would undermine the protection of privacy and the integrity of 
the  individual,  in  particular  in  accordance  with  European  Union  legislation  regarding  the 
protection of personal data.  
The  applicable  legislation  in  this  field  is  Regulation  (EU)  2018/1725  of  the  European 
Parliament and of the Council of 23 October 2018 on the protection of natural persons with 
regard  to  the  processing  of  personal  data  by  the  Union  institutions,  bodies,  offices  and 
agencies and on the free movement of such data, and repealing Regulation (EC) No 45/2001 
and Decision No 1247/2002/EC  (‘Regulation 2018/1725’). 
In  the  recent  Psara  judgment,  the  General  Court  reiterated  that  Article  4(1)(b)  ‘is  an 
indivisible provision [which] requires that any undermining of privacy and the integrity of 
the individual must always be examined and assessed in conformity with the legislation of 
the  Union  concerning  the  protection  of  personal  data,  in  particular  with  Regulation  No 
45/2001’ and that ‘[it] establishes a specific and reinforced system of protection of a person 
whose personal data could, in certain cases, be communicated to the public […]’.4 
                                                 
2 
Ibid. 

In  addition  to  the  above-mentioned  Code  of  Conduct  for  Members  of  the  Commission,  see 
Commission  decision  of  18.11.2008,  ‘General  implementing  provisions  adopting  the  Guide  to 
missions for officials and other servants of the European Commission’, C(2008)6215. 

Judgment  of  25  September  2018,  Maria  Psara  and  Others  v  European  Parliament,  T-639/15  to  T-
666/15 and T-94/16, EU:T:2018:602, paragraph 65, (hereafter ‘the Psara judgment’). 


 
Furthermore, the General Court reaffirmed that no automatic priority can be conferred on 
the objective of transparency over the right to protection of personal data.5   
Notwithstanding the fact that this judgment referred to Regulation No 45/2001, it applies by 
analogy to Regulation No 2018/1725, as, in principle, the rest of the case law pertaining to 
the former. 
Article  3(1)  of  Regulation  No  2018/1725  provides  that  personal  data  ‘means  any 
information relating to an identified or identifiable natural person […]’. The Court of Justice 
ruled that any information that, due to its content, purpose or effect, is linked to a particular 
person, qualifies as personal data.6 
In the Rechnungshof case law, the Court of Justice further confirmed that ‘there is no reason 
of principle to justify excluding activities of a professional […] nature from the notion of 
private life’.7 
The General Court also stressed that ‘[t]he Court previously held that derogations from the 
protection of personal data must be interpreted strictly’.8 
The  documents  falling  under  the  scope  of  your  request  contain  information  concerning 
identified natural persons, namely Commissioner Vera Jourova and they reveal in a detailed 
manner  how,  where  and  when  the  Commissioner  spent  these  amounts.  Therefore,  they 
undoubtedly consist of information that qualifies as personal data. 
The General Court reaffirmed in the Psara judgment that ‘[t]he fact that data concerning the 
persons in question are closely linked to public data on those persons […] does not mean at 
all  that those  data  can no  longer  be  characterised as  personal  data,  within  the  meaning  of 
Article 2(a) of Regulation No 45/2001’.9 
The  public  disclosure  of  these  personal  data  would  consequently  constitute  processing 
(transfer)  of  personal  data  within  the  meaning  of  Article  9(1)  (b)  of  Regulation  No 
2018/1725.   
Pursuant to this provision, ‘personal data shall only be transmitted to recipients established 
in the Union other than Union institutions and bodies if […] the recipient establishes that it 
is necessary to have the data transmitted for a specific purpose in the public interest and the 
controller, where there is any reason to assume that the data subject’s legitimate interests 
might be prejudiced, establishes that it is proportionate to transmit the personal data for that 
specific purpose after having demonstrably weighed the various competing interests’. Only 
if both of these conditions are fulfilled and the processing constitutes lawful processing in 
accordance  with  the  requirements  of  Article  5  of  Regulation  No  2018/1725,  can  the 
transmission of personal data occur. 
According  to  settled  case  law,  the  condition  of  necessity  laid  down  in  Article  9(1)(b)  of 
Regulation  No  2018/1725  requires  the  demonstration  by  the  applicant  that  the  transfer  of 
                                                 
5      Ibid, paragraph 91. 

Judgment  of  20  December  2017,  C-434/16,  Peter  Novak  v  Data  Protection  Commissioner
EU:T:2018:560, paragraphs 33-35 

Judgment  of  20  May  2003,  C-465/00,  C-138/01  and  C-139/01,  Rechnungshof  v  Österreichischer 
Rundfunk and others
, EU:C:2003:294, paragraph 73. 

