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COUNCIL OF
Brussels, 25 January 2011
THE EUROPEAN UNION
15785/2/10
REV 2

SCH-EVAL 132
ENFOPOL 313
COMIX 719

NOTE
from:
Drafting Group for updating of Schengen catalogue on Police Cooperation
to:
Working Party for Schengen Matters (Schengen evaluation)
Subject:
Updated Catalogue of Recommendations for the correct application of the 
Schengen Acquis and Best practices: Police cooperation
SCHENGEN CATALOGUE
RECOMMENDATIONS AND BEST PRACTICES
POLICE COOPERATION
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SCHENGEN CATALOGUE
RECOMMENDATIONS AND BEST PRACTICES
POLICE COOPERATION
INTRODUCTION
1. The purpose of the Catalogue is to indicate recommendations and best practices, in order to 
provide an example for both those States acceding to Schengen and those fully applying the 
Schengen acquis. Thus, the Catalogue gives these States an indication as to what is expected 
of them, particularly in practical terms, regarding the implementation of the Schengen 
acquis. The recommendations and best practices stem from the experience gained by both 
the SCHEVAL WP in verifying the correct application of the Schengen acquis in several 
countries and by experts regarding the implementation and application of the new 
instruments in the field of international cooperation. 
The text of the Catalogue does not seek to introduce new requirements. It should, however, 
make it possible to draw the Council's attention to the need - where appropriate - to amend 
certain provisions of the Schengen acquis so that the Commission and/or the Schengen 
states take the recommendations and best practices into account when putting forward 
proposals or formal initiatives. The SCHEVAL WP uses the following definitions to 
conduct this exercise:
Recommendations: a non-exhaustive series of measures which should enable establishing a 
basis for the correct application of the Schengen acquis and for monitoring it;
Best Practices: a non-exhaustive set of working methods or model measures which are 
considered as the optimal application of the Schengen acquis, it being understood that 
several best practices are possible for each specific part of Schengen co-operation.
2. It should be noted that the concept of this Catalogue differs from other Catalogues 
containing recommendations and best practices in the area of Schengen acquis. The reason 
for this is that this Catalogue was drafted with the aim to avoid overlaps with other 
documents related to police cooperation. Thus, although this Catalogue concerns exclusively 
police cooperation related to Schengen, it contains an Annex in which all other relevant 
documents in the field of police cooperation are listed (in some cases with a hyperlink). As 
such, this Catalogue should be considered and used as a complementary document to all 
relevant documentation on police cooperation. 
3. Though the concept is different, the purpose of the Catalogue remains unchanged, and it 
should continue to serve as a reference tool for Schengen evaluations and as a practical 
guide for evaluations in both candidate countries (first mandate) and in Schengen States 
(second mandate). 
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4. The Catalogue is divided into two parts: part A contains recommendations and best practices 
on structure and training, operational cooperation and the exchange of information. The 
recommendations and best practices are presented in tabular form (recommendations on the 
left and best practices on the right). Part B contains a list of cross-references to other 
relevant tools related to police cooperation. If possible, a hyperlink is provided. 
5. Proposals for updates of the Catalogue should be notified immediately to the General 
Secretariat of the Council as well as to the Presidency.
*
*         *
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C O N T E N T S
PART A – RECOMMENDATIONS AND BEST PRACTICES
CHAPTER 1 - STRUCTURE AND TRAINING
Organisational structure, strategy and national coordination
Statistics
Agreements
Common issues on agreements
Agreements on joint patrols
Agreements on liaison officers

Liaison officers in other Schengen States
Co-operation between liaison officers in third countries

Training
Basic training
Further training
Linguistic training
Training for management levels

CHAPTER 2 - OPERATIONAL COOPERATION
Cross-border surveillance
Cross-border pursuit

Controlled deliveries
Radio communications (Article 44 CISA) SCH/Com-ex (99) 6
CHAPTER 3 - EXCHANGE OF INFORMATION
Information exchange in urgent situations
Time limits
Spontaneous exchange of information and intelligence in criminal matters and in 
public order and security

PART B –
CROSS-REFERENCES TO OTHER EXISTING TOOLS
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PART A – RECOMMENDATIONS AND BEST PRACTICES
CHAPTER 1 - STRUCTURE AND TRAINING
RECOMMENDATIONS
BEST PRACTICES
Organisational structure, strategy and national coordination
1. Each Schengen State should develop a 
A joint operational plan could be established 
national plan defining the steps to be taken to 
between neighbouring states in order to agree on 
establish an organisational structure and strategy  co-operation and arrangements on a practical 
to support police co-operation as required by the  level. This plan should be updated regularly. 
