Ceci est une version HTML d'une pièce jointe de la demande d'accès à l'information 'Concepts against "Fake News"'.


 
EUROPEAN COMMISSION 
Secretariat-General 
 
   The Secretary-General 
 
Brussels, 12.6.2017 
C(2017) 4135 final 
Mr Arne SEMSROTT 
c/o Open Knowledge Foundation  
Singerstrasse 109 
10179 Berlin 
Germany 
DECISION  OF  THE  SECRETARY  GENERAL  ON  BEHALF  OF  THE  COMMISSION  PURSUANT 
TO ARTICLE 4 OF THE IMPLEMENTING RULES TO REGULATION (EC) N° 1049/20011 
Subject:  
Your  confirmatory  application  for  access  to  documents  under 
Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001 - GESTDEM 2017/308 

Dear Mr Semsrott, 
I refer to your e-mail of 8 March 2017, by which you submit a confirmatory application 
in  accordance  with  Article  7(2)  of  Regulation  (EC)  No  1049/2001  regarding  public 
access  to  European  Parliament,  Council  and  Commission  documents  ("Regulation 
1049/2001").  
1. 
SCOPE OF YOUR REQUEST 
In your initial application of 17 January 2017 you requested access to any concept paper 
the  EU  Commission  has  prepared  to  counter  'Fake  News'  in  the  form  of  a  European 
regulation  and  any  correspondence  by  the  EU  Commission  with  Google  and  Facebook 
regarding 'Fake News'. 

In  its  initial  reply  of  1  March  2017,  the  Directorate-General  for  Communications 
Networks,  Content  and  Technology  (DG  CNECT,  hereinafter)  identified  the  following 
documents as falling under the scope of your request: 
1.  Background Note on the subject of 'fake news' (Ares(2017)881559); 
2.  DG CNECT proposal for background note on 'fake news' (Ares(2017)881373); 
                                                 

Official Journal L 345 of 29.12.2001, p. 94. 
 
Commission européenne/Europese Commissie, 1049 Bruxelles/Brussel, BELGIQUE/BELGIË - Tel. +32 22991111 
http://ec.europa.eu/dgs/secretariat_general/ 

3.  Letter  from  Commissioner  Oettinger  to  the  President  of  the  Commission  on 
online platforms (Ares(2017)123266); 
4.  Note on online platform policy (Ares(2017)881690); 
5.  E-mail  from  Google  to  the  Commission  services  on  the  '2016  Bad  ads  report' 
(Ares(2017)517901); 
6.  E-mail  from Google to the  Commission  services on the issue of 'fake news' and 
other issues (Ares(2017)881011); 
7.  Exchange  of  e-mails  between  Facebook  and  the  Commission  services 
(Ares(2017)880679 and Ares(2017)881934). 
Through its initial reply dated 1 March 2017, DG CNECT: 
  Granted partial access to documents 5, 6 and 7, by redacting only personal data 
based on Article 4(1)(b) (protection of privacy and the integrity of the individual) 
of Regulation 1049/2001; 
  Refused  access  to  documents  1,  2,  3  and  4,  based  on  Article  4(3),  first 
subparagraph  (protection  of  the  decision-making  process)  of  Regulation 
1049/2001. 
Through your confirmatory application you request a review of this position and present 
several  arguments  supporting  your  requests.  These  will  be  addressed  in  the  respective 
parts of this decision. 
2. 
ASSESSMENT AND CONCLUSIONS UNDER REGULATION 1049/2001 
When  assessing  a  confirmatory  application  for  access  to  documents  submitted  pursuant 
to  Regulation  1049/2001,  the  Secretariat-General  conducts  a  fresh  review  of  the  reply 
given by the Directorate-General or service concerned at the initial stage. 
Having  carried  out  a  detailed  assessment  of  your  request  in  light  of  the  provisions  of 
Regulation 1049/2001, I am pleased to inform you that wide partial access is granted to 
documents  1,  2,  3  and  4.  The  undisclosed  parts  of  these  documents  are  covered  by  the 
exceptions of Article 4(3), first subparagraph (protection of the decision-making process) 
and  of  Article  4(1)(b)  (protection  of  privacy  and  the  integrity  of  the  individual)  of 
Regulation 1049/2001.  
The detailed explanations are provided below. 
2.1.  Protection of the decision-making process 
Article 4(3), first subparagraph of Regulation 1049/2001 provides that:  
Access  to  a  document,  drawn  up  by  an  institution  for  internal  use  or  received  by  an 
institution,  which  relates  to  a  matter  where  the  decision  has  not  been  taken  by  the 
institution, shall be refused if disclosure of the document would seriously undermine the 
institution's  decision-making  process,  unless  there  is  an  overriding  public  interest  in 
disclosure. 


