Ceci est une version HTML d'une pièce jointe de la demande d'accès à l'information 'Commissioners' Expenses 2014 and 2015'.


 
EUROPEAN COMMISSION 
 
 
Brussels, 13.7.2016 
C(2016) 4650 final 
 
 
Helen DARBISHIRE  
Access Info Europe 
Calle Cava de San Miguel 8, 4c 
28005 Madrid 
Spain 
 
Copy by email: 
ask+request-2348-
[adresse e-mail] 

DECISION OF THE SECRETARY GENERAL ON BEHALF OF THE COMMISSION PURSUANT 
TO ARTICLE 4 OF THE IMPLEMENTING RULES TO REGULATION (EC) N° 1049/20011 
Subject: 
Your confirmatory application for access to documents under 
Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001 - GESTDEM 2015/5430 

Dear Ms Darbishire, 
I  refer  to  your  e-mail  of  4  December  2015,  in  which  you  submit  a  confirmatory 
application in accordance with Article 7(2) of Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001 regarding 
public access to European Parliament, Council and Commission documents2 ('Regulation 
1049/2001'). Finalising the reply to your application took more time than expected and I 
would like to apologise for that delay. 
1. 
SCOPE OF YOUR REQUEST 
In your initial application of 19 October 2015, dealt with by the Commission's Office for 
the  Administration  and  Payment  of  Individual  Entitlements  (PMO),  you  requested 
access, under Regulation 1049/2001, to documents which contain information regarding 
[t]he  mission  and  representation  costs  (expenses)  of  the  Commissioners  in  the  current 
(Juncker) Commission from 1 November 2014 to 30 July 2015
. You explained that [you 
are]  interested  in  obtaining  documents  which  will  provide  [you],  inter  alia  and  at  a 
minimum, with a sufficient level of detail to be able to ascertain how much was spent by 
                                                 

Official Journal L 345 of 29.12.2001, p. 94. 
2    Official Journal L 145 of 31.5.2001, p. 43. 
 
Commission européenne, B-1049 Bruxelles / Europese Commissie, B-1049 Brussel - Belgium. Telephone: (32-2) 299 11 11. 
http://ec.europa.eu/dgs/secretariat_general/ 

each  Commissioner  on  each  mission  they  have  undertaken  (with  details  on  travel, 
accommodation, refreshment, etc.) itemised by payment (in other words, the breakdown 
of  the  spending  by  invoice  or  bill)
.  You  also  clarified  that  with  regard  to  the 
representation costs, [you are] interested in knowing for each identified activity or event, 
the details of what was spent and for which items, broken down per invoice or bill paid

2. 
INITIAL REPLY 
Following  an  initial  search  for  the  documents  requested,  it  appeared  that  your  request 
relates to the information stored in the following categories of documents:  
 
(1) 1180 summary fiches relating to Commissioners' missions undertaken during the 
period 1 November 2014 to 30 July 2015, 
  
(2) 540  request  for  reimbursement  of  representation  costs  covering  the  above-
mentioned period.  
 
Through its reply of 13 November 2015, PMO: 
 

provided  two  tables  setting  out,  for  the  period  requested,  (1)  the  mission 
expenses  of  each  Commissioner  and  (2)  the  representation  costs  of  each 
Commissioner3.  
Both  tables  contain  global  figures,  which  encompass  the  travel  costs, 
accommodation  and  daily  subsistence  costs,  not  subdivided,  however,  to 
specify the amount for each specific mission or event;     

explained that in order to provide the information with the requested level of 
detail,  the  Commission  would  have  to  process  manually  all  the  above- 
mentioned  files.  The  reason  provided  was  that  the  databases  storing  the 
above-mentioned  files  do  not  permit  for  extraction  of  the  requested 
information  through  the  automatic  means.  In  consequence,  an  amount  of 
work  necessary  to  satisfy  the  request  would  be  disproportionate  to  the 
interest served by disclosure4; 

refused access to any documents containing more detailed information on the 
basis of the exception of Article 4(1)(b) of Regulation 1049/2001 (protection 
of the privacy and integrity of the individual). 
 