Schengen Convention. This national Plan 
(“Schengen Road Map”) should provide 
A coordination mechanism - “National Schengen 
practical operational guidance on how each 
Working Group” - could be established to 
State applies the respective Articles of the 
coordinate the national preparatory process to 
Schengen Convention.
enter Schengen.
2. A Central authority responsible for 
Refer to Manual of Good Practices concerning 
international police co-operation should be 
the International Police Cooperation Units, doc. 
designated as the single point of contact for each  7968/08 + COR 1 + COR 2, in particular chapter 
Schengen State and for all the activities 
3 (and corrigenda)
concerning international police cooperation 
including gathering and analysing of the statistic  As there are different units dealing with different 
data regarding Schengen cooperation 
parts of police cooperation on national level, the 
instrument, as it is recognised to be an effective 
accessibility via one single point of contact is 
evaluation and management tool.
necessary so the requesting country should not 
take care of different competencies and contacts 
Central authority is reachable 24/7.
in requested country.  The National Liaison 
Office/ Permanent Service/ Integrated 
Manuals should be drafted containing special 
Office/Front Desk/Communication Centre with 
provisions for police cooperation with 
24/7 service for back offices where all the 
neighbouring countries.
different police channels are present can be 
considered as a best practice concerning the 
The SIRENE´s stand-by service number should 
handling Schengen requests (including art. 39, 
be duly spread (and available).
46 CISA) and ensuring the effective control of 
information exchange.  
All officers involved in international police 
cooperation at central level are located at one 
site. 
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In order to enhance day-to-day co-operation, the 
liaison officers of Border Guards and Customs 
are seconded to the Central authority where they 
have full access to all relevant databases of their 
authorities if necessary 24/7. 
The Memorandum of understanding between 
Police and Custom and other specialised law 
enforcement services is an excellent basis for 
good cooperation between these services.
3. National police bodies should have 
permanent access to Central authority.
4. The Central authority should compile both 
management information and operational 
information on police co-operation.
5. Management systems, used by the services, 
should be able to generate criminal intelligence, 
by using the results from the field work, and to 
analyse it.
6. In the field of public order and public 
Refer to Council Decision 2006/960/JHA of 18 
security, the central authorities should hold a list  December 2006 on simplifying the exchange of 
of requests for which direct assistance can be 
information and intelligence between law 
given in urgent situations. 
enforcement authorities of the Member States of 
the European Union ( Swedish Framework 
Decision), in particular Art. 3 and 4.
7. The Central authority should have an in-depth  Centralised supervision and instructions should 
knowledge of national and European legislation  ensure that national service level (standards) 
supporting police co-operation and act as a 
correspond to EU legislation
centre of excellence for national services.
All Schengen relevant information should be 
accessible through Police Intranet.
8. Coordination should exist between Central 
authority, Joint Police Stations and the Police 
and Customs Co-operation Centres.
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9. Member States should put in place a 
mechanism enabling to solve possible disputes 
of competence between the authorities.
10. A national plan should include procedures to  No handwritten request.
facilitate operational assistance and exchange of 
information between Central authorities, Joint 
The information shall be supplied at earliest 
Police Stations and Police and Customs Co-
possible stage.
operation Centres in order to fight cross-border 
crime. 
11. All means of communication (e.g. 
telephone, fax, internet, e-mail, radio-
communications, mobile telephones, …) could 
be used.
Information should be handled and transmitted
in accordance with existing rules on data 
protection and data security.
12. For utmost efficiency in bilateral 
It is clearly desirable that nationally authorised 
communication, languages familiar to both 
officers are knowledgeable in the most 
parties shall be used.
commonly spoken languages (multi-linguistic 
approach), both for direct communication and 
the ability to manage documentation in the 
absence of translation support.
The standard practice is to exchange forms in the 
language of the issuing country and in English.
13. The Schengen States undertake to ensure 
Central authority is equipped to forward and 
that their police authorities shall, in compliance 
process requests rapidly.
with national law and within the scope of their 
powers, assist each other for the purposes of 
The Central authority should be informed of all 
preventing and detecting and investigating 
serious and organised crime Schengen-related 
criminal offences.
police co-operation actions that are taken 
throughout the national territory.
