This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'EU Concept for Military Operations'.


 
EUROPEAN EXTERNAL ACTION SERVICE 
 
EUROPEA UIO 
                       
MILITARY STAFF 
 
 
Brussels, 30 October 2014 
 
 
EEAS 00990/4/14 
REV 4 
 
 
CSDP/PSDC 
 
 
 
OTE 
From:  
European Union Military Staff 
To:  
European Union Military Committee 
No. Prev. doc.:   - 
Subject:  
Draft European Union Concept for EU-led Military Operations and Missions 
 
 
AO: 
LtCol (GS) Thomas SENGESPEICK 
 
Tel: 02 584 5078 
 
 
Delegations will find attached the 4th revised draft European Union Concept for EU-led Military 
Operations and Missions, reflecting the discussion during the EUMCWG on 27 October 2014 on 
the second part of the concept (until paragraph 42). 
As requested by the EUMCWG para 10, 36a and 39b were verified and corrected by the LEGAD. 
 
 
________________________ 
 
 
EEAS 00990/4/14 REV4 
 
TS/is 
1/34 
 
EUMS 
 
E 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
DRAFT  
 
EUROPEA UIO COCEPT FOR 
 
EU-LED MILITARY OPERATIOS and MISSIOS 
 
 
 
 
 
 
EEAS 00990/4/14 REV4 
 
TS/is 
2/34 
 
EUMS 
 
E 

link to page 7 link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 9 link to page 10 link to page 11 link to page 12 link to page 25 link to page 32  
EUROPEA UIO COCEPT FOR 
EU-LED MILITARY OPERATIOS and MISIOS 
 
TABLE OF COTETS 
 
 
A.  INTRODUCTION .......................................................................................................................7 
B.  AIM ..............................................................................................................................................8 
C.  SCOPE .........................................................................................................................................8 
D.  ASSUMPTIONS ..........................................................................................................................9 
E.  STRATEGIC ENVIRONMENT ...............................................................................................10 
F. 
PRINCIPLES .............................................................................................................................11 
G.  CONSIDERATIONS .................................................................................................................12 
H.  CONDUCT ................................................................................................................................25 
I. 
TRANSITION............................................................................................................................32 
 
 
 
EEAS 00990/4/14 REV4 
 
TS/is 
3/34 
 
EUMS 
 
E 

REFERECES 
 
A. 
European Security Strategy (15895/03, dated 8 December 2003). 
B. 
Consolidated  version  of  the  Treaty  on  European  Union  (Official  Journal  of  the  European 
Union, dated 9 May 2008). 
C. 
The Requirements Catalogue 2005 (13732/05 dated 7 November 2005). 
D. 
Report  on  the  Implementation  of  the  European  Security  Strategy  -  Providing  Security  in  a 
Changing World- (17104/08, dated 10 December 2008). 
E. 
Host Nation Support Concept for EU-led military operations (7374/12, 6 March 2012). 
F. 
EU  Concept  for  Air  Operations  in  support  of  the  Common  Security  and  Defence  Policy 
(8569/11, dated 5 April 2011). 
G. 
EU Maritime Security Operations (MSO) Concept (8592/12, dated 10 April 2012). 
H. 
EU Concept for Contractor Support to EU-led Military Operations (00754/14, dated 4 April 
2014) 
I. 
EU Concept for CBRN EOD in EU-led Military Operations (8948/08, dated 29 April 2008). 
J. 
EU  Concept  for  Personnel  Recovery  in  Support  of  the  CSDP  (15408/11,  dated  13  October 
2011). 
K. 
Concept  for  Countering  Improvised  Explosive  Devices  (C-IED)  in  EU-led  Military 
Operations (13839/1/12, dated 18 October 2012). 
L. 
EU Military Concept on environmental protection and energy efficiency for EU-led military 
operations (13758/12, dated 14 September 2012).  
M. 
Revised  Guidelines  on  the  Protection  of  Civilians  in  CSDP  Missions  and  Operations 
(14940/10, dated 18 October 2010 
N. 
EU  Concept  for  the  Use  of  Force  in  EU-led  Military  Operations  (17168/2/09,  dated 
2 May 2011). 
O. 
"Promoting  Synergies  between  the  EU  Civil  and  Military  Capability  Development" 
(15475/09 dated 9 November 2009). 
P. 
Suggestions  for  crisis  management  procedures  for  CSDP  crisis  management  operations 
(7660/2/13, 18 June 2013)  
Q. 
EU  Concept  for  Military  Planning  at  the  Political  and  Strategic  level  (10687/08,  dated 
16 June 2008). 
R. 
Interim EU Military Rapid Response Concept - main body and Annex A (00601/3/14, dated 
27 June 2014). 
S. 
EU Battlegroup Concept (13618/1/06, dated 11 December 2012). 
 
EEAS 00990/4/14 REV4 
 
TS/is 
4/34 
 
EUMS 
 
E 

T. 
EU Maritime Rapid Response Concept (15294/07, dated 15 November 2007). 
U. 
EU Air Rapid Response Concept (16838/07, dated 21 December 2007). 
V. 
EU Concept for Force Generation (10690/08, dated 16 June 2008). 
W. 
Council  Decision  setting  up  the  Political  and  Security  Committee  (2001/78/CFSP,  dated 
22 January 2001). 
X. 
EU Framework Nation Concept (16276/10, dated 22 November 2010). 
Y. 
EU Concept for Military Command and Control (10688/5/08, dated 24 September 2012). 
Z. 
EU Concept for CIS for EU-led Military Operations (9971/12, dated 15 May 2012). 
AA.  Military  Information Security Concept for EU-led Crisis Management  Operations (6630/05, 
dated 21 February 2005). 
BB.  Council Decision 2013/488/EU of 23 September 2013 on the security rules for protecting EU 
Classified information (OJ L 274, M15.10.2013, p. 1), as amended. 
CC.  EU  Concept  for  Cyber  Defence  for  EU-led  military  operations  (18060/12,  dated 
20 December 2012). 
DD.  ISTAR  Concept  for  EU  Crisis  Management  and  EU-led  Crisis  Management  Operations, 
(7759/07, 23 March 2007).  
EE.  EU  Concept  for  Military  Intelligence  Structures  in  EU  Crisis  Management  and  EU-led 
Military Operation/Missions (Revision 2, 16361/13, dated 18 November 2013). 
FF.  EU  Concept  for  Strategic  Movement  and  Transportation  for  EU-led  Military  Operations 
(9798/12, dated 11 May 2012). 
GG.  EU  Concept  for  Reception,  Staging,  Onward  Movement  and  Integration  (RSOI)  for  EU-led 
Military Operations (9844/12, dated 11 May 2012). 
HH.  EU Concept for the Implementation of a European Union Air Deployable Operating Air Base 
(6908/1/10, dated 19 March 2010). 
II. 
European Union Concept for Special Operations (00962/3/14 REV3, dated 28 July 2014). 
JJ. 
EU Concept for Military Information Operations (6917/08, EXT 1 dated 2 February 2011). 
KK.  EU Concept for Psychological Operations (7314/08, dated 5 March 2008). 
LL.  EU  Concept  for  Civil-Military  Cooperation  (CIMIC)  for  EU-led  Military  Operations 
(11716/1/08, dated 3 February 2009). 
MM.  EU  Concept  for  Logistic  Support  for  EU-led  Military  Operations  (3853/11,  dated 
4 April 2011). 
NN.  Military Engineering Concept for EU-led Military Operations (11242/12, dated 12 June 2012) 
OO.  Comprehensive  Health  and  Medical  Concept  for  EU-led  Crisis  Management  Missions  and 
Operations (00559/6/14, dated 30 April 2014). 
 
EEAS 00990/4/14 REV4 
 
TS/is 
5/34 
 
EUMS 
 
E 

PP.  EU Military Lessons Learned (LL) Concept (12322/1/11, dated 30 Mar 2012). 
QQ.   European Union Maritime Security Strategy (MSS) (11205/14, dated 24 June 2014) 
RR.  Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear (CBRN) Countermeasures Concept for EU-
Led Military Operations (11845/14, dated 11 July 2014) 
 
 
EEAS 00990/4/14 REV4 
 
TS/is 
6/34 
 
EUMS 
 
E 

 
A. 
ITRODUCTIO 
 
1. 
Maintaining  freedom,  security  and  prosperity  in  Europe  requires  that  Europe  fulfils  its 
potential  as  a  global  actor  and  security  provider.  In  today's  world,  single  states  find  great 
difficulty  in  dealing  alone  with  the  new  emerging  security  challenges,  ranging  from  energy 
security  to  climate  change  to  economic  competiveness  to  international  terrorism,  but  the 
European  Union (EU) as a whole  and by offering  a frame for MS participation can address 
these  risks  in  a  comprehensive  manner.  By  connecting  the  different  strands  of  EU  external 
policy, such as diplomacy, security, trade, development, humanitarian aid, the EU can tackle 
global security challenges, relating to its responsibility, goals and interests, in a joined up way 
using  its  Comprehensive  Approach  to  crisis  management.  The  Common  Security  and 
Defence  Policy  (CSDP)  supports  the  EU  Common  Foreign  and  Security  Policy  (CFSP)  in 
order  to  strengthen  the  EU's  contribution  to  international  peace  and  security  and  upholding 
and developing international law. Furthermore, the European Security Strategy (ESS) (Ref A) 
highlights  the  requirement  for  the  EU  to  share  in  the  responsibility  for  global  security  with 
partners  such  as  UN,  NATO  and  AU  and  to  be  able  to  sustain  several  operations 
simultaneously. 
 