 
                                                 
3   Ares(2015)5058328 
4   Judgment of the  Court of First Instance (First Chamber) of  19 July 1999 in case  T-14/98, Hautala v 
Council, (ECLI:EU:T:1999:157), paragraph 86. 


3. 
CONFIRMATORY APPLICATION AND THE PROPOSAL FOR THE FAIR SOLUTION 
Through your confirmatory application, you request a review of the position of the PMO 
and  underpin  your  request  with  detailed  arguments.  In  particular,  you  question  PMO's 
statement  that,  in  order  to  satisfy  your  request,  it  would  be  necessary  to  individually 
assess all 1180 mission cost and 540 representation cost files.  
 
As  regards  the  mission  costs,  you  argue  that,  given  that  it  was  possible  to  extract  very 
precise totals for the mission expenses, it does appear that this data is indeed held in a 
database
 and there must be a possibility to extract a more detailed cost breakdown than 
that provided to you at the initial stage.  
 
You employ a similar argumentation with regard to  the representation costs. You argue 
that, given that the Commission was able to provide you with information regarding the 
total expenditure for each Commissioner, (…) it does seem rather surprising that there is 
not a digitisation of such information
. In consequence, it should be possible to compile a 
more detailed breakdown of Commissioners' representation costs.  
 
In its fair solution proposal of 18 April 2016, the Secretariat-General explained that it is 
true  that,  the  files  mentioned  in  PMO's  initial  reply  are  digitised  to  a  certain  extent  as 
they  form  part of the respective  IT databases (MIPS  as  concerns missions and  RepCost 
for the representation costs), these databases do not include any search function enabling 
one to extract the requested data through a routine query5.  
 
The  Commission  also  clarified  that,  in  case  of  MIPS,  the  information  requested  (i.e.  the 
reimbursed cost of individual missions, including the corresponding cost components such as 
travel  and  accommodation  costs)  is  reflected  in  the  individual  summary  fiche  for  each 
mission. In case of the representation costs, only the global cost of each representation event 
is introduced into the  RepCost database. The detailed cost components are included only in 
the  underlying  documentation  such  as  bills  and  invoices,  which  are  not  digitised  (i.e.  not 
scanned nor uploaded into the database). 
 
Taking  into  account  the  available  search  facilities,  extraction  of  the  requested  data  range 
would require developing specific scripts for that purpose or carrying out heavy, successive 
manipulations in order to filter out the requested information.  
 
Consequently, in order to satisfy your request, it would be necessary to carry out  a concrete 
and  individual  examination  of  1180  mission  summary  fiches  and  540  requests  for 
reimbursement  of  representation  costs,  so  as  to  assess  the  possibility  of  granting  partial 
access  thereto  by  redacting  both  the  information  that  does  not  fall  under  the  scope  of  your 
request  (but  is  included  in  the  above-mentioned  documents)  and  personal  data  within  the 
meaning  of  Regulation  45/2001.  That  would  constitute  an  administrative  burden 
                                                 
5   Judgment  of  the  General  Court  of  2  July  2015,  in  case  T-214/13,  Typke  v  Commission
(ECLI:EU:T:2015:448), paragraph 56. 


