Esta es la versión HTML de un fichero adjunto a una solicitud de acceso a la información 'Police & Justice'.


 
 
 
COUNCIL OF 
Brussels, 13 June 2014 
THE EUROPEAN UNION 
(OR. en) 
10492/14 
 
 
 
 
 
 
DAPIX 75 

 
 
ENFOPOL 157 
 
"I/A" ITEM NOTE 
From: 
General Secretariat of the Council 
To: 
COREPER/Council 
No. prev. doc.: 
6721/3/14 
Subject: 
Draft Guidelines for a Single Point of Contact (SPOC) for international law 
enforcement information exchange 
 
 
1. 
Over the last years, the Working Party on Information Exchange and Data Protection 
(DAPIX) discussed the methodology of setting up a single point of contact (SPOC) for 
international law enforcement information exchange. In the light of recent evolutions and, in 
particular, of experience with the operational functioning of SPOCs, the Presidency suggested 
to update the "Manual of Good Practices concerning International Police Cooperation at 
National Level" (doc. 7968/08 ENFOPOL 63) with a view to drawing up SPOC Guidelines. 
2. 
DAPIX discussed the draft Guidelines on 12/13 March, 7 April and agreed on them on 2 June. 
3. 
Consequently, COREPER is invited to confirm the agreement on the text of the draft 
Guidelines as set out in annex and to submit it to the Council for endorsement. COREPER 
and Council are invited to take note of the overview on international law enforcement 
cooperation structures in each Member State, set out in the addendum (ADD 1) to this note 
which will be updated when necessary to take account of changes in Member States' 
structures.
 
10492/14 
 
GB/sl 

 
DG D 2C 
 
EN 
 

link to page 2 link to page 2 link to page 2  
ANNEX 
Draft Guidelines for a Single Point of Contact (SPOC) 
for international law enforcement information exchange 
Introduction 
The current Guidelines are meant for those units within the Member States' law enforcement 
authorities that are responsible for international law enforcement cooperation. 
There are many different forms and channels of international law enforcement cooperation, each 
with its own purpose, needs, specific characteristics, ways of communication, etc. 
It requires a lot of Member States' resources to service all these channels in the best possible way. 
Member States, both as a requested or a requesting State, had to set up efficient structures, or 
improve existing national platforms in order to cope with the increased international information 
exchange since the entry into force of the Council Framework Decision on simplification of 
information exchange (the so-called Swedish Framework Decision)1, the "Prüm Decision"2 and any 
further implementation of the principle of availability and the principle of equivalent access3. 
The "one stop shop" strategy has to be, as far as possible, recommended. 
This document aims to provide guidelines and examples for the above-mentioned units to maximise 
the use of their resources, avoid overlaps and make cooperation with other Member States more 
efficient, expedient and transparent.
                                                 
1 
Council Framework Decision 2006/960/JHA of 18 December 2006 on simplifying the 
exchange of information and intelligence between law enforcement authorities of the 
Member States of the European Union 
2 
Council Decision 2008/615/JHA of 23 June 2008 on the stepping up of cross-border 
cooperation, particularly in combating terrorism and cross-border crime, and Council 
Decision 2008/616/JHA of 23 June 2008 on the implementation of Council Decision 
2008/615/JHA of 23 June 2008 on the stepping up of cross-border cooperation, particularly 
in combating terrorism and cross-border crime 
3 
According to Art. 3 (3) of Council Framework Decision 2006/960/JHA, conditions 
applicable for cross-border exchange of information or intelligence shall not be stricter than 
those applied at national level. 
 
10492/14 
 
GB/sl 

ANNEX 
DG D 2C 
 
EN 
 

 
 
The characteristics of an ideal international unit (or platform) are hereafter expressed. The 
Guidelines for a Single Point of Contact (SPOC) should be applied whenever possible and useful 
but always taking into account national legislation and regulations, structures and organisations. 
Given the differences between Member States' legal situation (central/federal states), their law 
enforcement structures and powers (federal/regional/local levels, number of police forces, mandates 
of agencies, statutory responsibilities, etc.), not all guidelines, recommendations or examples will 
be useful or even applicable in every Member State. 
Among the guidelines Member States should select the solution appropriate for their situation in 
view of the common and agreed aim of enhancing international cooperation and consider 
appropriate ways of informing other Member States about the selected solutions in view of the 
exchange of best practices. 
The current Guidelines contain, next to this introduction, the following chapters: 
• 
structure and composition of a SPOC for international cooperation 
• 
national information exchange and availability of national databases and networks at the 
SPOC 
• 
international information exchange: criteria for the use of cooperation channels / use of 
European and international databases 
• 
staff training. 
The national sheets on existing Member States' structures for international law enforcement 
cooperation are set out in the addendum to this document. 
 