In case Schengen related operations will have a 
serious impact in the territory of the concerned 
countries, especially if it involves a great number 
of officers and means, the support should be 
carried out by the Central Authority.
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14. Central authorities constitute a network to 
The Central authority oversees the forwarding of 
exchange operational needs between themselves  the request to the competent authority or, when 
to develop practical modalities of their co-
letters rogatory are required, informs the Central 
operation and generally improve the quality of 
authority of the requesting state of this.
their service.
Schengen States shall inform each other via the 
central authorities of the way authorisation for 
use of written information in criminal 
proceedings must be obtained.
15. The Central authority double-checks the 
Professional translators should be available for 
legitimacy of requests.
central services responsible for police 
cooperation, especially at the 
SIRENE/INTERPOL office.
The information that could be exchanged on the 
basis of a request for mutual assistance should 
also address the possibility of exchange of 
samples of evidence for identification or 
comparison.
16. The exchange of information at local level 
should not be limited, but it is important to 
ensure, that the Central authority is informed 
by the local authorities about the essential 
(general) facts in relevant cases of cross-border 
cooperation.
17. 
Schengen States may agree that the police 
a) The Central authority maintains an electronic  and/or judicial authorities may transmit requests 
evidence of the requests and implements an 
for authorisation and the documents resulting 
electronic workflow with its national 
from dealing with such requests by any secure 
correspondents. This enables it to be aware in 
and reliable means that allow swift 
real time about general facts on all cases of 
transmission, provided the transmission 
international cooperation dealt so the duplicity 
provides a written trace of the document's 
on one hand and loss of information are avoided  author (e.g. telefax, e-mail). 
(case management system).
b) The conditions for obtaining information or 
data should comply with the national data 
protection rules.
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Statistics
18. All Schengen states should be able to 
Encourage the creation of:
provide the relevant and available data on crime 
-
a joint database structure;
statistics and crime trends in their territory.
-
meetings between heads of service;
-
joint training sessions
19. All available reliable and comparable 
Information exchange on bilateral basis can be of 
statistics, including data regarding relevant 
interest to other countries. Therefore, this 
Schengen articles (e.g. articles 39 – 41 CISA) , 
information should always be transmitted to the 
should be collected and analysed by the Central 
Central authority so that this office can ensure 
authority responsible for international co-
the broader coordination, management control 
operation as it is recognised to be an effective 
and overall strategic overview of the information 
evaluation and management tool.
exchange. 
The compilation of statistics at a strategic level 
would help to determine the threat assessment 
and assist in the prioritisation of resources and 
effectiveness of the cooperation on national as 
well as international level (staff, operational 
hours, planning of joint activities etc.) where 
appropriate. 
Where appropriate, statistics should be used on 
the national level for monitoring and evaluating 
of the capacities of relevant structures 
responsible for applying  Schengen tools in order 
to properly fulfil its tasks (deadlines, standards, 
quality).
Statistics should cover data concerning the use of 
articles 39, 46, 40, 41 CISA and article 7 of the 
Swedish Framework Decision and other 
activities covered by this catalogue. 
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Agreements
Common issues on agreements
20. Schengen states may conclude law 
Law enforcement authorities should have the 
enforcement type of agreements with all 
possibility to conclude cooperating regulations 
Schengen countries, especially with 
with their counterparts in order to further detail 
neighbouring countries.
practical arrangements.
Develop bilateral agreements so that they meet 
the Schengen acquis requirements in all 
respects, in particular with regards to cross-
border operations such as : 
·
setting up Joint Police Stations, Police 
and Customs Cooperation Centres, joint 
patrols 
·
direct access of the officials in these 
centres to their national databases
·
alleviate the burden on the Central 
authority
·
maintain supervision and information at 
national level.
In multi-border areas: the creation of a 
multiparty structure gathering all border actors is 
given as an example (the Luxembourg centre is 
composed of services from Luxembourg, 
Belgium, Germany and France)
21. Agreements could be reached on the 
Refer to European Best Practice Guidelines for 
creation of Police and Customs Cooperation 
Police and Customs Cooperation Centres, doc. 
Centres (PCCCs)
13815/08, in particular part I. A 2 and Annex 1.
