Esta es la versión HTML de un fichero adjunto a una solicitud de acceso a la información 'Employment, Social Affairs and Inclusion Documents Regarding Ritual Abuse in the EU'.



Ref. Ares(2019)7249385 - 25/11/2019
Ref. Ares(2019)7512838 - 06/12/2019
Expert Workshop 
Implementation of the child sexual abuse directive 2011/93/EU with regard 
to children with disabilities 
30 January 2018 
Conclusions Paper 
 
The Child Sexual abuse and Exploitation Directive 2011/93/EU1 is the main EU legislative 
instrument  in  this  area.  The  Directive  is  a  comprehensive  legal  framework  which  covers 
investigation  and  prosecution  of  crimes,  assistance  to  and  protection  of  victims,  and 
prevention.  It  approximates  the  definition  of  20  offences,  sets  minimum  levels  for  criminal 
penalties,  and  facilitates  reporting,  investigation  and  prosecution.  It  extends  national 
jurisdiction to cover sexual abuse by EU nationals abroad, gives child victims easier access to 
legal  remedies  and  includes  measures  to  prevent  additional  trauma  from  participating  in 
criminal  proceedings.  Offenders  are  to  be  subjected  to  risk  assessments,  and  have  access  to 
special  intervention  programmes.  Information  on  convictions  and  disqualifications  are  to 
circulate  more  easily  among  criminal  records,  making  controls  more  reliable.  The  Directive 
prohibits  advertising  the  possibility  of  sexual  abuse,  or  organising  child  sex  tourism,  and 
provides for education, awareness raising and training of officials. 27 EU Member States (not 
including  Denmark)  are  obliged  to  implement  its  provisions  in  their  national  laws.  The 
deadline for transposition of this directive was December 13, 2013. 
 
On  16  December  2016,  the  Commission  adopted  two  reports  on  the  measures  taken  by 
Member  States  
to  combat  the  sexual  abuse  and  sexual  exploitation  of  children  and  child 
pornography. One report2 covers the entire Directive whereas the other report3 focuses on the 
measures  against  websites  containing  or  disseminating  child  pornography  (Article  25  of  the 
Directive).  The  reports  present  a  first  overview  of  measures  taken  by  Member  States  to 
transpose  the  Directive  into  national  law.  The  reports  show  that,  although  the  Directive  has 
led to substantial progress, there is still considerable room for improvement, in particular with 
regard  to  prevention  and  intervention  programmes  for  offenders,  the  assistance,  support  and 
protection  measures  for  child  victims  and  the  provision  of  adequate  safeguards  when  the 
optional blocking measures are applied.  
 
In  the  reports,  the  Commission  announced  that  it  would  continue  to  provide  support  to 
Member States to ensure a satisfactory level of transposition and implementation, notably by 
facilitating the development and exchange of best practices in specific areas. 
 
                                                           
1 Directive 2011/93/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council on combating the sexual sexual abuse and 
sexual exploitation of children and child pornography, OJ L 335/1 
17.12.2011 
2 Report from the Commission to the European Parliament and the Council assessing the extent to which the 
Member States have taken the necessary measures in order to comply with Directive 2011/93/EU of 13 
December 2011 on combating the sexual abuse and sexual exploitation of children and child pornography, 
COM(2016) 871 final, 16.12.2016 
3 Report from the Commission to the European Parliament and the Council assessing the implementation of the 
measures referred to in Article 25 of Directive 2011/93/EU of 13 December 2011 on combating the sexual 
sexual abuse and sexual exploitation of children and child pornography, COM/2016/0872 final, 16.12.2016 

 

One  area  identified  as  requiring  targeted  attention  is  the  protection  of  children  with 
disabilities.  While  all  children  are  vulnerable,  children  with  different  degrees  and  forms  of 
disabilities are particularly so. Different factors enhance their exposure to risks of child sexual 
abuse, pose  challenges  to the society’s responses, and require strengthening the measures  in 
place  with  the  aim  of  preventing  the  sexual  abuse,  protecting  child  victims  and  prosecuting 
offenders.  These  factors  may  include  reduced  awareness  in  children  with  disabilities  of  the 
risks  of  sexual  abuse,  increased  dependence  on  adults  for  different  daily  tasks,  insufficient 
support for families or carers for children with disabilities, difficulties in realising the nature 
and extent of the sexual abuse, difficulties in reporting it or fear of retribution by the offender, 
or  responses  to  the  sexual  abuse  from  different  actors  (teachers,  medical  staff,  lawyers,  etc) 
that are not completely adapted to the specific needs of children with disabilities among many 
others. 
 
