Ceci est une version HTML d'une pièce jointe de la demande d'accès à l'information 'Gender Equality in EU’s foreign and security policy - AFET'.

Opinion on Gender Equality in EU’s foreign and security policy
(2019/2167(INI))
Rapporteur: Hannah Neumann (Greens/EFA)
COMPROMISE AMENDMENTS
COMP 1: Gender equality and gender mainstreaming
Covers AMs 10 (Ceccardi), 11 (Villanueva Ruiz), 12 (Barley), 13 (Vautmans), 14 (Neumann),
16 (Zovko), 17 (Biedron)
Draft opinion
Paragraph 1

Draft opinion
Amendment
1.
Calls on the EEAS, the
1.
Calls on the EEAS, the
Commission and the EU Member States to
Commission and the EU Member States to
systematically integrate gender
further support and systematically
mainstreaming into the EU’s foreign and
integrate gender equality [16 Zovko] ,
security policy;
gender mainstreaming, including gender
budgeting [17 Biedron], and an
intersectional perspective, including equal
and diverse representation, [13
Vautmans] 
into the EU’s foreign and
security policy, calls on the EU to lead by
example and to make gender equality an
important goal of the EU external action
[12 Barley]; making it visible in all policy
areas, in particular [13 Vautmans] in
multilateral fora and in all political and
strategic dialogues, human rights
dialogues, policy formulation and
programming, country level human rights
strategies, public statements, global
human rights reporting as well as in the
monitoring, evaluation and reporting
processes [14 Neumann], decision-
making processes, negotiations and
leadership, [Villanueva Ruiz] calls for the
diverse experiences of women and girls
facing multiple and intersecting forms of
discrimination and marginalization to be
put at the heart of policy-making [12
Barley];


COMP 2: Gender in foreign policy
Covers AMs 9 (Neumann) and 11 (Villanueva Ruiz)
Draft opinion
Paragraph 1a (new)

Draft opinion
Amendment
1a.
Stresses  that  Sweden,  Denmark,
Switzerland  and  Norway  have  a  strong
gender-equality  focused  foreign  policy;
welcomes 

that 
France, 
Spain,
Luxembourg, 
Ireland,
Cyprus 
and
Germany, among others, have announced
their  intent  to  make  gender  equality  a
priority  of  their  foreign  policy;  further
welcomes that the new EU commission has
made  gender  equality  one  of  their  key
priorities  across  all  policy  areas  [9
Neumann]; stresses  that  the  following
principles  should  be  at  the  core  of  a  EU
gender-based 

policy: 
human 
rights,
democracy 
and 
the 
rule 
of 
law,
disarmament 
and 
non-proliferation,
international cooperation for development
and climate action; [11 Villanueva Ruiz]

COMP 3: Training
Covers  AMs 23  (Zovko), 26  (Neumann), 28  (Biedron), 29  (Vautmans),  30  (Loiseau),  31
(Cseh), 32 (Ceccardi), 33 (Castaldo), 55 (Vautmans)
Draft opinion
Paragraph 2

Draft opinion
Amendment
2.
Calls on the VP/HR to make
2.
Stresses that gender equality and
substantial and highly visible progress on
gender mainstreaming require not only
gender equality in terms of leadership and
high-level policy statements but also
management, staffing, training, financial
political commitment of the EU and
resources and organisational hierarchy;
Member States’ leadership, prioritisation
calls in this regard for mandatory training
of objectives and monitoring (23 Zovko);
on gender equality;
Calls on the VP/HR to make substantial
and highly visible progress on gender
equality in terms of leadership and
management, staffing and recruitment [29
Vautmans]
organisational hierarchy [30

Loiseau], training, financial resources, pay
gap and work-life balance [30 Loiseau],
and to ensure political and operational
commitment to implement effective and
transformative gender mainstreaming [26
Neumann]
; calls in this regard for
mandatory and recurrent [29 Vautmans]
training on gender equality and gender
mainstreaming [31 Cseh, 33 Castaldo] for
all middle and upper managers of the
EEAS, staff of EU diplomatic services and
Heads/Commanders of CSDP missions
and operations [26 Neumann, 28
Biedron]
stresses that advancing
women's rights and gender equality
should be horizontal priorities for all EU
Special representatives and be a
cornerstone of their mandate, in
particular for the EU special
representative on human rights; [AM 55
Vautmans]