10492/14 
 
GB/sl 

ANNEX 
DG D 2C 
 
EN 
 

 
1.  STRUCTURE AND COMPOSITION OF A UNIT FOR INTERNATIONAL 
COOPERATION 
1.1  Structure 
– 
The SPOC is a "one stop shop" for international law enforcement cooperation: it has one 
phone number and one e-mail address (and other communication means, fax, etc.) for all 
international law enforcement cooperation requests dealt with at national level. 
– 
It gathers under the same management structure the different national offices or contact points 
such as 
 
the Europol National Unit (ENU) 
 
the Interpol National Central Bureau (NCB) 
 
the SIRENE Bureau 
 
the contact point for national liaison officers posted abroad and foreign liaison officers 
posted in the Member State 
 
the contact points designated pursuant to the "Swedish Framework Decision" and the 
"Prüm Decisions" (step 2 – exchange of additional information following a hit for DNA, 
fingerprints and VRD) 
 
if any: the contact point for the regional and bilateral offices 
– 
A front desk at the SPOC determines which office/contact point will deal with the request. 
– 
Ideally, the SPOC houses these offices and contact points in the same building. 
 
10492/14 
 
GB/sl 

ANNEX 
DG D 2C 
 
EN 
 

 
– 
The SPOC is set up through its own national legislative or regulation identity, to empower 
them to meet their large-scale responsibilities and duties. This is particularly useful in the 
light of the multi-agencies composition of the SPOC. The platform is placed under the 
responsibility of a leading Ministry (usually the Ministry of Interior) and a leading 
Department (usually the national criminal police). 
– 
The relationship between the SPOC and all competent law enforcement and other concerned 
authorities is established through national law and regulated in written agreements, in 
particular with those authorities represented in the SPOC but not belonging to the "leading 
Ministry". 
– 
These agreements or regulations lay down the necessary legal aspects but also practical 
working procedures. 
– 
The SPOC operates 24/7 (see 3.1.2) 
– 
The SPOC comprises the most comprehensive national competence, covering the broadest 
geographical and material scope as possible, to be able to handle the full range of possible 
requests related to law enforcement cooperation. 
– 
The SPOC has the competence to direct any request that would be wrongly addressed to the 
appropriate requested authority, without returning the request to the requesting country. 
– 
The SPOC is set up in a secure working environment, including high level of security and 
safety of the premises and is equipped with back up power systems. 
 
10492/14 
 
GB/sl 

ANNEX 
DG D 2C 
 
EN 
 

 
1.2  Resources 
– 
The SPOC is a multi-agency organisation, composed of staff coming from/belonging to 
different services and / or Ministries including criminal police, public order police, border 
guards, customs, and judicial authorities. 
– 
In Member States where judicial authorities supervise criminal investigations, the presence of 
these authorities in the SPOC is very useful for 
 
a quicker response to requests related to criminal investigations, especially where the 
transmission of information by law enforcement channels requires a clearance by the 
judicial authorities 
 
the "flagging" procedure related to a European/International Arrest Warrant 
(EAW / IAW) 
 
the transmission of rogatory letters to the relevant investigating judge or prosecutor 
office 
 
legal advice to police/customs staff of the SPOC or help to solve possible conflict 
between national law and the object of the request sent by another Member State 
(see 3.3.5) 
 
the permission "on the spot" of urgent surveillances within national territory, as defined 
by the provisions of Article 40 of the Schengen Convention (or to forward such requests 
to another Member State). 
– 
The SPOC is sufficiently and adequately staffed, including interpretation or translation 
capacities, to function on a 24/7 basis. 
– 
In as far as possible, all staff is trained and equipped/mandated to deal with all kinds of tasks 
within the SPOC. Where this is not possible, it is ensured that all tasks can be dealt with 
through on-call duty officers 24/7. 
– 
The ICT capacities are state of the art, including secure and back-up communication lines 
(phone, fax, e-mail), an efficient and effective electronic case management system, and 
appropriate and timely (helpline) IT support. 
 