2. 
Under the authority of the High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security 
Policy  (HR),  current  EU  crisis  management  organisations  such  as  the  European  Union 
Military Staff (EUMS), the Civilian Planning and Conduct Capability (CPCC) and the Crisis 
Management and Planning Directorate (CMPD) work within the structure of the post Lisbon 
European External Action Service (EEAS) in order to plan and conduct CSDP operations and 
missions. 
 
3. 
The Treaty on European Union (Ref B)1 and the ESS contain the range of tasks for potential 
CSDP operations and missions. The range and scope of these tasks are further developed in 
the  Illustrative  Scenarios,  (Ref  C)  (Assistance  to  Humanitarian  Operations,    Separation  of 
Parties by Force, Stabilisation, Reconstruction and Military advice to third countries, Conflict 
Prevention and Evacuation Operations (non-permissive/segregated environment). 
 
                                                 
1 Treaty on European Union, Article 42 & 43 
 
EEAS 00990/4/14 REV4 
 
TS/is 
7/34 
 
EUMS 
 
E 

4. 
The EU is a global actor, ready to share the responsibility for global security. To make these 
ambitions  credible,  deployments  must  be  able  to  support  diplomacy  and  other  means  for 
conflict  resolution  anywhere  in  the  world.  Hence,  it  is  envisaged  that  military  power 
combined  with  civilian  instruments,  in  symmetric  and  asymmetric  scenarios,  needs  the 
capability to project mission tailored forces  and  expertise, with short preparation time, over 
strategic distances into remote regions, including austere areas of operation. 
 
5. 
CSDP  operations  are,  by  nature,  conducted  outside  the  EU  in  distant  theatres,  which  may 
offer  little  or  no  Host  Nation  Support  (HNS).  Such  operations  could  be  described  as 
expeditionary  in  that  they  involve  the  projection  over  extended  lines  of  communications  of 
independent,  specially  designed  and  prepared,  sustainable  EU  military  and  /or  civilian 
instruments with the ability to work  autonomously.  Examples include EUFOR Tchad/RCA, 
EUCAP NESTOR and EU NAVFOR Op ATALANTA. 
 
 
B. 
AIM 
 
6. 
The purpose of this document is to provide to inter alia military commanders, military staffs, 
EU  civilian  staffs,  external  actors  etc.,  an  overarching  conceptual  framework  for  EU-led 
Military Operations and Missions. 
 
 
C. 
SCOPE 
 
7. 
An EU-led military operation or mission will involve a number of phases which could include 
planning,  pre-deployment,  deployment,  initial  entry,  implementation,  transition  and  re-
deployment.  An  analysis  of  the  phases  for  EU-led  military  operations  and  missions  is 
included in this work. 
 
8. 
Due to its overarching nature, this framework concept draws on and provides coherence for 
the existing family of EU military concepts.  
 
 
EEAS 00990/4/14 REV4 
 
TS/is 
8/34 
 
EUMS 
 
E 

9. 
Dependent on scales, EU military components and HQs may be required. These may include 
Land,  Air,  Maritime  and  Special  Operations  components  to  create  a  Joint  and  Combined 
effect and are considered within the scope of this document. The nature of a crisis requiring 
an  EU-led  military  operation  or  mission  will  determine  the  necessary  combination  of 
components.  
 
D. 
ASSUMPTIOS 
 
10. 
[In  accordance  with  the  Treaty  on  European  Union  and  its  article  42.  1,  EU-led  military 
operations  and  missions  may  be  conducted  outside  the  Union  for  peace  keeping,  conflict 
prevention  and  strengthening  international  security  in  accordance  with  the  principles  of  the 
United Nations Charta.(CY proposal)] or [In accordance with the EU Treaty and recent EU 
military operations and missions, EU-led military operations and missions will be conducted 
outside EU territory]. To be decided by EUMCWG during the next discussion. 
 
11. 
It must be assumed that EU-led military operations and missions will be conducted in austere 
conditions.  In this context the term "austere" implies one or a combination of the following 
in-theatre  conditions;  an  unstable  security  situation,  extended  lines  of  communication,  a 
scarcity  of  basic  infrastructure,  limited  Host  Nation  Support  (HNS)  and  health  hazards 
emanating from natural or man-made sources. 
 
12. 
Any  Crisis  Response  intervention  is  likely  to  be  part  of  a  wider  and  continuous  EU 
engagement (Comprehensive Approach) in that State or Region and coordinated through the 
EEAS. The local impact on the area of engagement goes beyond the immediate effects of the 
CSDP  operation  or  mission.  The  impact  on  the  political,  economic,  cultural  and  social 
dimensions should be considered in planning and conduct. 
 
13. 
Depending  on  the  nature  of  the  crisis,  EU-led  military  intervention  could  be  executive2 
(military operation) or non-executive (military mission). A military operation may involve a 
Standard  Military  Response,  a  Generic  Military  Rapid  Response  or  an  Express  Response 
(Ref R). 
 
                                                 
2 Executive: the operations mandated to conduct actions in replacement of the host nation; non-executive: the operation is supporting 
the host nation with an advisory role only. 
 
EEAS 00990/4/14 REV4 
 
TS/is 
9/34 
 
EUMS 
 
E 

E. 
STRATEGIC EVIROMET 
 
14. 
Despite its success in CSDP operations, the EU today faces increasingly complex threats and 
challenges  (Ref  D)  such  as  but  not  limited  to,  the  proliferation  of  weapons  of  mass 
destruction,  transnational  terrorism  and  organised  crime,  cyber  security,  illegal  migration, 
border  management,  food  and  water  insecurity,  energy  security,  climate  change  and 
instability  due  to  fragile  states.  Hybrid  Threats  in  which  adversaries  employ  an 
interconnected,  unpredictable  mix  of  traditional  warfare,  irregular  warfare,  terrorism  and 
organised crime for political, military or other purposes must also be considered. Therefore, 
the EU, employing, where necessary, a selection or all of the instruments at its disposal in a 
comprehensive manner, must be able to act as early as possible and if practicable before the 
onset of a crisis. 
 
15. 
Increased complexity in the global security environment requires that, for CSDP operations, 
EU-led military forces, whether acting alone or as part of a wider palette of EU instruments, 
must  be  mission  tailored  and  capable  of  operating  in  a  non-linear  and  multidimensional 
engagement  space.  EU-led  military  forces  must  therefore  be  able  to  coordinate  and  employ 
lethal and non-lethal actions, as part of the EU's comprehensive approach.  
 
16. 
The increasing tendency by adversaries to take full advantage of the widespread availability 
of  advanced  technology  and  to  employ  asymmetric  means  (e.g.  Improvised  Explosive 
Devices)  has  serious  implications  for  the  conduct  and  tempo  of  EU-led  military  operations 
and missions.  
 
17. 
The  design  and  implementation  of  clear,  coordinated  strategic  communication,  including  a 
clear  indication  of  the  desired  end  state,  is  critical  to  establish  and  sustain  support  for  the 
entire duration of EU-led military operations and missions within the populations of the Host 
Nation  and  the  Member  States  (MS)  and  across  the  wider  global  audience.  The  strategic 
communication must match with the overall InfoOp campaign within theatre.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
EEAS 00990/4/14 REV4 
 
TS/is 
10/34 
 
EUMS 
 
E 

F. 
PRICIPLES 
 
18. 
Unity  of  Political  Direction  and  Guidance.  EU  complex  engagements  will  require  the 
coordinated  leadership  of  EU  instruments  in  the  framework  of  the  EU  comprehensive 
approach. During the planning phase and duration of a mission in order to ensure alignment, 
complementarity and sequencing of all the required instruments it is vital that all instruments 
have a shared understanding of the mission and a common purpose throughout all levels and 
phases of the engagement. The Political Framework for Crisis Approach (PFCA) should set 
the  political  context,  clearly  articulating  what  the  crisis  is  why  the  EU  should  act  and  what 
instruments  could  be  available.  This  PFCA  is  essential  to  give  CSDP  and  other  actors  the 
ability to  "hook-in" to commonly agreed overall strategy and objectives.  It must be ensured 
that a clearly defined end state is given. 
 
19. 
Complementary Effects in the Theatre. EU actors must ensure that the effects they create in 
the theatre are not fragmented or competing but complementary. This requires collaboration 
and coordination between all EU in-theatre instruments, alongside bilateral MS assistance – 
"the whole is greater than the sum of its parts."  
 
20. 
Integrated and continuous planning at strategic level.  Increased competence of the EU at the 
strategic  level  to  plan  and  conduct  military  operations  without  lags  or  gaps  affects  EU's 
effectiveness and credibility. The capability for the upper military layer to assess and control 
at any time the subordinate layers in close interaction with non-military EU actors and with 
due respect to the distinctive responsibilities of the tactical/operational levels of command is 
a factor in success and efficiency in using all available EU means and instruments.  
 
21. 
Unity of Effort in Theatre. To achieve complementary effects in theatre, unity of effort and 
maximum cooperation between EU military and civilian actors should be ensured, through an 
EU comprehensive approach. This will firstly require shared awareness doctrine, procedures 
and  training,  including  multi-layer  exercises  to  ensure  the  principle  is  understood  and 
secondly requires leadership and coordination to ensure its application.  
 
22. 
Cooperation and Coordination. Cooperation and coordination between all relevant EU actors, 
MS, non-EU TCNs, relevant international organisations and Third States is a prerequisite for 
the efficient and effective conduct of EU-led operations. 
 
