This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Minutes of meeting with TotalEnergies SE'.

Briefing for Olivier Guersent 
Meeting with […] 
TotalEnergies auprès des institutions de l'Union européenne 
8 March 2022 – 10:30 to 11:30 
SUMMARY 
  The meeting is with […] TotalEnergies […]. 
  08 March 2022, 10:30 - 11:30 
  Purpose of the meeting:     
o  Measures in the FR RRF that are relevant to Total 
o  CEEAG 
o  IPCEI hydrogen – timing, progress, application of IPCEI and CEEAG […] 
o  IPCEI batteries – implementation (incl. Total project) 
 
Overview of the Frenh Recovery and Resilience Plan 
Objective of the other side […] 
Objective of the Commission: […] 
 
 
Climate, Energy and Environmental Protection State Aid Guidelines (CEEAG) 
Objective of the other side: ask questions on the main provisions of the newly endorsed CEEAG 
and on its applicability. 
Objective  of  the  Commission:  explain  the  content  of  the  CEEAG  and  provide  feedback  on  the 
questions that might arise. 
 
 
Contents 
Overview of the Frenh Recovery and Resilience Plan .. .. .. . .. .. . .. . .. .. . .. .. . .. .... .. . ..... . .. . .. ..  2 
The CEEAG ... . .. . .. .. . .. .. .... .. .... . .. .. . .. . .. .. . .. .. .... .. . .. .... .. . .. .. . .. .. . .. . ..... . .. .. . .. .. . ..  4 
IPCEI projects on Hydrogen – TotalEnergies ... .. . .. .. . .. .. . .. .. . .. . .. .. . .. .. . .. . ..... . .. .. . .. .. . . 13 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 1 
COMP / 11860 

Briefing for Olivier Guersent 
Meeting with […] 
TotalEnergies auprès des institutions de l'Union européenne 
8 March 2022 – 10:30 to 11:30 
 
Overview of the Frenh Recovery and Resilience Plan 
NECESSARY FACTS AND FIGURES  
  RRF allocation: Overal  EUR 207.8 bil ion, of which EUR 39.4 bil ion grants (1.5% of 2019 GDP) and 
EUR 168.4 bil ion loans (6.8% of 2019 GNI). No loan request. 
  Formal submission: 29 April 2021 
  College meeting for adoption of Council Implementing Decision: 23 June 2021 
  Adoption by the Council: 13 July 2021 
  1st prefinancing paid: 19 August (€ 5.1 bil ion) 
  1st payment request: approved in February 2022 
 
  From policy perspective: 
o  Green/digital  targets  are  met.  France  claimed  that  51%  of  the  Plan  is  devoted  to  the 
climate transition and 25% to the digital transition. The Commission’s estimates showed 
that, applying correctly the Regulation's tagging methodology, the French Plan would stil  
meet the 37% and 20% targets, but not with a large margin for the digital one. 
o  Assessment  of  the  plan:  The  French  plan  addresses  the  human  capital  area  (where  the 
DESI score is the lowest), with measure to improve digital skil s. An investment of EUR 250 
mil ion  is  envisaged  also  to  rise  in  basic  digital  skil s  of  the  population.  The  measure 
envisages three flagship actions: 
  Trained digital mediators, offering digital initiation workshops; 
  Tools  to  enable  caregivers  (social  workers,  local  authorities,  etc.)  to  better 
support French people who cannot do their administrative procedures alone; 
  Places  of  proximity  open  to  al   offering  many  activities  related  to  digital 
technology with trained mediators. 
o  Investments in digital capacities are mentioned in the plan (cloud, AI, data). 
o  Flagship uptake: Al  digital flagships have been take up. 
o  Multi-country projects: 
  IPCEI Hydrogen “Industry” 
  IPCEI Hydrogen “Technology” 
  IPCEI Cloud 
  IPCEI Microelectronics and Connectivity 
o  Extension of  the  Franco-German  cooperation  already  carried  out in  the  field  of  artificial 
intel igence and the development of the battery chain is also under consideration. 
o  Country digital profile: France ranks 15th out of 27 EU Member States (+UK) in the 2020 
edition of the Digital Economy and Society Index (DESI). France performance is below EU 
average in two dimensions: human capital and use of internet services. 
o  Based  on  data  prior  to  the  pandemic  and  compared  to  last  year,  the  country  overal  
scored better but remains far from EU’s top performers. France improved significantly in 
the integration of digital technology dimension, registering good progress in the number 
of companies using social media and big data and sharing information online. France also 
performs well in the Digital public services dimension, gaining one position, thanks to the 
high  number  of  e-government  users  and  showing  progress  in  the  provision  of  digital 
public  services  for  business.  France’s  position  has  worsened  in  the  human  capital 
dimension, mainly to the low share of people with “above basic digital skills” and in the 
connectivity dimension, where despite a good increase in its score, it remained below the 
EU average. 
o  France DESI 2020 performance and evolution over time is il ustrated in the below graphs. 
 