10492/14 
 
GB/sl 

ANNEX 
DG D 2C 
 
EN 
 

 
1.3  Publicity 
– 
The SPOC is adequately known by the national police officers, and officers from other law 
enforcement agencies. Apart from its contact details (phone, fax numbers, e-mail addresses), 
every investigating police officer knows the basic services provided by the SPOC, and the 
main channels to be used depending on the type of the request concerned. 
– 
For that purpose, a national "quality manual for international law enforcement cooperation" is 
drafted and published, both on Intranet and through booklets. It includes summary 
information on: 
 
legal framework and international instruments (under national law, EU, United Nations, 
bilateral agreements on crime prevention and legal assistance) 
 
standard of quality and required data for request for law enforcement cooperation and 
legal assistance 
 
the various international channels and the national rules of how to use them 
 
necessity, appropriateness and proportionality of the request 
 
limits and restrictions to information exchange. 
 
10492/14 
 
GB/sl 

ANNEX 
DG D 2C 
 
EN 
 

 
2.  NATIONAL INFORMATION EXCHANGE AND AVAILABILITY OF NATIONAL 
DATABASES AND NETWORKS 
There is a close correlation between the way in  which information and data bases are shared 
internally and the proper sharing of information at international level (Chapter 3.3). 

Ability to answer correctly and quickly to other MS requests is dependent on the present Chapter. 
Subject to data protection rules and the authorisation level of respective staff members, the SPOC 
has access, direct or at request from competent authorities, to the broadest range of relevant national 
databases and in any case to all those databases available to the authorities represented in the SPOC. 
This covers in particular law enforcement databases, identity documents database, vehicle 
registration, national visa database, immigration office database, prisoners database, DNA 
databases, fingerprint databases, information exchange with the national liaison officers, border 
control database, trade register, ANPR etc. 
– 
Ideally, all members of the SPOC have access to all of these databases, if necessary on a 
hit/no hit only basis; if this is not possible, all databases are accessible to the unit on a 24/7 
basis, where necessary via on-call duty officers. 
– 
The SPOC has arrangements for indirect (e.g. on a hit/no hit basis) but quick, effective and 
efficient access to relevant databases of other authorities or bodies, where appropriate subject 
to judicial approval. This applies to records of companies providing electricity, water, phone 
and other communication supplies. 
– 
The SPOC uses standard forms for transmitting international requests to and receiving the 
corresponding replies from the national authorities, which are independent from the law 
enforcement authority involved (at local level or in the SPOC). 
 
10492/14 
 
GB/sl 

ANNEX 
DG D 2C 
 
EN 
 

link to page 9  
– 
The SPOC shall respect all applicable data protection rules 
 
condition for access to the data 
 
designation of duly empowered officials according to the appropriate user profile 
 
keeping of records (logging of checks and searches, date and time of access, type of 
data used for consultation, name of authorities having requested the check, records of 
the staff members -name or personal code- having consulted data, etc.) 
 
conservation period of personal data 
 
deletion of data 
 
purpose limitation/ownership rights 
– 
The data protection rules are implemented and reflected in internal business procedures and 
working instructions, which are subject to regular review and supervision by the national data 
protection authority. 
– 
Access to the databases and communication with national authorities is via secure means. 
– 
Access to the different databases is organised in a user-friendly way, where possible via a 
single workstation. 
– 
SPOC shall respect the security rules for protection of classified information4. 
                                                 
4 
see: National legislation, Council Decision of 23 September 2013 on the security rules for 
protecting EU classified information (2013/488/EU), and concluded bilateral agreements on 
exchange and protection of classified information 
 