Psara judgment, op. cit., paragraph 68. 
9    Psara judgment, paragraph 52. 


 
personal data is the most appropriate of the possible measures for attaining his/her objective, 
and that it is proportionate to that objective.’10  
Furthermore,  the  applicant  needs  to  provide  convincing  evidence  in  order to  establish  the 
need for the transfer of personal data, and not make use of general considerations relating to 
the public interest and rights to transparency and information.11  
In your request, you do not put forward any arguments to establish the necessity to have the 
data  transmitted  for  a  specific  purpose  in  the  public  interest.  Therefore,  the  European 
Commission  does  not  have  to  examine  whether  there  is  a  reason  to  assume  that  the  data 
subjects’ legitimate interests might be prejudiced. 
Furthermore, I consider that the transfer of the personal data of Commissioner Vera Jourova 
contained in the requested documents, would go beyond what is necessary for attaining the 
objective of ensuring the transparency of the costs pertaining to the mission, and is therefore 
disproportionate to that purpose. 
Therefore,  I  conclude  that  the  transfer  of  personal  data  contained  in  the  requested 
documents  does  not  fulfil  the  requirement  of  lawfulness  provided  for  in  Article  5  of 
Regulation No 2018/1725. 
Consequently,  I  conclude  that,  pursuant  to  Article  4(1)(b)  of  Regulation  (EC)  No 
1049/2001,  access  cannot  be  granted  to  the  personal  data,  as  the  need  to  obtain  access 
thereto for a purpose in the public interest has not been substantiated and there is no reason 
to think that the legitimate interests of the individual concerned would not be prejudiced by 
disclosure of the personal data. 
The fact that Article 4(1)(b) of Regulation No 1049/2001 is an absolute exception that does 
not require the institution to balance the exception defined therein against a possible public 
interest in disclosure, only reinforces this conclusion. 
The exceptions laid down in Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001 must be waived if there is an 
overriding  public  interest  in  disclosure.  Such  an  interest  must,  firstly,  be  public  and, 
secondly, outweigh the harm caused by disclosure. 
Nevertheless,  please  note  that  Article  4(1)(b)  of  Regulation  (EC)  No  1049/2001  does  not 
include  the  possibility  for  the  exceptions  defined  therein  to  be  set  aside  by  an  overriding 
public interest. 
In  accordance  with  Article  4(6)  of  Regulation  No  1049/2001,  I  have  considered  the 
possibility of granting partial access to the documents requested. However, for the reasons 
explained above, no meaningful partial access is possible without undermining the interest 
of privacy and the integrity of the individual protected under Article 4(1)(b) of Regulation 
No 1049/2001. 
In accordance with Article 7(2) of Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001, you are entitled to make 
a confirmatory application requesting the Commission to review this position. 
 
                                                 
10  Judgment of 15 July 2015, Dennekamp v Parliament, T-115/13, EU:T:2015:497, paragraph 77. 
11     Psara judgment, paragraphs 73-76. 



 
Such a confirmatory application should be addressed within 15 working days upon receipt 
of this letter to the Secretariat-General of the Commission at the following address: 
European Commission 
Secretariat-General 
Transparency, Document Management and Access to Documents (SG.C.1)  
BERL 7/076 
B-1049 Brussels,  
or by email to: [Dirección de correo del organismo DG SG] 
 
 
Yours sincerely, 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
            [Signed] 
Giuseppe Scognamiglio 

Electronically signed on 06/06/2019 16:42 (UTC+02) in accordance with article 4.2 (Validity of electronic documents) of Commission Decision 2004/563