With that in mind, the Commission organised on 30 January 2018 an Expert workshop on the 
implementation of the Child sexual abuse directive with regard to children with disabilities

The purpose of the expert workshop was to facilitate discussions among participants from EU 
Member  States  in  the  field  of  law  enforcement  and  child  protection,  international 
organisations  and  bodies  and  external  experts.  The  discussions  were  structured  around  two 
sorts of environment  in  which children  with  disabilities may find themselves, namely in  the 
private  life  environment;  and  in  the  public  and  social  life  environments,  knowing  that  the 
same child may be in different environments on different occasions. 
 
The conclusions below detail the salient points and challenges that practitioners are facing in 
this area together with corresponding, possible actions to be taken, as expressed and discussed 
by those present during the meeting. They only include risks and measures that are specific of 
or  more  significant  in  children  with  disabilities  and  are  to  be  considered  in  addition  to 
measures of more general scope relating to child sexual abuse. The adoption of the measures 
identified may  contribute to  better protection of  children with  disabilities  from  sexual  abuse 
and ultimately to  a better implementation of the child sexual  abuse directive in EU Member 
States. 
 
 

 

 
Children with disabilities in the private environment 
 
PREVENTION OF SEXUAL ABUSE 
Risk factors for child sexual abuse 
Possible actions to address them 
 
 
  Children  whose  disabilities  render  them  non-   Enhance  prevention  measures  with  regard  to 
verbal are a more attractive target for offenders 
children  whose  disabilities  render  them  non-
as  it  diminishes  the  possibility  of  the  victim 
verbal. 
reporting. 
  Insufficient  knowledge  and  awareness  on    Awareness  raising  activities  in  accessible 
children's  sexual  rights  among  parents  and 
format  for  caregivers  and  family  members  on 
primary caregivers of children with disabilities 
the  risks  of  child  sexual  abuse,  on  possible 
and 
among 
children 
with 
disabilities 
action  to  avoid  or  reduce  them  and  on 
themselves. 
strategies  to  empower  children  to  avoid 

becoming victims of sexual abuse. 
  Limited  information  is  given  to  children  and 
young people with disabilities on relationships    Establishing  educational  programmes  that 
and  sexuality  including;  sexual relations,  what 
strengthen 
the 
self-confidence 
and 
constitutes  sexual  abuse  and  what  defines 
assertiveness of children with disabilities. 
unacceptable/abusive behaviour. 
  Ensuring that information on the sexual rights 
of children is easily accessible both to children 
with  disabilities  and  their  parents  and  primary 
caregivers. 
Information 
packages 
should 
facilitate  distinguishing  healthy  from  abusive 
sexual  relationships  based  on  the  use  of 
adaptive  communication  techniques  in  such  a 
way  as  to  be  easily  understood  by  children 
with disabilities in an age-appropriate format. 
  Children  with  special  needs  are  more    Enhancing  awareness  of  caregivers  and 
vulnerable  to  sexual  abuse  and  exploitation 
family members in contact with the child4 on 
online,  particularly  children  suffering  from 
the risks of online sexual abuse and means to 
cognitive  impairments  or  learning  disabilities. 
prevent  it.  Developing  training  for  parents 
For  example,  they  may  more  easily  give  their 
and  primary  caregivers  on  how  to  protect 
trust  to  online  groomers  or  have  more 
children  with  disabilities  from  the  risk  of 
difficulties to recognize signs of grooming. 
online  sexual  abuse  arising  from  visiting 
websites and certain social media  
  Empowering  the  children  with  the  tools  to 
protect  themselves  from  online  sexual  abuse 
by  avoiding  risky  situations,  adopting 
security measures, identifying signs of online 
sexual  abuse  activity  and  being  aware  on 
action to take. 
  Multi-disciplinary  participation  in  the  design 
of  awareness  raising  campaigns  and  training 
material 
and 
activities, 
including 
the 
                                                           
4 Member States and the Commission noted the importance of raising awareness and training front-liners such as 
police  officers,  therapists  and  care-workers  where  the  child  and  its  representatives/family  members/care  givers 
are most likely to approach as their first point of contact.  

