Ceci est une version HTML d'une pièce jointe de la demande d'accès à l'information 'Correspondance about environmental and food safety standards in relation to TTIP'.









Ref. Ares(2016)4049973 - 02/08/2016
Ref. Ares(2016)7049618 - 19/12/2016
 
The Consumer Voice in Europe 
HORMONE-DISRUPTING CHEMICALS: WHEN WILL THE 
EU ACT AGAINST THESE EVERYDAY TOXICANTS? 
BEUC Position on the Regulation of Endocrine Disruptors 
  
 
 
 
 
 
Contact: 
 – [adresse e-mail] 
 
BUREAU EUROPÉEN DES UNIONS DE CONSOMMATEURS AISBL | DER EUROPÄISCHE VERBRAUCHERVERBAND 
Rue d’Arlon 80, B-1040 Brussels • Tel. +32 (0)2 743 15 90 • www.twitter.com/beuc • [adresse e-mail] • www.beuc.eu 
EC register for interest representatives: identification number 9505781573-45 
 
  Co-funded by the European Union 
 
Ref: BEUC-X-2016-077 – 29/07/2016 



 
 
Endocrine Disruptors: Why it matters 
Hormone-disrupting chemicals or EDCs for short have been linked to severe human health 
problems, including infertility, genital malformations, early puberty, obesity, cancer and 
neuro-behavioural disorders.  
Consumers  may  encounter  these  harmful  chemicals  in  many  commonly-used  products. 
Examples include skin creams containing propylparaben, phthalates in toys and textiles, 
furniture with brominated flame retardants, and bisphenol A used in everything from plastic 
flooring and paper receipts to food containers.  
In theory, EDCs are regulated by several EU laws. In practice, however, implementation 
of these laws falls short as the EU lacks concrete criteria that define what an ‘endocrine 
disruptor’  is.  Moreover,  current  risk  evaluation  methods  largely  overlook  a  chemical’s 
possible  endocrine  disrupting  properties.  As  a  result,  EDCs  escape  control  despite  the 
urgent need to reduce consumer exposure. 
 
 
Recommendations 
For  more  than  two  decades,  the  EU  has  debated  how  to  reduce  public  exposure  to 
endocrine-disrupting  chemicals  (EDCs).  Conclusive  evidence  links  EDCs  to  a  range  of 
severe diseases and disorders. Therefore a renewed political commitment to protect people 
and the environment against these toxic chemicals is urgent.  
BEUC calls on EU leaders to:  
  Adopt scientific EDC criteria applicable to all relevant EU laws. EDC criteria 
must identify both those chemicals we know are endocrine disruptors and those we 
suspect. This would allow the EU to act on early warning signs and prevent potential 
harm to its citizens and the environment.  
  Reject  the  Commission’s  flawed  proposal  on  criteria  for  endocrine 
disruptors which will fail to adequately protect consumers. 
  Apply a precautionary approach in all relevant legislation. The possible public 
health  implications  of  EDC  exposures  and  the  uncertainties  in  risk  assessment 
underscore the need to replace EDCs with safer alternatives whenever possible. 
  Place  the  burden  of  proof  on  the  economic  operator,  not  the  public
Companies  should  be  made  responsible  for  demonstrating  the  safety  of  their 
products. The evidence they provide should be assessed by scientific committees.  
  Make  the  presence  of  EDCs  in  consumer  products  more  visible.  Better 
information about the use of known and suspected EDCs in products would allow 
consumers to make informed choices on how to protect their health. 
  Update risk assessment and risk management methods to take into account 
low-dose effects and the cumulative impact of different chemicals.  
  Increase  funding  for  research  to  address  knowledge  gaps.  It  is  crucial  to 
better understand the negative health effects of endocrine-disrupting chemicals on 
human health and on the environment. 
 


link to page 4 link to page 5 link to page 6 link to page 7 link to page 10 link to page 11 link to page 12 link to page 13 link to page 13 link to page 14 link to page 15 link to page 16 link to page 16
 
Contents 
1.  An ubiquitous threat to consumer health ..................................................... 3 
2.  Broken Promises: EDCs escape effective control .......................................... 4 
3.  EDC criteria must identify all substances that may harm consumers ........... 5 
4.  The Commission disregards the need for precaution on EDCs ...................... 6 
5.  How the EU can better protect consumers against EDC ................................ 9 
1.  Streamline existing REACH processes with regard to EDCs .............................10 
2.  Amend the Cosmetics Regulation with regard to EDCs ...................................11 
3.  Strengthen sector and product legislation ....................................................12 
4.  Protect consumers through a powerful EU Market Surveillance System ............12 
5.  Improve transparency about EDCs in consumer products ...............................13 
6.  Revise the Community EDC Strategy ...........................................................14 
6.  Industry must assume responsibility and phase out EDCs ......................... 15 
7.  TTIP and Better Regulation distract the EU from regulating EDCs .............. 15 
 
 
 



 
1.  An ubiquitous threat to consumer health 
As consumers, we are all unwitting participants in a dangerous experiment with potentially 
sweeping consequences for our health. Endocrine disruptors1 refer to a group of chemicals 
that interfere with the body’s sensitive hormonal system. Given their capacity to mimic, 
interfere and block natural hormones, exposure to even tiny amounts of these chemicals 
can  cause  severe  and  irreversible  effects  on 
humans  and  wildlife,  such  as  infertility  or 
hormone-related cancers.2  
Exposure to endocrine-
Exposure  to  endocrine-disrupting  chemicals 
disrupting chemicals 
(EDCs) occurs at home and at work, through 
(EDCs) occurs at home 
the air we breathe, the food we eat, and the 
and at work, through the 
water  we  drink.  Because  chemicals  with 
air we breathe, the food 
endocrine-disrupting  properties  are  found  in 
we eat, and the water we 
many of the products we use every day, this is 
drink 
a risk that concerns us all. Evidence from six 
product tests undertaken by BEUC’s members 
illustrates the scope of our exposure:  
  Five out of eight cans of peeled tomatoes tested3 by the Danish Consumer Council 
contained bisphenol A, a known endocrine disruptor. 
  UFC  Que-Choisir,  our  French  member,  found4  known  or  suspected  endocrine 
disruptors, such as ethylhexyl methoxycinnamate, in 7 out of 17 sunscreens.  
  The  phthalate  DIBP  was  found  in  two  soft  toys  tested5  by  German  Stiftung 
Warentest. 
  1 in 2 beauty balms tested6 by Altroconsumo in Italy contained either known or 
suspected endocrine disruptors, such as propylparaben or butylparaben. 
  PFOA, a chemical with known endocrine-disrupting properties, was found in three 
out of six children’s jackets tested7 by the Norwegian Consumer Council. 
  The  Danish  Consumer  Council  found8  that  in  4  out  of  5  ’loombands’,  a  popular 
children’s toy, concentrations of the phthalate DEHP exceeded legal limit values. 
In  all  of  these  tests,  however,  risky  chemicals  were  found  in  some  but  not  in  all 
tested products
. Much of our exposure could be avoided as in many cases use of these 
chemicals do not seem necessary for the final product. (The annexed test results from our 
members corroborate this conclusion.) 
                                           
1   According to the accepted World Health Organization/International Programme on Chemical Safety 
(WHO/IPCS) definition, an endocrine disruptor is an exogenous substance or mixture that alters 
function(s) of the endocrine system and consequently causes adverse health effects in an intact organism, 

or its progeny, or (sub)populations. http://www.who.int/ipcs/publications/en/ch1.pdf?ua=1 
2   See e.g. Andrea C. Gore et al., Introduction to Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs). A Guide for Public 
Interest Organizations and Policy-Makers, Endocrine Society and IPEN, December 2014. 
https://www.motherjones.com/files/introduction_to_endocrine_disrupting_chemicals.pdf 
3   http://kemi.taenk.dk/bliv-groennere/test-bisphenol-still-found-canned-peeled-tomatoes 
4   https://www.quechoisir.org/comparatif-creme-solaire-n697/ 
5   https://www.test.de/Kuscheltiere-Zwei-Drittel-fallen-durch-den-Sicherheits-und-Schadstofftest-4947548-
4947558/ 
6   http://emagazine.altroconsumo.it/?paper=testsalute&selDate=20141001 
7   http://www.forbrukerradet.no/vi-mener/2015/fpa-mat-og-handel-2015/helseskadelige-stoffer-funnet-i-
norske-barnejakker/ 
8   http://kemi.taenk.dk/bliv-groennere/test-kemi-i-vedhaeng-til-loombands 