PCCCs have no operational jurisdiction but 
provide assistance and advice to the units 
responsible for police, border and customs tasks 
in their cross-border relations.
Establishment of the Police and Customs 
Cooperation Centres/Joint Police Station is not 
only an effective tool of cooperation for the 
contracting parties but other Member States 
benefit from them.
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Agreements on joint patrols
22. Refer to Manual on cross-border operations, 
The agreements on the setting up of common 
doc. 10505/4/09 REV 4, in particular part 4.2.
patrols could mention and define the following 
elements:
- the type of personnel and the competent 
administration ;
- the carrying of firearms, of a uniform, or of any 
distinctive sign (armband);
- the service weapons which are authorised;
- the conditions to use firearms and the rules of 
intervention ;
- setting-up of training sessions concerning 
administrative and criminal law and criminal 
procedures used in border areas;
- patrols may be conducted as cross-border 
surveillance patrols in the execution of a 
judicial co-operation request, or in favour of 
the administration;
- the officers are competent for carrying out 
autonomous police measures;
- the State where the joint team operates  
guarantees a protection to the officers of the 
other State acting on its territory; it provides 
them with the same protection and assistance 
as the one it gives its own officers. All officers 
are submitted to the rules of civil and criminal 
liability in force on the territory in which they 
act.
Agreements on liaison officers
Liaison officers in other Schengen States
23. Refer to Compendium on law enforcement 
Co-operation between liaison officers should be 
liaison officers, doc. 10504/2/09 REV 2, in 
encouraged. 
particular Part 1 - the introduction.
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Co-operation between liaison officers in third countries
24. Refer to Council Decision 2003/170/JHA of  The deployment of common liaison-officers like 
27 February 2003 on the common use of liaison  e.g. in the Nordic co-operation should be further 
officers posted abroad by the law enforcement 
enhanced.  Available community-funding for 
agencies of the Member States, as amended by 
such projects should increasingly be used to 
Council Decision 2006/560/JHA, in particular 
further enhance a common approach in this field.
Art. 3.
Cooperation between liaison officers and 
national meetings of all liaison officers posted 
abroad to different destinations are beneficial 
and should be encouraged.
Selection of destinations for secondment of 
liaison officers should follow a thorough 
assessment and be based on a national strategy 
for the posting of all types of liaison officers 
(e.g. police and migration attachés, ILO’s –
Immigration liaison offers, also short-term 
liaison officers as cost-efficient practice for 
specific tasks) abroad in order to avoid overlaps 
and to make the best possible use of 
complementary functional profiles which might 
have different legal foundations and duties.
Changes in a member state liaison officers 
network remain a competence of the member 
Member states submit their contributions for the  states but it is opportune to notify each other of 
annual update of the Compendium on law 
their intentions to change their liaison officers 
enforcement liaison officers (doc. 10504/2/09 
network and to share information on which the 
REV 2) annually.
decision is based.
Concept of having “ad hoc liaison officers” is a 
cost-effective practice.
Liaison Officers should be posted to the service 
responsible for the management of the Liaison 
Officers network.
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Training
Basic training
25. All officers involved in the international 
Depending on their tasks, the knowledge of 
police cooperation should have a thorough 
relevant manuals on police cooperation, relevant 
knowledge of all relative EU provisions and 
bilateral agreements, readmission provisions, etc.  
other main and relevant documents of the 
is desirable and should be covered by the 
international police cooperation. 
training course. 
26. Training programmes should be flexible, 
Officers within the Central authorities along with 
taking into account the changes in e.g. risk 
training authorities can organise training sessions 
assessment and the new EU legislation and 
for all operative personnel. Separate or joint 
instruments which have been implemented. 
training sessions can be organised for judicial 
Explanation of SIS/SIRENE should be part of 
authorities.
the training.
Police, Custom and Border Administrations 
should work towards a common strategy for 
training in Schengen matters. This strategy 
should also include a follow-up training in order 
to secure its accuracy with a view to future 
changes in legislation or best practice. New 
learning technologies can be promoted (e-
learning, Intranet, CD-ROMs).
Informative posters on Schengen matters should 
be available in all offices.
27. Schengen topics should be part of the 
education of all police officers.
Training programmes should emphasise the 
importance of the practical education. 