 

involvement  of  Law  Enforcement  Agencies 
(LEAs),  Child  Protection  NGOs,  and  social 
media and Internet service providers. 
  Public  authorities  and  child  protection  NGOs 
reaching 
out 
to 
chat/social 
media 
administrators  to  discuss  the  possibilities  for 
sexual  abuse  and  possible  preventative  and 
reactive  measures  they  may  adopt  to  reduce 
risks of child users and facilitate investigations. 
  Industry  actors  providing  online  services  for 
children  with  disabilities  to  ensure  protection 
by  design  in  their  products,  notably  by  setting 
the  privacy  default  settings  at  the  most 
protective level. 
  Overburdening  of  parents/primary  caregivers    Providing  more  consistent  support  services 
and other family carers, notably due to lack of 
for families of children with disabilities. 
support  for  families,  insufficient  access  to    Setting  up  holistic,  individual  tailor-made 
information about available services, limited or 
programs  for  families  and  caregivers  to 
no  access to  respite programmes  which  would 
provide  timely  and  adequate  support  within 
ease  the  financial,  physical  and  emotional 
the child's private environment. 
distress.  This  could  lead  to  lack  of  effective 
protection  and  care,  and  increase  the    Training 
of 
doctors/psychologists/other 
possibilities for sexual abuse. 
medical  professionals  in  primary  healthcare 
to raise their awareness of the risks of sexual 
abuse  of  children  with  disabilities  to  discuss 
prevention  of  sexual  abuse  with  the  parents 
and  primary  carers  to  prevent  sexual  abuse 
from their side. 
  Considering the risks of sexual abuse for each 
child 
with 
disabilities 
and 
modulating 
accordingly 
the 
design 
of 
monitoring/inspection/supervision  and  review 
of  foster  care  arrangements  for  children  being 
cared  for  in  institutions,  as  well  as  the  design 
of  home  visits  for  children  who  are  cared  for 
by their parents  
  Greater risk  of  sexual  abuse  for children  with    Step 
up 
policies 
to 
achieve 
de-
disabilities for the fact of being in institutions,  
institutionalisation of children with disabilities 
due  to  the  lack  of  a  protective  figure  with  a 
and  their  placement  in  family  or  community 
close  bonding  similar  to  parental  care  and 
care with appropriate support. 
greater  opportunity  for  offenders  to  perpetrate    Institutions  should  adopt,  publicise  and 
sexual abuse which goes undetected.5 
implement  robust  child  safeguarding  policies, 
that  cover  four  areas:  policy,  people, 
procedures  and  accountability  as  described  in 
child  safeguarding  standards  by  Keeping 
children safe. 
 
  New institutional structures should be designed 
in such a way as to take into consideration and 
                                                           
5 Around 15.000 children live in residential settings across the EU. 

 