 
Although  the  long-term  impact  of  this  ubiquitous  exposure  is  not  fully  understood, 
scientists warn that EDCs may cause severe diseases and disorders.9 In the EU, the cost 
of  EDC  exposure  has  conservatively  been  estimated  at  an  astronomic  €157  billion  per 
year.10 Against this background, the World Health Organisation and the UN Environmental 
Programme have called the impacts of endocrine disruptors a “global threat” that needs to 
be resolved.11 
2.  Broken Promises: EDCs escape effective control  
The 7th Environmental Action Programme (EAP) commits the European Union to develop 
by  2015  horizontal  measures  to  ensure  “the  minimisation  of  exposure  to 
endocrine disruptors.”
12 Yet, to date, the pace of EU action to protect consumers against 
EDCs  remains  inexcusably  slow  –  or  altogether  absent.  While  several  EU  laws  regulate 
EDCs in theory, their practical implementation falls short as they lack concrete criteria that 
define what an ‘endocrine disruptor’ is. As a result, EDCs escape effective control under 
current EU laws despite the urgent need to minimise consumer exposure.  
Under  EU  pesticides  laws,13 
BOX 1  Four options for EDC criteria 
the European Parliament and 
Council  set  December  2013 
The 2014 Commission Roadmap considers four options for possible 
EDC criteria: 
as  a  deadline  for  the 
European  Commission  to 
Option 1: no formal criteria are specified, but the interim criteria set 
in EU pesticides laws could continue to apply. 
adopt  scientific  criteria  to 
Option 2: use the WHO/IPCS definition to identify EDCs. 
determine 
endocrine-
Option 3: use the WHO/IPCS definition combined with three 
disrupting  properties.  In  line 
categories based on the different strength of evidence for 
with  the  7th  EAP,  these  laws 
fulfilling the WHO/IPCS definition. 
Option 4: use the WHO/IPCS definition and include potency as an 
oblige  the  Commission  to 
element of hazard characterisation.  
develop  hazard-based  EDC 
criteria  based  exclusively  on 
BEUC supports Option 3 as it would allow the EU to respond to 
early warning signs and prevent potential harm to its citizens 
scientific  evidence  related  to 
and the environment. 
the endocrine system. 
BEUC rejects Option 4 which modifies the accepted scientific WHO 
definition by introducing the vague notion of ‘potency.’ As 
In 
summer 
2013, 
the 
expressed in the landmark BfR consensus statement* 
Commission  was  about  to 
“potency is not relevant for identification of a compound as 
publish  draft  EDC  criteria.14 
an endocrine disruptor.” 
But  a  coordinated  lobby 
*  Roland Solecki et al., Scientific principles for the identification of endocrine disrupting 
chemicals – a consensus statement. Outcome of an international expert meeting 
attack  by  the  chemicals  and 
organized by the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR), Berlin, 4 May 
pesticides industries derailed 
2016. http://www.bfr.bund.de/cm/349/scientific-principles-for-the-identification-of-
endocrine-disrupting-chemicals-a-consensus-statement.pdf 
the  democratic  decision-
 
                                           
9   See e.g. A. C. Gore et al., EDC-2: The Endocrine Society’s Second Scientific Statement on Endocrine-
Disrupting Chemicals, November 2015. 
https://www.endocrine.org/~/media/endosociety/files/publications/scientific-statements/edc-2-scientific-
statement.pdf?la=en 

10   This estimate includes direct costs such as hospital stays, physicians' services, nursing-home care and other 
medical costs as well as indirect costs resulting from lost worker productivity, early death and disability, and 
loss of intellectual abilities caused by prenatal exposure. This estimate however does not cover intangible 
cost such as a loss of life-quality. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4399291/ 
11   United Nations Environment Programme and the World Health Organization, State of the Science of 
Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals 2012. Summary for Decision-Makers, 2013. 
http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/78102/1/WHO_HSE_PHE_IHE_2013.1_eng.pdf?ua=1  
12   http://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/?uri=CELEX:32013D1386 
13   Respectively, the Plant Protection Products Regulation (EC) No 1107/20092 and the Biocidal Products 
Regulation (EU) No 528/20123.  
14   http://www.environmentalhealthnews.org/ehs/news/2013/pdf-links/2013.06.11%20EDC_Recommendation 
%20Commission%20Draft.pdf 



 
making process.15 Rather than adopt EDC criteria as required by the law, the Commission 
instead  decided  to  first  conduct  an  assessment  of  possible  socio-economic  impacts, 
deliberately ignoring the deadlines set in the law.  
The Commission subsequently published a roadmap16 (see BOX 1) that compares various 
options for EDC criteria and also considers changes to existing laws. A compulsory review 
of the Cosmetics Regulation with respect to EDCs was meanwhile shelved and is now one 
and a half years overdue.  
The Commission’s failure to adopt scientific criteria is unlawful as established by 
the General Court of the European Union in December 2015. Notably, the Court ruled17 that 
criteria to determine endocrine-disrupting properties must be based on science relating to 
the endocrine system only – independent of economic considerations.18 The Court further 
found  that  the  decision  to  carry  out  an  impact  assessment  does  not  exonerate  the 
Commission  from  complying  with  the  December  2013  deadline  set  in  the  Biocides 
Regulation.  
BEUC welcomes the Court’s landmark decision as a victory for European consumers. Our 
everyday  exposure  to  endocrine-disrupting  chemicals  –  in  our  homes,  workplaces  and 
communities – must stop in order to protect the health of current and future generations.19  
3.  EDC criteria must identify all substances that may harm consumers 
An EU definition of endocrine disruptors needs 
to capture all chemicals that may disrupt the 
hormonal  system;  that  is,  both  those 
chemicals  we  know  are  endocrine  disruptors 
and  those  we  suspect.  Similar  to  chemicals 
Similar to chemicals that 
that cause cancer, change DNA or are toxic to 
cause cancer, change 
reproduction  (CMRs),  EDCs  should  be 
DNA or are toxic to 
classified  and  regulated.  BEUC  therefore 
reproduction, EDCs 
supports  the  introduction  of  a  strict  hazard-
should be classified and 
based 
classification 
system, 
where 

regulated 
distinction is made between knownpresumed
and  suspected  EDCs.  Such  a  system  would 
facilitate a simple classification scheme based 
on available evidence. It would further enable 
authorities  to  prioritise  chemicals  for  regulatory  attention.20  Compared  to  the  policy 
option presented in the Commission Roadmap,21 this is equivalent to ‘Option 3’
.  
                                           
15   http://corporateeurope.org/sites/default/files/toxic_lobby_edc.pdf 
16  http://ec.europa.eu/smart-regulation/impact/planned_ia/docs/2014_env_009_endocrine_disruptors_en.pdf 
17   http://curia.europa.eu/jcms/upload/docs/application/pdf/2015-12/cp150145en.pdf 
18   http://curia.europa.eu/juris/document/document.jsf;jsessionid=9ea7d0f130d58da361001f9141699c35f1e0 
bf49014d.e34KaxiLc3eQc40LaxqMbN4OchqSe0?text=&docid=173067&pageIndex=0&doclang=SV&mode=ls
t&dir=&occ=first&part=1&cid=639996 
19   See also BEUC, Open letter to Commissioner Andriukaitis, The European Commission’s approach to 
chemicals which can disturb the hormonal system, Brussels, 2 February. 
http://www.beuc.eu/publications/beuc-x-2016-011_ec_approach_to_chemicals_which_can_disturb_the_ 
hormonal_system.pdf 
20   See Rémy Slama et al., Scientific Issues relevant to Setting Regulatory Criteria to Identify Endocrine 
Disrupting Substances in the European Union, Environmental Health Perspectives, 25 April 2016. 
http://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/wp-content/uploads/advpub/2016/4/EHP217.acco.pdf 
21   European Commission, Roadmap: Defining criteria for identifying Endocrine Disruptors in the context of the 
implementation of the Plant Protection Product Regulation and Biocidal Products Regulation, June 2014. 
http://ec.europa.eu/smart-regulation/impact/planned_ia/docs/2014_env_009_endocrine_disruptors_en.pdf 



 
Our position aligns with the recommendations of international scientists,22 the European 
Parliament23 and the EDC-Free Europe coalition.24 It is likewise in line with the judgment 
of the European Court of Justice.25 In their review of the four criteria options proposed by 
the Commission, epidemiologist Rémy Slama and colleagues for example conclude:26  
“Only options 2 and 3 comply with science. […] We believe that, because of the parallel 
with definitions of carcinogenic hazards (which have different categories based on evidence 
levels)  and  because  it  calls  for  the  identification  of  suspected  EDs,  Option  3  is  more 
relevant.”
 