COMP 4: Presence of women in EU institutions
Covers AMs 7 (Guteland), 13 (Vautmans), 22 (Biedron), 25 (Barley), 27 (Zovko), 35
(Neumann), 37 (Neumann), 48 (Biedron), 52 (Biedron), 55 (Vautmans), 63 (Villanueva), 100
(Zovko)
Draft opinion
Paragraphs 2 a, 2 b (new)

Draft opinion
Amendment
2a.
Calls for better gender balancing
when it comes to the EU external
representation; regrets the considerable
gender gap in the EEAS, where women
account for only two out of eight EU
Special Representatives [55 Vautmans],
31.3% of middle-management positions
and 26% at the level of senior
management; welcomes the VP/HR
commitment to reach 40% of women in
management positions by the end of his
mandate; [35 Neumann]; recalls however
that the European Commission
announced in its Gender Equality
Strategy 2020-2025 its objective to reach


gender balance of 50% at all levels of its
management by the end of 2024 [52
Biedron]; stresses that this objective
should also apply to future nomination of
EU Special Representatives [25 Barley, 7
Guteland, 55 Vautmans]; deplores the
fact that there are no women among the
new Deputy Secretaries-General
appointed by VP/HR; [48 Biedron]

2b.
Welcomes the EEAS Gender and
Equal Opportunities Strategy 2018-2023
but regrets the lack of specific and
measurable objectives; calls for its update
in order to include concrete and binding
objectives, including [100 Zovko]
regarding the presence of women in
management positions, and for its
subsequent implementation [22 Biedron];
regrets likewise the absence of diversity
targets and of overall diversity in the EU
institutions, especially regarding race,
ability and ethnic backgrounds [63
Villanueva]; calls on the VP/HR to

increase the percentage of women in EU’s
internal decision-making mechanisms
[27 Zovko]; stresses the need for gender-
responsive recruitment procedures,
including by the European Personnel
Selection Office, which do not further
accentuate gender inequalities in the
institutions; [37 Neumann] calls for
gender-responsive leadership to be part of
middle and senior management job
descriptions [13 Vautmans];

COMP 5: EUDELs
Covers AMs 27 (Zovko), 46 (Ceccardi), 47 (Zovko), 49 (Barley)
Draft opinion
Paragraph 3

Draft opinion
Amendment
3.
Calls on the VP/HR to ensure that
3.
Calls on the VP/HR to ensure that
the Heads of EU Delegations abroad have a
the Heads of EU Delegations abroad have a
formal responsibility to ensure that gender
formal responsibility to ensure that gender
equality is mainstreamed throughout all
equality is mainstreamed throughout all

aspects of the Delegation’s work and are
aspects of the Delegations’ work and that
required to report on it; further calls on the
gender equality issues are regularly raised
VP/HR to ensure that there is one full-time
in political dialogues with government
gender focal point in the EU Delegations;
counterparts, and [27 Zovko, 49 Barley]
are required to report on it; further calls on
the VP/HR to ensure that there is one
gender focal point in the EU Delegations;
notes that in particular the use of gender
analysis in the formulation of EU
external action is increasing and almost
all EU Delegations have carried out a
detailed gender analysis; [47 Zovko]

COMP 6: CSOs
Covers  AMs 50  (Cseh),  90  (Neumann),  91  (Neumann),  106  (Barley),  116  (Barley),  119
(Neumann), 144 (Cseh),
Draft opinion
Paragraph 3 a (new)

Draft opinion
Amendment
3a.
Calls  on  the  EU  delegations  to
monitor  the  backlash  against  gender
equality and women’s rights [106 Barley]
as well as the tendencies of shrinking space
for civil society and to take specific steps to
protect  them  [119  Neumann];  urges  the
Commission,  EEAS,  Member  States  and
Heads  of  EU  Delegations  to  ensure
increased  [144  Cseh]  political  and
financial support to independent local civil

society, including women’s organisations,
especially  for  capacity-building  actions
[106 Barley], women [106 Barley] human
rights  defenders,  journalists,  academics
and  artists  [144  Cseh]  and  to  make
cooperation and consultation with them a
standard  element  of  their  work  [119
Neumann, 50 Cseh];