 2 
COMP / 11860 

Briefing for Olivier Guersent 
Meeting with […] 
TotalEnergies auprès des institutions de l'Union européenne 
8 March 2022 – 10:30 to 11:30 
 
  From a State aid perspective 
o  State  aid  and  competition  rules  ful y  apply  to  the  measures  funded  by  the  RRF.  Union 
funds channel ed through the authorities of Member States, like the RRF funds, become 
State resources and can constitute State aid if al  the other criteria of Article 107(1) TFEU 
are met. When this is the case and State aid is present, these measures must be notified 
and approved by the Commission before Member States can grant the aid, unless those 
measures are covered by an existing aid scheme or comply with the applicable conditions 
of a block exemption regulation, in particular the GBER. When State aid is present and it 
requires  notification,  it  is  the  duty  of  the  Member  State  to  notify  State  aid  to  the 
Commission before granting the aid. 
o  It is  important  to  emphasize  that  the State  aid analysis  carried out  by  France in its RRP 
cannot be considered a State aid notification. Also, the approval of the french RRP by the 
Council  does  not  mean  a  State  aid  approval  for  al   measures  included  and  does  not 
override  the  requirement  for  Spain  to  notify  instances  of  potential  State  aid  to  the 
Commission. 
o  DG COMP has reviewed 9 components of reforms and investments of the FR RRP. 
o  For  several  investments  and  reforms,  the  plan  does  not  include  any  State  aid  self-
assessment and the information provided in the plan does not al ow DG COMP to make a 
prima facie assessment as to whether the relevant measure wil  be State aid compliant. In 
this respect, in many cases the questions and comments raised were not addressed by the 
authorities  in  the  final  version  of  the  component,  for  example  as  regards  urban 
densification or greening of ports. 
o  Based on the review of the available information, on a prima facie only basis, […] 
 
 
 
  Overall structure of the plan: 
The draft plan is a subset of the EUR 100 bil ion national recovery plan cal ed ‘France Relance’. It is 
structured around 3 pil ars (green, competitiveness, cohesion) and 9 components.   
Contact: 
[…] 
Updated on: 
02.03.2022 
 
 
 
 3 
COMP / 11860 

Briefing for Olivier Guersent 
Meeting with […] 
TotalEnergies auprès des institutions de l'Union européenne 
8 March 2022 – 10:30 to 11:30 
The CEEAG 
SPEAKING POINTS 
  On 27 January 2022 the Commission adopted the new Guidelines on State aid for climate, 
environmental protection and energy (CEAAG). 
  The new Guidelines create a flexible, fit-for-purpose enabling framework for the Member 
States  to  reach  the  objectives  of  the  European  Green  Deal,  including  the  Fit  for  55 
package. 
  The CEEAG broaden the categories of investments and technologies that Member States 
can support to contribute to the climate targets. Member States wil  be able to support 
any  technology  delivering  carbon  reductions,  also  using  flexible  instruments  like 
‘contracts for difference’. 
  Among  other  technologies,  the  CEEAG  cover  aid  for  hydrogen  generation  under  the 
general decarbonisation section (4.1). However, specific measures to support renewable 
hydrogen are possible to achieve the targets included in the Hydrogen Strategy. 
  The decarbonisation section of the CEEAG also al ows to support hydrogen demand, for 
instance  where  aid  is  necessary  to  incentivise  the  switch  from  a  fossil  fuel-based  to  a 
hydrogen-based  production  processes  which  would  reduce  carbon  emissions  linked  to 
industrial activities. 
  The CEEAG also introduced a dedicated section on State aid for clean mobility projects, 
encompassing aid for the purchase of vehicles and aid for the deployment of recharging 
and  refuel ing  infrastructure.  The  latter  also  covers  support  for  on-site  renewable 
electricity and renewable or low-carbon hydrogen production and storage facilities. 
  State  aid  for  pol ution  reduction,  circular  economy  and  biodiversity,  as  wel   as  energy 
efficiency in buildings wil  also be possible under the CEEAG. 
  The  new  Guidelines  seek  to  empower  citizens  and  smal -medium  enterprises  in  the 
energy transition, by including dedicated provisions for their support. 
  Maximum aid ceilings are eliminated for most categories of measures, so now State aid 
can cover the ful  additional cost of a greener investment over a less green alternative. 
  With  competitive  bidding  as the  default  mechanism  for  awarding  contracts  and  setting 
subsidies, the Guidelines keep competition distortions to a minimum. 
  By  requiring  public  authorities  to  identify  the  relative  costs  of  different  measures  to 
decrease emissions, the Guidelines shine a light on the most cost-effective approach. 
  By requiring public consultations for the largest subsidy schemes, the Guidelines make the 
process more inclusive and more transparent. They give taxpayers and citizens a say on 
the  support  measures  they  are  funding.  To  al ow  Member  States  and  stakeholders  the 
necessary  time  to  adjust  to  these  two  requirements  (i.e.,  quantification  and  public 
consultation), the Commission has postponed their entry into force until 2023. 
 4 
COMP / 11860 