4.  The Commission disregards the need for precaution on EDCs 
On 15 June 2016, after a delay of almost three years, the European Commission announced 
a set of proposed criteria for the identification of endocrine disruptors.27 BEUC welcomes 
that  the  Commission  acknowledges28  the  scientific  consensus29  that  potency  is  not 
relevant for scientific criteria to identify endocrine disruptors
.  
BEUC  nonetheless  strongly  opposes  the 
proposed  criteria  as  the  Commission’s 
approach  contradicts  the  precautionary 
principle
,  namely  that  protective  action 
should  prevail  in  the  face  of  scientific 
If the proposed criteria 
uncertainty.  The  proposed  criteria  will  force 
were applied, bisphenol A 
regulators  to  await  evidence  that  a  chemical 
– a widely acknowledged 
beyond  doubt  causes  harm,  before  they  can 
endocrine disruptor – 
take protective action – but by then the harm 
would not be recognised 
to  human  health  and  the  environment  would 
as such 
already have occurred.30 BEUC in consequence 
urges  Member  States  and  the  European 
Parliament to reject these flawed criteria 
and  to  demand  that  the  Commission 
amends its proposal in line with Option 3

                                           
22   See Jean-Pierre Bourguignon et al., Science-based regulation of endocrine disrupting chemicals in Europe: 
which approach? The Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology. 13 June 2016. 
http://www.thelancet.com/journals/landia/article/PIIS2213-8587(16)30121-8/ 
23   European Parliament resolution of 14 March 2013 on the protection of public health from endocrine 
disrupters (2012/2066(INI)), notably proposing “the introduction of ‘endocrine disrupter’ as a 
regulatory class, with different categories based on the strength of evidence.” 
http://www.europarl.europa.eu/sides/getDoc.do?pubRef=-//EP//TEXT+TA+P7-TA-2013-0091+0+DOC+ 
XML+V0//EN 
24   http://www.edc-free-europe.org/ 
25   http://curia.europa.eu/jcms/upload/docs/application/pdf/2015-12/cp150145en.pdf 
26   Rémy Slama et al., Scientific Issues relevant to Setting Regulatory Criteria to Identify Endocrine Disrupting 
Substances in the European Union, Environmental Health Perspectives, 25 April 2016. 
http://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/wp-content/uploads/advpub/2016/4/EHP217.acco.pdf 
27   http://europa.eu/rapid/press-release_IP-16-2152_en.htm 
28   Communication from the Commission to the European Parliament and the Council on endocrine disruptors 
and the draft Commission acts setting out scientific criteria for their determination in the context of the EU 
legislation on plant protection products and biocidal products (COM/16/0350) 
29   Roland Solecki et al., Scientific principles for the identification of endocrine disrupting chemicals – a 
consensus statement. Outcome of an international expert meeting organized by the German Federal 
Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR), Berlin, 4 May 2016. http://www.bfr.bund.de/cm/349/scientific-
principles-for-the-identification-of-endocrine-disrupting-chemicals-a-consensus-statement.pdf 
30   See Endocrine Society, Endocrine Society Experts Concerned EU Chemical Criteria Will Not Protect Public, 
July 2016. https://www.endocrine.org/news-room/current-press-releases/endocrine-society-experts-
concerned-eu-chemical-criteria-will-not-protect-public 



 
Against  the  advice  of  international  scientists,31  32  the  Commission  proposes  an 
unprecedented burden of proof for a chemical to be defined as an endocrine disruptor. The 
Endocrine  Society,  which  speaks  on  behalf  of  the  world’s  preeminent  EDC  experts, 
concludes33 that this restrictive definition sets “the bar so high that it will be challenging 
for chemicals to meet the standard, even when there is scientific evidence of harm.” As a 
result, few chemicals will be identified and regulated as endocrine disruptors. In effect, 
the Commission’s proposal would prevent the EU from effectively protecting its 
citizens and the environment against the threat of EDCs.
 
Specifically, the Commission’s proposal is fundamentally flawed because: 
  The criteria demand an onerous level of proof for a substance to be defined as 
an endocrine disruptor. The Commission proposes to identify chemicals as endocrine 
disruptors only when evidence of known adverse effects in humans and wildlife exists. 
This is a notably stricter approach than current EU practice for chemicals that cause 
cancer, change DNA or are toxic to reproduction (CMR). Proving a causal relationship 
between a chemical and its effect in humans is notoriously difficult. In fact, most CMR 
substances are  only presumed to cause these effects.34 35 In contrast, the  proposed 
criteria replace expert judgement of presumed effects with the much stronger demand 
that a chemical is known to cause an endocrine-disrupting adverse effect relevant for 
human health.36  
Few substances will meet this unprecedented standard of proof, including some that 
are already recognised to be endocrine disruptors. The French, Danish, and Swedish 
governments  for  instance  conclude37  that  if  the  proposed  criteria  were  applied, 
bisphenol A – a widely acknowledged endocrine disruptor that the EU for example has 
banned in plastic baby bottles – would not be recognised as such. The health impacts 
of EDCs can take years or even generations to appear, and the Commission’s approach 
would allow chemicals to cause significant harm before they finally are regulated.38 
  It  would  hinder  an  effective  EU  response  to  substances  suspected  of 
endocrine  disruption.  Systematic  identification  of  chemicals  that  may  cause 
endocrine  disruption  would  allow  the  EU  to  act  on  early  warning  signs  and  prevent 
potential  harm  to  its  citizens  and  the  environment.  Consistent  with  EU  practice  for 
substances of equal concern, such as CMR substances, endocrine disruptors should be 
classified and regulated using categories that express the degree of concern based on 
                                           
31   Marlene Ågerstrand et al., Open letter in response to the proposed criteria for identification and regulation 
of endocrine disrupting chemicals, under the PPP and Biocides Regulations, 6 July 2016. 
http://policyfromscience.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/Open-Letter-to-Andriukaitis-about-EDC-
Criteria.pdf 
32   Andreas Kortenkamp et al. EU regulation of endocrine disruptors. A missed opportunity, The Lancet 
Diabetes and Endocrinology. 1 July 2016. http://thelancet.com/journals/landia/article/PIIS2213-
8587(16)30151-6/fulltext 
33   https://www.endocrine.org/news-room/current-press-releases/european-commissions-overreaching-
decision-fails-to-protect-public-health 
34   ClientEarth, How will the EU identify EDCs and ban or approve their use? The Commission cannot change 
the scope and basis of the mechanism through the back door, July 2016. 
http://www.documents.clientearth.org/wp-content/uploads/library/2016-07-08-summary-of-analysis-of-
european-commission-proposals-and-legal-requirements-concerning-the-determination-of-scientific-criteria-