3b.
Welcomes
the  fact  that  the
proposed  IPA  III  regulation  and  NDICI
include  gender  equality  as  a  specific
objective;  calls  for  specific  funding  on
gender  equality  and  for  [116  Barley]
integrating 


gender-responsive
perspective [34 Barley], gender-responsive

budgeting and obligatory requirements for
ex-ante and ex-post [36 Guteland] gender
impact  assessments  in  these  regulations
[34 Barley ] and to be reported back to the
European Parliament [36 Guteland]; calls
for  reduced  administrative  constraints  to
allow access to funding for local and small
civil  society  organisations  and  especially

women’s organisations; [106, 116 Barley]
3c.
Calls on the VP/HR, the EEAS and
the  Member  States  to  ensure  full
implementation  of  the  EU  Guidelines  on
Human Rights Defenders and to adopt an
annex aiming  to  recognise  and  develop
additional strategies and tools to better and
more  effectively  respond  and  prevent  the
specific  situation, threats  and  risk  factors

faced by women’s human rights defenders;
calls  for  the  immediate  introduction  of  a
gender  perspective  and  specific  measures
to support WHRD in all programmes and
instruments  aiming  to  protect  Human
Right Defenders; [91 Neumann]

3d.
Welcomes the EU decision to renew
the EU Action Plan on Human Rights and
Democracy 

and 
calls 
for 
gender
mainstreaming  and  targeted  actions  for
gender equality and women’s rights to be
included  in  the  implementation  phase  of
the Action Plan [90 Neumann];

COMP 7: Women in CSDP
Covers  AMs 51  (Biedron), 53  (Zovko),  54  (Neumann),  56  (Loiseau), 57  (Stefanuta), 58
(Castaldo), 59 (Barley), 60 (Biedron), 61 (Ceccardi), 67 (Zovko), 108 (Zovko)
Draft opinion
Paragraph 4

Draft opinion
Amendment
4.
Regrets that not a single one of the
4.
Welcomes  that  the  number  of
12 civilian CSDP missions is headed by a
women  deployed  to  CSDP  missions  and
woman; calls on the VP/HR to draw up a
operations  has  increased; [Zovko  53]
gender strategy for CSDP missions with
regrets  that  not  a  single  one  of  the  12
specific targets;
civilian  CSDP  missions  is  headed  by  a

woman and  that  out  of  70  Heads  of
Mission so far only six have been women
[54 Neumann]; reiterates that only 22 out
of  176  employees  in  the  European  Union
Military  Staff  (EUMS)  are  female,  of
which 12 serve as secretaries or assistants;
[51 Biedron]; 
calls on the VP/HR to draw
up  a  gender equality  [57  Stefanuta, 59
Barley,  60  Biedron] 
strategy  for  CSDP
missions  with  specific  targets for  both
leadership  and  personnel  [59  Barley,  58
Castaldo]
recalls that a concerted effort by
the  EU  leadership  and  member  states  is
needed as they provide the greater part of
CSDP  civilian  personnel  deployed [53
Zovko]; calls  on  EU  Member  States  to
fulfil their Commitment 16 of the Civilian
CSDP  compact  by  actively  promoting  the
presence of women at all levels and based
on  increased  national  contributions;
regrets that since the establishment of the
compact, the number of female personnel
has  decreased [54  Neumann]; invites  the
Member 

States 
to
pursue 
active
recruitment  strategies  and  to identify  and
address 

specific 
obstacles 
limiting
women’s  participation,  through  mission
reports  that  include  relevant  statistics  [56
Loiseau]; calls  on  the  EU  institutions  to
encourage  the  presence  of  women
participating 

in 
UN 
peacekeeping
operations at all levels, including military
and police staff [67 Zovko]
recalls that the
EU  made  a  commitment  to  increase  the
number  of  women  in  institutions  dealing
with 

conflict 
prevention, 
crisis
management  and  peace  negotiations  by
signing  the  UNSCR  1325  (2000)  on

‘Women,  Peace  and  Security”  which
clearly  identifies  women  as  important
actors  in  peacebuilding  and  conflict
mediation; [108 Zovko];