EEAS 00990/4/14 REV4 
 
TS/is 
11/34 
 
EUMS 
 
E 

 
23. 
Multi-nationality.  The  provision  of  troops  and  resources  for  EU-led  military  operations 
should  be  based  on  the  principle  of  multi-nationality.  Actors  for  such  operations  could 
include a combination of personnel from MS, non-EU European NATO countries and other 
countries which are candidates for accession to the EU or other Third-States as decided by the 
Council or the PSC. However, the key criteria for such operations remain interoperability and 
operational effectiveness. 
 
24. 
Interoperability.  Interoperability  aims  at  providing  compatibility  between  EU  Military  and 
Civilian  instruments  with  a  view  to  improved  operational  effectiveness.  A  solid  culture  of 
confidence,  connectivity  and  cooperation  between  EU  military  and  non-military  at  the 
strategic  level  can  be  developed  through  a  more  structured  interaction.  The  December 
European  Council  discussion  on  defence  highlighted  the  importance  of  the  EU  working 
closely  together  with  key  partners  such  as  NATO,  UN  and  AU.  This  means  working  in 
concert  to  tackle  global  security  challenges  both  at  the  strategic  level  and  on  the  ground. 
Interoperability  between  civilian  and  military  instruments  from  the  EU  and  other  key 
organisations is important.  
 
25. 
Legal  Requirements.  EU-led  military  operations  and  missions  will  be  conducted  in 
accordance  with  the  basic  legal  framework  as  laid  down  in  the  Council  Decision,  relevant 
International Law (in particular International Humanitarian Law (IHL), International Human 
Rights  Law  (IHRL),  International  Refugee  Law  (IRL),  mission-related  international 
agreements3  and  arrangements,  relevant  EU  Member  States'  Domestic  Legislation)  and  in 
addition consideration of Host Nation Law. 
 
 
G. 
COSIDERATIOS 
 
26. 
Characteristics. Because EU-led military operations and missions may involve the projection 
of forces, with their requisite support, over extended lines of communication into distant and 
austere  theatres  of  operation,  it  follows  that  such  forces  must  be  agile,  versatile,  flexible, 
highly  trained,  self-sufficient  and  interoperable.  Troop  Contributing  Nations  (TCNs)  are 
                                                 
3 In particular status of forces agreements (SOFA) and/or status of mission agreements (SOMA). 
 
EEAS 00990/4/14 REV4 
 
TS/is 
12/34 
 
EUMS 
 
E 

responsible  for  the  training  of  military  forces  for  EU-led  military  operations  and  missions. 
Experience  has  indicated  an  increased  likelihood  that  future  EU-led  military  operations  and 
missions  will  be  centred  in  urban  areas  -  operating  in  urban  areas  has  its  own  unique 
characteristics with respect to intelligence collection, force protection and force organisation 
(recent examples are Bangui and Mogadishu).  
 
27. 
Scale.  The  forces  for  EU-led  military  operations  and  missions  must  be  mission-tailored  for 
each  specific  operation  in  order  to  accomplish  the  mission.  Supplies,  equipment  and 
infrastructure must be limited and designed to operational necessity. 
 
28. 
Host  Nation  Support  (Ref  E).  The  success  of  CSDP  operations  is  highly  dependent  on  the 
capacity  to  generate,  deploy,  sustain  and  redeploy  EU-led  Forces.  Contractor  Support  to 
Operations  (CSO)/Host  Nation  Support  (HNS)  -  Adequate  military  logistics  complemented 
and  reinforced  with  civilian  capabilities  and  resources  are  necessary  to  flexibly  meet  the 
broad  range  of  operational  requirements  that  CSDP  operations  may  involve.  These 
requirements  are  especially  demanding  during  the  phases  of  deployment/redeployment  and 
also for the sustainment  of the  Force during operations. External support, if available,  from 
the State(s) hosting all or part of the EU-led  Force or via Contractor Support to Operations 
(CSO) might facilitate the completion of the logistic functions. The main difference between 
the concepts of HNS and CSO is the commercial nature under a civil contract on which the 
latter  is  based,  while  the  former  is  the  outcome  of  a  formal  agreement/arrangement 
established among the Nations or between the EU and the HN. CSO has become vital for all 
kinds  of  military  and  civilian  CSDP  engagements.  Cost  effectiveness  leads  to  an  increased 
need  for  CSO.  Communication  between  all  interested  parties,  in  particular  with  IOs  and 
NGOs,  is  a  prerequisite  in  order  to  achieve  coherent  planning;  this  communication  is 
coordinated by the relevant HQ.  
 
29. 
Air domain. Within the framework of the EU, Air Power is defined as the capacity to project 
power in the air to shape and influence the course of CMO (Ref F). In the context of EU-led 
operations  it  may  be  employed  as  a  stand-alone  military  operation  or  as  part  of  a  complex 
engagement and could form part of a Standard Military Response and / or a Military Rapid 
Response.  Air  capabilities  are  versatile  and  can  be  used  from  the  outset  of  a  Crisis 
Management Operation (CMO) to pursue tactical, operational or strategic objectives, in any 
 
EEAS 00990/4/14 REV4 
 
TS/is 
13/34 
 
EUMS 
 
E 

combination  or  all  three  simultaneously.  Air  Power  offers  unique  capabilities  that  must  be 
fully considered and integrated into all military planning. 
 
30. 
Land  domain.  Land  Power  is  the  capacity  to  project  power  on  the  ground  to  shape  and 
influence the course of CMO. Land forces will always operate in a complex and demanding 
environment  due  to  many  factors  (e.g.  terrain,  threats,  hazards,  population,  involvement  of 
national and internal organizations, governmental and non-governmental structures and other 
actors  in  the  region).  The  understanding  of  this  environment  is  essential  to  overcome  its 
complexity, particularly in the land domain, as part of the EU multidimensional response. In 
land operations and missions a special emphasis must be placed on the human dimension of 
the response in order to be credible, well-accepted and effective. In an EU military operation 
the  land  forces  can  be  taken  as  a  symbol  of  EU's  commitment  in  the  region.  It  can  also 
facilitate other EU or multinational actions in the area, secure or seize areas of responsibility 
and build third state capabilities by mentoring, advisory and training assessment. 
 
31. 
Maritime  domain.  The  EU's  prosperity,  its  development  and  well-being  are  critically 
dependant on international trade and other multiple activities performed at sea (e.g. fisheries, 
energy  resources  exploitation).  However,  these  maritime  activities  are  highly  vulnerable  to 
threats  and  challenges  to  the  security  of  the  maritime  environment  (Ref  G).  Within  the 
framework  of  EU,  maritime  forces  can  be  used  to  project  power  at  sea  and  from  the  sea  in 
accordance  with  the  EU  Maritime  Security  Strategy  (Ref  QQ)  and  its  Action  Plan  and  in 
accordance  with  all  relevant  EU  concepts.  In  this  regard  maritime  capabilities  under  the 
auspices of CSDP could be called upon to perform a variety of tasks ranging from traditional 
war fighting operations to specific tasks in support of the Member States maritime security. 
Sea power has the ability to concentrate forces for a longer period f time in areas far from the 
home  base  with  a  relative  self-sustained  logistic  capacity,  high  flexibility  and  without 
involvement of third countries.  The MS maritime forces can contribute to the EU response 
providing inter alia Naval Diplomacy, Crisis Response along with Maritime Deterrence and 
Defence. The use of maritime capabilities for EU-led military operations and missions should 
be considered during the planning phase (Ref G).  
 
32. 
Force Protection (FP). FP involves all measures and means to minimise the vulnerability of 
all  in-theatre  EU  personnel  and  EU  instruments,  facilities,  equipment,  operations  and 
activities  to  any  threat  and,  in  all  situations,  to  preserve  freedom  of  action  and  operational 
 
EEAS 00990/4/14 REV4 
 
TS/is 
14/34 
 
EUMS 
 
E 

effectiveness.  EU  in-theatre  actors  could  be  exposed  to  a  number  of  threats  and  dangers 
which could include, but are not limited to, missile attack, small arms fire, mines, Improvised 
Explosive  Devices  (IEDs),  technological  risks  and  Chemical,  Biological,  Radiological  and 
Nuclear  (CBRN)  attack.  Due  to  their  nature,  EU-led  operations  and  missions  will  require  a 
dynamic  FP policy  consisting of active, passive  and recuperation measures and means. One 
of the challenges for such operations is to achieve the highest degree of force protection while 
maintaining  a  light  and  agile  footprint.  In  a  complex  engagement,  involving  armed  EU 
military instruments, the military will normally have a primary role in the provision of FP. In 
specific circumstances, this role could be filled by appropriate EU civilian actors such as the 
Police or Gendarmerie or even Private Security Companies (Ref H)4, with utmost caution to 
the effects on the HN, both intended and unintended, when choosing such services. However, 
all in-theatre EU actors must be aware of and contribute to the FP policy,  which may involve 
addressing the following areas: 
a. 
Security.  In-theatre  security  encompasses  a  wide  range  of  activities  and  procedures 
which address the security of Personnel, Installations, Information, Equipment and Lines 
of Communication.  
b. 
Mine Awareness and Countering Improvised Explosive Devices (C-IED). The increased 
use  of  Improvised  Explosive  Devices  (IEDs)  in  conflicts  worldwide  is  significantly 
impacting  on  the  number  of  casualties  of  civilian  and  military  actors  as  well  as 
indigenous populations. Therefore, there is a distinct possibility that IEDs will present a 
considerable  threat  to  EU-led  military  operations  and  missions.  C-IED  involves  three 
lines  of  operation  namely  attacking  the  Networks,  Defeating  the  Device  and  Preparing 
the EU in-theatre actors (Ref K).   
c. 
Chemical,  Biological,  Radiological  and  Nuclear  (CBRN)  Defence.  CBRN  devices, 
whether manufactured or improvised, with or without explosive components, industrial 
and  technologic  risks  constitute  a  real  and  permanent  threat  to  EU-led  operations,  the 
indigenous population and the operational environment (Ref I). 
d. 
Air and Missile Defence. The air and / or missile threat exists through all phases of an 
EU-led  military  operation  from  deployment  through  Reception,  Staging,  Onward 
Movement and Integration (RSOI) to re-deployment. 
e. 
Personnel Recovery. The isolation, capture and /or exploitation of personnel during EU-
led operations could have a significant negative impact on operations security, morale of 
                                                 
