Ceci est une version HTML d'une pièce jointe de la demande d'accès à l'information 'Details and documents on activities in the education sector in Egypt'.


Schools for Skills – A New Learning Agenda for Egypt
SCHOOLS  
The economic reforms which Egypt has initiated since 1991 have reduced public sector dominance and 
increased opportunities for the private sector. The challenge for the Ministry of Education has been to make 
FOR SKILLS:
education and training more relevant to the country’s economic prospects. It was in this context that the 
ministry launched the comprehensive National Education Strategic Plan 2007-2012. Over this period progress 
was made in achieving higher participation and lower attrition rates at all levels in the education system, 
A NEW LEARNING
professionalisation of the teaching force, increased autonomy, and better data collection and reporting. A 
number of quality issues, however, remain a concern which need to be addressed. 
This book provides a brief overview of the history of education in Egypt as background to an in-depth analysis 
AGENDA FOR  
at the national, regional and municipal levels of the compulsory education system including vocational and 
technical education with a special focus on improving quality, equity, and efficiency. 
EGYPT
It concludes with a set of key recommendations concerning the structure of the system and its labour market 
relevance; the quality of teachers and teaching; access and equity; financing; governance and management; 
the strategic priorities and implementation management.
This report is part of the OECD’s ongoing co-operation with non-member economies around the world.
Contents
Chapter 1.  Introduction
Chapter 2.  Egypt’s education system
Chapter 3.  The National Education Strategic Plan 2007-2012
Chapter 4.  Education and the Changing Labour Market
Chapter 5.  The quality of teachers and teaching
Chapter 6.  Appropriate assessment
Chapter 7.  Financing general education
Chapter 8.  Strategic priorities
Chapter 9.  Implementation management
Chapter 10.  Conclusions
Write to us
Policy Advice and Implementation Division
Directorate for Education and Skills - OECD
2, rue André Pascal - 75775 Paris Cedex 16 - FRANCE
Find us at:
www.oecd.org/edu/policyadvice.htm
Education and Skills data on GPS: www.gpseducation.oecd.org



 
 
Schools for Skills – A New Learning Agenda for Egypt 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

 
 
This  work  is  published  under  the  responsibility  of  the  Secretary-General  of  the 
OECD. The opinions expressed and arguments employed herein do not necessarily reflect 
the official views of OECD member countries. 
This document and any map included herein are without prejudice to the status of or 
sovereignty  over  any  territory,  to  the  delimitation  of  international  frontiers  and 
boundaries and to the name of any territory, city or area. 
The  statistical  data  for  Israel  are  supplied  by  and  under  the  responsibility  of  the 
relevant Israeli authorities. The use of such data by the OECD is without prejudice to the 
status  of  the  Golan  Heights,  East  Jerusalem  and  Israeli  settlements  in  the  West  Bank 
under the terms of international law.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cover photo credits: © Orhan Çam – Fotolia.com. 
 
You  can  copy,  download  or  print  OECD  content  for  your  own  use,  and  you  can  include 
excerpts  from  OECD  publications,  databases  and  multimedia  products  in  your  own  documents, 
presentations,  blogs,  websites  and  teaching  materials,  provided  that  suitable  acknowledgment  of 
the source and copyright owner is given. All requests for public or commercial use and translation 
rights should be submitted to [adresse e-mail]. Requests for permission to photocopy portions of 
this material for public or commercial use shall be addressed directly to the Copyright Clearance 
Center (CCC) at [adresse e-mail] or the Centre français d’exploitation du droit de copie (CFC) 
at [adresse e-mail].  
 
 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

3 – FOREWORD 
 
 
Foreword 
Egypt  is  going  through  a  major  political  transition.  It  will  need  to  manage  that 
transition  in  ways  that  bring  about  greater  cohesion  in  the  Egyptian  society  and  greater 
capacity to build a more competitive and sustainable economy. Effective education is the 
key to both these challenges. 
While gains have been made, particularly over the last decade, in improving literacy 
and increasing educational participation, major deficiencies persist.  
Manifestations of the problems are well known to Egyptian education authorities and 
other interest groups. While some of the challenges are unique to Egypt’s circumstances, 
many  are  shared  among  several  countries  in  the  Middle  East  and  North  Africa,  and 
beyond. 
This  report  seeks  to  understand the  nature  of  the  challenges  ahead  for  Egypt  and  to 
inform  decision  makers  with  insights  derived  from  the  development  of  policies  and 
practices elsewhere.  
As  this  report  was  underway,  the  government  was  developing  its  National  Strategic 
Plan  for  Pre-University  Education  2014-2030  for  increasing  student  participation  and 
outcomes  at  each  stage  of  education,  including  the  increments  in  resources  required 
(personnel, capital works, equipment and student support services).  
The report was initiated in response to a request from the Government of Egypt and is 
concerned  with  the  broader  public  policy  issues  that  give  context  and  purpose  to  the 
strategic plan, and are matters of interest to the wider Egyptian community. 
This  activity  was  undertaken  within  the  Programme  of  Work  of  the  OECD 
Directorate  for  Education  and  Skills  Programme  for  Co-operation  with  Non-Member 
Economies  in  partnership  with  World  Bank  Human  Development  Department  of  the 
Middle  East  and  North  Africa  Region,  and  the  European  Training  Foundation.  This 
activity  was  funded  by  the  World  Bank  with  in  kind  support  from  the  Abu  Dhabi 
Education  Council,  the  European  Training  Foundation  and  the  Islamic  Development 
Bank. 
Members of the team were Ian Whitman (OECD), Joint Team Leader, former Head of 
the  OECD  Programme  with  Non-Member  Economies;  Ernesto  Cuadra  (World  Bank), 
Joint  Team  Leader,  former  Lead  Education  Specialist,  Middle  East  and  North  Africa 
Section;  Michael  Gallagher  (Australia),  Rapporteur,  former  Executive  Director  of  the 
Group  of  Eight  Universities  in  Australia;  Dina  Abu-Ghaida  (World  Bank),  Senior 
Economist, Middle East and North Africa Region; Satya Brink (Canada), Education and 
Human  Development  International  Consultant,  former  Director  of  Learning  Policy 
Research  at  Human  Resources  and  Skills  Development;  Andrew  Burke  (Ireland), 
Consultant, former Director of the postgraduate teacher education programme and Dean 
of Education at St. Patrick’s College, Dublin City University; Eduardo Cascallar (United 
States),  Managing  Director  for  Assessment  Group  International,  and  Guest  Professor, 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

4 – FOREWORD 
 
 
Catholic  University  of  Leuven;  Mahmoud  Gamal  El  Din  (World  Bank),  former  Senior 
Operations  Officer;  Jawara  Gaye  (Islamic  Development  Bank),  Senior  Education 
Specialist;  Marie  Niven  (United  Kingdom),  former  Deputy  Director  of  the  International 
Unit, Departments of Education and Employment; Sebastian Rubens y Rojo (United Arab 
Emirates), Education Advisor, Director General’s Office, Abu Dhabi Education Council; 
Helmut  Zelloth  (European  Training  Foundation),  Senior  Specialist  in  VET  Policies  and 
Systems.  Overall  support  and  co-ordination  was  provided  by  Raghada  Mohamed  Abdel 
Hamed  (World  Bank);  Louise  Binns,  Rebekah  Cameron,  Rachel  Linden,  Camilla 
Lorentzen and Diana Tramontano (OECD). 
The team was able to draw upon background information prepared by the Ministry of 
Education,  especially  the  Condition  of  Education  in  Egypt  2010  Report  on  National 
Education Indicators.  
The  team  also  benefitted  greatly  from  its  consultations  with  students,  parents, 
teachers, school principals, and education administrators in the Alexandria, Beira, Cairo, 
Fayoum,  Menia,  Luxor  and  Qena  governorates.  The  team  benefitted  too  from  its 
discussions  with  employers.  Useful  consultations  were  also  held  with  officials  from  the 
Professional  Academy  of  Teachers, the  National  Centre for  Examination  and Education 
Evaluation,  the  Centre  for  Curriculum  and  Instructional  Materials  Development,  the 
Central Agency for Public Mobilisation and Statistics, the National Authority for Quality 
Assurance  and  Accreditation,  the  General  Authority  for  Education  Building,  the 
Education Development Fund, and the Ministry of Education.  
The team is grateful for all the information and assistance provided and trusts that the 
report  will  provide  a  useful  reference  on  the  path  to  progressing  educational  reform  in 
Egypt. 
 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

5 – NOTE FROM THE AUTHORS 
 
 
 
Note from the Authors 
Since the completion of the OECD/World Bank review team’s visit to Egypt in 2013 
and the finalisation of its report, the Government of Egypt has adopted a new Education 
Strategic Plan for 2014-2030. The team only had information regarding the previous plan 
available  to  it,  and  focused  its  observations  and  discussions  on  the  situation  as  of  2012 
and early 2013. The team has not had the opportunity to consider the new plan and assess 
its  actions  and  priorities  against  the  recommendations  made  by  the  team.  However,  to 
assist  readers,  a  summary  of  the  key  programmes  of  the  new  strategic  plan  as  well  as 
changes to the Technical Education system is presented below: 
  Technical Education Development Programme. This includes the initiative of 
“a factory in each school and a school in each factory”, as well as implementation 
of the Egypt-European Union Support to the Technical and Vocational Education 
and Training Reform Programme in Egypt (Phase II)  – known as TVET II. This 
programme  envisions  developing  technical  education,  including  reforming  the 
Egyptian technical education curriculum in light of international models so as to 
prepare  workers  appropriately  and  fulfil  the  requirements  of  sustainable 
development. TVET II stresses co-operation amongst all the ministries concerned 
as well as stakeholders of technical and vocational education in order to enhance 
the  quality  and  improve  the  efficiency  of  this  part  of  the  education  system.  In 
addition, a new Ministry for Technical Education has been created, and the new 
Egyptian  constitution  includes  a  commitment  to  the  expansion  and  quality  of 
technical and vocational education in line with international standards. Articles 19 
and  20  of  the  constitution  also  specify  a  minimum  public  expenditure  on 
education of 4% of GDP in total (2% on higher education), gradually rising over 
time. 
  Technology Development Programme. The interactive classroom methodology 
is currently being applied in nine governorates in Egypt and will be expanded in 
the remaining governorates over the next three years. 
  Primary  Education  Development  Programme.  The  focus  here  is  on 
mainstreaming  and  expanding  the  Early  Grade  Learning  Programme  in  primary 
school  across  all  governorates.  This  programme  includes  both  reading  and 
mathematics  and  is  being  carried  out  in  partnership  with  the  US  Agency  for 
International Development (USAID). 
  Children with  Special  Needs Programme.  Increased  support  will  be  provided 
for the policy to include children with special needs schools in public education, 
including  equipping  schools  with  trained  cadres  and  the  necessary  tools,  in 
addition to co-operation with non-governmental organisations to provide resource 
rooms and follow-up services for students with special needs. 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