minimize the risk of child sexual abuse. 
  Ensuring that the child is never alone with only 
one  adult  staff  member  and  that  there  is 
enough  staff  rotation  to  avoid  burn-out  and 
relaxation of mutual controls by staff. 
  Ensuring  regular  and  child-rights  based 
monitoring, inspections and supervision of care 
institutions. 
  Insufficient  expertise  on  child  protection  and    Increasing  the  level  of  expertise  through 
children’s rights among people working for or 
appropriate training among people working for 
with children with disabilities 
or with children 
  Incomplete  background  checks  on  staff  at    Mandatory initial screening and regular vetting 
institutions. 
of  staff  working  directly  with  children  in 
institutional care. 
  Criminal records authorities in Member States 
should ensure the exchange of criminal records 
through  the  European  Criminal  Records 
Information System (ECRIS). 
  Children  with  disability  who  are  subjected  to    Equipping children with the means to identify 
frequent  physical  contact  by  carers  affecting 
sexual 
abuse 
through 
education 
and 
their  sexual  parts  (for  example,  hygiene 
awareness-raising6. 
routines)  may  find  it  more  difficult  to    Setting  out  protocols  for  carers  (particularly 
recognize  or  object  to  inappropriate  touching 
in  institutions)  to  reduce  or  as  much  as 
of private parts of their bodies due to the nature 
possible  eliminate  the  risk  of  sexual  abuse 
of  their  disability  and  needs.  Such  children 
(e.g.  avoiding  situations  of  a  carer  being 
may  not  be  able  to  recognise  sexual  abuse  if 
alone with the child or without witnesses) 
and when it occurs as they would have become 
accustomed  to  touch.  This  may  provide  more 
opportunities for sexual abuse. 
  Possible  sexual  abuse  by  peers  within  an    Grouping  children  in  institutions  in  a  way  to 
institutional setup. 
minimize  the  chances  of  sexual  abuse  (taking 
account  of  e.g.,  age,  overall  abilities  and 
difficulties  such  as  already  existing  cases  of 
sexual abuse…) 
  Education of children to protect other children 
and react in case of bullying, which can lead to 
sexual abuse. 
  Specific needs of children with disabilities not    Enshrining  processes  that  strengthen  existing 
sufficiently taken into account in the design of 
consultative  mechanisms7  for  persons  with 
policies concerning them. 
disabilities  within  legislative  and  policy 
making arenas.  
 
DETECTION OF SEXUAL ABUSE, PROTECTION AND SUPPORT TO CHILD 
                                                           
6 SoSAFE! Is a system which uses a standardised framework of symbols, visual teaching tools and concepts to 
teach  strategies  for  moving  into  intimate  relationships  in  a  safe  and  measured  manner,  and  provides  visual 
communication tools for reporting physical or sexual abuse: https://sosafeprogram.com/ [accessed 18/02/2018] 
 

 

VICTIMS 
Risk factors for child sexual abuse 
Possible actions to address them 
 
 
  Lack  of  clear  reporting  mechanisms  for    Having  adequate  structures  in  place  that  all 
children to know how to report. 
children, 
regardless 
of 
their 
level 
of 
communication can refer to in case of possible 
sexual abuse. 
  Children  with  cognitive  impairments  and    Giving children the tools to express themselves 
disabilities  that  effect  speech  are  less 
through  alternative  forms  of  communication 
likely/able to  report  possible  sexual  abuse  due 
other than speech e.g. through drawings, or use 
to the nature of their disability. 
of communication aids to facilitate reporting of 
sexual abuse. 
  Difficulties  of  children  with  disabilities  to    Training  family,  care  givers,  social  services, 
report  sexual  abuse,  especially  if  the  sexual 
education and leisure and healthcare personnel 
abuser is a family member or main care giver. 
coming in contact with children with disability 
on how to notice possible signs and changes in 
behaviour  of  children  suffering  from  sexual 
abuse  in  order  to  allow  for  easier  and  faster 
detection. 
  Setting up protocols for staff in institutions to 
take  possible  sexual  abuse  seriously  and 
investigate/report when there are indications of 
such sexual abuse taking place. 
  Children  with  disabilities  may  not  feel    Raise  awareness  and  train  teachers/school 
comfortable  talking  about  sexual  abuse  with 
psychologists  to  check  if  other  children  know 
adults and may instead talk to peers.  
of  any  sexual  abuse  that  friends  with 
disabilities may be going through. 
  Raise  awareness  and  train  peers  to  detect 
possible sexual abuse and report it. 
  Professionals detecting signs of sexual abuse in    Provide  for  mandatory  reporting  by 
children  with  disabilities  may  not  report 
professional  working  in  contact  with  children 
suspicions 
of suspected sexual abuse they may detect 
  Set up detailed protocols to facilitate reporting 
of  suspected  sexual  abuse  on  children  with 
disabilities 
  Lack  of  expertise  in  social  services  about  the    Promoting training of social service employees 
support  needs  of  children  with  disabilities 
to  further  specialise  on  the  provision  of  social 
having suffered sexual abuse  
support  to  children  and  specifically  children 
with disabilities. 
  Fear  of  reprisal  by  the  perpetrator  following    Alleged  perpetrators  should  be  removed  from 
reporting. 
the  setting  or  the  immediate  environment 
frequented by the victim to protect the victim 
  Continued  traumatization of  victims  of  sexual    Setting  up protocols  and  providing  training  to 
abuse  due  to  cumbersome  investigative  and 
Law  enforcement  officials,  judicial  authorities 
legal proceedings 
and lawyers8 on measures to prevent trauma to 
the children with disabilities from participating 
                                                           