4   For limitations see EU Concept for Contractor Support to EU-led military operations (00754/14, dated 4 April 2014). 
 
EEAS 00990/4/14 REV4 
 
TS/is 
15/34 
 
EUMS 
 
E 

in-theatre  EU  personnel  and  public  support.  In  order  to  mitigate  the  risks,  the  EU 
therefore requires a system to recover military and civilian personnel. (Ref J).   
f. 
Environmental  Awareness.  Environmental  Awareness  is  an  important  factor  in 
maintaining  the  health  and  well-being  of  all  EU  in-theatre  actors  and  the  local 
population  by  preventing  inadvertent  damage  to  the  natural  environment  and/or  to 
significant cultural or historic resources. Environmental Awareness should be considered 
in all phases of EU-led military operations and missions and in pre-deployment training 
(Ref L). 
 
33. 
Use of Force. 
a. 
The authorisation of, and control on, the use of force for EU-led military operations and 
missions  is  an  essential  part  of  the  political  guidance  and  strategic  direction  for  such 
operations, which is exercised by the Political and Security Committee (PSC) under the 
authority of the Council and the High Representative (HR). 
b. 
EU-led  military  operations  and  missions  must  be  consistent  with  the  provisions  of 
international,  EU  and  national  law  applicable  in  the  situation  in  which  EU  forces  are 
called upon to operate. Guidance on the use of force for each EU-led military operation/ 
mission  is  included  in  the  Crisis  Management  Concept  (CMC),  the  Military  Strategic 
Options  (MSOs),  the  Initiating  Military  Directive  (IMD),  the  Concept  of  Operations 
(CONOPS) and the Operation Plan (OPLAN) pertaining to that operation.  
c. 
Authorised  use  of  force  for  mission  accomplishment  will  be  laid  down  in  Rules  of 
Engagement (ROE), which are directives to military commanders and forces (including 
individuals)  that  define  the  circumstances,  conditions,  degree,  and  manner  in  which 
force,  or  other  actions,  which  might  be  construed  as  provocative,  may,  or  may  not,  be 
applied. Depending on the ROE /legal framework, the OpCdr will select different COAs. 
This highlights the need for a LEGAD advisory team to be associated with the planning 
from the outset. The framework and principles governing the use of force by units and 
individuals  of  EU-led  military  operations/  missions  are  defined  in  the  EU  Concept  for 
the  Use  of  Force  in  EU-led  Military  Operations  and  in  the  EU  Concept  for  Contractor 
Support  to  Operations  (in  cases  where  the  use  of  force  applies  also  to  Private  Security 
Companies) (Ref H & N). 
 
34. 
Joint Targeting.   A well-developed, flexible joint targeting process applying a full spectrum 
approach  that  blends  a  variety  of  capabilities  to  generate  a  range  of  physical  and 
 
EEAS 00990/4/14 REV4 
 
TS/is 
16/34 
 
EUMS 
 
E 

psychological effects will allow the European Union to meet the challenges of contemporary 
operations.  Using  strategic  direction  operational-level  targeting  focuses  on  determining 
specific  effects  to  generate  and  synchronise  specific  lethal  and  non-lethal  actions,  to  satisfy 
the Joint Force Commander's objectives. 
 
35. 
Fratricide  Prevention.  The  possibility  of  the  death  of  in-theatre  EU  actors  due  to  "friendly 
fire"  must  be  avoided  or,  at  the  very  least,  reduced  to  the  absolute  minimum  by  the 
implementation  of  measures  and  procedures  such  as  in-theatre  coordination,  liaison, 
situational awareness and use of friendly force tracking systems.       
 
36. 
Protection of Civilians. 
a.  The  Law  of  Armed  Conflict  (LOAC),  which  consists  of  treaties  and  customary 
international  law,  attempts  to  provide  protection  for  those  involved  in  or  affected  by 
armed  conflict  or  occupation,  including  combatants  and  non-combatant  members  of  the 
population and to regulate the conduct of armed conflict. It is based on four fundamental 
principles, namely: military necessity, humanity, proportionality and distinction between 
combatants and civilians and between military objectives and civilian objects (Ref M).   
b.  Efforts to protect non-combatant members of the population can enhance FP of in-theatre 
EU  actors.  However,  in  certain  situations  it  can  be  difficult  to  balance  FP  and  civilian 
protection. Guidelines for the protection of civilians should be included in the planning of 
EU-led military operations and missions and must be complied with in theatre.   
 
37. 
Capability Development 
a.  The  ongoing  and  future  development  of  EU  military  capabilities  that  are  robust, 
deployable, sustainable, interoperable and usable is taken forward through the Capability 
Development Plan (CDP), which is produced in close cooperation between EU Member 
States  (MS),  the  European  Defence  Agency  (EDA),  Crisis  Management  and  Planning 
Directorate  (CMPD),  the  European  Union  Military  Committee  (EUMC)  and  the 
European  Union  Military  Staff  (EUMS).  The  CDP  provides  an  analysis  of  capability 
needs,  capability  trends  and  potential  capability  shortfalls  as  well  as  a  database  of 
national plans and priorities. It helps MS to develop their national capability plans and to 
identify and exploit areas of common interest. 
 
 
 
EEAS 00990/4/14 REV4 
 
TS/is 
17/34 
 
EUMS 
 
E 

b.  The CDP takes the following factors into consideration: 
(1) 
Prioritised  military  capability  shortfalls  and  their  associated  risks  as  identified 
within the framework of the Headline Goal Process.  
(2) 
An  estimate  of  capability  requirements  for  2025  based  on  global  strategic 
research, available technology and potential threats. 
(3) 
Current plans and programmes of MS. 
(4) 
Lessons Learned from operations regarding capabilities. 
c.  Capability  development  for  civilian  missions  is  mainly  achieved  by  building  on  the 
Civilian  Headline  Goal  2010  &  beyond  which  utilises  the  results  of  the  Civilian 
Headline Goal 2008 and the experience gained from CSDP civilian missions. 
d.  Work on the promotion of synergies in the development and use of civilian and military 
capabilities for EU crisis management operations (Ref O) is ongoing and addresses such 
areas as, inter alia, logistic support, CIS, medical support, security and force protection, 
information  sharing,  intelligence,  contracting  (e.g.  Support  Coordination  Board)  and 
lessons  learned.  Such  synergies  aim  to  provide  a  more  comprehensive  operational 
capability  for  EU-led  military  operations  and  missions  as  well  as  providing  a  more 
efficient use of resources.   
 
38. 
Preparation and Decision Making. 
a.  The EEAS contributes to the monitoring and early warning of potential crises that may 
require the intervention of EU-led operations through bodies such as the EU  INTCEN, 
the  CMPD,  the  Civilian  Planning  and  Conduct  Capability  (CPCC),  the  EUMS  and 
through the EU Conflict Early Warning System. 
b.  The  EUMC  assesses  the  risks  of  potential  crises  and  makes  recommendations  to  the 
PSC,  either  at  the  latter's  request  or  on  its  own  initiative  acting  within  the  guidelines 
forwarded  by  the  PSC  (Ref  P).  As  a  crisis  intensifies  so  too  does  the  requirement  for 
accurate  information  to  enable  further  assessments  and  planning.  A  Fact-Finding 
Mission (FFM) or Information Gathering Mission (IGM) may be dispatched to the crisis 
area in order to verify facts and assess the need for further EU action. Having analysed 
all available information the PSC may decide that EU action is appropriate triggering the 
activation of the Crisis Management Procedures (CMP). 
 