28. All police personnel should have basic 
knowledge of Article 39 and Article 12 of the  
Council Framework Decision 2006/960/JHA of 
18 December 2006 on simplifying the exchange 
of information and intelligence between law 
enforcement authorities of the Member States of 
the European Union and where to channel 
information. 
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29. The knowledge of police officers in relevant 
information technologies is also an essential 
requirement that has to be covered in view of 
the needs of continuous development of 
international cooperation. 
30. All officers seconded to the Central 
This training course could contain e.g. :
authority depending on their competences and 
-
knowledge of relevant Schengen and EU 
tasks should have completed a training course 
provisions;
covering their tasks.
-
in depth knowledge of relevant manuals 
on police cooperation (such as Manual on 
cross-border operations);
-
basic rules and procedures;
-
in depth knowledge of relevant bilateral 
agreements;
-
genuine and forged travel and identity 
documents;
-
Dublin, and readmission provisions;
-
Schengen Information System;
-
Europol;
-
judicial co-operation.
31. With regard to training, the police personnel  A national "quality manual for international 
actively involved in Schengen matters, require 
police cooperation" should be drafted and 
persistent training on the provisions of the 
published, both on Intranet and through booklets. 
Schengen acquis. The relevant manuals have to 
It will include summary information relating to 
be brought to the attention of all police officers 
police cooperation based on Schengen acquis:
and should be always available in various forms, 
in a full translated version, as a brief guideline 
·
Legal framework and international 
(summarising the most relevant provisions) or at 
instruments (under national law, EU, 
the police intranet.
bilateral agreements on crime prevention 
and legal assistance)
·
Standard of quality and required data for 
request for legal assistance
·
The various international channels
·
Necessity, appropriateness and 
proportionality of the request
·
Limits and restrictions to information 
exchange. 
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Further training
32. A training programme with regular 
A training program can be established on local 
training/briefing should be established as part of  and central level to ensure a continued offer of 
working hours.
education on issues relevant to co-operation. 
The efficient system of “train the trainers” for 
the multipliers should be developed.
Regular exchange of nationally authorised 
officers, common training, at least once a year.
Seminars and workshops may be set up for the 
Sirene officers.
Linguistic training
33. All officers should be able to speak a foreign  Encourage staff to learn other languages. Set up 
language useful to their work. All officers, 
language programs for those officers particularly 
mainly those working in the Central authority, 
involved in cross-border co-operation. e.g. at the 
should have adequate knowledge of English,
Police and Customs Co-operation Centres if 
and those involved in cross-border co-operation  necessary.
e.g. at the Police and Customs Co-operation 
Centres should have knowledge of neighbouring 
countries' languages.
Training for management levels
34. Member States should send officers to the 
International experience is an asset. 
training provided by different relevant agencies, 
e.g. the European Police College, Frontex.
Exchange programmes between states should be 
considered as a means of broadening 
management experience.
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CHAPTER 2 - OPERATIONAL COOPERATION
RECOMMENDATIONS
BEST PRACTICES
Cross-border surveillance
Regarding cross-border surveillance, refer to the 
Manual on cross-border operations (doc. 
10505/4/09 REV 4), especially Chapter 2.
Cross-border pursuit
Regarding cross-border pursuit, refer to the 
Manual on cross-border operations (doc. 
10505/4/09 REV 4), especially Chapter 3.
Controlled deliveries
Regarding controlled deliveries, refer to the 
Manual on cross-border operations (doc. 
10505/4/09 REV 4), especially point 2.5.
Radio communications (Article 44 CISA) SCH/Com-ex (99) 6
35. Effective cross-border cooperation requires 
adequate communication capabilities including 
interoperable radio communication systems in 
border areas and between operational services 
from different Member States. Therefore, 
Council Recommendations on improving radio 
communication between operational units in 
border areas (doc. 10141/09 ENFOPOL 143 
TELECOM 116 COMIX 421) were adopted, 
stating that significant improvement in 
interoperability in border areas can be achieved 
as follows:
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a) In the short term, countries with common 
borders can work together to improve 
communications with local solutions. (Such 
measures can be part of bilateral agreements for 
setting up joint police stations and police and 
customs co-operation centres the 
implementation of which should be reported to 
the Council.)
b) In the medium term, current law-enforcement 
and public-safety mobile communications 
systems need to be connected to provide a more 
effective solution for cross-border 
communications and facilitate roaming 
Thus, it was recommended that Member States 
adopt any appropriate local measures in the 
short and medium term to improve cross-border 
cooperation.