10492/14 
 
GB/sl 

ANNEX 
DG D 2C 
 
EN 
 

 
3.  INTERNATIONAL INFORMATION EXCHANGE 
3.1  Access to information 
– 
The SPOC has direct access to European and international law enforcement databases (SIS, 
Europol databases, Interpol databases, CIS) and European databases, such as EURODAC, or 
software applications such as EUCARIS, to which law enforcement has been given access. 
– 
The SPOC is connected to the Europol (SIENA), Interpol (I-24/7 communication system), 
and sTESTA network. 
– 
Access to the databases and communication is achieved via secure means. 
– 
Access to the different databases is organised in a user-friendly way, where possible via a 
single workstation and combined with access to national databases and systems. 
3.2  General rules for international communications 
– 
A request is sent through one channel only. 
– 
If a request is, in exceptional cases, sent through different channels at the same time, this is 
clearly indicated on the request. 
– 
If the request is sent to parties for information only, this is clearly indicated. 
– 
The channel is NOT be changed during an on-going operation or during any phase unless it is 
absolutely necessary and the partner’s choice of channel when replying to the requests is 
respected. 
– 
A change of channel is communicated to all parties, including the reason for the change. 
– 
The requirements of the channel used (for example – usage of the handling and evaluation 
codes for Europol SIENA are respected. 
 
10492/14 
 
GB/sl 
10 
ANNEX 
DG D 2C 
 
EN 
 

link to page 11  
– 
The purposes of and restrictions on the processing of information defined by the provider of 
the information are respected. 
– 
Whenever possible, the SPOC replies directly to the international request, where appropriate 
with copy to the concerned national authority. 
– 
Where the SPOC cannot reply directly, because it is beyond its mandate and/or because it 
cannot directly obtain the information, it forwards the request to the appropriate competent 
national authority, even if the original request was wrongly addressed to another authority. 
– 
When a request is refused, the grounds for refusal have to be provided through the initial 
channel. 
– 
When receiving a reply from the national authorities to an international request, the unit pro-
actively verifies whether this information can be useful to another Member State, Europol or 
Eurojust5 and if this is the case, requests and encourages the owner of the information to 
transmit the information further. 
3.3  Specific rules for the choice of channel 
– 
The front desk is crucial in choosing the most appropriate and relevant channel by gathering 
all requests ("in" or "out") dealt with by the SPOC, before dispatching them to the relevant 
desk (Europol, Interpol, SIRENE, bilateral liaison officers). In this context, the SPOC should 
acts on the basis of clear and specific national rules which build on the basis of the criteria 
below. 
– 
This helps to prevent overlaps or that a request is sent more than once through different 
channels and may even lead to the discovery that two different national services or 
departments are investigating the same case or are targeting the same suspect. 
                                                 
5 
See Art.6 (2) of Council Framework Decision 2006/960/JHA 
 
10492/14 
 
GB/sl 
11 
ANNEX 
DG D 2C 
 
EN 
 

 
Possible cooperation channels: 
– 
bilateral and regional liaison officers 
– 
SIRENE Bureau 
– 
Europol (ENU, liaison officers at Europol) 
– 
Interpol (NCB, liaison officers at Interpol) 
– 
jointly staffed units in border regions, in particular PCCCs 
– 
direct contacts between concerned authorities 
– 
coordination units for Naples II/ Anti-Fraud Information System (AFIS)/CIS/FIDE/FIU 
Proposed criteria for use of channels: 
– 
Europol 
– 
EU reach and its mandate (terrorism, serious and organised crime, 2 or more MS 
concerned) 
– 
Contributions to AWF, EMPACT projects, analysis, JITs 
– 
Exchange of classified information (up to EU RESTRICTED) 
– 
Exchange under Swedish Framework Decision (SIENA form/ UMF) 
– 
Urgency 
– 
Interpol 
– 
Exchange of information with EU Member States and third countries 
– 
Alerts (wanted/missing persons, arrest warrants, extraditions) 
 