disproportionate  to  the  interest  served  by  the  (partial)  disclosure  of  the  requested 
documents6.  
In  the  light  of  the  above,  and  in  line  with  Article  6(3)  of  Regulation  1049/2001,  the 
Commission  proposed,  in  its  above-mentioned  letter  of  18  April  2016,  to  narrow  down 
the temporal scope of your request (i.e. 9 months, from 1 November 2014 until 30 July 
2015) to a shorter timeframe (two weeks, whether consecutive or not).  It explained that 
such a narrowed-down scope would cover a more manageable number of documents.  
On 13 May 2016, you accepted that proposal, by narrowing down the timeframe of your 
request to the two-week period from 27 April 2015 to Sunday 10 May 2015 inclusive.  
In  the  light  of  the  above,  the  Commission  has  identified  the  following  documents  as 
falling under the scope of your confirmatory application: 
1)  56  summary  fiches  corresponding  to  56  missions  undertaken  by 
Commissioners during the period 27 April 2015 to Sunday 10 May 2015;   
2)  35  reimbursement  requests,  covering  the  representation  costs  incurred  by 
Commissioners during the above-mentioned period.   
4. 
ASSESSMENT AND CONCLUSIONS UNDER REGULATION 1049/2001 
When  assessing  a  confirmatory  application  for  access  to  documents  submitted  pursuant 
to  Regulation  1049/2001,  the  Secretariat-General  conducts  a  fresh  review  of  the  reply 
given by the Directorate-General concerned at the initial stage. 
Following this review,  I am pleased to inform  you that wide partial access is granted to 
all 56 mission summary fiches7 and 35 reimbursement requests for representation costs.  
The undisclosed parts of the documents: 
  are  either  covered  by  the  exception  concerning  protection  of  privacy  and 
integrity of individual, provided for in Article 4(1)(b) of Regulation 1049/2001; 
or 
  contain information falling outside the scope of your request. 
The detailed explanations are provided below.   
4.1.  Protection of the privacy and integrity of the individual  
Article  4(1)(b)  of  Regulation  1049/2001  provides  that  [The  institutions  shall  refuse 
access to a document where disclosure would undermine the protection of (…) privacy 
                                                 
6  
According to the detailed calculation included in the letter of 18 April 2016,  in order to prepare the 
reply to your request, one full-time equivalent (FTE) would have to spend 83 full working days.  
7  
Please  note  that  in  case  of  4  missions  the  corresponding  pdf  files  contain  two  or  more  summary 
fiches. These additional summary fiches relate to the costs in  supporting documents submitted after 
the  settlement  of  the  costs  included  in  the  'main'  summary  fiche"  or  corrections  for  administrative 
errors.  


and  the  integrity  of  the  individual,  in  particular  in  accordance  with  Community 
legislation regarding the protection of personal data
]. 
Personal data of the Commission staff members and third parties  
The  mission  summary  fiches  contain  the  names,  surnames  and  telephone  numbers  of 
Commission staff members. The reimbursement requests for representation costs include 
the names, surnames, office addresses, signatures and telephone numbers of Commission 
staff  members,  as  well  as  the  names  and  surnames  of  third  parties  such  as  persons 
providing services (e.g. external interpreters), or persons met or invited, together with the 
name of the organisation they represented and their position therein.  
These  are  undoubtedly  personal  data  in  the  meaning  of  Article  2(a)  of  Regulation 
45/20018,  which  defines  it  as  any  information  relating  to  an  identified  or  identifiable 
natural  person  (…);  an  identifiable  person  is  one  who  can  be  identified,  directly  or 
indirectly,  in  particular  by  reference  to  an  identification  number  or  to  one  or  more 
factors specific to his or her physical, physiological, mental, economic, cultural or social 
identity
.  
It  follows  that  public  disclosure  of  the  above-mentioned  information  would  constitute 
processing  (transfer)  of  personal  data  within  the  meaning  of  Article  8(b)  of  Regulation 
45/2001.  
In  accordance  with  the  Bavarian  Lager  ruling9,  when  a  request  is  made  for  access  to 
documents  containing  personal  data,  the  Regulation  45/2001  becomes  fully  applicable. 
According  to  Article  8(b)  of  that  Regulation,  personal  data  shall  only  be  transferred  to 
recipients  if  the  recipient  establishes  the  necessity  of  having  the  data  transferred  and  if 
there  is  no  reason  to  assume  that  the  data  subject's  legitimate  interests  might  be 
prejudiced. Those two conditions  are cumulative.10 Only if both  conditions  are  fulfilled 
and  constitutes  lawful  processing  in  accordance  with  the  requirements  of  Article 5  of  
Regulation 45/2001, can the processing (transfer) of personal data occur..  
 
In that context, whoever requests such a transfer must first establish that it is necessary. If 
it  is  demonstrated  to  be  necessary,  it  is  then  for  the  Institution  concerned  to  determine 
that there is no reason to assume that that transfer might prejudice the legitimate interests 
of the data subject.11  
I would also like to bring to  your attention the recent judgment in the ClientEarth case, 
where  the  Court  of  Justice  ruled  that  “whoever  requests  such  a  transfer  must  first 
                                                 
8   Regulation (EC) No 45/2001 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 18 December 2000 on 
the  protection  of  individuals  with  regard  to  the  processing  of  personal  data  by  the  Community 
institutions and bodies and on the free movement of such data. 