 

Document  3  is  a  letter  from  Commissioner  Oettinger,  at  the  time  the  Member  of  the 
Commission  responsible  for  Digital  Economy  and  Society,  addressed  to  President 
Juncker,  stressing the  importance of the issue, outlining  some initial policy options and 
seeking his political orientation on the issue of fake news and online misinformation. 
Documents 1, 2 and 4 are internal notes including some initial policy options based on a 
very  preliminary  analysis  of  the  issue  of  online  misinformation  and  fake  news  and 
preliminary  assessments  addressed  to  Vice-President  Ansip.  It  is  important  to  note  that 
draft documents 1 and 2 have been transmitted neither to Cabinet of the President of the 
European  Commission  Jean-Claude  Juncker  nor  to  the  other  Members  of  the  European 
Commission.  These  purely  internal  preliminary  considerations  reflect  only  the  opinions 
of the Commission staff members on challenges, possible strategies and ways forward to 
address concerns regarding 'fake news' and online misinformation. These opinions were 
expressed for internal use and at that stage were not drafted in order to be transmitted to 
the public, at least while the Commission's decision-making process is ongoing and the 
Commission  has  not  yet  taken  any  decision  whether,  and  if  so,  what  action  should  be 
taken.  
The  Commission  is  treating  the  issue  with  the  utmost  care.  In  addition,  due  to  the 
sensitivity of the topic and the attention that has and may arise in the media and among 
groups  of  stakeholders  and  the  public,  premature  disclosure  of  the  documents  would 
seriously  undermine  the  Commission's  decision-making  process  as  a  full  release  of  the 
documents  at  this  stage  would  disseminate  preliminary,  internal  considerations  into  the 
public domain. Indeed, it would trigger external pressure by the above-mentioned groups, 
which could misinterpret the content of the document and draw premature conclusions. 
In  addition,  some  parts  of  these  documents  reflect  internal  considerations,  as  well  as 
references to views and positions expressed by Member States and external stakeholders. 
The  engagement  with  different  stakeholders  is  based  on  a  relationship  of  mutual  trust 
among all stakeholders involved which would be undermined by their disclosure.  
In  your  confirmatory  application,  you  argue  that  the  Commission  has  disclosed  three 
other documents that demonstrate it actively sought input into its preliminary discussion 
on 'fake news' from a limited number of private stakeholders. 

As  regards  contacts  with  third  parties,  it  is  necessary  to  underline  that  the  Commission 
followed  the  scope  of  the  initial  request  where  only  any  correspondence  by  the  EU 
Commission  with  Google  and  Facebook  regarding  'Fake  News'
  was  requested  and 
subsequently wide partial access to these documents was granted.  
In  addition,  it  is  apparent  from  the  correspondence  disclosed  to  you  at  the  initial  stage 
that, contrary to what you argue, the Commission services did not consult Facebook and 
Google  on  any  policy  strategy.  To  the  contrary,  the  correspondence  between  the 
Commission  and  these  two  companies  concerns  purely  factual  information,  regarding 
inter alia the action taken by Google and Facebook.  