COMP 8: Gender analysis and conflict prevention
Covers AMs 15 (Cseh), 39 (Guteland), 65 (Vautmans), 72 (Neumann), 73 (Guteland), 74
(Vautmans), 76 (Barley), 77 (Cseh), 78 (Loiseau), 79 (Zovko), 80 (Stefanuta), 81 (Rangel),
82 (Paet), 83 (Ceccardi), 149 (Villanueva)
Draft opinion
Paragraph 5

Draft opinion
Amendment
5.
Stresses that developing and using
5.
Stresses  that  developing  and  using
gender analysis and the systematic
gender 
analysis 
and 
the 
systematic
integration of a gender perspective
integration  of  a  gender  perspective and
constitutes one of the foundations of
including  it  in  decision  making  [82  Paet]
effective and lasting conflict prevention
constitutes  one  of  the  foundations  of
and resolution;
effective  and  lasting  conflict  prevention,
management 

[74 
Vautmans]
and
resolution,
stabilisation,  peacebuilding,
post-conflict  reconstruction,  governance
and  institution  building
regrets  that  the
dominant narrative around women is one
of  victimization  that  deprives  women  of
their  agency  [72  Neumann]  and stresses
the  need  for  the  recognition  of  the
significant role women and girls play at the
local, national and international level [79
Zovko] in  achieving  sustainable  peace,
particularly  through  the  facilitation  of
dialogue, 

mediation 
and 
peace
negotiations [81 Rangel]; calls for the safe,
meaningful and inclusive participation of
women and girls from the grassroots level
in  peace  in security  matters,  including
peacebuilding,

post-conflict
reconstruction, governance and institution
building actions [76 Barley, 65 Vautmans],
and  across  the  various  stages  of  the
conflict cycle [149 Villanueva], in line with
sustainable 

development 
goals
[78
Loiseau,  80  Stefanuta];  notes  that  the
promotion  of  women’s  rights  in  crisis  or
conflict-ridden  countries  fosters  stronger,
healthier  [15  Cseh], more  secure and
resilient communities that are less likely to
resort  to  violent  means  to  settle  disputes
and  conflict  [77  Cseh];  highlights  the
importance  of  inclusion  of  young  women
and  girls  in  peace  building  and  in  this


regard notes the contribution of the Youth,
Peace and Security Agenda [73 Guteland];

COMP 9: Gender mainstreaming in CSDP
Covers AMs 64 (Zovko), 115 (Neumann)
Draft opinion
Paragraph 5a (new)

5a. Welcomes  the  guidelines  on  gender
mainstreaming  for  the  EU  civilian
missions,  stresses  that  these  guidelines
represent 


concrete 
tool 
for
implementation,  directed  towards  all
mission  staff,  including  management,
and 

will 
help 
to 
systematically
mainstream  a  gender  perspective  and
adopt  gender  equality  policies  in  the
activities and phases of all civilian CSDP
missions  and  is  convinced  that  for  the
CSDP mission planning should take into
account  the  recommendations  of  local

women’s  organisations  [64  Zovko];
welcomes  that  all  civilian  CSDP
missions  count  now  with  a  gender
adviser; regrets however that this is not
the  case  with  military  CSDP  missions;
encourages  EU  Member  States  to  put
forward  candidates  for  the  existent
vacancies;  calls  to  ensure  that  all  EU-
deployed military and civilian personnel
are  sufficiently  trained  on  gender
equality and WPS, specifically on how to
integrate a gender perspective into their
tasks [115 Neumann];

COMP 10: VAW in CSDP and peacekeeping operations
Covers AMs 62 (Guteland), 118 (Neumann)
Draft opinion
Paragraph 5b (new)


Draft opinion
Amendment
5b.
Calls for an update of the Upgraded
Generic Standards of Behaviour for CSDP
Missions  and  Operations  to  include  the
principle  of  zero-tolerance  to  non-action
for  EU  leadership  and  management
regarding 

sexual 
and 
gender-based
violence;  [118  Neumann,  62  Guteland]
regrets that only a few EU CSDP missions
provide training on sexual or gender-based
harassment and calls on the EEAS and the
Member  States  to  support  all  efforts  to
combat sexual or gender-based violence in
international peacekeeping operations and
to ensure that whistle-blowers and victims
are effectively protected; [62 Guteland];

COMP 11: WPS
Covers AMs 93 (Neumann), 97 (Zovko), 96 (Vautmans), 104 (Neumann)
Draft opinion
Paragraph 6