Briefing for Olivier Guersent 
Meeting with […] 
TotalEnergies auprès des institutions de l'Union européenne 
8 March 2022 – 10:30 to 11:30 
  While supporting the green transition, the CEEAG also contribute to phasing out support 
to fossil fuels. 
  In fact, when assessing the balance between the benefits of a supported activity and the 
distortion  State  aid  can  cause,  the  environmental  harm  of  fossil  fuels  is  accounted  for, 
making it unlikely that a positive balance wil  be found for these projects. 
  Natural  gas,  on  the  other  hand,  is  considered  a  transition  fuel  and,  as  such,  can  be 
supported if its compatibility with our 2030 and 2050 climate targets is demonstrated and 
if  there  are  sufficient  safeguards  to  ensure  that  the  aid  does  not  lock  in  natural  gas 
technologies. 
  In  order  to  cater  for  the  enhanced  decarbonisation  efforts  required  to  meet  the  EU 
climate  targets,  the  CEEAG  introduce  changes  to  the  rules  on  reductions  for  energy 
intensive users. 
  Al  levies financing decarbonisation and social policies are eligible for reductions while the 
number of eligible sectors have been streamlined to ensure a level playing field. 
  The rules have also been reviewed to better sustain the progressive decarbonisation of 
these  companies  by,  among  others,  linking  levy  reductions  to  commitments  by  the 
beneficiaries to reduce their carbon footprint. 
  The  provisions  of  the  Guidelines  are  complemented  by  the  General  Block  Exemption 
Regulation  (GBER),  which  lays  down  ex  ante  compatibility  conditions  on  which  basis 
Member  States  can  implement  State  aid  measures  without  prior  notification  to  the 
Commission. 
  The GBER provisions on aid in the field of climate, environmental protection and energy 
are  currently  undergoing  a  targeted  revision  that  wil   al ow  Member  States  to mobilise 
more aid for green projects, without the need for prior approval from the Commission. 
KEY MESSAGES ON MAIN COMMENTS RECEIVED IN THE PUBLIC CONSULTATION 
  Security of supply 
Total  says:  Capacity  mechanisms  are  needed  to  complement  the  increase  in  RES  and 
ensure  security  of  supply  and  thus  SA  rule  should  not  hamper  their  implementation. 
Support for interruptibility and demand response should be possible to ensure flexibility of 
the energy. 
LTT: The CEEAG aims at better aligning security of supply rules with the 2019 Electricity 
Regulation and to explain how the rules apply to variety of different possible measures for 
security of supply, including interruptibility mechanisms. 
The rules further limit the potential for fossil fuels to benefit from support under security 
of  supply  measures,  and  enable  Member  States  general y  to  introduce  environmental 
criteria in their security of supply measures to ensure support is targeted at sustainable 
activities. 
 5 
COMP / 11860 

Briefing for Olivier Guersent 
Meeting with […] 
TotalEnergies auprès des institutions de l'Union européenne 
8 March 2022 – 10:30 to 11:30 
Final y, the rules clarify, fol owing recent jurisprudence, the need for the costs of security 
of supply measures to be borne by the consumers that benefit from the security of supply 
provided. 
  Decarbonisation 
Total  says:  The  new  guidelines  should  al ow  State  aid  to  be  granted  to  al   assets  and 
technologies contributing to carbon neutrality, such as renewable and nuclear low-carbon 
assets, carbon capture and storage, electricity storage, etc. 
LTT: To facilitate to the greatest possible extent the achievement of the Union’s climate 
targets,  the  scope  of  the  proposed  Guidelines  is  extended  to  potential y  cover  al  
technologies that reduce greenhouse gases under a unique decarbonisation section (4.1). 
With  regard  to  nuclear  energy,  the  CEEAG  indeed  do  not  cover  aid  for  supporting 
specifical y new nuclear electricity projects. In this respect the CEEAG fol ow the same line 
as  the  previous  guidelines  (the  2014  EEAG).  This  is because  support  for  nuclear  energy 
general y concerns a limited number of very large projects, is particularly sensitive from a 
security  perspective  and  legal y  needs  to  take  account  particularly  of  the  EURATOM 
Treaty. However, that does not mean that aid for nuclear energy cannot be approved as 
such: it can be notified and approved directly under the Treaty on the Functioning of the 
European Union (TFEU) and the EURATOM Treaty. 
  Hydrogen 
Total says: Aid covering OPEX is necessary to boost the production of renewable and low-
carbon  hydrogen,  since  the  costs  of  producing  hydrogen  by  electrolysis  are  mainly 
correlated  with  the  supply  of  electricity.  It  is  important  that  projects  are  rewarded 
according to their decarbonisation potential with a technology neutrality approach. 
LTT: The approach taken in the CEEAG is derived by existing case practice and is based on 
the  principle  that  investment  aid  is  less  distortive  than  operating  aid.  Nevertheless, 
operating aid can stil  be granted when Member States  justify that this aid is necessary 
and results in even more environmental y friendly operating decisions. 
Total  says:  The  CEEAG  should  make  it  possible  for  the  Commission  to  approve  aid 
supporting  the  demand  of  renewable  and  low-carbon  hydrogen.  Such  aid  should  be 
possible also in the form of tax reductions. 
LTT:  Section  4.1  on  decarbonisation  is  sector  and  technology-neutral.  This  means  that  any 
technology  leading to a reduction in  greenhouse gas emissions would  be eligible. Aid granted  to 
incentivise undertakings to change their production process to a hydrogen-based process would be 
covered  by  the  decarbonisation  section  of  the  CEEAG  if  such  shift  to  hydrogen  determines  a 
reduction  in  emissions.  Aid  can  cover  both  the  extra  investment  and  operating  costs  (e.g.,  the 
additional costs linked to hydrogen consumption).   
  Hydrogen refuel ing infrastructure for clean mobility 
Total says: Aid for the deployment of recharging and refuel ing infrastructure for transport 
should  cover  infrastructure  supplying  both  renewable  and  low-carbon  hydrogen,  in  line 
with the Hydrogen Strategy. 
 6 
COMP / 11860 