Judgment of the Court (Grand Chamber) of 29 June 2010 in case C-28/08 P, European Commission v 
the Bavarian Lager Co. Ltd.
 (ECLI:EU:C:2010:378), paragraph 63. 
10   Judgment of the Court (Grand Chamber) of 29 June 2010 in case C-28/08 P, European Commission v 
the Bavarian Lager Co. Ltd. (ECLI:EU:C:2010:378), paragraphs 77-78. 
11   Judgment  of  the  Court  of  Justice  of  16  July  2015  in  case  C-615/13P,  ClientEarth  v  EFSA, 
(ECLI:EU:C:2015:489), paragraph 47. 


establish  that  it  is  necessary.  If  it  is  demonstrated  to  be  necessary,  it  is  then  for  the 
institution  concerned  to  determine  that  there  is  no  reason  to  assume  that  that  transfer 
might prejudice the legitimate interests of the data subject. If there is no such reason, the 
transfer  requested  must  be  made,  whereas,  if  there  is  such  a  reason,  the  institution 
concerned must weigh the various competing interests in order to decide on the request 
for  access
”12.  I  refer  also  to  the  Strack  case,  where  the  Court  of  Justice  ruled  that  the 
Institution  does  not  have  to  examine  by  itself  the  existence  of  a  need  for  transferring 
personal data13.  
 
Neither  in  your  initial,  nor  in  your  confirmatory  application,  have  you  established  the 
necessity of disclosing any of the above-mentioned personal data.  
 
Therefore, I have to conclude that the transfer of personal data through the disclosure of 
the requested documents cannot be considered as fulfilling the requirement of Regulation 
45/2001 and in consequence, the use of the exception under Article 4(1)(b) of Regulation 
1049/2001 is justified, as there is no need to publicly disclose the personal data included 
therein, and it cannot be assumed that the legitimate rights of the data subjects concerned 
would not be prejudiced by such disclosure.  
 
Personal data of the Members of the College  
Each individual mission summary fiche contains the name, surname, personal id number, 
unique  identifier  of  the  Cabinet,  office  address  and  telephone  number  of  the  relevant 
College  Member.  Every  representation  cost  reimbursement  request  includes  the  name 
and  surname  of  the  relevant  College  Member.  Some  requests  also  include  the 
Commissioner's private bank account number.  
Contrary to what you argue in your letter of 13 May 2016, these are also personal data in 
the  meaning  of  Article  2(a)  of  Regulation  45/2001,  as  defined  above.  Consequently, 
public  disclosure  of  the  above-mentioned  information  would  constitute  processing 
(transfer) of personal data within the meaning of Article 8(b) of Regulation 45/2001.  
As  mentioned  above,  in  accordance  with  the  Bavarian  Lager  ruling,  when  a  request  is 
made  for  access  to  documents  containing  personal  data,  Regulation  45/2001  becomes 
fully applicable. According to Article 8(b) of that Regulation, personal data shall only be 
transferred  to  recipients  if  the  recipient  establishes  the  necessity  of  having  the  data 
transferred and if there is no reason to assume that the data subject's legitimate interests 
might be prejudiced. Those two conditions are cumulative.14 Only if both conditions are 
fulfilled  and  constitutes  lawful  processing  in  accordance  with  the  requirements  of 
Article 5 of Regulation 45/2001, can the processing (transfer) of personal data occur. In 
this context, whoever requests such a transfer must first establish that it is necessary.  
                                                 
12  Judgement  of  the  Court  of  Justice  of  16  July  2015  in  case  C-615/13P,  ClientEarth  v  EFSA, 
(ECLI:EU:C:2015:489), paragraph 47   
13   Judgment  of  the  Court  of  Justice  of  2  October  2014  in  case  C-127/13 P,  Strack  v  Commission
(ECLI:EU:C:2014:2250), paragraph 106. 
14   Judgment of the Court (Grand Chamber) of 29 June 2010 in case C-28/08 P, European Commission v 
the Bavarian Lager Co. Ltd. (ECLI:EU:C:2010:378), paragraphs 77-78. 