 
 
 
EEAS 00990/4/14 REV4 
 
TS/is 
18/34 
 
EUMS 
 
E 

39. 
Planning. 
a. 
For EU-led military operations and missions planning is an iterative process in which all 
factors relevant to the impending mission are analysed. It is conducted at the following 
four levels: 
(1) 
The Political and Strategic Level (EU Institutional level) (Ref Q). 
(2) 
The Military Strategic Level (OHQ level). 
(3) 
The Military Operational Level (FHQ level). 
(4) 
The Tactical Level (Component Headquarters level). 
b. 
For Eu-led military operations the OpCdr and OHQ operate at the Military Strategic and 
the FCdr and FHQ at the Operational level. For EU-led military missions currently the 
Council's  practise  is  to  appoint  an  EU  Mission  Commander  (MCdr)  and  designate  a 
Mission  Headquarters  (MHQ)  which  performs  functions  on  both  the  strategic  and 
operational level.  
c. 
Advance planning, including civil-military coordination, for military crisis management 
is conducted by: 
(1) 
Non-specific CSDP EEAS elements (inter alia: Geographic, Conflict Prevention, 
MD CROC, EU Delegations), within the context of developing, implementing and 
reviewing the EU's overarching, regional or thematic strategies. 
(2) 
CMPD through co-ordinating and ensuring the political-strategic framework for 
military and civilian CSDP instruments. 
(3) 
EUMS for military input to the political-strategic planning and development of 
military strategic options and contingency plans in support of CMPD. 
(4) 
CSDP planning may also engage with other services, Commission (FPI, ECHO, 
DEVCO, HOME), MS embassies etc. 
d. 
Following detection of the crisis the PSC will provide political and strategic guidance 
for further action and planning, initiating the Political Framework for Crisis Approach 
(PFCA). By definition the PFCA then sets out the political context, articulates what the 
crisis is, why the EU should act and what instruments could be available, and are best 
suited for that action. It acts as a tool for the CA in that it potentially gets all 
stakeholders (Security Policy and Conflict Prevention Directorate, Geographical desks 
and Commission) at the table. 
e. 
As regards options for CSDP engagement the PSC may then task CMPD to develop a 
Crisis Management Concept (CMC), which may then result in Military Strategic 
Options (MSOs) and an Initiating Military Directive (IMD). These products allow the 
 
EEAS 00990/4/14 REV4 
 
TS/is 
19/34 
 
EUMS 
 
E 

development of a CONOPS and an OPLAN by the OpCdr/ MCdr. Even after being 
mandated, the responsiveness of the nominated EU military commanders and HQs is 
subject to operational lags. There is a continuous requirement to train staff in EU 
procedures, working practices and familiarity with the content of early planning stages; 
partly due to lack of institutional memory and corporate knowledge. 
f. 
The specific legal framework for the conduct of EU-led military operations and 
missions is established in the relevant Council Decisions. Normally a Status of Forces 
Agreement (SOFA) and/or a Status of Mission Agreement (SOMA) will be required 
with the authorities of the countries in which the operation is being conducted. Pending 
the conclusion of a SOFA/SOMA, the HN may decide to issue an Unilateral Declaration 
binding it as an interim solution. The SOFA / SOMA ensure adequate legal status 
(rights and obligations, privileges, immunities and facilities) for in-theatre EU-led 
actors. It often contains general provision on HNS and therefore must be taken into 
account in the development of HNS arrangements (Technical Arrangements (TAs), 
Requirements and Statement of Requirements)5.   
 
40. 
Response and Scale. 
a. 
For  EU-led  military  operations  and  missions  the  urgency  and  nature  of  the  crisis  will 
determine the scale and timing of the response. A standard Military Response, which is 
derived  from  the  Helsinki  Headline  Goal  2003,  is  regarded  as  the  ability  to  deploy  a 
large scale force within 60 days. The Readiness Status and Response Times are outlined 
in the Interim EU Military Rapid Response Concept - main body and Annex A (Ref R). 
In short the concept outlines that a Standard Military Response Time is a period of up to 
60  days,  a  generic  Military  Rapid  Response  Time  is  a  period  up  to  25  days  and  an 
Express  Response  Time  is  a  period  up  to  10  days  after  the  EU  decision  to  launch  the 
operation. 
b. 
An  EU  Battlegroup  (EU  BG),  which  could  be  used  for  a  stand-alone  EU-led  military 
operation  or  for  the  initial  phase  of  a  larger  operation,  is  a  particular  form  of  RR  in 
which the ambition regarding deployment is that forces should start implementing their 
mission on the ground no later than 10 days after the EU decision to launch the operation 
(Ref S). One of the factors governing the deployment of an EU BG is its limited size and 
therefore its limited capability. 
                                                 
5 In EU practice, a TA can directly derive from a SOFA/Unilateral Declaration. There is - in general - no need to conclude or adopt 
any additional document as an intermediate step (such as a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU)). 
 
EEAS 00990/4/14 REV4 
 
TS/is 
20/34 
 
EUMS 
 
E 

c. 
Air Power has the ability to concentrate force over long distances in a short time and can 
contribute  to  an  immediate  response  option  across  the  whole  spectrum  of  Crisis 
Management tasks.  
d. 
The use of air, land and maritime assets and associated resources for a RR in an EU-led 
military operation are governed by the Interim EU Rapid Response Concept (Ref R). 
 
41. 
Force Generation (FG). FG is the process where the military assets and capabilities required 
for an EU-led military operation are designated by Troop Contributing Nations (TCN) and/ or 
International Organisations6 and made available to the OpCdr to meet the requirements of the 
operation.  It  comprises  the  identification  and  the  activation  of  the  required  assets  and/or 
capabilities and ends with their TOA by TCN to the OpCdr. TCN are those MS and, after a 
Council  decision,  third  States  providing  military  assets  or  capabilities  for  a  particular 
operation  (Ref  V).  The  three  phases  of  FG  for  EU-led  military  operations  and  missions, 
namely,  Identification,  Activation  and  Deployment,  and  the  associated  principles  and 
procedures, are described in detail in the EU Concept for Force Generation. 
 
42. 
Command and Control (C2). 
a. 
The Political and Security Committee (PSC), under the authority of the Council and the 
HR, exercises the political control and strategic direction of EU-led military operations 
and  missions,  based  on  the  advice  and  recommendations  of  the  EUMC  (for  military 
operations) and where appropriate PMG (Ref W). 
b. 
Responsibility for the conduct of an EU-led military operation lies with the OpCdr, who 
is  authorised  to  exercise  operational  command  or  operational  control  over  assigned 
forces.  In  addition  to  FG,  the  OpCdr  is  also  responsible  for  the  development  of  the 
Concept of Operations (CONOPS) and the Operation Plan (OPLAN). The OpCdr, who 
is  supported  by  an  OHQ,  which  is  outside  the  JOA,  coordinates  the  deployment, 
sustainment  and  redeployment  of  the  EU-led  military  force.  Responsibility  for  the 
conduct of an EU-led military mission lies with the MCdr, who is authorised by Council 
to exercise command over assigned forces and mission tailored MHQ in theatre.  
c. 
The OHQ for a particular EU-led military operation is designated by the Council from 
one of the following options; one of the five EU OHQs (UK OHQ (PJHQ) Northwood, 
                                                 
6 The Berlin + arrangements set the conditions for the release, monitoring and return or recall of NATO assets and capabilities for 
their use in an EU-led military operation. 
 
EEAS 00990/4/14 REV4 
 
TS/is 
21/34 
 
EUMS 
 
E 

FR OHQ (CPCO) Mt Valérien, DE OHQ (RFOC) Potsdam, IT OHQ (JOHQ) Rome and 
EL OHQ Larissa), the EU OPSCEN Brussels or an EU OHQ at SHAPE (Berlin+).  
d. 
An  EU-led  military  operation  may  also  have  recourse  to  a  Framework  Nation7,  which 
could include a significant contribution to military strategic planning, operational level 
planning, the mounting, deployment, execution, support and redeployment of the forces 
for the operation (Ref X). 
e. 
The  EU  FCdr,  acting  under  the  authority  of  the  OpCdr,  executes  the  EU-led  military 
operation  within  the  JOA.  The  Component  Commanders  (CC)  of  an  EU-led  military 
operation,  acting  under  the  authority  of  the  EU  FCdr,  are  responsible  for  making 
recommendations  to  the  FCdr  on  the  employment  of  their  forces  and  assets  and  for 
planning, coordinating and conducting operations. The Principles, Structure, Command 
Options, Responsibilities and Coordination relating to C2 for EU-led military operations 
are  described  in  greater  detail  in  the  EU  Concept  for  Military  Command  and  Control 
(Ref Y). 
 
43. 
Communications and Information Systems (CIS). 
a. 
CIS Planning for EU-led military operations and missions should include consideration 
of  all  levels  of  command  from  the  Political  Strategic  to  the  Tactical  and  additionally, 
where necessary, other national, international and non-governmental organisations. The 
object  is  to  enable  the  passage  of  information  in  a  timely  manner  throughout  both  the 
EU  military  and  civilian  chains  of  command  and  across  inter-organisational 
relationships,  in  order  that  timely  decisions  can  be  taken  and  implemented  at  the 
appropriate level. 
b. 
The non-fixed C2 structure for EU-led military operations and missions can mean that 
there  are  different  CIS  solutions  for  each  operation.  The  responsibilities,  planning 
factors  and  options  for  CIS  for  EU-led  military  operations  are  described  in  the  EU 
Concept for CIS for EU-led Military Operations (Ref Z). 
c. 
For  complex  engagements  involving  EU  military  and  civilian  instruments,  shared  and 
interconnected  networks  and  systems  would  result  in  overall  improvements  in 
operational efficiency and effectiveness.  
d. 
As the EU does not have a standing military Command and Control (C2) structure, clear 
and effective arrangements are needed to facilitate the successful CIS support of these 
                                                 
7 A Framework Nation is defined as: "A Member State (MS) or a group of MS that has volunteered to, and that the Council has 
agreed, should have specific responsibilities in an operation over which the EU exercises political control". 
 