10492/14 
 
GB/sl 
12 
ANNEX 
DG D 2C 
 
EN 
 

 
– 
Verification of persons identity / documents 
– 
24/7 availability and urgency 
– 
SIRENE 
– 
SIS alerts 
– 
Cross border surveillance 
– 
24/7 availability and urgency 
– 
Bilateral/regional channels 
– 
Exchange of classified information (depends of concluded bilateral agreements) 
– 
Urgency, trust 
– 
PCCC 
– 
Local reach and exchange of information about crimes committed in the border area 
– 
Naples II/AFIS/CIS/FIDE/FIU 
– 
Specific information exchange/ legal assistance 
3.4  Case Management System 
Dealing with law enforcement information exchange, the SPOC should follow the “circle of 
criminal intelligence”, i.e. it receives a request, evaluates it according to the importance, replies 
directly (when possible) and disseminates it to the competent authority that is most suitable for the 
operational handling and, finally, supplies the information requested. 
With a view to making this procedure more efficient at each SPOC, access to a “case management 
system", that evaluates, classifies and disseminates the information originating from all cooperation 
channels and national authorities, is considered of crucial importance. 
 
10492/14 
 
GB/sl 
13 
ANNEX 
DG D 2C 
 
EN 
 

 
The prioritisation of the incoming information should be among the core functions of the SPOC. To 
support this, the system that is dealing with the reception-evaluation-distribution of the incoming 
data should also have the ability of prioritisation. A built-in capability of automated characterisation 
of the importance level of the incoming information would be ideal, so that this data could be 
handled with the appropriate concern and urgency. The characterisation could be as following: 
o  Level 1 (Urgent) 
o  Level 2 (Normal / Non-urgent) 
Every case should automatically be attributed to a single registration number, unique for the 
involved cooperation channels such as SIRENE, INTERPOL, EUROPOL, etc. This could make the 
handling of each case more speedy and help avoiding any confusion during the course of the above 
described “circle of criminal intelligence”. Besides, following the attribution of a single registration 
number, the creation of a related folder would be ideal. The existence of such a folder would render 
the management of the cases more convenient and non-susceptible to mishandlings. 
Before being distributed to the operating agencies the data contained in each request that arrives at 
the SPOC should undergo an automated cross-check against national and international databases 
available at the SPOC. The thorough “examination” of the incoming information can lead to 
reducing the correspondence between the SPOC and national law enforcement agencies. 
Ideally, the national case management systems should be connected SIS/SIRENE and Interpol, as 
well as to SIENA. 
 
10492/14 
 
GB/sl 
14 
ANNEX 
DG D 2C 
 
EN 
 

 
4. 
STAFF COMPETENCE AND TRAINING 
4.1  General recommendations 
– 
Staff is experienced in dealing with international cases and main EU and international tools of 
police co-operation. 
– 
Staff has knowledge of issues such as intelligence and criminal investigative techniques, as 
well as of the national legislation and data protection rules. 
– 
Staff is able to communicate orally and to have good written skills in foreign languages. Basic 
knowledge of one or two languages other than the mother tongue is an asset, especially of 
those languages mostly used in the international cooperation cases of their Member State 
(based on geographical, economic or historical reasons or on criminal phenomena). 
– 
Staff has enough computer skills to fulfil its desk duties. 
– 
Staff receives regular training, both about EU and international cooperation mechanisms 
(i.a. via CEPOL) and about national developments. 
4.2  Specific requirements for the management of the SPOC 
– 
The management of the SPOC has a broad background in law enforcement. 
– 
The management has a suitable ranking to require additional information from national 
competent authorities and / or to speed up and ensure the follow up of requests within the time 
frames. 
– 
The management has good knowledge of national and international law (in particular of the 
Schengen, Europol and Interpol legal framework and standards) in order to advise staff 
members (and provide regular training on those matters). 
– 
The management is empowered to settle a difference between / provide an assessment on 
different channels that may be used, using the criteria set out in Chapter 3.3. 
 
10492/14 
 
GB/sl 
15 
ANNEX 
DG D 2C 
 
EN 
 

 
The management is able to assess and decide (in close cooperation with the authority that initially 
sent the request) about the most appropriate cooperation channel to be used, according to criteria set 
out in Chapter 3.3, and to convince the concerned authorities of this, as well as of the need and 
requirement to forward relevant information beyond the initial destination. 
 
 
10492/14 
 
GB/sl 
16 
ANNEX 
DG D 2C 
 
EN 
 

Document Outline