Briefing for Olivier Guersent 
Meeting with […] 
TotalEnergies auprès des institutions de l'Union européenne 
8 March 2022 – 10:30 to 11:30 
LTT: Aid can be granted under the CEEAG for the deployment of refuel ing infrastructure 
supplying  renewable  or  low-carbon  hydrogen.  At  the  same  time,  the  Commission 
acknowledges  the  need  to  address  the  ‘chicken  and  egg’  problem  by  ensuring  enough 
incentives  for  rol ing  out  a  Union-wide  network  of  hydrogen  refuel ing  infrastructure  in 
the first place. This is why the Commission indicates in the Guidelines that it wil  assess 
whether the Member State has a credible pathway towards the phasing out of hydrogen 
that is not renewable or low-carbon to supply the refuel ing infrastructure by 2035. 
To facilitate the assessment of composite measures covering on-site hydrogen production 
and the instal ation of refuel ing infrastructure, the clean mobility section of the CEEAG 
also al ows to support the costs of instal ing electrolysers to produce renewable or low-
carbon hydrogen on-site, as wel  as the costs of an on-site hydrogen storage facility.   
  Biomethane and clean mobility 
Total  says:  Biomethane  is  the  only  transport  fuel  that  goes  even  beyond  zero-emission 
mobility.  Therefore,  the  requirement  for  CNG  and  LNG  vehicles  and  refuel ing 
infrastructure to have at least 20% blending with biomethane is welcome. The definition of 
‘zero-emission  mobility’  should  be  based  on  lifecycle  emissions,  in  order  to  achieve  real 
emission savings. 
LTT:  While  the  use  of  biomethane  or  biofuels  to  run  gas  vehicles  clearly  reduces  the 
environmental impact of operating such vehicles, aid supporting the purchase of new gas-
fuel ed  vehicles  may  have  high  negative  effects  as  it  may  lock  in  gas  technologies  and 
thereby hamper the development and market uptake of new solutions with zero tailpipe 
emissions (e.g., hydrogen or electric vehicles). 
That said, the situation is very different among the various transport modes, with aviation 
and maritime transport being very hard to decarbonise. 
-  For  maritime  transport,  zero-emission  sea-going  vessels  are  not  expected  to  be 
available  on  the  market  before  2030,  hence  biofuels  and  biogas  may  indeed 
constitute  a  possible  solution  in  the  short  term.  For  this  reason,  the  CEEAG  al ow 
Member States to support the acquisition of gas-fuel ed vessels and the deployment 
of gas refuel ing infrastructure in ports, provided that they demonstrate that cleaner 
solutions are not available on the market, and that the refuel ing infrastructure would 
trigger the transition towards the use of low-carbon fuels, as part of a clear pathway 
towards decarbonisation. 
-  For  road  transport,  alternative  solutions  to  gas  already  exist  or  are  expected  to 
become  available  in  the  short  term  (e.g.,  electric  and  hydrogen  cars  are  already  a 
reality  and  zero-emission  trucks  are  expected  to  be  available  soon  on  the  market). 
The  Commission  would  therefore  expect  Member  States  to  focus  their  support 
measures  for  the  greening  of  road  transport  on  zero-emission  technologies,  which 
would  entail  lower  risks  of  negative  effects  on  competition  and  deliver  more 
significant environmental protection improvements. This is why aid for investments in 
gas vehicles for road transport is excluded from the scope of the Guidelines and gas 
refuel ing  infrastructure  can  only be  financed  if  it  is to  be used  by  heavy-duty  road 
vehicles. 
 7 
COMP / 11860 