EEAS 00990/4/14 REV4 
 
TS/is 
22/34 
 
EUMS 
 
E 

operations. To secure the information exchange between and at all levels of the military 
C2  structure  an  agreed  set  of  general  information  security  regulations  and  procedures 
must be available.  Information Security planning as an integral part of the overall CIS 
planning  has  to  ensure  adequate  security  right  from  the  start  of  an  operation. 
The Military  CIS  Concept  for  EU-led  CMOs  identified  the  need  to  develop  an 
Information  Security  Concept  and  this  need  was  reinforced  by  the  objectives  stated  in 
the ECAP 2004 roadmap. The concept (Ref AA) describes the overarching and common 
security requirements agreed by MS and EU GSC (General Secretariat of the Council). 
While  also  taking  into  consideration  MS  (Member  States)  security  directives  this 
concept is based on EU Council’s Security Regulations and EU Accreditation Process. 
These  documents  are  the  foundation  for  Information  Security  within  the  EU.  Full 
interoperability between all participants of an EU operation, civil and military, must be 
achieved. The Concept reinforces the need for EU, MS, TCNs and other organisations 
to  implement  common  information  security  policies,  procedures  and  standards.  In 
addition  it  describes  common  information  security  criteria,  protective  principles, 
responsibilities and identifies planning factors to support military C2 structures in EU-
led CMOs. 
e. 
The EU has established  an autonomous capacity  to lead military operations within the 
range  of  tasks  defined  through  CSDP.  These  tasks  require  decision  making  based  on 
situational awareness. Such situational awareness relies on adequate information that is 
increasingly  provided  by  computer  networks.  When  military  action  is  considered 
appropriate, the shape and size of the military assets and capabilities required need to be 
assigned  to  each  operation.  EU  network  communication  is  therefore  required  between 
decision-makers  in  Brussels  down  through  the  chain  of  command  to the tactical  level, 
external  to  Brussels  and  MS,  within  the  JOA  and  other  locations.  Therefore,  network 
communications  extend  beyond  the  military  domain  cross  geographic,  organisational 
and  functional  boundaries  and  into  the  diverse  civilian  entities  within  CSDP.  The 
integrity  of  computer  networks  and  security  of  information  on  networks  used  at  all 
levels  of  EU-led  operations  is  critical  to  achieving  the  required  political  and  strategic 
effects. Computer networks therefore need to be defended to preserve their integrity and 
security.  
f. 
The  tasks  as  defined  through  CSDP  require  command  and  control  (C2)  and  decision 
making  based  on  situational  awareness.  Such  situational  awareness  is  significantly 
dependant  on  information  provided  through  Communication  and  Information  Systems 
 
EEAS 00990/4/14 REV4 
 
TS/is 
23/34 
 
EUMS 
 
E 

(CIS) and computer networks. Increasingly too, military capability in its widest sense is 
reliant  on  computers  and  networks  to  operate.  This  increase  in  reliance  on  computer 
networks  allows  us  to  exploit  the  benefits  of  improved  Network  Enabled  Capability 
(NEC)  and  is  therefore  not  just  a  CIS  issue:  it  affects  all  arms.  The  Cyber  Defence 
Concept  supersedes  the  EU  Concept  for  Computer  Network  Operations  in  EU-led 
military  operations  (13537/1/09,  17  March  2010),  but  does  not  necessarily  address  all 
aspects  of  Computer  Network  Operations  (CNO),  by  taking  account  of  the  wider 
context  of  cyberspace  which  is  defined  as  the  fifth  operating  environment.  An  EU 
Concept  (Ref  CC)  elaborates  more  on  the  measures  and  standards  that  will  improve 
overall  Cyber  Defence.  The  integrity  of  computer  networks  and  the  security  of  the 
information on the networks used during EU-led operations is critical to achieving the 
mission.  Cyberspace  in  general  and  computer  networks  in  particular,  need  to  be 
defended to ensure information assurance.  Cyber Defence is one capability that, when 
combined  with  other  measures,  such  as  IT  security,  physical  security  and  personnel 
security  provides  information  assurance.  In  addition  the  Concept  provides  a  definition 
of  Cyber  Defence  terminology  sets  out  responsibilities  and  principles  for  CSDP 
Operations  and  Missions  and  offers  EU  Member  States,  institutions  and  agencies 
guidance  for  the  development  of  military  capability  requirements  for  use  on  EU 
missions (Ref CC). 
g. 
The European External Action Service (EEAS), supported by the General Secretariat of 
the  Council  and  European  Commission,  is  responsible  for  providing  all  required  CIS, 
including  the  provision  of  information  assurance.    As  a  minimum  this  comprises  the 
necessary communications links at the Political Strategic levels including the links to all 
offered OHQs and FHQs, in their fixed location, the EU SATCEN and other EU actors 
in  theatre.    These  CIS  and  links  must  be  available  on  a  permanent  basis  to  reduce 
planning  and  reaction  time  in  a  crisis  situation,  and  must  include  centrally  provided 
services to enhance interoperability and information flows.  Links to NATO (SHAPE) 
are also essential on a permanent basis for potential Berlin Plus operations.  EEAS must 
also  provide  the  necessary  CIS  for  Fact  Finding  Missions  and  other  such  missions  so 
that  deployed  personnel  can  conduct  their  mission  to  the  necessary  level  of 
confidentiality  as  well  as  being  able  to  communicate  that  information  remotely  with 
EEAS organisations and possibly OHQs. 
 
 
 
EEAS 00990/4/14 REV4 
 
TS/is 
24/34 
 
EUMS 
 
E 

44.  Intelligence,  Surveillance,  Target  Acquisition  and  Reconnaissance.  (ISTAR)  contributes  to 
early warning, risk assessment, situational awareness and target intelligence and thus supports 
the  decision  making  and  planning  activities  in  the  framework  of  EU  crisis  management.  Its 
products  such  as  warnings,  risk  assessments  and  comprehensive  analysis  are  needed  on  a 
permanent  basis  and  must  be  tailored  to  the  user's  requirements  and  securely  processed  and 
disseminated  wherever  feasible  on  a  near  real  time  basis.  They  complete  the  Common 
Operational  Picture  (COP)  and  the  situational  awareness  of  decision-makers.  The  principles 
for  the  application  of  ISTAR  in  support  to  EU-led  Crisis  Management  Operations  are 
elaborated further in the EUMS Concept (Ref DD). 
 
45.  Intelligence.  The  provision  of  timely,  accessible,  relevant,  comprehensive  and  accurate 
intelligence  and  identification  of  potential  threats  is  essential  in  order  to  support  EU-led 
military operations and missions. Intelligence from all sources, which include all CSDP actors 
both  in  theatre  and  in  Brussels,  MS  particularly  TCN  and  third  parties  will  play  a  key  role. 
The nature and scope of the EU-led military operation or mission will determine intelligence 
requirements and the intelligence architecture to be utilised therein (Ref EE). 
 
 
H. 
CODUCT  
 
46.  Entry. 
a. 
The  initial  introduction  of  EU-led  military  forces  into  a  JOA  is  often  the  period  of 
greatest risk for such forces. Entry is normally  accomplished using all available means 
and  capabilities  which  include  the  singular  or  combined  employment  of  airborne, 
seaborne or overland movement. The presence or creation of some entry points such as 
an available air or sea port, an assailable coastline, a suitable and supportable drop zone 
or  an  accessible  frontier  is  essential  for  a  successful  entry  phase.  Forcible  entry 
involving  the  seizure  of  a  lodgement  area  in  a  hostile  environment  by  military  forces 
employing combative means is the most difficult form of entry and may only have to be 
considered  in  the  most  extreme  circumstances.  However,  the  vast  majority  of  EU-led 
military  operations  will  involve  the  introduction  of  EU-led  forces  into  a  permissive 
environment or an environment that has not yet turned hostile. 
b. 
Initial  entry  is  often  associated  with  preliminary  operations  which  are  carried  out  in-
theatre prior to the arrival of the main body of EU-led military forces. Such operations 
 
EEAS 00990/4/14 REV4 
 
TS/is 
25/34 
 
EUMS 
 
E 

could include the establishment of logistic nodes, lines of communication, Intelligence, 
Surveillance  and  Reconnaissance  (ISR)  and  CIS  architecture.  Preliminary  operations 
could also involve the conduct of SOF operations, which in essence can form the Initial 
Entry Force (IEF). 
 
47.  Strategic Movement and Transport (M&T). 
a. 
It is essential that EU-led military forces arriving in a JOA or a Forward Mounting Base 
(FMB)  do  so  in  the  correct  sequence  and  in  accordance  with  the  OpCdr's  intent.  The 
sequenced arrival into theatre of EU-led military forces and their requisite supplies is not 
just dependent on the volume and availability of transport but also on the capacity of the 
reception  facilities  and  other  factors  which  include  political,  security,  protection  and 
operational/ tactical planning issues associated with the operation. 
b. 
M&T support for EU-led military operations is the collective responsibility of relevant 
EU  actors  and  Troop  Contributing  Nations  (TCNs).  This  M&T  responsibility  extends 
through  all  phases  of  an  operation  and  includes  strategic  planning  and  deployment, 
Reception,  Staging  and  Onward  Movement,  Integration  (RSOI),  sustainment  and 
redeployment. 
c. 
Permanent structures which facilitate the high-level planning and coordination of M&T 
for EU-led military operations include the EU Movement Planning Cell (EUMPC) and 
the  Multinational  Movement  Coordination  Centres8  (MMCCs).  Other  M&T  structures 
normally activated during the planning phase of the operation include the EU Movement 
Coordination  Centre  (EUMCC),  FHQ  Logistic  Staff  (CJ-4  LOG),  the  National 
Movement Coordination Centre (NMCC) and the National Support Element (NSE). The 
EU Concept for Strategic Movement and Transportation for EU-led Military Operations 
highlights  the  principles,  responsibilities  and  procedures  relating  to  M&T  for  EU-led 
military operations (Ref FF). 
d. 
Where possible, the coordinated use of strategic airlift and in-theatre movement facilities 
should be employed for  complex engagements involving both EU civilian and military 
actors. 
 