8 See Validity Foundation (former MDAC) project Innovating European lawyers to advance rights of children 
with disabilities http://mdac.org/en/innovating-lawyers 

 

in  interview  processes  and  investigations 
(measures  already  contained  in  the  Child 
sexual  abuse  directive),  such  as  ensuring  that 
the  process  of  interviewing  children  is  fast-
tracked, minimizing the number of interviews, 
and 
implementing 
measures 
that 
minimize/remove  the  necessity  for  appearance 
at  court  to  limit  the  possibility  of  re-
victimization 
  Lack  of  coordination  among  practitioners    Encouraging  the  adoption  of  a  multi-
resulting  in  gaps  within  the  support  structures 
disciplinary 
approach 
to 
coordinate 
or  overlap  in  work/treatment  areas,  and 
interventions  with  such  children  and  avoid 
exposing victims to more trauma.  
overlap or gaps in treatment. 
  Stimulating  the  organization  of  horizontal, 
multidisciplinary  workshops  at  the  national 
level that bring together different experts. This 
will  ensure  that  all  stakeholders  are  aware  of 
what  their  role  is  in  the  overall  process  of 
protecting victims and ensuring the termination 
of sexual abuse. 
  Promoting  the  widespread  use  of  specific 
models  of  interviewing  such  as  the  Barnahus 
with forensic, front-line and judicial staff.9 
  Children  with  disabilities  are  seen  by    Train  General  Practitioners  who  more  often 
numerous  specialists  and  practitioners  who 
than  not  have  the  most  contact  with  children 
may however not have known the child over a 
with  disabilities  to  identify  signs  of  sexual 
long  time-span,  making  it  difficult  to  identify 
abuse 
subtle,  nuanced  changes  in  behaviour  or    Consider the possibility of assigning individual 
physical  condition  such  as  the  somatic 
case  workers  trained  in  detecting  signs  of 
symptoms that may accompany sexual abuse. 
sexual  abuse  who  have  the  overarching 
responsibility 
of 
managing 
the 
child's 
treatment,  both  in  a  familial  setting  and  even 
more importantly in an institutional set up.  
 
PROSECUTION OF OFFENDERS 
Risk factors for child sexual abuse 
Possible actions to address them 
 
 
  Lack  of  clear  reporting  mechanisms  to  Law    Law  enforcement  authorities  to  set  up 
Enforcement  authorities,  particularly  in  cases 
dedicated  reporting  mechanisms,  particularly 
of online sexual abuse. 
for  online  sexual abuse,  and  to  publicise  them 
appropriately. 
  Reports  of  sexual  abuse  may  not  lead  to  a    Reporting  mechanisms  should  provide  for  the 
proper  investigation  first  respondent  may  not 
opening  of  a  proper  investigation  for  all 
believe the child. 
reported cases, excluding the possibility for the 
first responder to decide that the report should 
                                                           
9 The "Barnahus" Model is a child-centred, interdisciplinary and multiagency approach utilized during 
investigations of suspected child sexual sexual abuse cases. The fundamental concept is to avoid subjecting the 
child to repeated interviews by various stakeholders in different locations thus supporting child victims of sexual 
abuse throughout the criminal justice process 