6 – NOTE FROM THE AUTHORS 
 
 
  Administrative  Development,  Legislation,  and  Laws  Programme.  Based  on 
the  Education  Law  No.  139  issued  in  1981,  the  precise  roles  of  the  Ministry  of 
Education  and  governorates  will  be  defined.  In  addition,  in  light  of  the  new 
Egyptian constitution, decentralisation will be implemented more effectively and 
school-based reform enhanced. 
  Human  Resource  Management  Programme.  Teachers’  salaries  have  been 
raised  by  setting  a  bonus  in  return  for  the  agreed  job  burden,  effective  from  1 
January 2014 and with an estimated cost of EGP 6.2 billion. This serves to create 
a positive environment in which school children can develop.  
  Gifted  and  Talented  Sub-programme  of  the  General  Secondary  Education 
Programme.  A  unit  for  science,  technology,  engineering  and  mathematics 
(STEM)  schools  will  be  established  as  part  of  the  Central  Administration  of 
secondary  education  of  the  general  education  sector.  An  evaluation  will  be 
conducted  of  existing  STEM  schools  as  a  basis  for  future  development  of  pre-
university education in Egypt.  
  Primary  and  Secondary  Education  Programmes.  The  science  curriculum  in 
basic education will be reformed in light of global contemporary trends. 
  Human  Resource  Development  and  Monitoring  and  Evaluation 
Programmes. The role  of inspection  and  monitoring bodies  at  all levels  will be 
further activated and developed. 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

link to page 13 link to page 15 link to page 17 link to page 18 link to page 18 link to page 18 link to page 20 link to page 20 link to page 22 link to page 25 link to page 27 link to page 29 link to page 30 link to page 31 link to page 33 link to page 34 link to page 37 link to page 42 link to page 47 link to page 51 link to page 52 link to page 57 link to page 59 link to page 60 link to page 62 link to page 69 link to page 70 link to page 72 link to page 73 link to page 74 link to page 81 link to page 83 link to page 84 link to page 87 link to page 92 link to page 94 link to page 95 7– TABLE OF CONTENTS 
 
 
Table of Contents 
Acronyms .................................................................................................................................................... 11 
Executive summary .................................................................................................................................... 13 
Chapter 1. Introduction .............................................................................................................................. 15 
Egypt’s place in the world ....................................................................................................................... 16 
Historical legacies .................................................................................................................................... 16 
Contemporary transitions and aspirations ................................................................................................ 16 
Government structure .............................................................................................................................. 18 
Economy .................................................................................................................................................. 18 
Investment climate ................................................................................................................................... 20 
Workforce ................................................................................................................................................ 23 
Technology .............................................................................................................................................. 25 
Human development ................................................................................................................................ 27 
Income distribution .................................................................................................................................. 28 
References ................................................................................................................................................ 29 
Chapter 2. Egypt’s education system ......................................................................................................... 31 
Historical development of education in Egypt ......................................................................................... 32 
The structure of educational provision .................................................................................................... 35 
Technical and vocational education and training ..................................................................................... 40 
The education workforce ......................................................................................................................... 45 
Technology in education .......................................................................................................................... 49 
Issues in Egyptian education .................................................................................................................... 50 
References ................................................................................................................................................ 55 
Chapter 3. The National Education Strategic Plan 2007-2012 ................................................................ 57 
The scope of the plan ............................................................................................................................... 58 
Achievements of the plan......................................................................................................................... 60 
Deficiencies in the design and execution of the plan ............................................................................... 67 
Foundations for future action ................................................................................................................... 68 
References ................................................................................................................................................ 70 
Chapter 4. Education and the Changing Labour Market ......................................................................... 71 
Current Egyptian labour market characteristics ....................................................................................... 72 
Anticipated changes in labour market structure and conditions .............................................................. 79 
Problems in the transition from education to work .................................................................................. 81 
Employer views about the relevance of schooling and the employability of graduates .......................... 82 
Education and preparation for the world of work .................................................................................... 85 
Active labour market measures ................................................................................................................ 90 
Future directions and policy options ........................................................................................................ 92 
References ................................................................................................................................................ 93 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

link to page 101 link to page 102 link to page 103 link to page 108 link to page 110 link to page 113 link to page 115 link to page 117 link to page 125 link to page 128 link to page 130 link to page 131 link to page 134 link to page 136 link to page 140 link to page 155 link to page 156 link to page 157 link to page 160 link to page 166 link to page 170 link to page 172 link to page 175 link to page 176 link to page 180 link to page 189 link to page 196 link to page 201 link to page 203 link to page 205 link to page 213 link to page 214 link to page 218 link to page 222 link to page 229 link to page 236 link to page 241 link to page 242 link to page 242 link to page 247 link to page 250 link to page 252 link to page 257 link to page 261 8 – TABLE OF CONTENTS 
 
 
Chapter 5. The quality of teachers and teaching....................................................................................... 99 
Teaching’s claim to professional status and recognition ....................................................................... 100 
Arguments and evidence supporting teaching reform ........................................................................... 101 
Critique of traditional approaches to pre-service education of teachers ................................................ 106 
Critique of traditional approaches to INSET and CPD .......................................................................... 108 
Guiding principles for reform of PRESET, INSET and CPD ................................................................ 111 
Characteristics of teaching in Egyptian schools .................................................................................... 113 
Pre-service teacher education in Egypt .................................................................................................. 115 
Induction, INSET and CPD in Egypt ..................................................................................................... 123 
Training for technical and vocational education and training in Egypt ................................................. 126 
Training of trainers for PRESET, INSET and CPD............................................................................... 128 
The need for and challenge of reform .................................................................................................... 129 
Information and communication technology in teaching and teacher education. .................................. 132 
A policy framework for teacher education ............................................................................................ 134 
References .............................................................................................................................................. 139 
Chapter 6. Appropriate assessment .......................................................................................................... 153 
The different uses of assessment ............................................................................................................ 154 
Assessment design principles ................................................................................................................ 156 
Problems with the current examinations in Egypt ................................................................................. 158 
What can be done? ................................................................................................................................. 164 
Implications and suggested solutions to some of the challenges in current educational assessments ... 168 
References .............................................................................................................................................. 170 
Chapter 7. Financing general education ................................................................................................. 173 
Adequacy of general education financing in Egypt ............................................................................... 174 
Cost-effectiveness of general education financing in Egypt .................................................................. 178 
Equity of general education financing in Egypt..................................................................................... 187 
Addressing issues of adequacy, equity and cost-effectiveness .............................................................. 194 
References .............................................................................................................................................. 199 
Chapter 8: Strategic priorities .................................................................................................................. 201 
The dimensions of the task ahead .......................................................................................................... 203 
Attending not just to quantity but also to quality ................................................................................... 211 
A principles-based and evidence-backed approach ............................................................................... 212 
Prioritising policy interventions ............................................................................................................. 216 
Technical and vocational education and training ................................................................................... 220 
Donor interest and donor landscape ....................................................................................................... 227 
References .............................................................................................................................................. 234 
Chapter 9: Implementation management ................................................................................................ 239 
Addressing Egypt’s particular challenges .............................................................................................. 240 
Drawing on recent efforts to change school systems elsewhere ............................................................ 240 
Lessons from international experience .................................................................................................. 245 
A systems approach is essential ............................................................................................................. 248 
Longer-term strategic planning and rolling shorter-term operational planning ..................................... 250 
References .............................................................................................................................................. 255 
Chapter 10: Conclusions .......................................................................................................................... 259 
 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

link to page 20 link to page 23 link to page 23 link to page 26 link to page 26 link to page 27 link to page 27 link to page 27 link to page 29 link to page 30 link to page 39 link to page 39 link to page 41 link to page 48 link to page 48 link to page 51 link to page 55 link to page 55 link to page 75 link to page 78 link to page 80 link to page 85 link to page 85 link to page 117 link to page 118 link to page 121 link to page 162 link to page 162 link to page 177 link to page 179 link to page 182 link to page 184 link to page 185 link to page 187 link to page 197 link to page 199 link to page 205 link to page 206 link to page 207 link to page 207 link to page 208 link to page 208 link to page 209 link to page 211 link to page 211 TABLE OF CONTENTS – 9 
 
 
Tables 
 
Table 1.1 Gross domestic product at factor cost by economic sector in 2012-13 (EGP millions) ............ 18 
Table  1.2  Comparing  Egypt,  Jordan  and  Malaysia  for  selected  factors  related  to  education  and 
innovation, Global Innovation Index, 2012 ....................................................................................... 21 
Table 1.3 Population and labour force trends ............................................................................................ 24 
Table 1.4 Distribution of employment by industry, and proportion of male employees, 2011 (%) .......... 24 
Table  1.5  Distribution  of  employment  of  persons  aged  15  years  and  over,  by  status  and  gender,  Egypt 
2011 (000s) ........................................................................................................................................ 25 
Table 1.6 World Economic Forum rankings of technology network readiness, 2013, Egypt ................... 25 
Table 1.7 Egyptian population by age composition, 2006 ........................................................................ 27 
Table 1.8 Population distribution by educational status (10 years and older) ........................................... 28 
Table 2.1 Schools, classes and students, by level of education and provider type, Egypt 2012/13 .......... 37 
Table 2.2 Al-Azhar institutes, classes, students and teachers, Egypt 2011/12 .......................................... 37 
Table 2.3 Share of intake by type of school (%) ....................................................................................... 39 
Table 2.4. Student-Teacher ratios for government primary, preparatory and general secondary schools by 
governorate, 2010-11 ......................................................................................................................... 46 
Table 2.5 Student-to-computer ratio and average computers per school, Egypt, 2009-10. ....................... 49 
Table  2.6  Average  household  expenditure  per  child  on  education  by  type  and  family  income,  Egypt, 
2005-06 (EGP) .................................................................................................................................. 53 
Table 4.1 Definitions of the informal sector, economy, enterprises and employment .............................. 73 
Table 4.2 Composition of employment by economic activity, 2002, 2006 and 2010 (%) ........................ 76 
Table 4.3. Unemployment rates by educational attainment and gender, age 15-29, 2012 (%) ................. 78 
Table 4.4 Employers’ assessment of Egyptian young workers’ skills (%) ............................................... 83 
Table 4.5 Employer satisfaction with the availability, cost and employability of workers, 2011 ............. 83 
Table 5.1 Faculties of education: Enrolments and graduations, PRESET programmes 2010-11 ........... 115 
Table 5.2 Length of PRESET programmes in European countries ......................................................... 116 
Table 5.3 Surpluses and shortages of teachers, aggregated by level of schooling .................................. 119 
Table 6.1 Number of schools and percentage of students performing at or above each level of the TIMSS 
classification (2007) ........................................................................................................................ 160 
Table 7.1 General education expenditure, as share of GDP and total public expenditure (2007-13) ..... 175 
Table 7.2 Unit cost by level of education, based on budget for fiscal year 2005/06 ............................... 177 
Table 7.3 General education budget, 2012/13, percentage share by chapters (types) of spending ......... 180 
Table 7.4 Share of budget authority in total general education budget, 2007-13 (%) ............................. 182 
Table 7.5 Budget of education directorates, by chapter (%) ................................................................... 183 
Table 7.6. Shares of education employees (%) and student/teacher ratio, by governorate (2010-11) .... 185 
Figure 7.13. Summary of school finance policy goals and policy levers ................................................ 195 
Table 7.7 Average general education wages, 2012-13 (EGP) ................................................................. 197 
Table 8.1 Projected school-age population, Egypt, 2012, 2015 and 2025 (’000s) .................................. 203 
Table 8.2 Baseline projections school population, Egypt, 2012, 2015 and 2025 (’000s) ....................... 204 
Table 8.3 Apparent leakage through the education pipeline, ages 6 to 16, by gender, Egypt (’000s) .... 205 
Table 8.4 Universal access to primary education by 2025 (’000s) .......................................................... 205 
Table 8.5 Halving the female attrition rate from Grade 5 to Grade 6 by 2025 (’000s) ........................... 206 
Table 8.6 Increase in participation rates by 2 percentage points by 2025 (’000s) .................................. 206 
Table 8.7 Increase in participation rates by 5 percentage points in 2025 (’000s) ................................... 207 
Table  8.8  Implications  of  scenarios  for  growth  in  the  private  sector  share  of  enrolments,  by  stage  of 
schooling, Egypt, 2012, 2015, 2025 ................................................................................................ 209 
 