 

Furthermore,  such  premature  disclosure  would  also  lead  to  a  risk  of  self-censorship  as 
these internal documents contain opinions, points of views and critical remarks that will 
help building the steps to follow. The Commission staff concerned would be hesitant to 
freely exchange views, both internally and with third parties, were that information to be 
made  public.2 Public  disclosure  of the whole  documents requested would also seriously 
undermine  the  serenity  of  the  ongoing  discussions  within  the  Commission  services  and 
their  Cabinets.  Indeed,  the  Commission  and  its  staff  members  would  not  be  able  to 
explore all possible options free from external pressure. 
This,  in  turn,  would  seriously  undermine  the  decision-making  process  protected  by 
Article 4(3), first subparagraph (protection of the decision-making process) of Regulation 
1049/2001.  
The  Court  of  Justice,  in  the  ClientEarth3  and  AccessEuropeInfo4  judgments, 
acknowledged that there may be a need for the Commission to protect internal reflections 
on  the  possible  policy  options  available  to  the  institutions  in  the  phase  preceding  the 
(inter-institutional)  legislative  procedure.  There  is  a  concrete  risk  that  disclosing  the 
information  at  this  stage  will  affect  the  Commission's  ability  to  defend  its  future 
proposals.  Furthermore,  as  established  in  the  Turco  judgment5,  the  Court  of  Justice 
distinguished  this  preliminary  assessment  of  the  institution  from  the  presumption  of 
wider openness for the institutions when acting in their legislative capacity.  
The  sensitive  nature  of  the  matters  at  stake,  such  as  cases  of  medical  or  scientific 
misinformation, fake news about national and EU institutions and EU policies, cases of 
defamation  and  disinformation  propagated  as  part  of  a  cyber-attack,  provides  further 
support  to  the  conclusion  that  certain  preliminary  assessments  and  positions  must  be 
protected  in  order  to  shield  the  institutions'  internal  assessment  against  any  outside 
pressure and premature conclusions, by the public, until the final decisions are taken6. 
 
In  light  of  the  foregoing,  access  to  the  documents  requested  is  refused  based  on  the 
exception of Article 4(3), first subparagraph (protection of the decision-making process) 
of Regulation 1049/2001.  
2.2.  Protection of privacy and the integrity of the individual 
Article 4(1)(b) of Regulation 1049/2001 provides that the institutions shall refuse access 
to a document where disclosure would undermine the protection of (…) privacy and the 
integrity  of  the  individual,  in  particular  in  accordance  with  Community  legislation 
regarding the protection of personal data. 
                                                 
2   Judgment of 18 December 2008, Muñiz v Commission, case T-144/05 P, EU:T:2008:596, paragraph 
89.  
3   Judgment  of  13  November  2015,  ClientEarth  v  Commission,  Joined  Cases  T-424/14  and  T-425/14, 
EU:T:2015:848, paragraph 95. 
4      Judgment of 17 October 2013, Council v Access Info Europe, case C-280/11 P, EU:C:2013:671. 
5      Judgment of 1 July 2008, Sweden & Turco v Council, case C-39/05 P and C-52/05 P, EU:C:2008:374. 
Judgments  of  1  July  2008,    Sweden  &  Turco  v      Council,  case  C-39/05  P  and  C-52/05  P, 
EU:C:2008:374, paragraph 69 and judgment of 15 September 2016,  Philip Morris v Commission, case  
T-796/14 and T-800/14, EU:T:2016:487. 

 

The  documents  requested  also  contain  personal  data,  such  as  names,  e-mail  addresses, 
telephone numbers. 
Pursuant to the Commission's administrative practice, access is granted to the names of 
individuals who hold a senior management position.  However, access must be refused to 
the names and contact details of individuals of the Commission or third parties who do 
not hold a senior management position, for the reasons explained below. 
In  this  respect,  Article  4(1)(b)  of  Regulation  1049/2001  provides  that  access  to 
documents  is  refused  where  disclosure  would  undermine  the  protection  of  privacy  and 
integrity  of  the  individual,  in  particular  in  accordance  with  Community  legislation 
regarding the protection of personal data.  