 

not be followed-up. 
  Children,  particularly  those  whose  disability    Encouraging and making available training on 
resulted  in  a  cognitive  impairment  may  be 
forensic  techniques  to  ascertain  the  reliability 
considered as unreliable witnesses in court. To 
of  children’s  testimonies  or  to  complement 
this end securing other forms of evidence such 
them for professionals including front-line and 
as  forensic  evidence  is  of  great  importance  to 
forensic law enforcement officers  
back up the child's testimony and ensure that a    Promote  the  use  of  specialised  investigative 
crime has indeed taken place and that if it has, 
tools  and  forensic  techniques  to  secure  other 
appropriate  punishment  and  reparations  are 
forms of evidence 
made. 
  Risk  of  manipulation  of  the  child  victim  by    Avoid  contact  between  the  alleged  offender 
offender 
and  the  child  victim  while  the  evidence  is 
collected. 
  Not  sufficient  deterrence  against  committing    Provide  for  very  high  penalties  for  sexual 
sexual abuse of a child with disabilities 
abuse  of  children  with disability  and  prioritise 
investigation and prosecution of these offences 
  Lack  of  effective  cooperation  between    Encourage the setting up of multi-disciplinary 
professional  services  in  the  prosecution  stage 
meetings with the aim of enhancing awareness 
(e.g. LEA and social services). 
of  the  roles  of  different  professional  with 
children 
with 
disability 
and 
foster 
collaborating. 
  Revising modes of referral in order to allow for 
swift  assessment  and  handling  of  issues  as  an 
adjunct to effective cooperation. 
 
Children with disabilities in public and social 
environments 
 
PREVENTION OF SEXUAL ABUSE 
Risk factors for child sexual abuse 
Possible actions to address them 
 
 
  Insufficient  awareness  of  social  environment    Social  environment  institutions  should  define 
institutions  (schools,  sports  centres,  etc)  - 
comprehensive 
child 
protection 
policies 
dealing with children in general about the risks 
covering  prevention,  reporting  of  child  sexual 
of  sexual  abuse,  and  in  particular  that  of 
abuse  and  protection  of  victims.  Child 
children with disabilities. 
protection policies should take into account the 
specific needs of children with disabilities and 
should be made public. 
  Public  authorities  should  motivate  institutions 
to adopt these policies through different means 
(legal  obligation,  condition  to  receive  public 
funding or public recognition, etc) 
  Staff training on the risks of sexual abuse and    Better  training  of  all  staff  in  regular  contact 
measure  to  prevent  them  in  places  such  as 
with 
children 
with 
disabilities, 
both 
schools,  social  clubs,  camp,  healthcare  setups 
professionals, temporary staff or voluntaries. 
etc.…  may  be  inadequate,  sporadic  and  often 
not mandatory.  

 

  Staff  vetting  not  systematic,  particularly  in    Mandatory  background  checks  for  all  staff  in 
more  informal  settings  (summer  camps,  social 
activities  involving  regular  contacts  with 
clubs) 
children. 
  Making  possible  checks  for  sexual  abuse 
convictions  across  the  EU  through  systematic 
use by national criminal registers of ECRIS. 
  Possibility  of  medical  staff,  nurses  or  carers    Ensuring  that  Standard  Operating  Procedures 
abusing  children during health checks  
(SOPs) mandate the presence of more than one 
professional  at  any  given  moment  when  in 
direct contact with the child,  
  Promoting the rotation of staff on an adequate 
shift  basis  to  avoid  burn-out  and  relaxation  of 
control  standards  of  staff,  particularly  in 
hospitals. 
  Making  mandatory  the  review  of  required 
qualifications  and  background  checks  by 
employers  coupled  by  compulsory  training  of 
staff. 
  Children  with  disabilities  may,  ,  become    Promotion  of  inclusive  schools  including 
isolated  and excluded  in social  situations such 
children  with  disabilities  to  the  maximum 
as  in  segregated  schools  or  even  within  an 
extent possible 
inclusive  learning/school environment, leading    Implementation  of  awareness  raising 
to increased risk of sexual abuse.  
campaigns promoting tolerance, understanding 
and  inclusive  schooling  from  early  stages  of 
education at the grass-root level. 
  Promoting  the  inclusion  of  modules  on 
disability  issues  within  the  curriculum  of 
teachers and learning support assistants.  
  Promoting  a  system  of  peer  matching  which 
brings  together  children  with  and  without 
disabilities  as  school  'buddies'  carrying  out 
activities jointly.  
  Considering  the  inclusion  of  lessons/training 
sessions  on  personal  and  social  development, 
and  civil  rights  of  children  in  the  school 
curriculum  to  empower  all  children  and 
especially children with disabilities.  
 