to-identify-endocrine-disruptors-coll-en.pdf 
35   Substances presumed to cause endocrine disruption were in fact included in the original ‘Option 2’ outlined 
in the Commission roadmap, see http://ec.europa.eu/smart-
regulation/impact/planned_ia/docs/2014_env_009_endocrine_disruptors_en.pdf  
36   Andreas Kortenkamp et al. EU regulation of endocrine disruptors. A missed opportunity, The Lancet 
Diabetes and Endocrinology. 1 July 2016. http://thelancet.com/journals/landia/article/PIIS2213-
8587(16)30151-6/fulltext 
37   http://www.regeringen.se/globalassets/regeringen/dokument/miljo--och-
energidepartementet/pdf/vytenisandriukaitis.pdf 
38   See Endocrine Society, Endocrine Society Experts Concerned EU Chemical Criteria Will Not Protect Public, 
July 2016. https://www.endocrine.org/news-room/current-press-releases/endocrine-society-experts-
concerned-eu-chemical-criteria-will-not-protect-public 



 
available  evidence.39  The  Cosmetics  Regulation  and  the  Toy  Safety  Directive  for 
example prohibit use of known, presumed and suspected CMR substances. A parallel 
approach should be taken for chemicals with endocrine-disrupting properties.  
The  Commission  concludes40  that  EDC  criteria  must  define  only  what  an  endocrine 
disruptor  is,  not  what  it  may  be.  We  fundamentally  disagree.  EU  pesticides  laws 
expressly  address  chemicals  with  endocrine-disrupting  properties  that  may  cause 
adverse effects
 or for which scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human 
health  or  the  environment  exists.  The  proposed  criteria  thus  run  counter  to  the 
democratic  decision  of  the  European  Parliament  and  Member  States.  Moreover,  by 
excluding  potential  endocrine  disruptors,  the  Commission  disregards  the  need  for 
precaution on EDCs.  
  The Commission exceeds its mandate by proposing changes to the law: first, 
the  Commission  proposes  to  change  the  wording  in  the  Plant  Protection  Products 
Regulation  from  the  conditional  ‘may  cause  adverse  effects  in  humans’  to  the 
affirmative  ‘having  endocrine  disrupting  properties  with  respect  to  humans’.  This 
change  however  contradicts  the  precautionary  approach  that  the  co-legislators 
deliberately chose to underpin the law. 
Second, the Commission proposes to broaden the derogation in the Plant Protection 
Products  Regulation  from  ‘negligible  exposure’  to  ‘negligible  risk’.  If  this  risk-based 
derogation  is  adopted,  toxic  substances  that  otherwise  would  be  banned  under  the 
law’s hazard-based approach could be allowed to stay on the market.  In effect, the 
Commission’s  proposal  would  thus  lower  the  level  of  protection  sought  by  the  co-
legislators. By proposing to change a crucial approval mechanism, the Commission in 
short exceeds the limits of its delegated powers.41  
  It  ignores  the  political  commitment  to  develop  horizontal  EDC  criteria 
applicable  to  all  current  and  future  laws  set  out  in  the  7th  Environmental  Action 
Programme. The Commission’s proposal is developed exclusively based on a sectoral 
view (pesticides). It is however unclear if the proposed criteria can be applied to other 
sectors or product groups, such as for example cosmetics. Unlike data-rich pesticides, 
the  EU  ban  on  animal  testing  of  cosmetics  ingredients  means  that  in  many  cases 
insufficient  evidence  is  available  to  meet  the  standard  of  proof  proposed  by  the 
Commission. If applied to cosmetics and other consumer products, the Commission’s 
proposal  could  jeopardize  the  need  to  protect  consumers  against  chemicals  with 
endocrine-disrupting properties.  
As  a  result  of  the  unprecedented  burden  of  proof  and  the  proposed  legal  changes,  few 
chemicals  will  be  defined  and  regulated  as  endocrine  disruptors,  even  when  there  is 
compelling scientific evidence of harm. We again insist that the Commission amends 
its proposal according to the recommendations outlined above

                                           
39   See Rémy Slama et al., Scientific Issues relevant to Setting Regulatory Criteria to Identify Endocrine 
Disrupting Substances in the European Union, Environmental Health Perspectives, 25 April 2016. 
http://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/wp-content/uploads/advpub/2016/4/EHP217.acco.pdf 
40   Communication from the Commission to the European Parliament and the Council on endocrine disruptors 
and the draft Commission acts setting out scientific criteria for their determination in the context of the EU 
legislation on plant protection products and biocidal products (COM/16/0350). 
41   See ClientEarth, How will the EU identify EDCs and ban or approve their use? The Commission cannot 
change the scope and basis of the mechanism through the back door, July 2016. 
http://www.documents.clientearth.org/wp-content/uploads/library/2016-07-08-summary-of-analysis-of-
european-commission-proposals-and-legal-requirements-concerning-the-determination-of-scientific-criteria-
to-identify-endocrine-disruptors-coll-en.pdf 



 
5.  How the EU can better protect consumers against EDC 
A  renewed  political  commitment  to  reduce  consumer  exposure  to  EDCs  is  urgent.  The 
possible  public  health  implications  of  EDC  exposures  and  the  uncertainties  in  risk 
assessment underscore the need to respond to early warning signals and to replace EDCs 
with safer alternatives whenever possible. BEUC therefore calls on EU leaders to draw 
up  an  ambitious  agenda  on  regulating  EDCs  in  all
  consumer  goods  with  clear 
objectives and observable deadlines.
  
A precautionary approach should be applied in 
all  consumer  relevant  legislation  to  reduce 
exposure  to  EDCs.  This  approach  needs  to 
include  overarching  principles  on  how  to 
reduce  EDC  exposures,  combined  with 
targeted strategies for all product categories, 
Where health concerns 
from  cosmetics  to  food  contact  materials, 
are raised, it should 
textiles  and  toys.  Where  health  concerns  are 
automatically trigger 
raised  in  one  sector  or  for  one  product,  it 
risk evaluation across 
should  automatically  trigger  risk  evaluation 
legislative ‘silos’ to 
across  legislative  ‘silos’42  to  fully  assess  the 
ensure swift action in 
impact of cumulative exposures and to ensure 
the absence of scientific 
swift  action  in  the  absence  of  scientific 
certainty 
certainty. The EU should systematically make 
industry  responsible  for  providing  sufficient 
evidence  to  demonstrate  safety.  All  evidence 
provided by industry needs to be verified and 
assessed 
by 
independent 
scientific 
committees.  
The EU should aim for a more holistic and coherent approach to risk management through 
greater reliance on grouping of chemicals.43 This would also help avoid situations where a 
chemical  with  endocrine-disrupting  properties  is  substituted  with  chemically  related 
substances with similar hazardous properties. Growing evidence for example suggests that 
bisphenol F and bisphenol S, two common substitutes for the endocrine disruptor bisphenol 
A, are also endocrine disruptors.44 Such ‘regrettable substitutions’ clearly undermine efforts 
to protect people and the environment. 
Once  adopted,  future  EDC  criteria  must  be  implemented  without  delay
Implementing  criteria  according  to  our  recommendations  will  for  instance  contribute  to 
reducing  consumer  exposure  to  EDCs  found  as  pesticide  residues  in  food  or  as  active 
ingredients  in  e.g.  antiseptic  hygiene  products,  insect  sprays  or  antibacterial  cleaning 
products.45  Based  on  the  criteria,  a  systematic  screening  of  existing  product  specific 
legislation  is  needed  to  ensure  that  all  relevant  consumer  legislation  takes  EDCs  into 
account. Here we highlight six areas where improvements in particular are urgent. 
                                           
42   Richard M. Evans et al., Should the scope of human mixture risk assessment span legislative/regulatory 
silos for chemicals? Science of the Total Environment 543, November 2015. 
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0048969715309785 
43   http://www.oecd.org/chemicalsafety/risk-assessment/groupingofchemicalschemicalcategoriesandread-
across.htm 
44   http://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/1408989/ 
45   See CHEM Trust and Health and Environment Alliance, Challenges and solutions in the regulation of 
chemicals with endocrine disrupting properties, no date. http://www.env-health.org/IMG/pdf/36-
_heal_ct_edc_criteria_briefing_paper.pdf 