                                                 
8 The Athens Multinational Sealift Coordination Centre (AMSCC) and Movement Coordination Centre Europe (MCCE) in 
Eindhoven. 
 
EEAS 00990/4/14 REV4 
 
TS/is 
26/34 
 
EUMS 
 
E 

48.  Reception, Staging and  Onward Movement,  Integration (RSOI). RSOI is part of the process 
that enables EU-led military forces and associated materiel deploying in the JOA to become 
operational (Ref GG). 
a. 
Reception.  This  is  the  process  whereby  EU-led  military  forces  and  their  requisite 
materiel  arriving  in  the  JOA  via  land,  air  or  sea  strategic  /  tactical  lift  are  received, 
offloaded, marshalled and cleared prior to staging. 
b. 
Staging. Staging is the assembly, temporary holding and organisation of EU-led military 
forces and their requisite materiel into formed units in preparation for onward movement 
and further activities. 
c. 
Onward Movement. This is the process of moving EU units from reception facilities and 
staging areas to the final destination. 
d. 
Integration.  This  is  the  synchronised  transfer  of  operationally  ready  units  into  the 
Combined  Joint  EU  force.  Integration  can  occur  at  any  point  along  the  strategic 
deployment  and  RSOI  continuum  and  is  complete  when  the  FCdr  has  established  C2 
over the unit. 
 
49.  Deployment  Models.  The  varied  nature  of  EU-led  military  operations  or  missions  requires 
that  consideration  be  given  to  the  different  options  for  the  deployment  and  employment  of 
forces. Employment / deployment options will be influenced by factors such as the nature of 
the  mission,  the  security  situation,  the  components  specific  requirements,  the  political 
environment,  the  economic  implications,  the  in-theatre  infrastructure  and  associated 
geographical  and  climatic  conditions.  Any  one  or  a  combination  of  the  following 
employment/ deployment can be adapted for EU-led military operations or missions: 
a. 
Strategic Deployment conducted directly into a JOA. RSOI of EU-led forces takes place 
in the JOA. 
b. 
Strategic Deployment to a Forward Mounting Base (FMB). RSOI of EU-led forces takes 
place  to  the  maximum  extent  possible  in  the  FMB,  which  is  located  within  the  JOA 
either on land or at sea. 
c. 
RSOI conducted at the Port of Embarkation (POE). Forces are subsequently strategically 
deployed directly into the JOA. This option is particularly applicable to Rapid Response 
and initial entry operations. 
 
 
 
 
EEAS 00990/4/14 REV4 
 
TS/is 
27/34 
 
EUMS 
 
E 

50.  EU Air Deployable Operating Base (DOB). 
a. 
An  EU  Air  DOB,  an  operating  base  from  where  joint  air  operations  are  conducted  to 
accomplish  or  support  one  or  several  EU-led  Crisis  Management  Operations,  may  be 
required  to  ensure  the  overall  success  of  EU-led  military  operations.  Selection  of  the 
most suitable location for the EU Air DOB will depend on factors such as the projected 
duration of the operation, the risk assessment, the access to the base, the envisaged HNS 
and  the  political  and  legal  arrangements  required  to  use  an  international  airport  or 
existing  air  base.  Ideally  the  establishment,  at  the  tactical  level,  of  an  EU  Air  DOB 
should be the responsibility of a Framework Nation, in accordance with the principles of 
the EU Framework Nation Concept. 
b. 
The EUMS is responsible for the initial planning in relation to the establishment of an 
EU Air DOB. This responsibility transfers to the OHQ as soon as the Initiating Military 
Directive  has  been  released  to  the  OpCdr.  The  procedures,  mechanisms  and  command 
and control structures associated with the activation, sustainment and recovery of an EU 
Air DOB are described in greater detail in the EU Concept for the Implementation of a 
EU Air Deployable Operating Base (Ref HH).  
 
51.  EU Sea Deployable Operating Base (DOB). 
a. 
The  joint  use  of  seaborne  platforms  to  project,  support  and  sustain  EU-led  military 
forces could offer significant advantages for the  conduct of EU-led military operations 
or missions. Such platforms could be located either over the horizon, in sight of shore, in 
port or utilising some combination of the three locations.  
b. 
Sea basing could help to ensure the expeditious deployment of the force  with requisite 
support  into  a  demanding  environment.  Depending  on  the  nature  of  the  operation  sea 
basing  could  range  in  size  from  a  single  ship  up  to  and  including  an  entire  fleet  and 
could support an element of or the entire EU-led military force.  
c. 
Sea  basing  can  be  used  throughout  all  phases  of  an  operation  from  initial  entry  to  re-
deployment  and  can  provide  capabilities  such  as  Command  and  Control, 
Communications,  Intelligence,  Surveillance,  Target  Acquisition,  Reconnaissance 
(ISTAR),  Sea  Point  of  Disembarkation  (SPOD),  Force  Protection  (FP),  Air  Defence 
(AD),  Naval  Fire  Support  (NFS),  as  well  as  medical  facilities,  supplies  and  RSOI 
enablers.    
 
 
 
EEAS 00990/4/14 REV4 
 
TS/is 
28/34 
 
EUMS 
 
E 

52.  In-Theatre Operations. 
a. 
In-theatre  responsibility  for  the  execution  of  EU-led  military  operations  rests  with  the 
FCdr, acting under the authority of the OpCdr. Such operations are normally carried out 
by conventional EU military forces. However, when conventional military assets and /or 
capabilities may not be able to fulfil the mission or tasks, there may be a need to conduct 
special  operations  either  independently  or  as  part  of  a  larger  military  effort.  Special 
Operations  Forces  (SOF),  which  are  designated  by  MS  and  non-EU  TCNs  provide  a 
flexible,  versatile  and  unique  capability,  whether  employed  alone  or  complementing 
other forces or agencies, to attain military-strategic or operational objectives (Ref II). 
b. 
Throughout  the  continuum  of  an  EU-led  military  operation  or  mission,  particularly  a 
complex  engagement,  the  role  of  the  military  may  change  from  "supported"  where  the 
military have a primary role to that of "supporting" where the military have a secondary 
role in support of other EU in-theatre instruments. The main role of forces involved in 
EU-led  military  operations  will  invariably  involve  security  operations  but  it  is  also 
possible that such forces could be directed in support of other post-conflict tasks9. 
c. 
In  a  complex  engagement  the  in-theatre  coordination  of  EU  military  and  civilian 
operations is vital in order to achieve the overall strategic political objectives. 
 
53.  Information Operations (Info Ops). 
a. 
Info Ops for EU-led military operations and missions is a military function that provides 
advice  and  coordination  of  military  activities  affecting  information  and  information 
systems10 in order to support the in-theatre mission and the political objectives of the EU 
(Ref  JJ).  The  successful  integration  and  coordination  of  the  following  core  and 
supporting capabilities and functions will influence, disrupt, corrupt or usurp adversarial 
human and automated decision making while protecting that of the EU, thus facilitating 
the Info Ops campaign. 
(1) 
Psychological Operations (PSYOPS) (Ref KK). 
(2) 
Operations Security (OPSEC). 
(3) 
Deception. 
(4) 
Electronic Warfare (EW). 
(5) 
Media Operations. 
                                                 
9 UN Indicative post-conflict tasks: Infrastructure, Employment, Economic Governance, Civil Administration, Elections, Political 
Process, DDR, Rule of Law, Human Rights, Capacity Building. 
10 In this context information systems comprise personnel, technical components, organisational structures, and processes that 
collect, analyse, assess, create, manipulate, store, retrieve, provide, display, share, transmit and disseminate information. 
 
EEAS 00990/4/14 REV4 
 
TS/is 
29/34 
 
EUMS 
 
E 

(6) 
Key Leader Engagement. 
(7) 
Physical Destruction. 
(8) 
Troop Information. 
(9) 
SOF. 
 
54.  Civil Military Cooperation (CIMIC) (Ref LL). 
a. 
The  purpose  of  CIMIC  in  EU-led  military  operations  and  missions  is  to  establish  and 
maintain  cooperation  between  the  in-theatre  EU  military  component,  (local) 
governmental organisations and civilian actors, including IOs and NGOs.   
b.  CIMIC, as an operational function, seeks to create the best possible moral, material, 
operational and tactical conditions for the achievement of the military mission. CIMIC 
core functions are grouped into the following areas: Civil-Military Liaison, Support to 
the Civil Environment and Support to the Military Force.   
 
55.  Logistic Support. 
a. 
Personnel,  materiel  and  infrastructure  are  the  main  focus  areas  in  terms  of  logistic 
support  for  EU-led  military  operations  and  missions.  In  all  categories  the  nature  and 
expected  operational  timeframe  will  be  critical  determinants  of  the  overall  logistic 
footprint.  However,  irrespective  of  these  determinants,  successful  EU-led  military 
operations and missions will require robust real-time logistic support. 
b. 
The  required  logistic  support  for  an  EU-led  military  operation  or  mission  has  to  be 
identified  early  in  the  planning  process  and  includes  consideration  of  the  legal 
framework,  existing  multinational  logistic  solutions,  strategic  lift,  availability  of  HNS, 
Contractor  Support  to  Operations  and  protection  of  the  entire  logistic  chain.  Early 
planning  also  involves  the  production  by  the  OpCdr  of  a  sustainability  statement 
outlining common criteria to be adopted by national contingents. This statement, which 
is agreed at the earliest stage by TCNs, is required to identify available logistic units and 
associated assets as well as maintenance and medical policies. 
c. 
TCNs are ultimately responsible for the provision of resources for national forces. TCNs 
retain full command over their own logistic forces within the national force contribution 
but the TOA specifies the command relationship of such forces to the OpCdr. However, 
multinational  support  arrangements  and  common  logistics  C2  structures  optimise  the 
logistic footprint and contribute to operational success.  
 