Briefing for Olivier Guersent 
Meeting with […] 
TotalEnergies auprès des institutions de l'Union européenne 
8 March 2022 – 10:30 to 11:30 
CNG  and  LNG  projects  not  covered  by  the  Guidelines  wil   be  subject  to  a  strict 
assessment by the Commission under the Treaty directly. When carrying out such an 
assessment, the Commission wil   careful y check whether, exceptional y, the Member 
State  can  demonstrate    positive  effects  of  such  a  measure  in  terms  of  expected 
environmental benefits which outweigh its negative effect on competition. This is not 
likely  to  be  the  case,  where  the  measure  leads  to    lock-in  effects  or  displaces 
investments into cleaner technologies. 
  Reductions in taxes and parafiscal levies 
Total says: The Commission should continue to al ow aid in the form of reductions in taxes 
reductions or parafiscal levies to the benefit GHP operators for the consumption of natural 
gas  or  biogas,  in  order  to  enable  them  to  produce  electricity  with  significantly less CO2 
emissions  than  a  conventional  thermal  power  plant,  under  competitive  conditions.  It 
should be specified that total tax exemptions for sustainable biofuels and other biomass 
fuels are al owed. 
LTT: We would need more information on the legal basis for granting tax relief to properly 
assess  the  specific  case;  in  general  terms,  reductions  on  taxes  covered  by  the  Energy 
Taxation  Directive  do  not  require  notification  to  the  Commission,  as  they  are  block-
exempted under Article 44 of the GBER. However, these tax reductions need to comply 
with the minimum tax rates set out in Annex I of the ETD. 
Reductions below the minimum rates (such as tax exemptions) are not covered by Article 
44  but  may  be  stil   approved  (and  possibly  block-exempted)  thanks  to  a  different  legal 
basis,  if  the  tax  relief  itself  serves  an  environmental  purpose.  However,  it  is  debatable 
whether this would be the case for taxes on natural gas consumption, while that may be 
easier  in  case  of  biogas  consumption.The  CEEAG  provisions  for  reductions  on 
environmental taxes and levies (Section 4.7.1 CEEAG) largely replicate the rules under the 
previous set of Guidelines (EEAG) on this matter. 
DEFENSIVES 
Q: Do al  requirements in the Guidelines apply as from January 2022? 
A: Not al . Although this is the general rule, for a number of conditions, a phasing-in period wil  
apply  in  order  to  provide  enough  time  for  Member  States  to  adapt  their  processes  and  build 
administrative capacity, when necessary. For example, the requirements to publicly consult and 
to calculate the CO2 abatement cost for new decarbonisation measures wil  apply as from 1 July 
2023. Also, for a transition period lasting until 31 December 2023, stand-alone electricity storage 
projects can stil  be considered as energy infrastructure – and assessed under the relevant rules. 
Final y,  for  energy-intensive  users,  Member  States  can  establish  a  phase-out  plan  for  certain 
current beneficiaries for the period of 2024-2028, in order to avoid disruptive changes in the levy 
burden for individual undertakings that do not meet the new eligibility conditions. 
Q: Why do the CEEAG not define low-carbon hydrogen? 
A: This is a complex issue and work is underway led by DG ENER to develop new definitions in this 
area. We therefore decided that at this stage - to ensure the guidelines remain future proof - it is 
best to avoid a definition of low carbon hydrogen. Support to non-renewable hydrogen projects 
 8 
COMP / 11860 

Briefing for Olivier Guersent 
Meeting with […] 
TotalEnergies auprès des institutions de l'Union européenne 
8 March 2022 – 10:30 to 11:30 
that reduce GHG emissions remains possible but wil  need to be assessed case by case, although 
eventual y a Union definition wil  be available. 
Q: Why are low-carbon hydrogen and renewable hydrogen on the same foot in the CEEAG? 
A: The CEEAG are in line with the Commission’s Hydrogen Strategy in enabling Member States to 
support low-carbon hydrogen for a transitional period, with renewable hydrogen being the long-
term  objective.  This  support  wil   come  with  safeguards  to  ensure  that  projects  do  not  lead  to 
stranded  fossil-fuel  assets,  and  do  not  lead  to  increased  demand  for electricity  generated  from 
fossil fuels. 
Specific  measures  to  support  renewable  hydrogen  are  possible  under  the  CEEAG  in  order  to 
comply with the targets included in the Hydrogen Strategy. 
Q:  What  is  the  treatment  of  blue  hydrogen  (i.e.,  hydrogen  produced  using  natural  gas,  but 
sequestering the process-related CO2)? Is it covered in the Guidelines? 
A: Aid for the generation of so-cal ed ‘blue’ hydrogen may be found compatible with the internal 
market  based  on  section  4.1  of  the  CEEAG  on  decarbonisation.  As  producing  hydrogen  using 
natural gas is normal/conventional practice, aid would only be possible to cover the extra costs of 
the carbon capture and storage equipment, not the basic costs of a steam methane reformer. 
Q: Why do the guidelines require that hydrogen refuel ing infrastructure supply only renewable or 
low-carbon hydrogen by 2035? 
A: While the shift from conventional fuels to hydrogen certainly produces a significant reduction 
in  tailpipe  CO2  emissions,  CO2  emissions  from  the  hydrogen  production  process  cannot  be 
ignored  (lifecycle  approach).  State  aid  under  the  guidelines  should  aim  to  reduce  the 
environmental  footprint  of  a  given  economic  activity,  including  by  reducing  greenhouse  gas 
emissions, and should not just result in shifting emissions from one sector to another. 
Q:  Isn’t  there  a  risk  that  technology  neutral  competitive  bidding  wil   favour  already  established 
technologies against innovative ones? 
A: Competitive bidding procedures have helped to lower the price of renewable energy, favouring 
the development of new technologies like wind and solar energy. Moreover, competitive bidding 
can  reduce  the  risk  of  over-subsidisation  thereby  also  ensuring  the  best  value  for  money  for 
taxpayers.  For  these  reasons,  competitive  bidding  wil   be  the  default  mechanism  under  most 
sections of the CEEAG to award aid. Where possible, open tenders across comparable areas and 
technologies are encouraged. 
There may  however  be  many  different  justifications  for  al owing  technology specific  tenders  as 
already  reflected  in  the  Commission’s  case-practice.  The  CEEAG  are  less  restrictive  than  the 
current EEAG, in particular for renewables, because they al ow separate tenders without further 
justification when costs of technologies are expected to differ by at least 10%. The rules establish 
an  open  list  of  examples  justifying  technology  specific  tenders  such  as  grid  issues,  long  term 
potential,  cost  efficiency  and  other  environmental  objectives.  In  cases,  where  Union  law 
establishes  specific  sectoral  or  technology  based  targets,  e.g.  for  energy  efficiency  under  the 
Energy  Efficiency  Directive  or  renewables  under  the Renewable  Energy  Directive  or where  new 
technologies need to be demonstrated, the CEEAG offer Member States flexibility to design more 
 9 
COMP / 11860 