(To examine the issues involved in the 
development of intersystem interfaces, 
including cost and funding opportunities and to 
In case the preferred solution is not adequate 
provide further recommendations, a Radio-
(e.g. communications for surveillance units 
communications Experts group was established 
across the total territory of Schengen States) 
under the LEWP (former PCWP) with 2 
standard GSM functionalities may provide 
subgroups - Forerunners and Inter System 
solution.
Interface (ISI), which reports to LEWP):
System enabling direct radio-communication 
between various law enforcement agencies.
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CHAPTER 3 - EXCHANGE OF INFORMATION
RECOMMENDATIONS
BEST PRACTICES
36. Refer to Swedish Framework Decision, in 
particular Title II and Guidelines on the 
implementation of Council Framework 
Decision 2006/960/JHA of 18 December 2006 
on simplifying the exchange of information and 
intelligence between law enforcement 
authorities of the Member States of the 
European Union, doc. 9512/10..
Requests for information are granted subject to 
the following conditions:
-
requests must be authorised by national 
law
-
requests must be within the scope of the 
powers of the authorities concerned; 
where the authority concerned is not 
empowered to grant assistance, the 
request must be forwarded to the 
competent authority.
-
activities to be carried out to respond to 
a request should not be those that are 
the exclusive responsibility of the 
judicial authorities or require their 
consent
-
written information may only be used 
as evidence with the prior consent of the 
competent authorities of the requested 
country 
-
information exchange must be 
admissible under the domestic law of 
the requested State.
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Information exchange in urgent situations
37. Refer to  Swedish Framework Decision, in 
Police units will avail themselves of the 
particular art. 4 and Guidelines on the 
minimum necessary procedures to exchange 
implementation of Council Framework Decision  requests and replies in a rapid and secure 
2006/960/JHA of 18 December 2006 on 
manner.
simplifying the exchange of information and 
Central authorities are responsible for updating 
intelligence between law enforcement 
the national fact sheets and informing the 
authorities of the Member States of the 
national police units. 
European Union, doc. 9512/10.
In cases of urgency, police units will 
immediately inform the Central authority of the 
police unit they have approached with direct 
request for assistance; with the same sense of 
urgency they will notify their own Central 
authority of the request they made and the reply 
they have received.
38. Use of existing channels must be ensured in 
all relevant cases according to the existing rules 
(mandate) and legal provisions. It must not be 
substitute by the communication on local or 
personal level. 
Time limits
39. Refer to the  Swedish Framework Decision, 
in particular Art. 4 and Guidelines on the 
implementation of Council Framework Decision 
2006/960/JHA of 18 December 2006 on 
simplifying the exchange of information and 
intelligence between law enforcement 
authorities of the Member States of the 
European Union, doc. 9512/10.
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Spontaneous exchange of information and intelligence in criminal matters and in public order 
and security
40. As a general rule information shall be 
The designated Central authority should be 
exchanged via Central authority.
considered as the first route for the transmission 
of information under Article 46 CISA. Even in 
particularly urgent cases their experience and 
structure should permit the best results for 
maintenance of public order and national 
security.
41. When, in urgent cases, the direct 
transmission of information takes place 
between national police units the Central 
authority must be notified immediately.
42. In particularly urgent cases, the exchange of 
information within the meaning of this Article 
may take place directly between the police 
authorities concerned, unless national provisions 
stipulate otherwise. The Central authority shall 
be informed of this as soon as possible.
43. To ensure the information can be supplied
The adoption of a system for validation of the 
as early as possible and that the data 
information is encouraged. Schengen States will 
communicated are effectively protected a 
be more able to respond to information, which is 
secure and reliable means of communications 
supported by a recognised validation by the 
must be available.
transmitting state.
A variety of secure and reliable means of 
communication should be available between 
central authorities for international police 
cooperation.
44. The information supplied should be 
detailed to such an extent that the receiving 
state can make a realistic evaluation of its 
worth or conduct a risk assessment.
45. When the source of the information is 
sensitive or has to be protected, this should be 
included in the original message. 
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46. The designated Central authority must be in 
a position to act or respond to the information 
supplied.