Draft opinion
Amendment
6.
Welcomes the EU Strategic
6.
Welcomes the EU Strategic
Approach to Women, Peace and Security
Approach to Women, Peace and Security
(WPS) and the EU Action Plan on WPS
(WPS) and the EU Action Plan on WPS
adopted in 2019; regrets, however, that
adopted in 2019 and calls for its robust
translating this policy commitment into
implementation [96 Vautmans]; regrets,
action remains a challenge;
however, that despite clear objectives and
indicators 
translating this policy
commitment into action remains a
challenge and requires continued efforts
(97 Zovko); stresses the importance of
National Action Plans for the
implementation of the WPS agenda;
welcomes that almost all EU Member
States will have their National Action
Plans on the UNSC Resolution 1325 by
the end of the year; regrets however that
only one of them includes an allocated
budget for implementation; calls on EU
Member States to include in this context
allocated budget for their implementation


and to develop national parliamentary
supervising mechanisms as well as to
introduce quotas for the participation of
women in control, evaluation, and
supervising mechanisms [104 Neumann];
regrets that many EU staff members have
not integrated WPS as part of their work
and that this agenda is seen as one that
can be applied at their discretion and with
the objective of improving the
effectiveness of missions, but not as way

to ensure women’s rights and gender
equality on its own [93 Neumann];

COMP 12: EEAS Principal Advisor
Covers AMs 101 (Ceccardi), 102 (Neumann), 103 (Cseh), 104 (Neumann), 105 (Zovko)
Draft opinion
Paragraph 7

Draft opinion
Amendment
7.
Welcomes the work done by the
7.
Welcomes the work that the EU
EEAS Principal Advisor on Gender;
Task Force on Women, Peace and
regrets, however, the limited capacity of
Security has carried out until now,
this role and calls for the advisor to report
including by ensuring the participation of
directly to the VP/HR;
relevant civil society organisations in its
discussions [102 Neumann]; 
welcomes
the work done by the EEAS Principal
Advisor on Gender; regrets, however, the
limited capacity of this role and calls for
the advisor’s role to be significantly
strengthened and for her/him [103 Cseh]
to report directly to the VP/HR; calls on
the VP/HR to have a full-time gender
advisor working on gender equality and
the WPS agenda in each EEAS
Directorate, reporting directly to the
Principal Advisor [102 Neumann], and to
encourage its staff to work closely with
the European Institute for Gender
Equality; stresses that knowledge sharing
between the EU institutions and agencies
is a substantial and highly efficient tool to
avoid high administrative costs and
unnecessary increase in bureaucracy [105
Zovko];


COMP 13: WPS in CSDP documents
Covers AMs 109 (Ceccardi), 110 (Zovko), 111 (Barley)
Draft opinion
Paragraph 8

Draft opinion
Amendment
8.
Urges the VP/HR and the EU
8.
Urges the VP/HR and the EU
Member States to include references to
Member States to include references to
UNSC resolution 1325 and follow-up
UNSC resolution 1325 and follow-up
resolutions in CSDP-related Council
resolutions in CSDP-related Council
decisions and mission mandates, and to
decisions and mission mandates, making
make sure that all CSDP missions and
sure that CSDP missions and operations
operations have an annual action plan on
have an annual action plan on how to
how to implement the objectives of GAP
implement the objectives of the future
III and the EU Action Plan on WPS;
[110 Zovko] GAP III and the EU Action
Plan on WPS; calls for gender analysis to
be put in place for new CSDP
instruments, including the European
Defence Fund and the proposed
European Peace Facility [111 Barley];

COMP 14: GAP
Covers AMs 20 (Neumann), 44 (Guteland), 45 (Guteland), 107 (Barley), 110 (Zovko), 112
(Arena), 114 (Villanueva Ruiz) 140 (Barley), 151 (Villanueva Ruiz)
Draft opinion
Paragraph 8 a, 8 b, 8 c, 8 d (new)