Briefing for Olivier Guersent 
Meeting with […] 
TotalEnergies auprès des institutions de l'Union européenne 
8 March 2022 – 10:30 to 11:30 
targeted  measures.  This  aims  to  achieve  the  right  balance  between  ensuring  the  cost-
effectiveness  of  public  spending,  and  supporting  the  deployment  of  innovative  technologies 
which may be key to achieve the Green Deal objectives.   
Q:  What  is  the  treatment  of  aid  for  CNG  and  LNG  refuel ing  infrastructure  for  waterborne 
transport? 
A: Action is urgently needed to decarbonise the transport sector. Ideal y, Member States would 
strive to achieve this objective by incentivising an immediate shift to zero-emission mobility, and 
the Commission clearly supports these efforts. 
However, currently, zero-emission solutions are not readily available across al  transport modes. 
For  instance,  in  the area  of  air or certain  segments of the waterborne  transport,  zero-emission 
solutions  do  not  yet  constitute  a  practicable  alternative.  The  new  Guidelines  therefore  provide 
that  Member  States  may  for  example  grant  aid  for  gas-fuel ed  ships  and  gas  refuel ing 
infrastructure,  as  a  transitional  solution  for  shifting  away  from  even  more  pol uting  diesel 
powered ships. Those measures wil  be closely scrutinised by the Commission to ensure that their 
positive effects on the internal market outbalance any negative effects and do not create lock-in 
effects. 
 
Q: What is the link between the CEEAG and Taxonomy? 
A:  The  CEEAG  and  the  EU  Taxonomy  are  both  important  pil ars  of  the  European  Green  Deal, 
fulfil ing different but complementary roles: 
  The  CEEAG  are  the  EU  rulebook  for  public  support  in  the  energy  and  environmental 
sectors,  setting  out  which  projects  can  be  supported  with  public  funds  and  how  this 
support can be provided, while minimising impacts on the market and providing value to 
European citizens. 
  The EU Taxonomy is a tool developed to enable private investors to re-orient investments 
towards more sustainable technologies and businesses. It wil  help make the EU a global 
leader  in  setting  standards  for  sustainable finance.  The  Taxonomy can  be  a  very  useful 
tool  in  the  context  of  EU  State  aid  assessments.  Where  measures  meet  the  taxonomy 
requirements, the State aid assessment can be simplified. In particular, in balancing the 
positive  and negative effects of the aid, the Commission wil  pay particular attention to 
compliance with the ‘do no significant harm' principle. 
However, there are other conditions in competition rules that would stil  need to be applied to 
ensure for example that the aid is necessary and proportionate (by way of example, the taxonomy 
identifies  renewable  energy  as  sustainable,  and  the  competition  rules  then  general y  require 
renewable energy to be supported through competitive bidding processes). Support may in some 
cases also be granted to projects that do not meet the standards laid down in the Taxonomy so 
long as their positive effects are justified and a lock-in of non-sustainable activities is avoided. 
Q: How can the CEEAG contribute to tackling high energy prices? 
 