-
content of information exchange
The central authorities shall supply one another, 
requested or not, with information if 
circumstances arise or if sizeable groups of 
persons who may pose a threat to public order 
(e.g. big public sport or cultural events) and 
security or are suspected to have organised 
serious crime move through or towards other 
Schengen States. The information shall be 
supplied at as early a stage as possible. Save as 
otherwise provided for under national law, the 
exchange of information within the meaning of 
this Catalogue may take place directly between 
the police services concerned in urgent cases. 
The Central authority shall be informed as soon 
as possible. 
- Content of the Information: Schengen States 
must ensure that the data communicated are 
effectively protected against unauthorized 
access, modification or disclosure. The 
information which Schengen States supply one 
another shall be used exclusively for the 
purpose for which it is provided. The 
information to be provided shall be supplied in 
accordance with relevant national legislation.
- Communication: In order to exchange 
The central authorities can use standardised 
information, the Central authority may use the 
templates, which are available e.g. in the Manual 
Liaison Bureaux and, if appropriate, joint police  on cross-border operations, police Intranet etc.
stations. The following means of 
communication may be used when exchanging 
information: telephone, fax, e-mail, radio 
communication and other means of data 
communication. 
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PART B – CROSS-REFERENCES TO OTHER EXISTING TOOLS
-
Manual of Good Practices concerning the International Police Cooperation Units at 
National Level (doc. 7968/08 ENFOPOL 63 + COR 1 + COR 2)
-
Manual on cross-border operations (doc. 10505/4/09 REV 4 ENFOPOL 157 
ENFOCUSTOM 55 CRIMORG 90 COMIX 465 + ADD 1)
-
Prüm Decisions:
-
Council Decision 2008/615/JHA of 23 June 2008 on the stepping up of cross-border 
cooperation, particularly in combating terrorism and cross-border crime.
-
Council Decision 2008/616/JHA of 23 June 2008 on the implementation of Decision 
2008/615/JHA on the stepping up of cross-border cooperation, particularly in combating 
terrorism and cross-border crime.
-
Council Decision 2008/617/JHA of 23 June 2008 on the improvement of cooperation 
between the special intervention units of the Member States of the European Union in 
crisis situations
-
Council Framework Decision 2006/960/JHA of 18 December 2006 on simplifying the 
exchange information and intelligence between law enforcement authorities of the 
European Union ("Swedish Framework Decision")
-
Council Decision 2009/371/JHA of 6 April 2009 establishing the European Police 
Office (Europol) (OJ L 121, 15.5.2009, p. 37).
-
Council Decision 2009/426/JHA of 16 December 2008 on the strengthening of Eurojust 
and amending Decision 2002/187/JHA setting up Eurojust with a view to reinforcing 
the fight against serious crime (OJ L 138, 4.6.2009, p. 14).
-
Council Framework Decision of 13 June 2002 on combating terrorism.
-
Council Framework Decision 2008/841/JHA of 24 October 2008 on the fight against 
organised crime. 
-
European Best Practice Guidelines for Police and Customs Cooperation Centres (doc. 
13815/08 ENFOPOL 183 ENFOCUSTOM 88 FRONT 85 COMIX 718)
-
Council Decision 2007/412/JHA of 12 June 2007 amending Decision 2002/348/JHA 
concerning security in connection with football matches with an international dimension 
(OJ L 155, 15.6.2007, p. 76) 
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-
Council Resolution of 3 June 2010 concerning an updated handbook with 
recommendations for international police cooperation and measures to prevent and 
control violence and disturbances in connection with football matches with an 
international dimension, in which at least one Member State is involved (OJ C 165, 
24.6.2010, p. 1)
-
Council recommendation of 6 December 2007 concerning a Handbook for police and 
security authorities concerning cooperation at major events with an international 
dimension (OJ C 314, 22.12.2007, p. 4)
-
Guidelines on the Implementation of Council Framework Decision 2006/960/JHA of 
18 December 2006 on simplifying the exchange information and intelligence between 
law enforcement authorities of the European Union ("Swedish Framework Decision")
-
Council Decision 2006/560/JHA of 24 July 2006 amending Decision 2003/170/JHA on 
the common use of liaison officers posted abroad by the law enforcement agencies of 
the Member States (OJ L 219, 10.8.2006, p. 31)
-
Compendium on law enforcement liaison officers (doc. 10504/2/09 REV 2 ENFOPOL 
156 JAIEX 37 COMIX 464)
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