 
1.  Streamline existing REACH processes with regard to EDCs 
Chemicals  with  endocrine-disrupting  properties  should  be  subject  to  stricter  control 
under  REACH
.  Based  on  the  EDC  criteria,  authorities  need  to  assess  the  endocrine-
disrupting  potential  of  registered  substances  and,  where  necessary,  pursue  appropriate 
risk  management  measures.  Priority  should  be  given  to  substances  likely  to  come  into 
contact with the public, particularly with vulnerable populations such as infants, women of 
childbearing age and pregnant women. 
The  EDC  criteria  should  also  play  an 
important role in determining how many 
and  which  EDCs  become  subject  to 
restrictions 

or 
authorisation 
under 
By 2020, the EU has 
REACH.46 EDCs identified as Substances of 
committed to ensure that 
Very  High  Concern  (SVHC)  should  be 
all relevant substances of 
included on the REACH Authorisation List 
very high concern, 
and  phased  out  without  delay.  Member 
including those with 
States  and  the  Commission  likewise  need  to 
endocrine-disrupting 
consider  more  restrictions  on  EDCs  in 
consumer  products,  especially  in  imported 
properties, are placed on 
goods.  
the REACH candidate list 
We  thus  welcome  the  French  government’s 
intention47  to  classify  bisphenol  A  (BPA)  as  a 
SVHC on the basis of its CMR and endocrine-disrupting properties. Sufficient evidence links 
BPA  to  endocrine  disruption  and  it  should  be  phased  out  in  all  consumer  products.48 
Immediate  action  is  likewise  required  against  the  32  substances  with  scientifically 
demonstrated  endocrine-disrupting  properties  included  on  the  SIN  (‘Substitute  It  Now’) 
List.49  The  European  Chemicals  Agency,  ECHA,  and  Denmark  have  recently  proposed50 
extensive restrictions on phthalates in consumer products, including those imported into 
the EU. We strongly support this proposal. 
 
Under the 7th Environmental Program, the EU has committed to “ensure that, by 2020, all 
relevant substances of very high concern, including substances with endocrine-disrupting 
properties, are placed on the REACH candidate list.”51 To achieve this goal, Member States 
need to advance their efforts to identify substances with endocrine-disrupting properties 
and  depending  on  the  outcome  to  nominate  those  substances  for  the  candidate  list. 
Member States should also demand that inclusion of SVHCs on the Authorisation List is 
accelerated.52  
Against  this  background,  we  regret  the  recent  decision  to  authorise  use  of  the  toxic 
phthalate DEHP in recycled PVC despite the existence of safer alternatives. This decision 
notably ignores the recommendation53 of the European Parliament which calls for a swift 
                                           
46   See CHEM Trust and Health and Environment Alliance, Challenges and solutions in the regulation of 
chemicals with endocrine disrupting properties, no date. http://www.env-health.org/IMG/pdf/36-
_heal_ct_edc_criteria_briefing_paper.pdf 

47   http://echa.europa.eu/registry-of-current-svhc-intentions/-/substance-rev/12537/term 
48   BEUC, Bisphenol A Should Be Phased Out from Consumer Products, March 2011. 
http://www.beuc.eu/publications/2011-00248-01-e.pdf 
49   See ChemSec, The 32 to leave behind. The most well-founded list of EDCs relevant for REACH, no date. 
http://chemsec.org/images/The_32_to_leave_behind_-_EDC_folder.pdf 
50   http://echa.europa.eu/registry-of-submitted-restriction-proposal-intentions/-/substance-rev/13107/term 
51   http://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/?uri=CELEX:32013D1386 
52   See European Environmental Bureau, A Roadmap to Revitalise REACH, November 2015. 
http://www.eeb.org/index.cfm/library/a-roadmap-to-revitalise-reach/  
53   European Parliament resolution of 25 November 2015 on draft Commission Implementing Decision XXX 
granting an authorisation for uses of bis(2-ethylhexhyl) phthalate (DEHP) under Regulation (EC) No 
1907/2006 of the European Parliament and of the Council (D041427 – 2015/2962(RSP)) 
10 


 
end to the use of DEHP in all remaining applications. This decision risks setting a dangerous 
precedent that could compromise the EU’s commitment to replace toxic substances with 
safer alternatives.54  
2.  Amend the Cosmetics Regulation with regard to EDCs 
Substances 
with 
endocrine-disrupting 
properties  are  widely  used  as  ingredients  in 
cosmetic 
products, 
for 
example 
as 
preservatives.  In  joint  test55  of  66  cosmetic 
products,  BEUC  and  International  Consumer 
The Commission has 
Research and Testing (ICRT), in collaboration 
with  our  British,  Danish,  French  and  Swiss 
failed to assess whether 
members,  found  high  levels  of  substances 
the Cosmetics Regulation 
known 
to 
have 
endocrine-disrupting 
is fit to protect 
properties. Similarly, the Norwegian Consumer 
consumers against 
Council  found56  that  one  in  two  lip  balms 
cosmetics ingredients 
contained  one  or  more  suspected  EDCs. 
with endocrine-
Although in all cases within legal concentration 
disrupting properties 
limits, EU laws do not consider or regulate 
the  cumulative  chemicals  exposure  from 
daily  use  of  multiple  cosmetic  products. 
This  suggests  that  the  health  of 
consumers  is  potentially  placed  at 
unacceptable risk
.57  
The  Cosmetics  Regulation  instructs  the  Commission  to  review  the  regulation  when 
Community  or  internationally  agreed  criteria  for  identifying  substances  with  endocrine-
disrupting properties are available, or at the latest by 11 January 2015.58 Despite this 
clear  deadline,  the  Commission  has  so  far  failed  to  assess  whether  the  Cosmetics 
Regulation  is  fit  to  protect  consumers  against  cosmetics  ingredients  with  endocrine-
disrupting properties. We strongly criticise this delay which may create unnecessary health 
risks for consumers.  
The Austrian government has called on the Commission to present before the end of 2016 
a concrete proposal for amending the EU Cosmetics regulation with regard to endocrine 
disruptors.59 BEUC strongly supports this initiative. 
It is paramount that a future amendment to the Cosmetics Regulation with regard 
to endocrine disruptors protect consumers effectively, including from cumulative 
exposures.
  Once  EDC  criteria  have  been  adopted,  the  Commission  should  therefore 
                                           
http://www.europarl.europa.eu/sides/getDoc.do?pubRef=-//EP//NONSGML+TA+P8-TA-2015-
0409+0+DOC+PDF+V0//EN 
54   See e.g. European Environmental Bureau, Stop! EEB sees red over DEHP authorisation application for PVC, 
no date. http://www.eeb.org/index.cfm/library/stop-eeb-sees-red-over-dehp-authorisation-application-for-
pvc/ 
55   BEUC & ICRT, Endocrine disrupting chemicals – analysis of 66 everyday cosmetic and personal care 
products, 21 June 2016. http://www.beuc.eu/publications/2013-00461-01-e.pdf 
56   http://www.forbrukerradet.no/test/tester/leppepomade/ 
57   See BEUC & ICRT, Endocrine disrupting chemicals – analysis of 66 everyday cosmetic and personal care 
products, 21 June 2016. http://www.beuc.eu/publications/2013-00461-01-e.pdf 
58   Art. 15(4) of the Cosmetics Regulation instructs the Commission to review the regulation with regard to 
substances with endocrine-disrupting properties when “Community or internationally agreed criteria for 
identifying substances with endocrine-disrupting properties are available, or at the latest on 11 January 
2015.” 
59   http://www.ots.at/presseaussendung/OTS_20160129_OTS0092/oberhauser-fordert-aenderung-der-eu-
kosmetikverordnung-und-schutz-vor-hormonell-wirksamen-stoffen 
11 