10 
COMP / 11860 

Briefing for Olivier Guersent 
Meeting with […] 
TotalEnergies auprès des institutions de l'Union européenne 
8 March 2022 – 10:30 to 11:30 
The  current  high  energy  prices  in  Europe  are  mostly  the  result  of  global  supply  and  demand 
patterns in the natural gas market, driven in part by the global economic recovery. 
On 13 October, the Commission adopted a Communication on “tackling rising energy prices while 
delivering  the  green  transition” that  describes  the  main  tools  for  Member  States  to  tackle  this 
chal enge,  and  how  the  Commission  can  support  them  in  this  respect.  Fol owing  up  to  the 
Communication  of  13  October,  and  as  requested  by  Member  States,  in  December  2021,  the 
Commission  proposed  to  improve  the  resilience  of  the  gas  system  and  strengthen  the  existing 
security of supply provisions. 
The  best  way  to  reduce  energy  costs  in  the  medium  and  long  term  is  to  reduce  the  EU's 
dependence on fossil fuel imports, and thus to accelerate the energy transition towards an energy 
efficient  electricity  system,  based  on  renewable  energy.  The  CEEAG  support  this  target.  For 
example,  the  CEEAG  cover  support  measures  to  help  companies  quickly  adapt  and  ful y 
participate  in  the  energy  transition.  This  includes  for  example  support  for  decarbonisation 
measures or increased energy efficiency, reducing the impact of increased electricity or gas prices 
for undertakings. 
Competition  law  al ows  a  range  of  measures  that  Member  States  can  take  without  unduly 
distorting  competition  in  the  market.  These  include  direct  support  measures  to  the  most 
vulnerable and  energy-poor,  such  as  payments or energy  al owances. Moreover, measures of  a 
general  nature,  equal y  helping  al   energy  consumers,  do  not  constitute  State  aid.  Such  non-
selective measures can take the form of general reductions in taxes or levies, a reduced rate to 
the supply of natural gas, electricity or district heating. 
NECESSARY FACTS AND FIGURES 
On  27/01/2022,  the  Col ege  of  Commissioners  adopted  the  new  Guidelines  on  State  aid  for 
climate, environmental protection and energy (CEEAG). 
The  new  rules  create  a  flexible,  fit-for-purpose  enabling  framework  to  help  Member  States 
provide  the  necessary  support  to  reach  the  European  Green  Deal  objectives  in  a  targeted  and 
cost-effective manner. In particular, the CEEAG: 
  Broaden  the  categories  of  investments  and  technologies  that  Member  States  can 
support to cover all technologies that can deliver the European Green Deal. A new single 
section  covers  the  reduction  or  avoidance  of  greenhouse  gas  emissions,  facilitating  the 
assessment  of  measures  supporting  the  decarbonisation  of  different  sectors  of  the 
economy,  including  through  investments  in  renewable  energy,  energy  efficiency  in 
production  processes  and  industrial  decarbonisation,  in  line  with  the  European  Climate 
Law.  The  revised  rules  general y  al ow  for  aid  amounts  up  to  100%  of  the  funding  gap, 
especial y  where  aid  is  granted  fol owing  a  competitive  bidding  process,  and  introduce 
new  aid  instruments,  such  as  Carbon  Contracts  for  Difference  to  help  Member  States 
respond to the greening needs of industry. 
  Cover aid for numerous areas relevant for the Green Deal. This includes new or updated 
sections on aid for the prevention or reduction of pol ution other than due to greenhouse 
gases, including noise pol ution, aid for resource efficiency and circular economy, aid for 
 