DETECTION OF SEXUAL ABUSE, PROTECTION AND SUPPORT TO CHILD 
VICTIMS 
Risk factors for child sexual abuse 
Possible actions to address them 
 
 
  Insufficiently effective reporting channels 
  Developing  of  SOPs  in  all  organisations 
conducting activities involving regular contacts 
with  children  related  to  the  reporting  of 
possible sexual abuse including inter alia: 
  Clearly  establishing  reporting  mechanisms 
within the school hierarchy; 

 

  A  checklist  of  questions  to  be  asked  to  the 
child reporting the sexual abuse; 
  Practical measures to be taken upon reporting 
such as which authorities to contact; 
  Instructions  on  measures  relating  to  the 
preservation of evidence. 
  Difficulties  of  staff  in  detecting  the  sexual    Introducing  programs  that  improve  child–
abuse  due  to  insufficient  bonding  between 
caregiver  communication  skills;  and  increase 
occasional  care  givers  and  children  with 
the  quality  of  the  child–caregiver  bond  and 
disabilities. 
build trusting, positive relationships. 
  Insufficient detection of possible  sexual abuse    Creating  of  manuals  on  symptoms  of  sexual 
in public and social environments, particularly 
abuse, alerts on behavioural changes. 
sexual  abuse  affecting  children  with  cognitive    Training  to  medical  staff  regularly  examining 
or communication impairments. 
children  with  disabilities  to  detect  signs  of 
sexual abuse. 
  Introduce 
mandatory 
reporting 
by 
professionals  in  contact  with  children  on 
suspected sexual abuse. 
  Professionals detecting signs of sexual abuse in    Provide  for  mandatory  reporting  by 
children  with  disabilities  may  not  report 
professional  working  in  contact  with  children 
suspicions 
of suspected sexual abuse they may detect 
  Set up detailed protocols to facilitate reporting 
of  suspected  sexual  abuse  on  children  with 
disabilities 
  Parents  may  have  difficulty  believing  that  the    Awareness  raising  targeting  parents  about 
child is telling the truth. 
potential  sexual  abuses  at  school  and  other 
environments,  about  possible  signs  of  sexual 
abuse,  and  about  action  to  take  and  reporting 
channels in case of suspicions. 
 
PROSECUTION OF OFFENDERS 
Risk factors for child sexual abuse 
Possible actions to address them 
 
 
Similar to those of private life environment 
Similar to those of private life environment 
 
Relevant documents: 
 
  FRA report: Violence against children with disabilities: legislation, policies and programmes 
in the EU: http://fra.europa.eu/en/publication/2015/children-disabilities-violence [accessed on 
13/02/2018] 
  FRA  report:  Child-friendly  justice  –  Perspectives  and  experiences  of  children  involved  in 
judicial  proceedings  as  victims,  witnesses  or  parties  in  nine  EU  Member  States  +  Annexes: 
http://fra.europa.eu/en/publication/2017/child-friendly-justice-childrens-view  [accessed  on 
13/02/2018]. 
  MDAC  &  VALIDITY  -  Innovating  European  Lawyers  to  Advance  the  Rights  of  Children 
with  Disabilities:  http://validity.ngo/innovating-european-lawyers-to-advance-the-rights-of-
children-with-disabilities/ 
[accessed on 13/02/2018] 
10 
 

  the  European  Barnahus  Quality  Standards:  http://www.childrenatrisk.eu/promise/european-
barnahus-quality-standards/ [accessed 13/02/2018] 
 
11