 
launch a comprehensive screening of all ingredients approved for use in cosmetic products 
to assess their known and potential endocrine-disrupting properties. Where a substance 
can plausibly be linked to adverse effects, its use in cosmetics should be restricted – or 
prohibited altogether.  
3.  Strengthen sector and product legislation   
Robust chemical provisions are non-existent for many consumer products.60 REACH will not 
compensate for these deficits as consumer goods – particularly imported ones – are barely 
covered  under  REACH.  Moreover,  current  EU  chemicals-related  legislation  regulating 
consumer products largely fail to set sufficiently ambitious thresholds to ensure adequate 
protection of consumer health.  
BEUC urges the Commission to review all consumer relevant legislation to ensure that the 
risks  associated  with  EDCs  are  adequately  controlled.  We  in  particular  see  a  need  to 
strengthen  requirements  on  chemicals  with  endocrine-disrupting  properties  in  the  Toy 
Safety  Directive61  and  under  the  Regulation  on  Food  Contact  Materials,62  while  special 
precautions for EDCs in medical devices are needed.63 A product-specific approach to tackle 
EDCs in textiles must also be considered.64 A clear deadline for this exercise is required to 
guarantee that current loopholes are closed without delay.  
4.  Protect consumers through a powerful EU Market Surveillance System  
Enforcement  of  EU  consumer  and  chemicals-
related laws remains inadequate. In 2015, 25 
per cent of total of notifications to the EU 

Good laws are irrelevant if 
RAPEX  system  were  related  to  chemical 
they are not enforced 
risks,65 including toys containing phthalates, a 
category  of  industrial  chemicals  known  for 
their 
endocrine-disrupting 
properties. 
However, as a result of inefficient and ineffective market surveillance activities and a lack 
of  clear  rules  with  regard  to  chemicals  in  consumer  products,  this  figure  likely 
represents only the tip of the iceberg
. From a consumer perspective, it is unacceptable 
that  no  EU  harmonised  market  surveillance  system  is  in  place  to  ensure  meaningful 
controls in all Member States. Stricter market surveillance rules are urgently needed.  
In  February  2013,  the  European  Commission  proposed  a  Consumer  Product  Safety 
Regulation  and  a  Market  Surveillance  Regulation.  This  package  contains  important 
innovations to enhance product safety, such as new rules on better traceability throughout 
product  supply chains.66  Despite backing from the European Parliament, Member States 
continue to block this badly needed overhaul of the system. We regret this standstill which 
                                           
60   See ANEC, Hazardous chemicals in products - The need for enhanced EU regulations, June 2014. 
http://www.anec.eu/attachments/ANEC-PT-2014-CEG-002.pdf 
61   ANEC and BEUC, EU Subgroup on chemicals in toys fails its mission. Critical review, November 2012. 
http://www.beuc.eu/publications/2012-00799-01-e.pdf 
62   See e.g. Health and Environment Alliance (HEAL), Food contact materials and chemical contamination, 
February 2016. http://www.env-health.org/IMG/pdf/15022016_-_heal_briefing_fcm_final.pdf  
63   BEUC, Position on the Regulations on medical devices, March 2013. http://www.beuc.eu/publications/beuc-
x-2013-031_ipa_medical_devices-beuc_updated_position-final.pdf 
64   ANEC and BEUC, Protecting consumers from hazardous chemicals in textiles, March 2016. 
http://www.beuc.eu/publications/beuc-x-2016-020_protecting_consumers_from_hazardous_chemicals_ 
in_textiles.pdf 
65   European Commission, Press release. Protecting European consumers: toys and clothing top the list of 
dangerous products detected in 2015, Brussels, 25 April 2016. http://europa.eu/rapid/press-release_IP-16-
1507_en.htm 
66   ANEC and BEUC, Position Paper on European Commission proposal for a Consumer Product Safety 
Regulation, June 2013. http://www.beuc.eu/publications/2013-00394-01-e.pdf 
12 


 
places consumers at unnecessary and unacceptable risk. Good laws are irrelevant if they 
are  not  enforced.  Member  States  should  promptly  agree  to  a  common  European 
market  surveillance  framework  that  will  ensure  a  coherent  and  consistent 
approach  to  the  presence  of  dangerous  chemicals,  such  as  phthalates,  in 
consumer goods

5.  Improve transparency about EDCs in consumer products 
At present, there is a serious lack of information on 
which products contain chemicals with endocrine-
disrupting  properties.  As  a  result,  it  is  almost 
impossible  for  consumers  to  avoid  these  harmful 
Given the little 
chemicals.  More  transparency  about  EDCs  is 
information available, 
essential  in  particular  for  products  which 
consumers  come  in  direct,  close  or  regular 

it is almost impossible 
contact with, such as bed mattresses or textiles. 
for consumers to 
avoid products that 
Article  33  of  REACH  establishes  the  consumers’ 
contain EDCs 
right to be informed about substances of very high 
concern  present  in  products.  It  is  however 
generally  recognised  that  this  mechanism  falls 
short and needs to be strengthened.67 Research68 undertaken by BEUC and our members 
for example found that consumers experience severe difficulties in accessing information 
and that companies rarely have sufficient knowledge of their obligations under REACH. At 
the same time, of the close to 800 chemicals with known or suspected endocrine-disrupting 
properties,69 only a tiny fraction is included on the REACH Candidate list. Consumers are in 
short denied reliable information about the vast majority of chemicals that may present a 
risk to their health, including those suspected of being EDCs. 
The  European  Parliament  has  urged  “the  Commission  and  the  Member  States  to  take 
greater account of the fact that consumers need to have reliable information – presented 
in an appropriate form and in a language that they can understand – about the dangers of 
endocrine  disrupters,  their  effects,  and  possible  ways  of  protecting  themselves.”70  We 
strongly support this recommendation. 
The  EU  should  increase  funding  for  organisations  that  work  to  inform  the  public  about 
EDCs,  where  they  can  be  found  and  how  they  can  be  avoided.  The  Danish  Consumer 
Council has for example created a smartphone app, ‘kemiluppen’, which helps consumers 
avoid cosmetics and personal care products with undesirable substances.71 By scanning the 
product barcode consumers can access a chemical database and get answers immediately. 
At present, this database contains information on more than 6.900 products, some 1.800 
of which contains risky substances.72 To date, the app has been downloaded more than 
                                           
67   See ECHA, Report on the Operation of REACH and CLP 2016, May 2016. 
http://echa.europa.eu/documents/10162/13634/operation_reach_clp_2016_en.pdf 
68   BEUC, Chemicals, Companies and Consumers - How much are we told? October 2011. 
http://www.beuc.eu/publications/2011-09794-01-e.pdf 
69   See e.g. Andrea C. Gore et al., Introduction to Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs). A Guide for Public 
Interest Organizations and Policy-Makers, Endocrine Society and IPEN, December 2014. 
https://www.motherjones.com/files/introduction_to_endocrine_disrupting_chemicals.pdf 
70   European Parliament resolution of 14 March 2013 on the protection of public health from endocrine 
disrupters (2012/2066(INI)). http://www.europarl.europa.eu/sides/getDoc.do?pubRef=-
//EP//TEXT+TA+P7-TA-2013-0091+0+DOC+ XML+V0//EN 
71   http://kemi.taenk.dk/bliv-groennere/kemiluppen-runder-2-millioner-scanninger 
72   If a product is not in the database, consumers can via the app submit snapshots of the product and its 
ingredient list and ask that the product is assessed. When the product is assessed, the consumer receives 
an email with the answer. The answer is also accessible to all others who scan the product. 
13 