 
 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

link to page 22 link to page 25 link to page 38 link to page 47 link to page 79 link to page 79 link to page 79 link to page 164 link to page 164 link to page 178 link to page 178 link to page 180 link to page 188 link to page 189 link to page 190 link to page 191 link to page 192 link to page 193 link to page 194 link to page 195 link to page 196 link to page 215 link to page 245 10 – TABLE OF CONTENTS 
 
 
Figures 
 
 
 
Figure 1.1 Egypt GDP per capita, 2001-12 in USD in constant prices since 2000 ................................... 20 
Figure 1.2 Redundancy cost indicator in weeks of salary ......................................................................... 23 
Figure 2.1 The Egyptian education system ............................................................................................... 36 
Figure 2.2 Distribution of the government-sector teaching workforce by sector and gender, 2011 (%) .. 45 
Figure 4.1 Net job creation between 1998 and 2006, urban Egypt, by sector and educational achievement
 ........................................................................................................................................................... 77 
Figure 4.2 Egyptian unemployment rate, 2001-13 .................................................................................... 77 
Figure 6.1 Options and examination combinations available to the student in the Science and Art tracks, 
when taking the thanawiya amma examinations ............................................................................. 162 
Figure 7.1 Trends in government schools’ share of enrolment, by level of education (2006-11), Egypt 176 
Figure 7.2 Enrolment rates by level of education, 1994-2011 ................................................................ 176 
Figure 7.3 OECD comparison of unit costs at different levels of education (2009) ............................... 178 
Figure 7.4 Average general education wages by governorate, 2012-13 (EGP) ...................................... 186 
Figure 7.5 Relationship between total wages and compensation and unit cost of education .................. 187 
Figure 7.6 General education per student cost in terms of wages (EGP), by governorate (2012/13) ..... 188 
Figure 7.7 International performance-dispersion map in maths and science, TIMSS 2007 .................... 189 
Figure 7.8 Achievement in 2007 TIMSS by socio-economic status ....................................................... 190 
Figure 7.9 Type of primary school system attended, by family wealth .................................................. 191 
Figure 7.10. Type of secondary school system attended, by family wealth ............................................ 192 
Figure 7.11 Distribution of 2007 TIMSS scores by education system .................................................... 193 
Figure 7.12 Tutoring expenditures by circumstances (per pupil, in 2009 EGP) ..................................... 194 
Figure 8.1 The elements of cost-effectiveness ........................................................................................ 213 
Figure 9.1 Towards system-wide sustainable reform .............................................................................. 243 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

11– ACRONYMS 
 
 
Acronyms 
ACBEU 
Admission Co-ordination Bureau of Egyptian Universities 
AnPro 
Analysis and Projection model 
CAI 
computer-assisted instruction  
CAOA 
Central Agency for Organisation and Administration 
CAPMAS  Central Agency for Public Mobilisation and Statistics, Egypt 
CCIMD 
Centre for Curriculum and Instructional Materials Development 
CPD 
continuing professional development (of teachers) 
CPO 
Central Placement Office 
DPG 
Development Partners Group 
ECE 
early childhood education 
EGP 
Egyptian pound (unit of currency) 
EUIA 
Egyptian Union for Investors Associations 
ENCC 
Egyptian National Competitiveness Council 
ETF 
European Training Foundation 
ETP 
Enterprise TVET Partnership 
FOE 
faculty of education 
FOEP 
Faculty of Education Enhancement Project 
GAEB 
General Authority for Educational Buildings 
GDP 
gross domestic product 
GNP 
gross national product 
HDI 
Human Development Index 
HEEP 
Higher Education Enhancement Project 
HIECS 
Household Income, Expenditure and Consumption Survey 
IAI 
Internet-assisted instruction 
ICT 
information and communications technology 
IGCSE 
International General Certificate of Secondary Education 
IIE 
Institute of Industrial Education 
ILO 
International Labour Organization 
IMF 
International Monetary Fund 
INSET 
in-service education of teachers 
IOM 
International Organization for Migration 
ISCED 
International Standard Classification of Education 
ITC 
Industrial Training Council 
LMI 
labour-market information 
MENA 
Middle East and North Africa (region) 
MKI 
Mubarak-Kohl Initiative (German dual system of technical training) 
MOE 
Ministry of Education, Egypt 
MOF 
Ministry of Finance, Egypt 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

12 – ACRONYMS 
 
 
MOHE 
Ministry of Higher Education, Egypt 
MOMM 
Ministry of Manpower and Migration, Egypt 
MOITS 
Ministry of Industry, Trade and Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises, Egypt  
MTI 
middle technical institute 
NAQAAE  National Agency for Quality Assurance and Accreditation of Education 
NCEEE 
National Centre for Examinations and Educational Evaluation 
NESP 
National Education Strategic Plan 2007-2012 
NGO 
non-governmental organisation 
NSAT 
National Standardised Achievement Test 
NSP 
National Strategic Plan for Pre-University Education 2014-2030 
NSSP 
National Skills Standard Project 
NTA 
National TVET Authority 
PAT 
Professional Academy for Teachers, Egypt 
PCK 
pedagogical content knowledge 
PISA 
Programme for International Student Assessment 
PRESET 
pre-service education of teachers 
PSPU 
Policy and Strategic Planning Unit 
PVTD 
Productivity and Vocational Training Department (of MOITS) 
RAI 
radio-assisted instruction 
RCI 
redundancy cost indicator 
SABER 
System Approach for Better Education Results (World Bank) 
SCHRD 
Supreme Council for Human Resource Development 
SEEP 
Secondary Education Enhancement Project 
SIP 
School Improvement Plan 
SMEs 
small and medium-sized enterprises 
SPU 
Strategic Planning Unit 
STEM 
science, technology, engineering and mathematics 
STI 
Staff Training Institute 
SYPE 
Survey of Young People in Egypt  
TCC 
Technical Competency Centre 
TIMSS 
Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study 
TVET 
technical and vocational education and training 
Technical and Vocational Education and Training Reform Programme in Egypt 
TVET II 
(Phase II) 
UAE 
United Arab Emirates 
UNDP 
United Nations Development Programme 
UNESCO 
United Nations Education, Scientific and Cultural Organization 
UNIDO 
United Nations Industrial Development Organization 
VET 
vocational education and training 
VTC 
Vocational Training Centre 
WEF 
World Economic Forum 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

13 – EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 
 
 
 
Executive summary 
Egypt’s future depends in large part on the skills and resilience of its young people. 
However, too many young people are not developing the attributes that the country needs 
at  school.  Most  of  the  working-age  population  do  not  have  adequate  skills  for 
employment in a modern economy. Traditional sources of employment are not growing at 
anywhere  near  the  rate  required  to  absorb  new  entrants  to  the  labour  market  –  whether 
school  leavers  or  tertiary  education  graduates.  The  urgent  priority  for  Egypt  is  to  make 
education  and training  relevant  to  its economic  prospects.  It  will  need  to  do  so in  ways 
that develop rounded citizens who can work together to build a cohesive society.  
The  transformation  that  is  required  in  Egyptian  education  involves  improving  the 
learning experiences and outcomes of schooling so that educated youth can be productive 
citizens. That involves shifting the orientation of Egyptian schooling from the acquisition 
and repetition of knowledge to the development and demonstration of skills.  
It  means,  therefore,  reducing  the  current  emphasis  on  curriculum  content  coverage 
and  changing  classrooms  from  passive  to  interactive  places  of  learning.  It  also  means 
using assessment to monitor student progress and inform educational interventions, rather 
than as a crude and unfair tool for social sorting. 
It  means  overhauling  the  underperforming,  under-resourced  and  undervalued 
provision  of  technical  and  vocational  education  and  training  (TVET),  by  upgrading  its 
capacity  and  status,  reorienting  its  offerings  to  current  and  emerging  labour  market 
requirements,  and  integrating  it  as  a  system  at  the  centre  of  Egypt’s  economic 
transformation agenda.  
Egyptian  authorities  have  been  addressing  these  challenges.  The  comprehensive 
National Education Strategic Plan 2007-2012 set ambitious goals. Considerable progress 
has  been  made  in  achieving  higher  rates  of  participation  in  the  compulsory  and  post-
compulsory  stages  of  education.  Student  progression  rates  have  risen  and  attrition  rates 
have  fallen.  Attention  has  been  paid  to  increasing  professionalisation  of  the  teaching 
workforce,  greater  autonomy  for  school  principals  and  a  more  systematic  approach  to 
data collection and reporting of progress against targets. 
Less  progress  has  been  made,  however,  on  the  difficult  challenge  of  improving 
educational quality. The common factor undermining efforts to improve student learning 
at all levels is the invalid system of student assessment and its improper use. It is invalid 
because of deficiencies in its design, and its use is improper because scores derived from 
its  application  unjustifiably  determine  the  life  chances  of  students.  The  most  pervasive 
influence in Egyptian education is the secondary school leaving exam (thanwiya amma). 
It  needs  to  be  reconstructed,  alongside  the  development  of  more  valid  and  reliable 
assessment methods and a more flexible approach to university admissions.  
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

14 – EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 
 
 
School principals and classroom teachers should be given more discretion in the use 
of available resources and held accountable for the results they achieve. The educational 
leadership at the district administrations (idaras) and governorates (muddiriyas) need to 
see their role as managing for results rather than just inspecting to ensure that particular 
matters  are  covered.  They  need  to focus  on  what  students are learning,  and  provide  the 
support  that  principals  and  teachers  need,  including  by  diffusing  good  innovations  in 
teaching practice. 
Teachers  generally  will  need  more  focused  support  so  that  they  can  continue  to 
improve  their  teaching,  and  the  opportunity  to  share  and  learn  with  their  professional 
colleagues. The formation of the Professional Academy for Teachers represents a major, 
long-term structural advance. Teacher education generally, especially pre-service teacher 
education,  will  need  to  be  sharpened  up  and,  in  some  areas,  especially  in  technical  and 
vocational education, reshaped. 
A  well-constructed  and  well-communicated  change  agenda,  grounded  in  evidence 
about current deficiencies and looking ahead to future imperatives, and bringing together 
progressive  teachers  and  school  leaders,  should  harness  considerable  educator  support. 
Employers,  especially  in  private-sector  enterprises  which  will  be  the  main  source  of 
Egypt’s future economic base, should have a strong say in helping to reshape secondary 
education,  as  well  as  TVET  more  broadly,  and  thereby  helping  to  shape  Egypt’s  future 
labour supply. 
Serious attention needs to be paid not only to what change is required but also to how 
that change can be implemented, followed through and embedded in culture and practice 
in all classrooms, and in the steering and supporting arms of government administration 
at all levels. 
Considerable  effort  will  need  to  be  applied  to  making  the  necessary  shift  from  an 
authoritarian  and  unaccountable  management  model  to  one  based  on  transparent 
information  that  underpins  accountability  for  performance  at  every  level.  Broad  public-
sector reforms will be necessary complements to the education-specific and labour market 
reforms identified in this report. 
 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

15 – CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION 
 
 
Chapter 1. 
 