Draft opinion
Amendment
8a.
Welcomes  the  results  obtained
under the second gender action plan (GAP
II) with  regard  to  gender  equality [112
Arena],

and  welcomes  therefore  the
Commission’s  proposal  to  carry  out  a
review  and  present  a  new  EU  Gender
Action  Plan  III  (GAP  III)  in  2020  [110
Zovko]; calls  on  the  Commission to
address its shortcomings such as the weak
legal  basis,  the  absence  of  gender-
responsive  budgeting,  the  difficulties  to
accurate  reporting,  the  absence  of


timeframe  alignment  and  budget  cycles
and  the  lack  of  adequate  training  to  staff
[151  Villanueva  Ruiz]; recommends  for
the  GAP  III  to  be  accompanied  by  clear,
measurable,  time-bound  indicators  of
success,  including  an  allocation  of
responsibility for different actors and with
clear  objectives  in  each  partner  country
[20  Neumann]; urges  the  Commission,
given the impact of COVID-19 on women’s

and girls’ lives, to keep the renewal of GAP
III in its work plan for 2020 and not push
it back to next year [112 Arena];

8b.
Acknowledges  the  key  role  of  civil
society  organisations  and  in  particular
women’s rights organisations and women
human rights defenders in supporting the
implementation  of  the EU  Gender  Action
Plan  and  the  EU  Strategic  Approach  to
Women Peace and Security and its Action
Plan;  calls  on  the  Commission  to
strengthen the involvement of civil society
organisations  in  the  formulation  of  GAP
III  and  in  its  implementation  in  partner
countries; [107 Barley, 20 Neumann]

8c.
Stresses  that  GAP  III  should
explicitly  cover  women’s  rights  in  all
contexts, regardless of GDP and including
fragile  states  and  conflict  context  [44
Guteland],  as  well  as  most  vulnerable
groups such as refugee and migrant girls;
[45 Guteland]

8d.
Asks that the GAP III specifies that
85%  of  official  development  assistance
should  go  to  programmes  having  gender
equality  as  a  significant  or  as  a  principal
objective,

and
within 
this 
broader
commitment, calls  for  the  allocation  of a
sufficient  amount of  European  Union
official development assistance to specific
interventions for the promotion of equality,
the  empowerment  of  women  and  the
promotion of their rights [114  Villanueva
Ruiz]; calls  for  the  improvement  of  the
reporting  of  EU  funding  for  gender
equality allocated and disbursed in partner
countries  through  the  EU  GAP  III  [140


Barley]; calls  on  the  EEAS  and  the
Commission  to  establish  gender-specific
indicators  to  be  applied  in  the  project
selection, monitoring and evaluation [150
Villanueva Ruiz];

COMP 15: Climate
Covers 120 (Ceccardi), 121 (Lega), 122 (Gal), 123 (Neumann), 124 (Zovko), 125 (Cseh), 126
(Villanueva Ruiz), 127 (Paet), 129 (Vautmans), 133 (Guteland)
Draft opinion
Paragraph 9

Draft opinion
Amendment
9.
Recognises that gender equality is a
9.
Stresses  [127  Paet] that  gender
prerequisite for efficient management of
equality  is an  integral  part of  an efficient
climate challenges.
management in  the  external  action  and
thematic  areas,  including
[124  Zovko]
climate  challenges and  the  sustainable
development 

of 
our 
societies 
[129
Vautmans]; highlights the vulnerability of
women  and  girls  living  in  poverty  to
climate  change [125  Cseh] and stresses
that  in  order  to  achieve  a  fair  and  just
transition, which leaves no one behind, all
climate action must include a gender and
an  intersectional  perspective;  regrets  that
only 30% of climate negotiators are women
and  reminds  that  meaningful  and  equal
participation of women in decision making
bodies at international [124  Zovko],  EU,
national and local level climate policy and
action  is  vital  for  achieving  long-term
climate 

goals
[123 
Neumann, 
126
Villanueva Ruiz]; urges that GAP III make
clear links  to  the  Paris  Agreement  [133
Guteland] and asks the EU and its Member

States  to  ensure  access  of  women’s
organisations  to  international  climate
funds [123 Neumann]
.