 
100,000 times, and consumers have scanned more than 2 million products.73 We encourage 
EU leaders to provide funding to allow this and other innovative tools to be replicated by 
NGOs in other countries.  
Greater  transparency  about  known  and  suspected  EDCs  in  consumer  products 
would in short allow consumers to make informed choices on how to protect their 
health.
  Above  all,  however,  we  emphasise  that  improved  transparency  under  no 
circumstance should shift responsibility to the consumer for avoiding exposure. Only far 
reaching  regulatory  measures  as  set  out  above  are  an  acceptable  solution  to  protect 
consumer health and safety.  
6.  Revise the Community EDC Strategy 
Given the mounting evidence74 unequivocally linking EDCs to chronic diseases and severe 
disorders, the EU needs to revise the outdated 1999 Community EDC strategy75 on how to 
protect the health of current and future generations. A primary policy objective must be to 
lower human and environmental exposures to EDCs. A reinvigorated EDC strategy should 
increase  support  for  research  to  address  data  gaps  and  to  develop  the  scientific 
understanding  regarding  thresholds  and  low-dose  adverse  effects.76  BEUC  would  in 
particular  welcome  initiatives  that  will  achieve  a  better  scientific  understanding  of  the 
effects  of  exposures  during  critical  windows  of  development  such  as  foetuses,  young 
children and pregnant women.  
Risk assessment and risk management methods further need to be updated to take into 
account low-dose effects of EDCs as well as the combined effect of different chemicals.77 
Current EU legislation does not support a comprehensive and integrated assessment of the 
cumulative  effects  of  different  chemicals.  In  its  2012  Communication  on  Combination 
effects  of  Chemicals,78  the  Commission  committed  to  develop  by  June  2014  technical 
guidelines to promote a consistent approach to the assessment of priority mixtures across 
different EU laws. This has not happened. 
BEUC urges the Commission to publish as soon as possible guidance documents promoting 
an  integrated  and  coordinated  assessment  across  all  relevant  EU  laws.  Testing 
requirements should also be updated to fully assess the impact of total EDC exposures and 
of cumulative impacts, corresponding to the reality of our exposure.  
                                           
73   http://kemi.taenk.dk/bliv-groennere/kemiluppen-runder-2-millioner-scanninger 
74   See e.g. A. C. Gore et al., EDC-2: The Endocrine Society’s Second Scientific Statement on Endocrine-
Disrupting Chemicals, November 2015. 
https://www.endocrine.org/~/media/endosociety/files/publications/scientific-statements/edc-2-scientific-
statement.pdf?la=en 

75   Communication from the Commission to the Council and the European Parliament - Community strategy for 
endocrine disrupters - A range of substances suspected of interfering with the hormone systems of humans 
and wildlife (COM/99/0706). 
76   See Genon K. Jensen and Lisette van Vliet, Revising the EU Strategy on endocrine disruptors: nearing a 
decisive moment, Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health, 9 November, 2012. http://www.env-
health.org/IMG/pdf/jech_commentary_eu_edc_strategy_heal_website_.pdf 
77   See Andrea C. Gore et al., Introduction to Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs). A Guide for Public 
Interest Organizations and Policy-Makers, Endocrine Society and IPEN, December 2014. 
https://www.motherjones.com/files/introduction_to_endocrine_disrupting_chemicals.pdf 
78   European Commission, Communication from the Commission to the Council. The combination effects of 
chemicals Chemical mixtures, May 2012. http://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-
content/EN/TXT/PDF/?uri=CELEX:52012DC0252&from=EN 
14 


 
6.  Industry must assume responsibility and phase out EDCs 
Chemicals 
with 
endocrine-disrupting 
properties  must  be  replaced  with  safer 
alternatives.  Chemicals  manufacturers  and 
their downstream customers therefore need to 
phase  out  the  use  of  such  substances  in  all 
Expensive does not 
consumer  products.  The  evidence  from  our 
necessarily mean 'EDC 
members’  comparative  product  tests  tells  a 
free'. Our French and 
compelling  story:  across  diverse  product 
Belgian members found 
groups, EDCs are present in some but not in 
EDCs in some expensive 
all  products.  (See  annex)  Moreover,  neither 
price  nor  brands  appear  to  be  a  decisive 
brand creams, but not in 
factor.  For  example,  in  a  test79  of  16  BB 
the cheaper alternatives 
creams, 
Test-Achats/Test-Aankoop, 
our 
Belgian  member,  found  EDCs  in  three 
expensive  brand  creams,  but  none  in  the 
cheaper  alternatives.  In  a  test  of  anti-aging 
creams, UFC-Que Choisir likewise found EDCs in some expensive products, but not in the 
cheaper  alternatives.80  The  evidence  provided  by  our  members  thus  demonstrate 
that more often than not safer alternatives do exist
.  
Industry needs to  live  up to  its repeated claims of safety and social responsibility.  Our 
recommendation  is  clear:  invest  in  safer  alternatives  and  phase  out  chemicals 
with  endocrine-disrupting  properties  whenever  possible.
  Progressive  companies 
have already committed to substitution.81 Danish retailer company, COOP, has for example 
announced82 that it will remove bisphenol A from food cans in all the Group’s own brands. 
H&M, IKEA, Kingfisher and Skanska are global companies dedicated83 to identify and phase 
out  substances  with  endocrine  disrupting  properties in  their  products.  This  shows  that 
choosing  peoples’  health  and  the  environment  over  profit  is  not  only  the  responsible 
approach; it is good for business! 
7.  TTIP and Better Regulation distract the EU from regulating EDCs 
Against the backdrop of scandalous delays in regulating EDCs, the EU and the U.S. entered 
the TTIP negotiations with a focus on reducing non-tariff barriers. BEUC sees a clear risk 
that  current  TTIP  proposals  would  freeze  progress  on  reducing  consumer 
exposure  to  EDCs.
84  Regrettably,  the  threat  that  strong  EDC  criteria  would  jeopardise 
TTIP appears already to have had an adverse effect on the EU decision-making process.85 
The  unambitious  and  inadequate  criteria  proposed  by  the  Commission  on  15  June  only 
confirm these concerns. We expect that with the conclusion of a formal agreement, this 
regulatory freeze will intensify.  
                                           
79   https://www.test-achats.be/sante/soins-du-corps/news/bb-et-cc-cremes-pas-de-miracles 
80   https://www.quechoisir.org/comparatif-creme-antiride-n103/ 
81   ChemSec, The bigger picture. Assessing economic aspects of chemicals substitution, February 2016. 
http://chemsec.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/The_bigger_picture_160217_print.pdf 
82   https://om.coop.dk/presse/pressemeddelelser.aspx?nyhedid=13766 
83   http://chemsec.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/Company-letter-to-the-Commission-2016-06.pdf 
84   BEUC, The incompatible chemistry between the EU and the US. BEUC position on chemicals in TTIP, January 
2016. http://www.beuc.eu/publications/beuc-x-2016-007_beuc_ttip_and_chemicals_position_paper.pdf 
85   Stéphane Horel and Corporate Europe Observatory, A Toxic Affair: How the Chemical Lobby Blocked Action 
on Hormone Disrupting Chemicals, May 2015. 
http://corporateeurope.org/sites/default/files/toxic_lobby_edc.pdf 
15 


 
In  parallel,  the  Commission  has  launched  a 
fitness  check  of  EU  chemicals  legislation 
(except  REACH)  and  a  separate  REFIT 
evaluation of the REACH regulation. Much like 
the  TTIP  negotiations,  these  REFIT  exercises 
If we are serious about 
focus  narrowly  on  identifying  regulatory 
protecting people’s 
burdens  to  industry,  quantifying  costs,  and 
health and the health of 
eliminating  redundancies.86  This  unbalanced 
future generations, 
emphasis on regulatory costs diverts attention 
from  a  progressive  agenda  on  regulating 
Europe’s inaction on 
chemicals  of  concern  in  consumer  products, 
endocrine disruptors 
such as EDCs.  
must come to an end 
The  Commission  has  repeatedly  claimed  that 
neither  the  TTIP  negotiations  nor  its  Better 
Regulation  agenda  threaten  the  EU’s  high 
standards of protection. Given that the primary objective of both agendas is the elimination 
of regulatory costs to businesses87 – not the development of more ambitious EU policies to 
protect consumers – these claims have never been particularly convincing. 
TTIP and the Better Regulation drive must not serve to distract the EU from an ambitious 
agenda  on  better  protecting  consumers  against  chemicals  with  endocrine-disrupting 
properties. We remind EU leaders that safety delayed is all too often safety denied. If we 
are serious about protecting people’s health and the health future generations, Europe’s 
inaction on endocrine disruptors must come to an end.  
END 
 
 
                                           
86   ANEC and BEUC, Regulatory fitness check of chemicals legislation except REACH – a consumer view, May 
2016. http://www.beuc.eu/publications/beuc-x-2016-048_anec_beuc_chemicals_refit.pdf 
87   See e.g. Pieter de Pous, Better Regulation. TTIP under the Radar? European Environmental Bureau, January 
2016. http://www.eeb.org/index.cfm/library/better-regulation-ttip-under-the-radar/ 
16 



 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

This publication is part of an activity which has received funding under an operating grant 
  from the European Union’s Consumer Programme (2014-2020). 
 