In its judgment in the Bavarian Lager case, the Court of Justice ruled that when a request 
is made for access to documents containing personal data, Regulation (EC) No. 45/20017  
(hereafter 'Data Protection Regulation') becomes fully applicable8 . 
Article  2(a)  of  the  Data  Protection  Regulation  provides  that  'personal  data'  shall  mean 
any  information  relating  to  an  identified  or  identifiable  person  […],  an  identifiable 
person is one who can be identified, directly or indirectly, in particular by reference to 
an  identification  number  or  to  one  or  more  factors  specific  to  his  or  her  physical, 
physiological,  mental,  economic,  cultural  or  social  identity.  According  to  the  Court  of 
Justice,  there  is  no  reason  of  principle  to  justify  excluding  activities  of  a  professional 
[…]  nature  from  the  notion  of  'private  life'9
.  The  names10  of  the  persons  concerned  as 
well  as  other  data,  from  which  their  identity  can  be  deduced,  undoubtedly  constitute 
personal data in the meaning of Article 2(a) of the Data Protection Regulation.  
It  follows  that  public  disclosure  of  the  above-mentioned  information  would  constitute 
processing  (transfer)  of  personal  data  within  the  meaning  of  Article  8(b)  of  Regulation 
45/2001.  According  to  Article  8(b)  of  that  Regulation,  personal  data  shall  only  be 
transferred  to  recipients  if  the  recipient  establishes  the  necessity  of  having  the  data 
transferred and if there is no reason to assume that the data subject's legitimate interests 
might be prejudiced. Those two conditions are cumulative11. Only if both conditions are 
fulfilled  and  the  processing  constitutes  lawful  processing  in  accordance  with  the 
requirements  of  Article  5  of    Regulation  45/2001,  can  the  processing  (transfer)  of 
personal data occur. 
In  its  recent  judgment  in  the  ClientEarth  case,  the  Court  of  Justice  ruled  that  whoever 
requests such a transfer must first establish that it is necessary. If it is demonstrated to be 
necessary, it is then for the institution concerned to determine that there is no reason to 
assume  that  that  transfer  might  prejudice  the  legitimate  interests  of  the  data  subject.  If 
there is no such reason, the transfer requested must be made, whereas, if there is such a 
reason, the institution concerned must weigh the various competing interests in order to 
                                                 
7   Regulation (EC) No 45/2001 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 18 December 2000 on 
the  protection  of  individuals  with  regard  to  the  processing  of  personal  data  by  the  Community 
institutions  and  bodies  and  on  the  free  movement  of  such  data,  Official  Journal  L  8  of  12  January 
2001, page 1. 
8   Judgment of 29 June 2010, Commission v Bavarian Lager, C-28/08P, EU:C:2010:378, paragraph 63. 
9   Judgment  of  20  May  2003,  Rechnungshof  v  Österreichischer  Rundfunk  and  Others,  C-465/00,  C-
138/01 and C-139/01, EU:C:2003:294, paragraph 73. 
10   Judgment in Commission v Bavarian Lager, cited above, EU:C:2010:378, paragraph 68. 
11   Ibid, paragraphs 77 and 78. 