Introduction 
 
This  chapter  outlines  the  context  for  educational  policy  in  Egypt.  It  notes  the  special 
place of Egypt in the world, its accumulated cultural characteristics and its contemporary 
political-economic  transition.  The  chapter  describes  key  aspects  of  Egypt’s  economy, 
investment climate, workforce, employment structure and technological capacity. It also 
outlines key aspects of its population and human development.
 
 
 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

16 – CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION 
 
 
Egypt’s place in the world 
Egypt is located 27o N, 30o E, in northeast Africa, between the Mediterranean Sea on 
the north and the Red Sea on the east. It is bordered by the Gaza Strip and Israel to the 
northeast, Sudan to the south and Libya to the west. 
Its total area is 1.01 million km2, of which 995 450 km2 is land, only 3% of it arable. 
Its main features are the River Nile and the desert. 
The  estimated  population  at  the  2006  census  was  73  million.  On  the  basis  of  more 
recent  estimates  (CAPMAS,  2012),  the  present  population  is  around  80  million.  Over 
97% of the population lives in the narrow strip of the Nile Valley and in the Nile Delta, 
which is merely 5% of the country’s total land. 
Egypt  has  long  been  a  nodal  point  for  routes  –  westward  along  the  coast  of  North 
Africa, northwest to Europe, northeast to the Levant, southward along the Nile to Africa, 
and southeast to the Indian Ocean and Asia. 
Egypt  has  a  major  role  in  Middle  Eastern  geopolitics  arising  from  its  size  and 
location: its  control  of  the  Suez  Canal,  linking  the  Indian  Ocean  and the  Mediterranean 
Sea, and its control of the Sinai Peninsula, the only land bridge between Africa and the 
rest of the eastern hemisphere. 
Historical legacies 
Egypt  gave  rise  to  one  of  the  world’s  great  civilisations,  with  a  unified  kingdom 
forming around 3200 BC and a series of dynasties ruling for the next three millennia. The 
last native dynasty fell to the Persians in 341 BC. Egypt’s special location has exposed it 
to  rule  by  different  powers  such  as  the  Ptolemies,  Romans,  Arabs,  Fatimids,  Mukluks, 
Ottomans, French and British. Each of these had its own influence on Egyptian culture. 
However, the Arabic and Muslim cultures, dating from the 7th century, can be claimed to 
have the most significant impact on Egypt. Before the Arab invasion in 639, Coptic was 
both the popular and religious language. Today Coptic is a liturgical language only and 
Arabic is the common and official language, while English and French are widely used by 
the educated classes (Mikhail, 2008).  
Britain seized control of Egypt’s government in 1882, although nominal allegiance to 
the  Ottoman  Empire  continued  until  1914.  Partially  independent  from  Britain  in  1922, 
Egypt  acquired  full  sovereignty  with  the  overthrow  of  the  British-backed  monarchy  in 
1952 and its declaration as an independent republic.  
Since  1954,  Egypt  has  passed  through  a  number  of  stages,  starting  with  socialism 
under President Nasser, followed by an “open door” era initiated by President Sadat. The 
era of economic development, under President Mubarak from 1981, involved reforms to 
the highly centralised economy inherited from the Nasser period. Each of these eras has 
had its own impact on the Egyptian context in terms of economics, politics and education 
and, not least, the occupational aspirations of young people and their families. 
Contemporary transitions and aspirations 
On  17 December  2010,  Mohammed  Bouazizi,  a  street  vendor  who  could  not  get  a 
stable  job,  who  was  earning  some  USD  140  per  month  and  using  the  money  to  put  his 
sister  through  university  (Beaumont,  2011),  set  himself  on  fire  in  the  Tunisian  city  of 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

 CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION – 17 
 
 
Sidi-Bouzid after a police inspector confiscated his fruit, scales and cart. His act triggered 
protests against the repressive regime of then President Zine El-Abidine Ben Ali who was 
forced  to  flee  to  Saudi  Arabia  just  ten  days  later.  These  events  reverberated  throughout 
the  Arab  world,  giving  vent  to  longstanding  anti-authoritarian  sentiment  and,  in  several 
countries, including Egypt, inspiring a democratic uprising. While the grounds for revolt 
were  deep  and  far-reaching  across  the  society,  notably  the  socio-economic 
marginalisation  of  at  least  half  of  the  population  excluded  from  the  formal  economy, 
educated  youth  had  particular  grievances. The  post  2008  generation  of  young  graduates 
were  seeing  a  sudden  shift  in  their  projected  life-arc,  from  an  upward  to  a  downward 
curve (Mason, 2012). These “graduates with no future” were feeling cheated out of the 
promised returns to educational attainment: a secure and rewarding job, a secure basis for 
family formation, a better living standard than their parents. 
On  25  January  2011,  tens  of  thousands  of  Egyptians  staged  unprecedented 
demonstrations  in  Cairo’s  Tahrir  Square  and  other  Egyptian  urban  centres.  On 
11 February  then  President  Hosni  Mubarak  stood  down  and  handed  power  to  the  army. 
By  March,  Egyptian  voters  had  approved  a  new  interim  constitution  and  in  November 
elections  were  held  for  Egypt’s  first  post-revolution  parliament.  Expectations  were 
diverse  and  aspirations  high.  As  it  turned  out,  the  Muslim  Brotherhood’s  Freedom  and 
Justice  Party  gained  the  largest  single  block  of  votes  (37%)  followed  by  the  Salafist-
dominated Nour Party (24%). 
In  May  2012,  the  first  round  of  elections  for  a  new  president  was  held.  Before  the 
second  round  could  be  conducted,  the  Supreme  Court  ruled  that  the  elected  parliament 
was illegitimate, and dissolved it. In June, President Muhammad Morsi was elected with 
a majority of 51.7% of the second-round vote. In July, the new president issued a decree 
annulling  the  Supreme  Court’s  dissolution  of  parliament.  The court  declared  its  rulings 
“binding”.  The  president  subsequently  issued  a  decree  to  widen  his  powers.  Protests 
escalated.  
As political tensions mounted, the grassroots Tamarod campaign started in May 2013 
collecting  signatures  to  force  President  Morsi  to  step  down,  with  calls  for  mass 
demonstrations  nationwide  on  30 June  2013.  These  Tamarod-led  mass  demonstrations 
were followed by the announcement of an ultimatum by the army that gave all political 
forces a 48-hour period to resolve the impasse. President Morsi was removed as President 
of  Egypt  on  2 July,  and  the  Minister  of  Defence,  General  Abdel  Fatah  al-Sisi,  made  an 
announcement outlining a new political transitional phase in a televised speech on 3 July. 
The  head  of  Egypt’s  Supreme  Constitutional  Court,  Adly  Mansour,  was  sworn  in  as 
interim  president  according  to  the  announced  roadmap.  On  9 July  he  issued  a 
constitutional  declaration  with  33  articles  setting  the  milestones  and  timeline  of  this 
9-month  political  transition  phase,  and  appointed  an  interim  technocratic  government 
which took office on 17 July. The transition roadmap also included suspending the 2012 
constitution,  setting  up  a  process  for  amending  it and  holding  a  referendum  on  the  new 
constitution, followed by  parliamentary  and  presidential  elections.  In  a  deeply  polarised 
context  and  a  volatile  security  situation  due  to  various  confrontations  between  security 
forces  and  supporters  of  the  Muslim  Brotherhood,  a  50-member  Constitutional 
Committee was appointed on 2 September and first met on 8 September. 
This political volatility may be seen as part of the struggle for democratisation after a 
long period of authoritarianism. The unrest and uncertainty, however, also undermine the 
necessary process of developing the capacity of the people to make their way in a more 
competitive, globally integrated and knowledge-based world. 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

18 – CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION 
 
 
Government structure 
The Parliament of the Arab Republic of Egypt is a bicameral legislature. The People’s 
Assembly  is  the  lower  house  and  comprises  454  deputies.  The  Assembly  has  a  5-year 
term. All seats are voted on in each election. The Shura Council is the upper house. The 
Council  comprises  264  members  of  which  174  members are  directly  elected  and  the  88 
are appointed by the President of the Republic for 6-year terms. Membership is rotating, 
with one-half of the Council renewed every three years. The Shura Council’s legislative 
powers  are  limited.  The  country  is  divided  into  27  governorates  (muddiriyas),  under  7 
economic regions. 
Economy 
Agricultural production in Egypt is confined to the fertile corridor irrigated from the 
Nile river. Egypt’s natural resources include petroleum, natural gas, iron ore, phosphates, 
manganese,  limestone,  gypsum,  talc,  asbestos,  lead  and  zinc.  Egypt  has  a  developed 
energy market based on coal, oil, natural gas and hydropower. There are substantial coal 
deposits in the northeast Sinai. Oil and gas are produced in the western desert regions, the 
Gulf of Suez, and the Nile Delta. In addition, Egypt has large gas reserves. 
Egypt’s primary economic strength stems from its diversity, in comparison with the 
rest  of  the  region.  Table  1.1  shows  the  breakdown  of  gross  domestic  product  (GDP)  in 
2010-11.  Hydrocarbon  extraction constituted  15%  of GDP  (the  lowest  proportion  in  the 
Arab  world),  manufacturing  17%,  agriculture  15%,  wholesale  and  retail  12%, 
construction  and  real  estate  7%,  financial  and  telecommunications  services  8%,  and 
externally oriented sources such as the Suez Canal and tourism over 3% each. The public 
sector  overall  accounted  for  38%  of  GDP,  with  significant  government  functions  in 
mining,  electricity,  water,  brokerage,  social  insurance,  the  Suez  Canal  and  general 
government administration. The Egyptian military contributes to economic activity. 
Table 1.1 Gross domestic product at factor cost by economic sector in 2012-13 (EGP millions) 
 