The  content  of  this  publication  represents  the  views  of  the  author  only  and  it  is  his/her  sole 
responsibility; it cannot be considered to reflect the views of the European Commission and/or 
the  Consumers,  Health,  Agriculture  and  Food  Executive  Agency  or  any  other  body  of  the 
European Union. The European Commission and the Agency do not accept any responsibility for 
use that may be made of the information it contains. 
 

17 
BEUC would like to thank the European Environment and Health Initiative (EEHI) for providing 
funding for the development of this publication. 

 

ANNEX - Non-exhaustive list of BEUC members’ comparative product tests, 2013-2016  
 
BEUC Member 
Country 
Product/ 
No. tested 
Products 
Substance(s) found 
Product group 
products  
with 
unwanted 
substances  
Altroconsumo 
Italy 
Anti-aging 
15 

Propylparaben, butylparaben 
creams 
and/or octyl methoxycinnamte 
Altroconsumo 
Italy 
BB creams 
14 

Propylparaben, butylparaben 
and/or octyl methoxycinnamte 
Danish 
Denmark 
Canned peeled 


Bisphenol A 
Consumer 
tomatoes 
Council 
Danish 
Denmark 
‘Loombands’ 


DEHPi  
Consumer 
(toy) 
Council 
Danish 
Denmark 
Food contact 
16 

Fluorinated substances 
Consumer 
materials 
Council 
(paper) 
Danish 
Denmark 
Chewing gum 
150 
92 
BHAii or BHTiii 
Consumer 
Council 
Danish 
Denmark 
Baby sleeping 


DEHP and fluorinated substances  
Consumer 
bags 
Council 
Danish 
Denmark 
Headphones 
16 

Phthalates (DEHP, DIBPiv and 
Consumer 
DINPv) 
Council 
Danish 
Denmark 
Prams 


DEHP, TCEPvi and/or TDCPvii  
Consumer 
Council 
 
Danish 
Denmark 
Pushchairs 


TCPPviii or chlorinated paraffins 
Consumer 
Council 
Danish 
Denmark 
Microwave 


Fluorinated compounds  
Consumer 
popcorn 
Council 
Danish 
Denmark 
Schoolbags 


Phthalates (DEHP, DBPix and 
Consumer 
DPHPx) and/or chlorinated paraffins  
Council 
Danish 
Denmark 
Winter mittens 
11 

Fluorinated substances and/or 
Consumer 
nonylphenol ethoxylates  
Council 
Danish 
Denmark 
Pesto 


DEHP 
Consumer 
Council 
Danish 
Denmark 
Vitamins 
12 

BHT 
Consumer 
Council 
 
 

 

BEUC Member 
Country 
Product/ 
No. tested 
Products 
Substance(s) found 
Product group 
products  
with 
unwanted 
substances  
Danish 
Denmark 
Game 
12 

Phthalates (DPHP, DEHP and 
Consumer 
controllers 
DINP), chlorinated parafins and/or 
Council 
TCPP 
Danish 
Denmark 
Child restraints 
52 

DINP or TCPP 
Consumer 
Council 
Danish 
Denmark 
Lip balms 
89 
24 
Benzophenone-3, BHA, BHT, 
Consumer 
propylparaben, ethylparaben,  
Council 
methylparaben and /or ethylhexyl 
methoxycinnamate 
Danish 
Denmark 
Sunscreens 
66 
13 
Ethylhexyl methoxycinnamate, 
Consumer 
benzophenone-3, ethylparaben,  
Council 
methylparaben, BHT, and /or 
cyclopentasiloxane  
Danish 
Denmark 
Personal care 
6.944 
1.741 
Parabens, BHT, triclosan, BHA, 
Consumer 
products (From 
ethylhexyl methoxycinnamate 
Council 
the App 
and/or benzophenones  
‘Kemiluppen’) 
Danish 
Denmark 
Toothpastes 
32 

Triclosan, methylparaben and/or 
Consumer 
propylparaben 
Council 
DECO 
Portugal 
Deodorants 
15 

Ethylhexyl methoxycinnamate  
PROTESTE 
Norwegian 
Norway 
Children’s 


PFOAxi 
Consumer 
jackets 
Council 
 
Norwegian 
Denmark 
Lip balms 
 
 
Benzophenone-3, ethylhexyl 
Consumer 
methoxycinnamate, ethylparaben, 
Council 
methylparaben, propylparaben 
and/or BHT 
Norwegian 
Norway 
Cleaning wipes 
18 

Propylparaben and/or 
Consumer 
methylparaben 
Council 
Norwegian 
Norway 
Sunscreens 
35 
11 
Propylparaben, methylparaben 
Consumer 
and/or ethylhexyl 
Council 
methoxycinnamate 
Norwegian 
Norway 
Deodorants 
40 
10 
Cyclometicone, BHT and/or 
Consumer 
cyclopentasiloxane  
Council 
Stiftung 
Germany 
Soft toys 
30 

DIBP 
Warentest 
Stiftung 
Germany 
Anti-aging 


Methyl, propyl and/or ethylparaben 
Warentest 
creams 
Stiftung 
Germany 
Fan make-up 
12 

Phthalates (DEHP, DIBP, DBP 
Warentest 
(cosmetic) 
and/or BBPxii) 
 
 

 

BEUC Member 
Country 
Product/ 
No. tested 
Products 
Substance(s) found 
Product group 
products  
with 
unwanted 
substances  
Test-
Belgium 
BB creams 
16 

Propylparaben 
Achats/Test-
Aankoop 
Test-
Belgium 
Anti-aging 
17 

Propylparaben, butylparaben 
Achats/Test-
creams 
and/or octyl methoxycinnamte 
Aankoop 
UFC Que-
France 
Sunscreens 
17 

Ethylhexyl methoxycinnamate 
Choisir 
and/or cyclopentasiloxane 
UFC Que-
France 
Anti-aging 
15 

Ethylhexyl methoxycinnamate 
Choisir 
creams 
and/or cyclopentasiloxane 
UFC Que-
France 
Baby wipes 
21 

Propyl and/or butylparaben 
Choisir 
UFC Que-
France 
Make up set for 


Propylparaben 
Choisir 
kids 
UFC Que-
France 
Carnival kits 
10 

Propylparaben and/or lead 
Choisir 
UFC Que-
France 
Deodorants 


Cyclopentasiloxane 
Choisir 
(Men) 
UFC Que-
France 
Deodorants 
16 

Cyclopentasiloxane and 
Choisir 
(Women) 
propylparaben 
UFC Que-
France 
Toothpastes 
16 

Triclosan or propylparaben 
Choisir 
UFC Que-
France 
Personal care 
237 
126 
Benzophenones, BHA, ethylhexyl 
Choisir 
products 
methoxycinnamate, 
cyclopentasiloxane, 
cyclotetrasiloxane, sodium 
propylparaben, propylparaben 
and/or butylparaben 
 
 
 
 
                                                           
i   Bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate 
ii   Butylated hydroxyanisole 
iii   Butylhydroxytoluene 
iv   Diisobutyl phthalate 
v   Diisononyl phthalate 
vi   Tris (2-chloroethyl) phosphate 
vii   Tris (1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate 
viii   Tris (1,3-dichloroisopropyl) phosphate 
ix   Dibutyl phthalate 
x   Di(2-Propyl Heptyl) phthalate 
xi   Perfluorooctanoic acid 
xii   Benzyl butyl phthalate