11 
COMP / 11860 

Briefing for Olivier Guersent 
Meeting with […] 
TotalEnergies auprès des institutions de l'Union européenne 
8 March 2022 – 10:30 to 11:30 
biodiversity  and  for  the  remediation  of  environmental  damage.  Moreover,  the  CEEAG 
feature  dedicated  sections  for  aid  incentivising  investments  in  flagship  areas  such  as 
energy performance of buildings, and clean mobility, covering al  transport modes. 
  Alignment  of  the  security  of  supply  rules  with  the  2019  Electricity  Regulation.  The 
CEEAG  introduce  a  number  of  clarifications  to  better  align  the  security  of  supply  rules 
with  the  2019  Electricity  Regulation  and  to  explain  how  the  rules  apply  to  variety  of 
different possible measures for security of supply, including measures related to regional 
security of supply problems caused by network insufficiency. The rules also further limit 
the potential for fossil fuels to benefit from support under security of supply measures, 
and enable Member States to introduce environmental criteria in their security of supply 
measures to ensure support is targeted at sustainable activities. 
  Introduce  changes  to  the  current  rules  on  reductions  of  certain  electricity  levies  for 
energy  intensive  users.  The  rules  aim  at  limiting  the  risk  that,  due  to  these  levies, 
activities in certain sectors move to locations where environmental disciplines are absent 
or  less  ambitious  than  in  the  EU.  In  order  to  cater  for  the  enhanced  decarbonisation 
efforts  required  to  meet  the  EU  climate  targets,  the  CEEAG  cover  the  reductions  in  al  
levies  financing  decarbonisation  and  social  policies.  Furthermore, with  a view  to enable 
Member  States  to  maintain  a  level  playing  field,  and  based  on  objective  indicators  at 
sector level, the CEEAG have streamlined the number of eligible sectors. 
  Introduce safeguards to ensure that the aid is effectively directed where it is necessary to 
improve climate and environmental protection, is limited to what is needed and does not 
distort  competition  or  the  integrity  of  the  Single  Market.  the  CEEAG  wil   for  example 
enhance stakeholder participation in the design of large aid measures requiring Member 
States to consult stakeholders on their main features. 
  Ensure coherence with the relevant EU legislation and policies in the environmental and 
energy fields, by, among others,  ending  subsidies for the most  pol uting fossil fuels, for 
which a positive assessment by the Commission under State aid rules is unlikely in light of 
their  important  negative  environmental  effects.  Measures  involving new  investments in 
natural gas are unlikely to be approved unless it is demonstrated that the investments are 
compatible  with  the  Union's  2030  and  2050  climate  targets,  facilitating  the  transition 
from  more  pol uting  fuels  without  locking-in  technologies  that  may  hamper  the  wider 
development of cleaner solutions. The CEEAG also include a new section on aid for the 
closure of coal, peat and oil shale plants to facilitate decarbonisation in the power sector. 
  Increase  flexibility  and  streamline  the  previous  rules,  also  by  eliminating  the 
requirement  for  individual  notifications  of  large  green  projects  within  aid  schemes 
previously approved by the Commission. 
The  new  Guidelines  on  State  aid  for  climate,  environmental  protection  and  energy  fol ow  an 
evaluation  of  the  existing  rules,  the  Energy  and  Environmental  State  aid  guidelines  (EEAG), 
conducted as part of the State aid Fitness Check and a study carried out by external consultants. 
The  Commission  also  carried  out  an  extensive  consultation  of  al   interested  parties  on  the 
proposed  revised  rules  which  yielded  more  than  700  contributions.  The  process  has  involved 
Member States, business associations, interest groups, individual companies, NGOs and citizens. 
 
12 
COMP / 11860 

Briefing for Olivier Guersent 
Meeting with […] 
TotalEnergies auprès des institutions de l'Union européenne 
8 March 2022 – 10:30 to 11:30 
The review also reflects the Commission's experience stemming from its case practice in recent 
years. 
The General Block Exemption Regulation (GBER) is also undergoing a targeted revision with the 
aim to further facilitate green investments by widening its scope to cover aid for investments in 
new technologies, such as hydrogen and carbon capture and storage or usage, and for areas that 
are  key  to  achieve  the  objectives  of  the  Green  Deal,  like  resource  efficiency  and  biodiversity. 
Moreover,  the  GBER  revision  aims  to  further  refining  the  provisions  on  aid  for  investments  in 
flagship  areas  such  as  energy  performance  of  buildings  and  recharging  and  refuel ing 
infrastructure  for  clean  mobility,  which  were  already  introduced  as  part  of  the  targeted  GBER 
revision in July 2021. Final y, the rules wil  be made more flexible with regard to the definition of 
eligible costs and aid intensities. 
A public consultation on the targeted revision of the GBER took place between 06/10/2021 and 
08/12/2021  to  col ect  stakeholders’  input  on  the  proposed  targeted  amendment.  The  replies 
received are currently being analysed. 
 
Contact: 
[…] 
 
 
Updated on: 03/03/2022 
 
IPCEI projects on Hydrogen – TotalEnergies 
KEY MESSAGES 
  The  Commission  ful y  supports  the  initiative  from  the  industry  and  Member  States  in 
order  to  enable  Important  Projects  of  Common  European  Interest  (IPCEI)  in  strategic 
value chains for the EU economy, such hydrogen technologies and systems or low carbon 
emission industry. The Commission services are working ful  speed on the assessment of 
the  individual  projects  submitted  under  both  IPCEIs  on  Hydrogen,  “Technology”  and 
“Industry”.  First  requests  for  information  were  sent  for  al   individual  projects.  We  are 
currently  assessing  the  replies  and  sending  second  requests  for  information,  where 
necessary. 
  Experience with previous IPCEIs shows that the design of an IPCEI and the quality of the 
individual  company  projects  determine  the  speed  of  the  assessment  process.  The 
Member States are driving the design of the IPCEI and notification of individual projects. 
Manageability  is  another  important  factor:  it  is  evident  that  an  IPCEI  comprising  of 
hundreds of large projects wil  take longer to assess. 
  According to the IPCEI Communication, beyond the projects pursuing R&D&I activities or 
First  Industrial  Deployment,  support  for  important  infrastructure  projects  in  strategic 
value chains such as energy, transport, health and digital, are also eligible, insofar as al  
the other criteria are met. 
[…] 
 
 
 
13 
COMP / 11860 

Briefing for Olivier Guersent 
Meeting with […] 
TotalEnergies auprès des institutions de l'Union européenne 
8 March 2022 – 10:30 to 11:30 
NECESSARY FACTS AND FIGURES 
[…] 
 
Contact: 
[…] 
 
 
Updated on: 02/03/2022 
 
14 
COMP / 11860