Total 
Private 
Public 
Total 
1 677 351.8 
1 019 357 
657994.8 
Agriculture, woodlands & hunting 
243 355.5 
243 311 
44.5 
Extraction (petroleum, gas, etc.) 
290 739  
52 006 
238 733 
Manufacturing 
262 505 
219 209 
43 296 
Electricity 
21 237 
3 053 
18 184 
Water & sewerage 
5 826 

5 826 
Construction & building 
76 747 
67 847 
8 900 
Transportation & storage 
67 212 
50 373 
16 839 
Communication & information 
44 507 
29 663 
14 844 
Suez Canal 
32 396 

32 396 
Wholesale & retail trade 
183 831 
178 072 
5 759 
Financial intermediaries & supporting services 
54 814 
17 925 
36 889 
Insurance & social insurance 
5 287 
1 806 
3 481 
Restaurants & hotels 
52 761 
52 175 
586 
Real estate activities 
43 474 
41 667 
1 807 
General government 
174 713.3 

174 713.3 
Education, health & personal services 
63 721 
62 250 
1 471 
Note: The official currency is the Egyptian pound (EGP). In mid-May 2015, 1 USD was the equivalent of 7.62 EGP and 1 EUR 
bought 8.56 EGP. 
Source: CAPMAS (2012), Egypt Statistical Yearbook, 2012, CAPMAS (Central Agency for Public Mobilisation and Statistics), 
Cairo; Ministry of Finance. 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

 CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION – 19 
 
 
Under comprehensive economic reforms initiated in 1991, Egypt relaxed many price 
controls  and  partially  liberalised  trade  and  investment.  Manufacturing  became  less 
dominated by the public sector, especially in heavy industries. A process of public-sector 
reform  and  privatisation  began  to  enhance  private  business  opportunities.  Agriculture, 
mainly  in  private  hands,  has  been  largely  deregulated,  with  the  exception  of  cotton  and 
sugar production. Construction, non-financial services, and domestic wholesale and retail 
trades are largely private. 
Major  fiscal  reforms  were  introduced  in  2005  in  order  to  tackle  the  informal  sector 
which according to estimates represents somewhere between 30% and 60% of GDP (ILO, 
2011).  Many  changes  were  made  to  cut  tariffs,  tackle  the  black  market  and  reduce 
bureaucracy. The corporate tax rate was initially reduced to a flat 20% (from a previous 
range  of  34-45%)  and,  in  2012,  scaled  up  progressively  to  a  maximum  rate  of  25%. 
Amendments to investment and company law were introduced in order to attract foreign 
investors. However, these measures appear to have had little if any effect on the informal 
sector. 
After  unrest  erupted  in  January  2011,  the  Egyptian  government  halted  economic 
reforms  and  increased  social  spending  to  curb  public  dissatisfaction,  but  political 
uncertainty  caused  economic  growth  to  slow  significantly,  reducing  the  government’s 
revenues. Tourism, manufacturing, extractive industries and the Suez Canal were among 
the hardest hit sectors of the Egyptian economy, and economic growth is likely to remain 
below potential through to fiscal year 2016. 
Egypt’s  public  finances  have  been  deteriorating  sharply  as  a  consequence  of 
increasing recurrent spending, notably on fuel subsidies, public-sector wages and interest 
payments  on  public  debt.  In  the  2013  financial  year  (FY13)  the  overall  budget  deficit 
reached  almost  14%  of  GDP,  up  from  10.6%  in  FY12  and  9.8%  in  FY11  (Ministry  of 
Finance Bulletin, March 2014). 
GDP growth stalled during the period of political instability of 2011 and 2012 (Figure 
1.1).  Following  the  dismissal  of  President  Morsi,  in  early  July  2013,  Saudi  Arabia,  the 
United  Arab  Emirates  (UAE)  and  Kuwait  pledged  an  aid  package  of  USD 12 billion  to 
support  Egypt,  and  this  was  augmented  by  another  USD 3.9 billion  from  the  UAE  in 
October.  The  total  Gulf  support  package  comprises  grants  (cash  and  in-kind)  of 
USD 7 billion, USD 6 billion of interest-free 5-year deposits held at the Central Bank of 
Egypt  and  project  financing  of  USD 2.9 billion.  As  FY14  kick-started  with the windfall 
of  aid  pledged  by  the  Gulf,  the  interim  government  embarked  on  a  fiscal  stimulus 
programme to activate the economy and increase the real per capita growth rate. 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 


20 – CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION 
 
 
Figure 1.1 Egypt GDP per capita, 2001-12 in USD in constant prices since 2000 
 
Source: World Bank Development Indicators, available at http://data.worldbank.org. 
The World Economic Forum (WEF) lists Egypt as a transition economy. Its ranking 
on  the  Global  Competitiveness  Index  has  steadily  declined  from  70th  in  2009,  81st  in 
2010,  94th  in  2011  and  107th  in  2103,  out  of  144  countries  (World  Economic  Forum, 
2012).  Among  the  priorities  recommended  by  the  2012  WEF  report  was  the  need  to 
improve its education system. 
As of late 2013, the economic situation in Egypt was precarious. Following the sharp 
currency  depreciation  in  the  first  half  of  2013,  inflation  has  been  rising.  The  headline 
urban  inflation  rate  in  October  2013  was  10.5%,  with  food  inflation  at  13.2%.  Living 
standards continue to be adversely affected, given that food accounts for more than 40% 
of  the  average  Egyptian  per  capita  income,  with  higher  proportions  for  the  poor  and 
vulnerable segments of the population. Unemployment has also been rising. 
Investment climate 
An  estimated  2.7  million  Egyptians  living  abroad  contribute  actively  to  the 
development of their country through remittances (USD 14.3 billion in 2011), as well as 
the  circulation  of  human  and  social  capital  and  investment  (Collinson,  2012).  The 
Egyptian government is seeking to attract inwards investment in urban land development 
and private-sector business, including private for-profit investment in education. 
Egypt was ranked 74th out of 107economies in the Global Innovation Index in 2007 
and  it  ranked  108th  out  of  142  in  2013  (Dutta  and  Caulkin,  2007;  Dutta  and  Lanvin, 
2013). Compared to Malaysia, Egypt ranks lower in knowledge workers and information 
and  communication  technology  (ICT)  use  (Table  1.2).  Currently,  its  strengths  are  in  its 
rank  for  expenditure  on  education,  knowledge-intensive  employment  and  ICT 
infrastructure (Dutta and Lanvin, 2013). 
 
 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

 CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION – 21 
 
 
Table 1.2 Comparing Egypt, Jordan and Malaysia for selected factors related to education and innovation, 
Global Innovation Index, 2012 
Egypt 
Jordan 
Malaysia 
Factor 
(number 
(number 
(number or 
or rank) 
or rank) 
rank) 
Population 
84.6m 
6.5m 
29.5m 
GDP/capita, PPPs 
6 557.4 
6 044.4 
16 942.1 
Global Innovation Index rank  
108 
61 
32 
Education rank 
73 
45 
84 
Current expenditure on education rank, % gross national income (GNI) 
n/a 
n/a 
56 
Public expenditure per pupil rank, % GDP/capita 
70 
n/a 
61 
School life expectancy rank 
81 
78 
79 
Pupil-teacher ratio rank, secondary 
54 
39 
56 
Business sophistication rank 
99 
47 
27 
Knowledge workers rank 
67 
79 
43 
Knowledge intensive employment rank, % 
34 
n/a 
65 
Information and communication technologies infrastructure rank 
46 
82 
34 
ICT use  
74 
68 
52 
Note: shaded factors are strengths for Egypt  
Source: Dutta, S. and B. Lanvin (eds.) (2013), The Global Innovation Index 2013: The Local Dynamics of Innovation, INSEAD, 
WIPO and Cornell University, www.wipo.int/edocs/pubdocs/en/economics/gii/gii_2013.pdf 
Previous  regulatory  reforms,  including  the  establishment  of  a  “one-stop  shop”  for 
investment, made starting a business less time-consuming and costly, but without reforms 
in other areas they have proven to be largely cosmetic, failing to create real momentum 
for dynamic entrepreneurial growth. In the absence of a well-functioning labour market, 
informal labour activity persists in many sectors, as discussed in Chapter 4. 
Despite  Egypt’s  recent  tax  and  regulatory  improvements  there  are  still  major 
obstacles  to  increasing  investment  and  reducing  unemployment.  The  system  is  heavily 
bureaucratic  from  years  of  centralised  government,  small  and  medium-sized  enterprises 
(SMEs)  have  difficulty  accessing  finance,  infrastructure  development  is  needed,  and 
enterprises lack management capacity. 
The  major  issue  for  investment  is  macroeconomic  stability.  Egypt’s  GDP  growth 
slowed following the financial crisis, with growth of 1.98% in 2010/11, 2.2% in 2011/12 
and  2.1%  in  2012/13  as  the  country  suffered  from  loss  of  investor  confidence 
(Khandelwal  and  Roitman,  2013).  Political  instability  can  be  expected  to  be  associated 
with sizeable output losses, sluggish recovery, rising unemployment and inflation, and a 
much tightened fiscal position. While the windfall of Gulf aid is providing a short-term 
buffer  for  Egypt,  the  chronic  macroeconomic  imbalances  need  to  be  addressed  swiftly, 
most notably fiscal consolidation. 
The  World  Economic  Forum  report  (2012)  identified  three  other  major  areas  for 
improvement:  increasing  domestic  competition,  and  making  labour  markets  flexible 
(Egypt ranked 135th) and more efficient (Egypt ranked 141st). 
Increasing domestic competition  
Egypt  has  a  competition  policy  framework,  including  competition  law  and  a 
competition  authority,  but  lacks  an  effective  implementation  and  enforcement  regimen. 
There was some good news in the WEF report rankings in that there appears to be “less 
favouritism  by  government  officials”  (up  31  places  in  WEF  ranking)  and  “stronger 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