COMP 16: Trade
Covers AMs 41 (Guteland), 137 (Villanueva Ruiz), 146 (Barley),
Draft opinion
Paragraph 9 a (new)

Draft opinion
Amendment
9 a.
Calls  on the  Commission  and  the
Council  to  promote  and  support  the
inclusion  of  a  specific  gender  chapter  in
EU  trade  and  Investment  agreements;
calls as well for provisions to be included
in  these  trade  agreements  ensuring  that
their  institutional  structures  guarantee
periodical compliance reviews, substantial
discussions 

and 
the 
exchange 
of
information  and  best  practices  on  gender
equality and trade, through, among others,
the  inclusion  of  women  and  experts  on
gender  equality  at  all  levels  of  the
administrations concerned;  calls  on  the
EU and its Member States to include in ex-
ante  and  ex-post  impact  assessments  the
country-specific and sector-specific gender
impact of EU trade policy and agreements;
stresses  that  the  results  of  the  gender-
focused  analysis  should be  taken  into
account 

in 
trade 
negotiations

considering  both  positive  and  negative
impact throughout the whole process, from
the negotiation stage to implementation –
and should be accompanied by measures to
prevent  or  compensate  possible  negative
effects;

COMP 17: Violence Against Women
Covers AMs 75 (Arena), 85 (Paet), 86 (Neumann), 87 (Barley), 89 (Barley), 92 (Barley), 138
(Vautmans), 141 (Cseh)
Draft opinion
Paragraph 9 b (new)


Draft opinion
Amendment
9 b.
Calls  for  the  prevention  and
eradication  of all  forms  of  sexual  and
gender-based 

violence 
and 
serious
violations of human rights of women and
girls,  such  as  child,  early  and  forced
marriages

[138  Vautmans]  and  the
eradication  of  female  genital  mutilation
[141 Cseh]; calls for it to continue to be a
political priority for the EU in its external
action  and  to  be  systematically  addressed
in political dialogues with third countries;
[87 Barley]; calls on the Commission and
the  EEAS  to  focus,  in  particular,  on
preventing  gender-based  violence  during
conflicts and on support for and access to
essential  services including  sexual  and
reproductive  health  servicesfor  survivors
of  gender-based  violence;  [75  Arena]
stresses  that  in  conflict  situations women
and girls are exposed to heightened risks of
violations of their human rights [85 Paet];
is  deeply  disturbed  at  the  fact  that  sexual
violence  has  increasingly  become  part  of
the broader strategy of conflict and a tactic
of  war  [86  Neumann];  urges  the EU  to
exercise  all  possible  leverage  for  the
perpetrators of mass rapes in warfare to be
reported, 

identified, 
prosecuted 
and
punished in accordance with international
criminal  law  [87  Barley];  calls  for  the
revision and update of the EU Guidelines
on  violence  against  women  and  girls  and
for combatting all forms of discrimination
against them; [89 Barley];


COMP 18: SRHR
Covers AMs 42 (Guteland), 88 (Neumann), 139 (Arena), 142 (Villanueva Ruiz),145 (Barley),
147 (Villanueva Ruiz)
Draft opinion
Paragraph 9 c (new)

Draft opinion
Amendment
9 c.
Calls 
to 
guarantee 
universal
respect  for  and  access  to  sexual  and
reproductive health and rights as agreed in
the  Programme  of  Action  of  the
International  Conference on  Population
and Development, the Beijing Platform for
Action and the outcome documents of the
review conferences thereof, and to develop
appropriate  tools  to  measure  progress
towards this goal; calls to ensure that the
EU has a unified position and takes strong
action  to  univocally  denounce  the
backlash  against  sexual  and  reproductive
health  and  rights,  gender  equality,
LGBTIQ+ 

rights 
and 
measures
undermining women’s rights; calls on the
Commission and the EEAS to reaffirm the

EU’s  commitment  to  sexual and
reproductive  health  and  rights,  including
access  to  prenatal  care  and  maternal
health  services,  through  the  new  gender
action  plan  (GAP  III)  and  through  the
neighbourhood, 

development 
and
international 
cooperation 
instrument
(NDICI); calls on the Commission and the
EEAS  to  provide  political  and  financial
support  to  civil  society  organisations
fighting  for  the  sexual  and  reproductive
health  and  rights  of  all  people,  including
the most vulnerable or at risk, particularly
women  and  girls  on  the  move,  on
migration routes or in camps;

COMP 19: Education and inclusion
Covers AMs 38 (Guteland), 40 (Guteland), 135 (Cseh), 138 (Vautmans), 140 (Barley), 143
(Arena)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 9 d (new)