EEAS 00990/4/14 REV4 
 
TS/is 
30/34 
 
EUMS 
 
E 

d. 
Early  establishment  of  logistic  infrastructures  is  essential  in  order  to  properly  manage 
the  RSOI  process  for  personnel  and  materiel.  There  are  different  ways  to  manage  the 
logistic supply flow into the JOA, which depending on the nature of the mission could 
involve transportation by air, sea or overland.  
e. 
Although logistic support to EU-led military operations is a national responsibility there 
is  a  requirement  to  coordinate  and  synchronise  this  function  at  the  operational  level. 
Multinational  logistics  and  solutions  will  be  sought  at  the  earliest  stages  of  the 
operational  planning  process  and  implement  prior  to  the  deployment  for  operations. 
Even though National Support Elements (NSEs) come under the command of their own 
national authorities and are not part of the EU-led military force, they should cooperate 
with  the  FHQ.  Cooperation  and  centralisation  of  services  among  NSEs  can  produce 
significant  savings.  The  coordination  of  logistic  support  between  relevant  EU  actors, 
TCNs, and where appropriate, other states, IOs and organisations is essential. 
f. 
For  a  complex  engagement  the  in-theatre  logistics  for  all  CSDP  actors  could  be 
coordinated  in  an  EU  Logistics  Centre  (EULC)  which  could  be  jointly  staffed  by 
military  and  civilian  logistics  personnel.  The  principles,  characteristics,  guidelines, 
modes, finance and responsibilities relating to the provision of logistic support for EU-
led  military  operations  and  missions  are  contained  in  the  EU  Concept  for  Logistic 
Support to EU-led Military Operations (Ref MM & NN). 
 
56.  Health and Medical (H&M) Support.  
a. 
The aim of H&M Support in EU-led military operations and missions is to support same 
by  conserving  manpower,  preserving  life  and  health  and  minimising  residual  physical 
and mental disabilities. Appropriate medical support makes a major contribution to both 
force  protection  and  morale  through  the  prevention  of  disease,  rapid  evacuation  and 
treatment of the sick, wounded and injured and the return to duty of as many individuals 
as possible.  
b. 
Contributing  MS  and  non-EU  TCNs  are  ultimately  responsible  for  the  provision  of 
H&M  Support  to  their  forces  involved  in  EU-led  military  operations  or  missions. 
However,  coordination,  and  in  some  circumstances,  integration  of  medical  assets  and 
capabilities  will  optimise  the  provision  and  use  of  limited  resources  and  prevent 
unnecessary  redundancies.  On  TOA  the  OpCdr  has  the  shared  responsibility  for  the 
H&M  Support  of  all  forces  assigned  to  the  operation.  Where  required,  H&M  support 
resources and personnel for EU-led  civilian missions are normally sourced through the 
 
EEAS 00990/4/14 REV4 
 
TS/is 
31/34 
 
EUMS 
 
E 

Calls  for  Contributions  (CfC)  process  which  is  initiated  by  the  CPCC.  Medical 
capabilities and capacities assigned to an EU-led military operation or mission must be 
sufficient  and  have  the  same  level  of  readiness,  deployability  and  sustainability  as  the 
personnel they support.  
c. 
In preparing the H&M inputs to the OPLAN and CONOPS the OpCdr is assisted by his 
Medical Adviser, who is the senior medical staff officer in the OHQ with responsibility 
for setting the OpCdr's medical policy and ensuring that he and his staff are aware of the 
health  and  medical  implications  associated  with  the  EU-led  military  operation  or 
mission.  For  EU-led  civilian  operations  the  CivOpCdr  is  assisted  by  the  HoM  in 
determining  the  level  of  H&M  Support  required  for  the  mission.  The  Principles, 
Guidelines,  Organisation  and  Functional  Areas  for  H&M  Support  for  EU-led  military 
operations and missions are described in greater detail in the Comprehensive Health and 
Medical Concept for EU-led Crisis Management Missions and Operations (Ref OO). 
 
57.  In-theatre  Coordination.  In  addition  to  the  normal  organisational  and  coordinating  functions 
provided  by  the  HQ  staff  for  EU-led  military  operations  and  missions,  further  in-theatre 
coordination, particularly for complex engagements is necessary. There is a requirement for a 
focal point, where planning, conduct, support and other functions of the EU engagement can 
be  coordinated  in  theatre  e.g.  Intelligence,  Operations  and  Logistics.  This  measure  should 
only  be  considered  where  it  facilitates  the  attainment  of  common  goals  by  in-theatre  EU 
military  and  civilian  actors  in  a  comprehensive  manner.  It  should  not  be  imposed  as  an 
additional,  complicating  factor,  requiring  more  resources,  if  not  needed.  Ideally,  this  focal 
point  should  be  a  single  facility  with  appropriate  communications,  information  systems  and 
meeting rooms where institutions and actors, involved in the engagement, can coordinate their 
activities.  
 
 
I. 
TRASITIO 
 
58.  Transitional Phases. 
a. 
The desired end state for EU-led military operations and missions will normally include 
the provision of outcomes such as a Safe and Secure Environment, Rule of Law, Stable 
Governance,  Sustainable  Economy  and  Social  Well-Being.  The  attainment  of  the  end 
state  for  a  complex  engagement  could  involve  progression  through  a  number  of 
 
EEAS 00990/4/14 REV4 
 
TS/is 
32/34 
 
EUMS 
 
E 

transitional  phases  ranging  from  pre-conflict,  high-intensity  operations,  post-conflict 
stabilisation and reconstruction to long-term development.  
b. 
Throughout this continuum of phases the aim is to lessen the dependency on EU military 
instruments  with  an  associated  and  gradual  increase  in  emphasis  on  EU  civilian 
instruments. However, irrespective of this aim, there is always a possibility of increased 
military intervention at any stage throughout a complex engagement due to factors such 
as in-theatre volatility or a change in the security situation.  
c. 
Notwithstanding  the  possibility  of  fluctuations  in  the  roles  of  EU  military  and  civilian 
instruments  throughout  the  continuum  of  a  crisis,  the  principal  goal  must  be  the 
facilitation of the transfer of authority to the legal civilian authorities of the host nation 
as part of the wider political process. Transition must form an integral part of Advance 
and Crisis Response Planning for EU-led military operations and missions.  
d. 
Every  EU-led  military  operation  and  mission  will  have  its  own  internal  phases  which 
require  sequential  execution.  Advance  Planning  (where  applicable),  Crisis  Response 
Planning, training, exercises, leadership and lessons learned will all help to ensure that 
the transition between the deployment, employment and redeployment phases of EU-led 
operations is seamless. 
 
59.  Termination / Redeployment / Recovery. 
a. 
The  decision  to  terminate  an  EU-led  military  operation  or  mission  is  made  by  the 
Council based on an evaluation by the PSC which includes advice from the EUMC and 
CIVCOM.  In  the  event  that  such  an  operation  had  recourse  to  NATO  assets  and 
capabilities,  the  PSC  informs  the  NAC.  The  PSC  also  requests  the  EUMC  to  evaluate 
lessons learned (LL) on the basis of the reports by the OpCdr and the EUMS. (Ref PP)  
b. 
Redeployment should be regarded as a separate operation aimed at achieving an efficient 
and ordered exit from theatre.  The redeployment of military and /or civilian instruments 
from  an  EU-led  military  operation  or  mission  must  be  carefully  planned  as  early  as 
possible  and,  ideally,  before  the  deployment  phase  is  complete.  Such  planning  will  be 
dependent on the nature of the EU operation and the requirements of possible follow-on 
operations  by  the  EU  or  other  organisations  such  as  the  UN.  Post-engagement  EU 
residual commitments must be properly managed. 
c. 
Recovery planning will, for example, determine what equipment and supplies will be left 
in-theatre  for  follow-on  operations  and  what  will  actually  be  recovered.  Where  it  is 
intended that EU supplies and equipment should be used for non-EU follow-on missions 
 
EEAS 00990/4/14 REV4 
 
TS/is 
33/34 
 
EUMS 
 
E 

this  must  be  the  subject  of  clear  and  unambiguous  written  agreements  between  the 
relevant organisations. NSEs assist the in-theatre logistic function in the withdrawal and 
recovery  of  EU-led  military  forces,  equipment  and  supplies.  Where  applicable,  full 
settlement  must  be  made  with  all  agencies  and  organisations  that  provided  in-theatre 
support to the EU-led military operation or mission. 
d. 
The withdrawal of EU-led military forces from the JOA is executed by the FCdr under 
the authority of the OpCdr. For EU-led civilian operations this function is carried out by 
the HoM under the authority of the CivOpCdr.   
 
_________________ 
 
EEAS 00990/4/14 REV4 
 
TS/is 
34/34 
 
EUMS 
 
E 

Document Outline