22 – CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION 
 
 
corporate  ethics”  (up  by  17  in  the  WEF  ranking)  over  the  preceding  year  (World 
Economic Forum, 2012). 
Labour market  
Egypt’s labour market has been growing by more than 3% per annum. According to 
the  Ministry  of  Manpower  and  Migration  (MOMM),  There  are  about  715 000  potential 
entrants  to  the  labour  force  each  year,  mostly  young  educated  graduates.  New  job 
opportunities come nowhere near matching this demand. Where there is growth through 
investment  it  has  been  mainly  “jobless  growth”.  Private  investments  have  been  highly 
capital  intensive  both  because  of  energy  subsidies  and  because  employers  perceive  a 
mismatch between the skills they need and those provided through the education system. 
Egypt  has  high  labour  costs,  equivalent  to  25.6%  of  corporate  profits  (Angel-Urdinola 
and Semlali, 2010) which lead firms to substitute labour with capital and has the effect of 
slowing  down  economic  growth.  Social  contributions  are  a  significant  share  of  labour 
taxes, including pension contributions and unemployment insurance contributions which, 
as  discussed  in  Chapter  4,  discourage  the  formalisation  of  many  enterprises.  Egypt’s 
unemployment  insurance  system  and  public  employment  service  both  require 
modernisation and reform in coverage. Importantly, urgent attention needs to be given to 
the  mismatch  between  the  skills  demanded  from  employers  and  those  supplied  by  the 
education and training systems. 
Constitutional and legal provisions relating to employment 
Egypt’s labour laws militate against a flexible labour market which could otherwise 
adapt  to  economic  change,  attract  foreign  direct  investment  and  reduce  unemployment. 
The labour laws have favoured protecting employees’ job security over encouraging the 
creation of new jobs. Costs and regulatory hurdles for hiring and firing are very high. One 
indicator  generally  used  to  compare  costs  of  firing  employees  is  the  redundancy  cost 
indicator  (RCI)  (Angel-Urdinola  and  Kuddo,  2010).  The  indicator  measures  the  cost  of 
advance  notice requirements, severance  payments  and  penalties  due  when terminating  a 
redundant worker, expressed in weeks of salary. Egypt’s redundancy costs are among the 
highest in the world: the RCI in Egypt amounts to 132 weeks of salary, compared with an 
average of 50 in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), 53 in Latin America, 28 in 
Europe and Central Asia (ECA), and 27 among OECD countries (Figure 1.2).  
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

 CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION – 23 
 
 
Figure 1.2 Redundancy cost indicator in weeks of salary 
OECD
26.6 
Eastern Europe & Central Asia
27.8 
East Asia & Pacific
42.4 
Middle East & North Africa (Non-GCC)
30.3 
Latin America and Caribbean
53 
GCC
63 
Sub-Saharan Africa
67.6 
South Asia
75.8 
Iraq

Oman

Jordan

Yemen
17 
Tunisia
17 
Algeria
17 
Lebanon
17 
Djibouti
16 
Qatar
69 
Kuwait
78 
Saudi Arabia
80 
Syria
80 
United Arab Emirates
84 
Morocco
83 
Iran
87 
West Bank and Gaza Strip
91 
Egypt
132 
0
20
40
60
80
100 120 140
 
Source:  Angel-Urdinola,  D.F.  and  A.  Kuddo  (2010),  “Key  characteristics  of  employment  regulation  in  the  Middle  East  and 
North Africa”, SP Discussion Paper, No. 1006, World Bank, Washington, DC. 
In  July  2003,  a  new  labour  law  was  enacted  to  increase  flexibility  in  hiring  and 
dismissing  employees.  It  introduced  fixed-term  contracts,  allowed  workers  the  right  to 
strike, and introduced mechanisms for collective bargaining and worker/employer dispute 
settlements.  However  it  appears  to  have  had  a  limited  positive  impact  on  increasing 
flexibility and job creation. 
Workforce 
As  shown  in  Table  1.3,  Egypt’s  labour-force  participation  rate  has  been  rising 
alongside  its  increasing  population.  The  estimated  workforce  in  2006  was  23.3  million, 
consisting of 21.0 million employed and 2.1 million unemployed persons, with an official 
unemployment rate of 9%. Unemployment was distributed almost equally between rural 
and  urban  areas.  More  recently,  unemployment  levels  have  risen,  with  the  official 
unemployment rate in 2011 at 12%. 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

24 – CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION 
 
 
Table 1.3 Population and labour force trends 
Labour force trends 
1996 
2000 
2006 
2011 
Population (millions) 
59.3 
63.3 
72.6 
79.6 
Labour force (millions) 
17.2 
18.9 
23.3 
26.5  
Participation rate (%) 
29.1 
29.9 
32.1 
33.0 
Number of employed (millions) 
15.7 
17.4 
21.2 
23.4 
Number of unemployed (millions) 
1.53 
1.5 
2.1 
3.2 
Unemployment rate (%) 
8.9 
7.9 
8.9 
12.0 
Source: CAPMAS (2012), Egypt Statistical Yearbook, 2012, CAPMAS (Central Agency for Public 
Mobilisation and Statistics), Cairo 
Table  1.4  shows  the  distribution  of  employment  by  industry  sectors.  Agriculture 
remains the single largest industry by employment (29.2%). Agricultural employment has 
been  declining,  however,  down  from  41%  in  1990.  The  next  biggest  employer  is 
construction (11.6%), closely followed by wholesale and retail trade (11%), and then by 
manufacturing (9.8%) and education (9.1%). 
Table 1.4 Distribution of employment by industry, and proportion of male employees, 2011 (%) 
Industry share of 
Male share of each 
Industry sector 
total employment 
industry sector (%) 
(%) 
Agriculture, hunting, forestry & fishing 
29.2 
70.6 
Manufacturing 
9.8 
91.8 
Wholesale and retail trade, and repair of motor 
11.0 
89.3 
vehicles 
Construction 
11.6 
99.3 
Education 
9.1 
51.8 
Public administration and defence 
8.0 
77.0 
Transport and storage 
6.9 
97.8 
Health and social work 
2.7 
41.9 
Accommodation and food services 
2.0 
96.3 
Specialised scientific and technical activities 
1.8 
84.4 
Information and communications 
0.8 
79.8 
Electricity, gas, steam and air conditioning 
1.1 
93.5 
supply 
Financial and insurance services 
0.9 
75.6 
Administrative and support services 
0.7 
88.5 
Water supply, sewerage and waste 
0.7 
93.6 
management 
Arts, entertainment and recreation activities 
0.5 
85.2 
Home services for private households 
0.5 
76.3 
Mining and quarrying 
0.2 
100.0 
Other service activities 
2.4 
n.a. 
Total  
100 
 
Source:  CAPMAS  (2012),  Egypt  Statistical  Yearbook,  2012,  CAPMAS  (Central  Agency  for  Public 
Mobilisation and Statistics), Cairo. 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

 CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION – 25 
 
 
Table 1.5 shows that wage and salary earners accounted for 61% of all employment. 
Unpaid family workers comprised 11% of total employment, of whom 55% were female. 
Fewer women were business owners or self-employed than men. 
Table 1.5 Distribution of employment of persons aged 15 years and over, 
 by status and gender, Egypt 2011 (000s) 
 
Males 
Females 
Total 
Wage & salary earner 
11 837 
2 445 
14 282 
Business owner 
3 521 
147 
3 668 
Self-employed 
2 201 
645 
2 846 
Unpaid family workers 
1 160 
1 391 
2 551 
Total 
18 719 
4 628 
23 347 
Source: CAPMAS (2012), Egypt Statistical Yearbook, 2012, CAPMAS (Central Agency for Public Mobilisation and Statistics), 
Cairo. 
Technology  
In  the  2013  WEF  ranking  of  technology  network  readiness  (Bilbao-Osorio  et  al., 
2013),  Egypt  ranked  80th  out  of  144  economies  in  2013,  with  a  mean  score  of  3.78 
(Table 1.6). Egypt ranks reasonably high for the affordability of technology, ranking 8th 
for  cell  phone  charges,  but  very  low  for  skills  (139th  for  educational  quality,  for 
example). 
Table 1.6 World Economic Forum rankings of technology network readiness, 2013, Egypt 
RANK 
RANK 
INDICATOR 
VALUE 
 
INDICATOR 
VALUE 
/144 
/144 
1st pillar: Political and regulatory environment 
 
6th pillar: Individual use 
1.01 Effectiveness of law-
6.01 Mobile phone 
122 
2.6 
 
82 
101.1 
making bodies* 
subscriptions/100 pop. 
6.02 Individuals using Internet, 
1.02 Laws relating to ICTs* 
87 
3.7 
 
73 
38.7 

6.03 Households w/ personal 
1.03 Judicial independence 
53 
4.1 
 
70 
36.4 
computer, % 
1.04 Efficiency of legal system 
6.04 Households w/ Internet 
86 
3.4 
 
70 
30.5 
in settling disputes* 
access, % 
1.05 Efficiency of legal system 
6.05 Broadband Internet 
100 
3.2 
 
91 
2.1 
in challenging regulations* 
subscriptions/100 pop. 
1.06 Intellectual property 
6.06 Mobile broadband 
83 
3.3 
 
46 
24.0 
protection* 
subscriptions/100 pop. 
1.07 Software piracy rate, % 
6.07 Use of virtual social 
53 
61 
 
38 
5.9 
software installed 
networks* 
1.08 No. of. procedures to 
116 
42 
 
7th pillar: Business usage 
 
 
enforce a contract 
1.09 No. of days to enforce a 
7.01 Firm-level technology 
130 
1 010 
 
86 
4.6 
contract 
absorption* 
2nd pillar: Business and innovation environment 
 
7.02 Capacity for innovation* 
80 
3.0 
2.01 Availability of latest 
7.03 patents, 
115 
4.2 
 
72 
0.6 
technologies* 
applications/million pop. 
2.02 Venture capital 
7.04 Business-to-business 
40 
3.0 
 
111 
4.4 
availability* 
Internet use* 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

26 – CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION 
 
 
Table 1.6 World Economic Forum rankings of technology network readiness, 2013, Egypt (continued)  
RANK 
RANK 
INDICATOR 
VALUE 
 
INDICATOR 
VALUE 
/144 
/144 
7.05 Business-to-consumer 
2.03 Total tax rate, % profits 
90 
42.6 
 
80 
4.4 
Internet use* 
2.04 No. days to start a 
25 

 
7.06 Extent of staff training* 
129 
3.1 
business 
2.05 No. procedures to start a 
48 

 
8th pillar: Government usage 
business 
2.06 Intensity of local 
8.01 Importance of ICTs to 
121 
4.0 
 
122 
3.1 
competition* 
government vision* 
2.07 Tertiary education gross 
8.02 Government Online 
75 
32.4 
 
42 
0.60 
enrolment rate, % 
Service Index, 0–1 (best) 
2.08 Quality of management 
8.03 Government success in 
137 
2.8 
 
92 
4.0 
schools* 
ICT promotion* 
2.09 Government procurement 
95 
3.3 
 
9th pillar: Economic impact 
of advanced technology* 
9.01 Impact of ICTs on new 
3rd pillar: Infrastructure and digital content 
 
98 
4.0 
services and products* 
3.01 Electricity production, 
9.02 ICT PCT patents, 
86 
1 743.7 
 
67 
0.2 
kWh/capita 
applications/million pop. 
3.02 Mobile network coverage, 
9.03 Impact of ICTs on new 
41 
99.7 
 
80 
4.0 
% pop 
organisational models* 
3.03 International Internet 
9.04 Knowledge-intensive jobs, 
114 
3.8 
 
43 
30.3 
bandwidth, kb/s per user 
% workforce 
3.04 Secure Internet 
105 
3.0 
 
10th pillar: Social impacts 
 
 
servers/million pop 
3.05 Accessibility of digital 
10.01 Impact of ICTs on access 
100 
4.4 
 
104 
3.8 
content* 
to basic services* 
4th pillar: Affordability 
10.02 Internet access in 
 
 
 
116 
3.0 
 
schools* 
4.01 Mobile cellular tariffs, 
10.03 ICT use & government 

0.05 
 
94 
3.8 
PPP USD/min. 
efficiency* 
4.02 Fixed broadband Internet 
10.04 E-Participation Index, 0–1 
13 
17.25 
 
15 
0.68 
tariffs, PPP USD/month 
(best) 
4.03 Internet & telephony 
101 
1.40 
 
 
 
 
competition, 0–2 (best) 
5th pillar: Skills 
 
 
 
 
 
 
5.01 Quality of educational 
139 
2.3 
 
 
 
 
system* 
5.02 Quality of maths & 
139 
2.3 
 
 
 
 
science education* 
5.03 Secondary education 
101 
72.5 
 
 
 
 
gross enrolment rate, % 
5.04 Adult literacy rate, % 
113 
72.0 
 
 
 
 
 
Note: Indicators followed by an asterisk (*) are measured on a scale of 1 to 7 (with 7 the best). 
Source: CAPMAS (2012), Egypt Statistical Yearbook, 2012, CAPMAS (Central Agency for Public Mobilisation and Statistics), 
Cairo; Bilbao-Osorio, B., Dutta, S. & Lanvin, B. (Eds.) (2013). Global Information Technology Report 2013. Growth and Jobs 
in a Hyperconnected World
.
 Geneva: World Economic Forum and INSEAD. Retrieved April 10, 2013. 

SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

 CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION – 27 
 
 
In  the  rapidly  emerging  world  of  global  networks,  Egypt  risks  falling  behind  other 
countries, if it does not give urgent attention to raising the skills quality of its workforce – 
its efforts to develop its physical ICT capacity notwithstanding. 
Human development 
Population composition and distribution 
According  to  the  2006  Population,  Housing  and  Establishments  Census  (CAPMAS, 
2006), the population of Egypt was 72 798 million. Males represented 51% and females 
49% of the population. The age composition of the population is shown in Table 1.7. 
Table 1.7 Egyptian population by age composition, 2006 
Over 1 
Over 5 
Over 15 
Over 45 
<1 
and less 
and less 
and less 
and less 
60 plus 
Age group 
Total 
year 
than 5 
than 15 
than 45 
than 60 
years 
years old 
years old 
years old 
years old 
Population (000s) 
628 
7 090 
15 363 
36 288 
9 001 
4 428 
72 798 
Share of population (%) 
0.9 
9.7 
21.1 
49.9 
12.4 
6.0 
100.0 
Source: CAPMAS (2012), Egypt Statistical Yearbook, 2012, CAPMAS (Central Agency for Public Mobilisation and Statistics), 
Cairo; CAPMAS (2008), Egypt in Figures
In 1996, 38% of Egypt’s population was aged under 15 years old. In 2006 that age 
group  comprised  32%  of  Egypt’s  population  and  in  2011,  it  is  estimated  to  represent 
31.7%.  By  2021,  the  under-15  age  group  is  projected  to  total  25  million  and  comprise 
26% of Egypt’s total population (CAPMAS, 2012). 
In  2006,  the  rural  population  accounted  for  57%  and  the  urban  population  43%  of 
Egypt’s  total  population.  In  2012,  Cairo  had  a  population  of  some  8.7  million,  and 
Alexandria 4.5 million. 
Rising  fertility  rates  (three  children  per  woman)  and  higher  life  expectancies  are 
leading to a more rapid growth in Egypt’s population than was projected on the basis of 
the 2006 census. Egypt’s total population grew by 20% between 1996 and 2006 and by 
14% between 2006 and 2012 (CAPMAS, 2012). This growth is generating environmental 
stresses and urban settlement pressures, not least on water supplies. Egypt imports 40% of 
its food and 60% of its wheat (Oxford Business Group, 2011). Further use of arable land 
for  housing  will  add  to  Egypt’s  agricultural  challenges,  with  efforts  being  made  to 
reclaim areas of desert for productive use. 
The  United  Nations  Human  Development  Programme  has  a  standard  means  of 
comparing  the  well-being  of  countries  using  the  Human  Development  Index  (HDI), 
which  it  has  published  over  several  decades.  The  index  is  a  comparative  composite 
measure  of  life  expectancy,  literacy,  education,  standards  of  living  and  quality  of  life. 
Between 1980 and 2012 Egypt’s HDI rose by 2.1% annually from 0.407 to 0.662, which 
gives the country a rank of 112 out of 187 economies with comparable data. The growth 
in life expectancy and education were major components contributing to its improvement 
in rank and score (UNDP, 2013). In a globally competitive context, it will be the relative 
rather than the absolute level of the quantity and quality of education that will determine 
growth  and  well-being  in  the  future  (World  Bank,  2007).  The  pace  of  improvement 
relative to comparator countries will be as important as the level and quality of education.  
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

28 – CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION 
 
 
Over  the  past  two  decades,  Egypt  showed  marked  improvements  in  a  number  of 
social indices: infant mortality and  malnutrition among children under 5 both decreased 
by half and life expectancy rose from 64 to 71 years. 
The  progress  made  in  reducing  illiteracy  can  be  seen  in  Table  1.8.  Nevertheless, 
serious  problems  remain,  including  gender  inequalities.  Almost  half  the  female 
population  (48%)  have  less  than  6  years  of  schooling  compared  with  36%  of  men. 
Whereas 42% of males have educational attainment of Grade 12 or above, the equivalent 
proportion for females is 34%. Illiteracy rates among young women in Upper Egypt are 
24%, twice the rates of their male counterparts (World Bank, 2013). 
Table 1.8 Population distribution by educational status (10 years and older) 
Males 
Females 
Educational status 
1996 Census 

2006 Census 

(%) 
(%) 
Illiterate 
17 646 025 
39.4 
16 806 657 
29.6 
22.3 
37.3 
Read and write 
8 413 075 
18.8 
7 114 499 
12.0 
13.4 
10.5 
Adult education graduates 

0.0 
687 454 
1.0 
1.2 
0.7 
Less than intermediate certificate 
7 911 817 
17.6 
11 134 399 
19.4 
20.8 
17.9 
Intermediate certificate 
7 408 296 
16.5 
14 283 546 
25.8 
28.2 
23.3 
Above intermediate certificate 
904 212 
2.0 
1 808 268 
2.5 
2.8 
2.3 
University certificate & above 
2 547 995 
5.7 
5 476 704 
9.6 
11.1 
8.0 
Total 
44 831 420 
100.0 
57 311 527 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
Source: CAPMAS (2012), Egypt Statistical Yearbook, 2012, CAPMAS, Cairo; CAPMAS, (2008), Egypt in Figures, CAPMAS, 
Cairo. 
Income distribution 
The  Household  Income,  Expenditure  and  Consumption  Survey  (HIECS)  for 
2010/2011  showed  that  the  poverty  rate  –  those  living  on  less  than  USD 2  per  day  – 
increased from 21.6% in 2008/09 to 25.2% in 2010/11. Conversely, the extreme poverty 
rate – those living on less than USD 1.25 per day – declined from 6.1% to 4.8% over the 
same period. Inequality remained constant over the last two years of the survey, with the 
Gini coefficient recorded at 31% in both 2008/09 and 2010/11. Although only a little over 
half  of  the  population  lives  in  rural  areas,  more  than  78%  of  the  poor  and  80%  of  the 
extreme  poor  live  there.  These  income  disparities  are  reinforced  by  gaps  in  the  social 
indicators: virtually all health indicators and literacy rates are worse in Upper Egypt than 
in Lower Egypt and worse in rural areas than in urban areas.  
 
 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

 CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION – 29 
 
 
References 
Angel-Urdinola,  D.F.  and  A.  Kuddo  (2010),  “Key  characteristics  of  employment 
regulation  in  the  Middle  East  and  North  Africa”,  SP  Discussion  Paper,  No.  1006, 
World Bank, Washington, DC, http://siteresources.worldbank.org/SOCIALPROTECT
ION/Resources/SP-Discussion-papers/Labor-Market-DP/1006.pdf. 
 
Angel-Urdinola,  D.F.  and  A.  Semlali  (2010),  Labour  Markets  and  School-to-Work 
Transition  in  Egypt:  Diagnostics,  Constraints  and  Policy  Framework,  World  Bank, 
Washington, DC, https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/bitstream/handle/10986/1305
0/693060ESW0P1200it0220120dau000Copy.pdf?sequence=1.
 
Beaumont,  P.  (2011),  “Mohammed  Bouazizi:  The  dutiful  son  whose  death 
changed Tunisia’s fate”, The Guardian, www.theguardian.com/world/2011/jan/20/tuni
sian-fruit-seller-mohammed-bouazizi, 
20 January.   
Bilbao-Osorio,  B.,  Dutta,  S.  and  Lanvin,  B.  (Eds.)  (2013).  Global  Information  Technology 
Report  2013.  Growth  and  Jobs  in  a  Hyperconnected  World.  Geneva:  World  Economic 
Forum and INSEAD, Retrieved April 10, 2013. 
CAPMAS  (2012),  Egypt  Statistical  Yearbook,  2012,  CAPMAS  (Central  Agency  for 
Public Mobilisation and Statistics), Cairo.  
CAPMAS (2008), Egypt in Figures, CAPMAS, Cairo. 
CAPMAS  (2006),  Egypt  General  Census  for  Population,  Housing,  and  Establishments 
2006, CAPMAS, Cairo. 
Collinson, J. (1 2012), “Egyptian remittances peaked in 2011”, MicroDINERO. 8 August 
Dutta, S. and S. Caulkin (2007), “The World Business/INSEAD Global Innovation Index 
2007 
in 
association 
with 
BT”, 
World 
Business
January-February, 
www.globalinnovationindex.org/userfiles/file/GII-2007-Report.pdf. 
Dutta,  S.  and  B.  Lanvin  (eds.)  (2013),  The  Global  Innovation  Index  2013:  The  Local 
Dynamics 
of 
Innovation, 
INSEAD, 
WIPO 
and 
Cornell 
University, 
www.wipo.int/edocs/pubdocs/en/economics/gii/gii_2013.pdf.  
Ersado,  L.  et  al.  (2012),  Arab  Republic  of  Egypt:  Inequality  of  Opportunity  in 
Educational  Achievement,  Report  No.  70300-EG,  World  Bank,  Washington,  DC, 
https://blogs.worldbank.org/files/arabvoices/inequality_of_opportunity_in_educational
_outcomes-_report_no_70300.pdf. 
 