 
In  your  confirmatory  application,  you  point  out  that  [a]t  issue  here  is  the  spending  by 
public  officials  of  public  funds  while  on  public  business.  Often  the  activities  of  the 
Commissioners is proactively published 
(…). The only additional information requested 
are the details of how much these activities cost. 
I interpret your explanation to mean that 
the activities in  questions  (missions  and representation) are  financed through the public 
funds, the necessity of the transfer of the above-mentioned personal data is warranted by 
the general principle of transparency, i.e. the right of the general public to know the cost 
of these activates.  
 
However, according to the Dennekamp judgment, if the condition of necessity laid down 
by  Article 8(b)  of  Regulation  No 45/2001,  which  is  to  be  interpreted  strictly,  is  to  be 
fulfilled, it must be established that the transfer of personal data is the most appropriate 
means  for  attaining  the  applicant’s  objective,  and  that  it  is  proportionate  to  that 
objective15.  
I would like to emphasise in this respect that each individual mission summary fiche and 
request  for  the  reimbursement  of  representation  costs  includes  detailed  information 
about,  respectively,  mission  and  representation  costs.  That  information  has  not  been 
redacted  from  the  mission  summary  fiches  and  representation  cost  reimbursement 
requests, to which partial access is granted under this decision.  
That  anonymised  financial  information,  together  with  the  global  figures  released  at  the 
initial  stage  by  PMO,  therefore  provides  you  with  the  appropriate  level  of  detail 
regarding the costs in question in order for you to verify the way public money is spent. 
Therefore,  I  consider  that  the  additional  transfer  of  the  requested  personal  data  (i.e.  the 
name of the Commissioner and other personal data), would go beyond what is necessary 
for  attaining  your  objective,  as  this  goal  can  be  achieved  without  those  data  being 
transferred. 
I conclude that the transfer of personal data in question through the disclosure of the non-
redacted  versions  of  the  requested  documents  cannot  be  considered  as  fulfilling  the 
requirement  of  Regulation  45/2001  and  in  consequence,  the  use  of  the  exception  under 
Article  4(1)(b)  of  Regulation  1049/2001  is  justified,  as  there  is  no  need  to  publicly 
disclose the personal data included therein, and it cannot be assumed that the legitimate 
rights of the data subjects concerned would not be prejudiced by such disclosure.  
 
4.2.  Information falling outside the scope of the request  

The  mission  summary  fiches  to  which  you  request  access  contains  other  information 
regarding a mission such as, for example, details regarding the documentation provided, 
the reimbursement limits applied in particular cases, etc. The reimbursement requests for 
representation  costs  include  information  about  the  date  and  place  where  the  event  or 
                                                 
15   Judgment of the General Court of 15 July 2015 in case T-115/13, Dennekamp v European Parliament
(ECLI:EU:T:2015:497), paragraph 77.   



meeting to  which the representation  cost  is  linked was organised,  the detailed  nature  of 
the event, etc.  
As  you  initially  requested  to  have  access  to  documents  which  would  provide  you 
information to be able to ascertain how much was spent by each Commissioner on each 
mission  
[and  representation  cost]  they  have  undertaken,  I  consider  that  the  above-
mentioned information falls outside the scope of your request.  
5. 
OVERRIDING PUBLIC INTEREST IN DISCLOSURE 
The  exception  laid  down  in  Article  4(1)(b)  of  Regulation  1049/2001  is  absolute 
exception,  i.e.  its  applicability  does  not  need  to  be  balanced  against  overriding  public 
interest in disclosure.   
6. 
MEANS OF REDRESS 
Finally,  I  would  like  to  draw  your  attention  to  the  means  of  redress  that  are  available 
against  this  decision,  that  is,  judicial  proceedings  and  complaints  to  the  Ombudsman 
under the conditions specified respectively in Articles 263 and 228 of the  Treaty on the 
Functioning of the European Union. 
 
Yours sincerely, 
 
 
 
 
For the Commission 
Alexander ITALIANER 
Secretary-General 

 
 
 
 


Document Outline