Draft opinion
Amendment
9 d.
Regrets that women and girls
around the world are still subjected to
systematic discrimination; notes that

women’s poverty is largely due to a lack
of access to economic resources; [135
Cseh]; believes that education is key to
realising gender equality and
empowerment of women and girls;
therefore calls on the EU to increase its
commitment to promoting gender equality
and combating gender stereotypes in and
through education systems in its
upcoming Gender Action Plan III; [138
Vautmans]; calls on the Commission, the
Council and the EEAS that its
development cooperation policy and
humanitarian aid action supports
women's economic empowerment,
including visibility for women’s
entrepreneurship [135 Cseh] in partner
countries [140 Barley]; recalls that
greater inclusion of women in the labour
market, better support for female
entrepreneurship, safeguarding equal
opportunities and equal pay for men and
women and promoting work-life balance
are key factors for achieving long-term
sustainable and inclusive economic
growth, combating inequalities, and

encouraging women’s financial
independence [40 Guteland];

COMP 20: Political dialogues
Covers AMs 24 (Rangel), 69 (Zovko), 71 (Zovko), 132 (Arena), 136 (Barley)
Draft opinion
Paragraph 9 e (new)

Draft opinion
Amendment
9 e.
Recalls  the  need  to  tackle  gender
equality matters in political dialogues with

partner  countries;  [132  Arena];  stresses
the  importance  of

promoting  gender
equality  within  the  scope  of  the  EU’s
neighbourhood  and  enlargement  policy,
particularly  in  the  context  of  accession
talks;  [24  Rangel]  and  calls  on  the
Commission  and  the  EEAS  to  use  the
accession  negotiations  as  a  leverage  to
foster  gender  equality  in  the  candidate
countries;  [136  Barley];  welcomes  the
different mechanisms to monitor progress
towards  gender  equality,  such  as  the  one
recently  created  by  the  UfM  [69  Zovko]

and the project ‘EIGE’s cooperation with
the EU candidate and potential candidate
countries 2017-2019, improved monitoring

of gender equality progress’; calls on the
EIGE to continue monitoring progress on
gender equality in third countries; [Zovko
71] ;

COMP 21: COVID
Covers AMs 130 (Neumann) and AM 134 (Vautmans)
Draft opinion
Paragraph 9 f (new)

Draft opinion
Amendment
9 f.
Notes that the UN has warned that
the  COVID-19  pandemic  is  exposing  and
exacerbating  all  kinds  of  inequalities,
including 

gender 
inequality
[134
Vautmans]; is deeply  concerned  by the
unequal  partition  of  both  domestic  and
public care work, with women making up
around  70%  of  the  global  health
workforce, the worrisome spike in gender-
based  violence,  partially  due  to  extended
periods of confinement, and a constrained
access to reproductive and maternal health
[130 Neumann]; therefore calls on the EU
to  target  specific  actions  to  address  the
socio-economic  impact  of  COVID-19  in


women and girls [134 Vautmans]; stresses
that  adequate  funding  must  be made

urgently available to ensure that women’s
organisations,  human  rights’  defenders
and 

peacebuilders 
have 
full 
and
unhindered access to quality technology in
order 

to 
enable 
their 
meaningful
participation in decision-making processes
during  the  COVID19 crisis;  emphasises
the  need  for  the  VP/HR  and  the
Commission to acknowledge the necessity
of  human  security,  encompassing  all
aspects  of  the  EU  Strategic  Approach  to
WPS; stresses the need to ensure that the
implementation  of  the  EU's  Global
Response to COVID-19 is not gender blind
and calls for it to address the specific needs
of  women  and  other  marginalized  groups
appropriately  as  well  as  to  ensure  their
involvement  in  the  whole  programming
cycle 
[130 Neumann].
COMP 22: Gender analysis and conflict prevention (recital)
Covers AMs 1 (Stefanuta) and AM 72 (Neumann)
Draft opinion
Recital A a (new)

Draft opinion
Amendment
Aa.
whereas  inclusive  peace  processes
are  more  sustainable  and  offer  more
opportunities to  find  solutions  and  win

better support and women’s involvement in
peace  processes  and  peace  building  must
increase  [1  Stefanuta];  whereas  between
1988 and 2018 women constituted 13% of
negotiators, 3% of mediators and only 4%
of signatories in major peace processes [72
Neumann];