 

decide  on  the  request  for  access12.  I  refer  also  to  the  Strack  case,  where  the  Court  of 
Justice ruled that the Institution does not have to examine by itself the existence of a need 
for transferring personal data13. 
Neither  in  your  initial,  nor  in  your  confirmatory  application,  have  you  established  the 
necessity of disclosing any of the abovementioned personal data. 
Therefore, I have to conclude that the transfer of personal data through the disclosure of 
the  redacted  parts  of  the  requested  documents  cannot  be  considered  as  fulfilling  the 
requirement  of  lawfulness  provided  for  in  Article  5  of  Regulation  45/2001  and  in 
consequence,  the use of the exception under Article 4(1)(b) of Regulation 1049/2001 is 
justified, as there is no need to publicly disclose the personal date included therein, and it 
cannot  be  assumed  that  the  legitimate  rights  of  the  data  concerned  would  not  be 
prejudiced by such disclosure.  
Finally, the exception in Article 4(1)(b) of Regulation 1049/2001 is an absolute exception 
which does not require the institution to balance the exception defined therein against a 
possible public interest in disclosure, only reinforces this conclusion. 
3. 
NO OVERRIDING PUBLIC INTEREST IN DISCLOSURE 
The  exception  laid  down  in  Article  4(3),  first  subparagraph,  of  Regulation  1049/2001 
must  be  waived  if  there  is  an  overriding  public  interest  in  disclosure.  Such  an  interest 
must, firstly, be public and, secondly, outweigh the harm caused by disclosure. 
In your confirmatory application, you argue that there is an overriding public interest in 
disclosure of the four documents about 'fake news' because the issue deals directly with 
Article  11  of  the  Charter  of  fundamental  Rights  of  the  European  Union  on  freedom  of 
expression and information.  

I agree that the issue of fake news, online misinformation and its role in shaping public 
opinion  has  generated  considerable  political  and  media  attention.  The  European  Union 
has  already  established  policies  on  Media  Freedom  and  Media  Pluralism,  based  on 
Article 11 of the Charter of Fundamental Rights. These include addressing violations of 
media  freedom  and  pluralism  within  the  EU  competences,  facilitating  independent 
monitoring and practical solutions to address media freedom violations, and promotion of 
media freedom in enlargement policy and external action. 
To the contrary, since the decision-making process is ongoing and full disclosure of the 
internal  documents  would  affect  the  Commission's  ability  to  act  freely  from  external 
pressure in exploring all possible options at the current preparatory stage, I consider that 
such  disclosure  would  be  contrary  to  the  public  interest,  as  it  would  have  the  effect  of 
undermining the quality of the results of the Commission's deliberations.  
                                                 
12   Judgment of 16 July 2015, ClientEarth v EFSA, C-615/13P, EU:C:2015:489, paragraph 47. 
13   Judgment of 2 October 2014, Strack v Commission, C-127/13 P, EU:C:2014:2250, paragraph 106. 

 


Furthermore, I assure you that the Commission interpreted and applied the exception of 
Article  4  of  Regulation  1049/2001  strictly,  which  resulted  in  wide  partial  access  to 
requested documents 1-4.  
In  consequence,  I  consider  that  in  this  case  there  is  no  overriding  public  interest  that 
would outweigh the interests in safeguarding the protection of decision-making process, 
based on Article 4(3), first subparagraph of Regulation 1049/2001. 
4. 
PARTIAL ACCESS 
According  to  Article  4(6)  of  Regulation  1049/2001,  if  only  parts  of  the  requested 
document  are  covered  by  any  of  the  exceptions,  the  remaining  parts  of  the  document 
shall be released. 

Pursuant to Article 4(6) of Regulation 1049/2001, wide partial access is granted to those 
parts  of  documents  1,  2,  3  and  4  which  are  not  covered  by  any  of  the  exceptions  of 
Article 4 of the Regulation 1049/2001.  
5. 
MEANS OF REDRESS 
Finally,  I  would  like  to  draw  your  attention  to  the  means  of  redress  that  are  available 
against  this  decision,  that  is,  judicial  proceedings  and  complaints  to  the  Ombudsman 
under the conditions specified respectively in Articles 263 and 228 of the Treaty on the 
Functioning of the European Union. 
 
Yours sincerely, 
 
For the Commission 
 
Alexander ITALIANER 
 
Secretary-General 
 
 
 

 

Document Outline