ILO  (2011),  Measurement  of  the  Informal  Economy,  ILO  (International  Labour 
Organization), Geneva. 
Khandelwal,  P.  and  A.  Roitman  (2013),  “The  economics  of  political  transitions: 
Implications for the Arab Spring”, IMF Working Paper, No. 13/69, IMF (International 
Monetary Fund), Washington, DC. 
Mason, P. (2012), Why It’s Kicking Off Everywhere: The New Global Revolutions, Verso, 
London. 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

30 – CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION 
 
 
Mikhail,  A.M.  (2008),  The  Nature  of  Ottoman  Egypt:  Irrigation,  Environment,  and 
Bureaucracy  in  the  Long  Eighteenth  Century,  ProQuest,  University  of  California  at 
Berkeley. 
Ministry  of  Education  (2011),  Pre-University  Education  in  Egypt:  Background  Report
Ministry of Education, Cairo. 
Ministry  of  Education  (2010),  Condition  of  Education  in  Egypt  2010:  Report  on  the 
National Education Indicators, Ministry of Education, Cairo. 
Oxford Business Group (2011), The Report: Egypt 2011, Oxford Business Group. 
UNDP  (2013),  Human  Development  Report  2013.  The  Rise  of  the  South:  Human 
Progress  in  a  Diverse  World,  UNDP  (United  Nations  Development  Programme), 
Paris. 
UNDP (2010),  Egypt Human Development Report 2010  – Youth in Egypt: Building our 
Future, Institute of National Planning, Egypt and UNDP. 
World Bank (2013). Education in Egypt: Access, Gender, and Disability – Part 2 Gender
World Bank, Washington, DC. 
World Economic Forum (2012), The Global Competitiveness Report, 2012-2013, World 
Economic Forum, Geneva. 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

31 – CHAPTER 2: EGYPT'S EDUCATION SYSTEM 
 
 
Chapter 2. 
 
Egypt’s education system 
This chapter outlines the historical influences on Egyptian education, and describes the 
scale  and  structure  of  the  current  education  and  technical  education  systems,  and  the 
characteristics  of  the  teaching  workforce.  It  also  considers  aspects  of  educational 
governance  and  other  underlying  issues,  including  inequities  of  provision  and  access, 
curriculum  orientation,  student  tracking  into  general  or  technical  education,  and 
dependence on private tutoring.
 
 
 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

32 – CHAPTER 2: EGYPT'S EDUCATION SYSTEM 
 
 
Historical development of education in Egypt 
In  ancient  Egypt,  the  few  schools  that  did  exist  during  the  Middle  and  New 
Kingdoms, usually attached to temples or granaries, were exclusively for males training 
to be scribes and officials for the priesthood or civil administration. Only the daughters of 
nobles  received  an  education  in  reading  and  writing;  the  majority  of  Egyptian  women 
were trained at home by their mothers (David, 2015). Artists, draftsmen and sculptors had 
to convert texts written on papyri and ostraca into hieroglyphs on temple and tomb walls, 
and  inscribe  them  on  statues,  requiring  knowledge  of  both  scripts  (Heyworth-Dunne, 
1939). Craftsmen as well as scribes had to master reading and writing, in hieratic and in 
hieroglyphic. The educational track that a student followed was typically determined by 
the  position  that  his  father  held  in  society,  although,  students  who  showed  particular 
ability could receive training for higher status positions.  
Mathematics was used for measuring time, straight lines and Nile river flood levels, 
calculating areas of land, counting money, working out taxes and cooking (Rossi, 2004). 
The  Egyptian  calendar,  one  of  the  most  accurate  of  the  ancient  world,  was  developed 
through mathematical skills. Maths was also used in building tombs, pyramids and other 
architectural  marvels.  Students  did  their  arithmetic  silently,  but  they  recited  their  texts 
aloud until they knew them by heart. Then they attempted to write down what they had 
memorised. Educational principles are summarised in the so-called Books of Instruction 
(or the Instruction of Wisdom) which gave advice to ensure personal success consonant 
with the needs of the state and the moral norms of the day.  
Education in ancient Egypt was mainly vocational. The trades were highly valued and 
yielded relatively high earnings and power. Young men did not usually choose their own 
careers  but  rather  followed  in  the  trades  practised  by  their  fathers.  Herodotus  and 
Diodorus  refer  explicitly  to  hereditary  callings  in  ancient  Egypt  to  pass  on  a  father´s 
function to  his  children.  Writings  from  the  Roman  period  contain  some  interesting  data 
about the training of weavers and spinning girls. A test was probably given at the end of 
the  apprenticeship.  At  this  time  weavers  usually  sent  their  children  to  be  taught  by 
colleagues in  the  same  trade.  If  he  failed to  get  his pupil  through  the  whole  course,  the 
master  undertook  to  return  whatever  payment  the  father  had  advanced  for  the 
apprenticeship (Heyworth-Dunne, 1939).  
The arrival of the Greeks via the conquest of Alexander the Great over the Persians in 
332 BC brought new ideas and ideals, learning, philosophy and art. The Ptolemies made 
Alexandria the intellectual metropolis of the world. They amassed the famous library with 
its 700 000 manuscripts. Alexandria was the resort of the most gifted artists and scientists 
of  the  time.  Most  of  the  Greek  inheritance  was  preserved  by  the  Alexandrians  who 
assembled  the  treasures  of  ancient  learning,  copied  them  and  transmitted  them  to  the 
West.  It  was  in  Alexandria  that  Plotinus,  Jamblichus,  Porphyry  and  Hypatia  meditated 
and wrote in the last great philosophical school to carry on the traditions of Plato.  
Having conquered Egypt in 969 AD, the fourth Fatimid caliph, al-Mu’iz li Din Allah, 
transferred  his  ministers,  elite  civil  servants  and  army  from  Mahdia  in  Tunisia  to  the 
newly formed city of Cairo (al-Qahira). With the building of the al-Azhar mosque (Jami’ 
al-Qahira
),  a  tutoring  circle  (halaqa)  was  formed  in  975  for  teaching  Isma’ili-Shiite 
jurisprudence,  initially  based  on  the  book  al-Ikhtisar,  which  gave  al-Azharite  education 
its distinctive form. Other halaqas followed at the al-Azhar and other mosques (Walker, 
2002).  
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

 CHAPTER 2: EGYPT'S EDUCATION SYSTEM – 33 
 
 
In the year 998, al-Azhar moved a further step in becoming an Islamic “university” – 
an educational institute with powers to grant teachers credentials, the second in the world 
to  be  so  established  after  the  University  of  al-Karaouine  in  Fes,  Morocco.  The  fifth 
Fatimid caliph al-’Azeez Billah approved a proposal by his minister, Ya’qub ibn Kils, to 
systematise  al-Azharite  education.  This  involved  appointing  a  cohort  of  teachers, 
educated by ibn-Kils personally, following an organised curriculum and receiving regular 
payments  from  the  government.  Halaqa  education  in  al-Azhar  concentrated  on  Ismaili-
Shiite  beliefs,  but  gradually  the  curriculum  was  extended  to  include  Arabic  grammar, 
literature and history. Halaqas in other mosques that were established in the al-Azharite 
tradition included Arabic language, astronomy, mathematics, medicine and philosophy.  
A millennium later, the Ottoman pasha Muhammad Ali, who ruled Egypt from 1805 
to 1848, is credited with having created the “dual education system” in Egypt, remnants 
of  which  continue  to  this day.  The  dual  model  involved  one  system  serving  the  masses 
attending  traditional  Islamic  schools  (kuttab)  and  a  parallel  secular  system  of  schools 
(madrasa), funded by the government for elite civil servants. The  kuttab taught students 
the basics of reading and writing through memorising and reciting  Qur’anic verses. The 
madrasa  were  intended  to  offer  a  more  modern  pedagogy  for  developing  intelligent, 
balanced  citizens  who  would  support  Egyptian  economic  development.  The  extent  to 
which they actually employed active pedagogy is not clear (Starrett, 1998). Influenced by 
the French model, Ali was mainly interested in “specialised” schools at higher levels for 
the  preparation  of  professionals  such  as  the  School  of  Medicine,  the  School  of 
Engineering  and  the  School  of  Languages  and  Administration.  Ali  later  established 
“high” schools (1816), preparatory schools (1825) and primary schools (1832).  
During  the  period  of  British  occupation  (1882-1922),  investment  in  education  was 
curbed drastically and secular public schools began to charge fees. This was partly due to 
a financial crisis, but also to the British fears of civil unrest (Cochran, 1986). Education 
was fashioned to suit the needs of the British colonial administration. English was made 
the language of instruction in government schools. Employment in the civil service was 
guaranteed  to  all  graduates  of  government  secondary  schools.  However,  graduates  of 
kuttabs  were  barred  from  upward  social  mobility  (Starrett,  1998).  The  population 
exploded between 1882 and 1907, growing from 7 million to 11 million people. Literacy 
rates plummeted to 5% of the population by 1922. 
Foreign schools became popular among the Egyptian elite. The number of “mission” 
or  “language  schools”  that  used  modern  curricula  increased  significantly  during  this 
period  (Barsoum,  2004).  This  system  of  elite  “language  schools”  (madaris  lughat
continues to play a significant role. 
Under the conditions of limited independence, with British troops remaining in Egypt 
(1922-1952),  Egyptian  authorities  regained  some  control  over  education  policy.  Arabic 
was  introduced  as  the  main  language  of  instruction  in  government  schools,  while 
education  in  private  language  schools  continued  to  take  place  in  English  or  French 
(Cochran,  1986).  The  state  budget  for  education  was  raised  substantially.  The  1923 
constitution made primary education for all boys and girls between 6 and 12 years of age 
compulsory.  Fees  for  public  primary  schools  were  abolished  in  the  same  year.  At  that 
time,  the  “dual  system”  was  still  in  place:  primary  schools  that  were  free  of  charge 
provided  only  the  most  basic  skills  and  did  not  qualify  students  to  carry  on  with  their 
education.  The  fees  for  those  primary  schools  which  allowed  for  progression  to  the 
secondary level were only abolished in 1949, when a unified school system at the primary 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

34 – CHAPTER 2: EGYPT'S EDUCATION SYSTEM 
 
 
level  was  created  (Starrett,  1998).  In  1950,  the  Minister  of  Education,  Taha  Hussein, 
introduced free education at pre-university level for all Egyptian citizens. 
The  nationalist  policies  that  had  begun  after  independence  were  continued  after  the 
forced abdication of King Faruk in 1952 and during the rule of Gamal Abdel Nasser. In 
1962, universal free education was extended to include higher education. General access 
to free education and President Nasser’s guarantee of employment in the public sector for 
all  university  graduates,  which  was  announced  in  the  same  year,  contributed  to  a  rapid 
increase  in  student  enrolments  over  the  following  decades  (Barsoum,  2004).  However, 
the  state  soon  lacked  the  resources  to  meet  the  educational  needs  of  the  fast-growing 
population, and the quality of publicly provided education started to deteriorate (Cochran, 
1986). 
More  and  more  unqualified  teachers  had  to  be  hired  and  school  facilities  were 
insufficiently  equipped for  the  masses  of  students  they  had  to  accommodate. The  social 
status  of teachers  began to  decline.  Many  schools  started  to operate  in shifts,  some  two 
per  day  and  others  three  per  day/night,  especially  in  densely  populated  urban  areas 
(Barsoum,  2004).  This  trend  continued  under  the  rule  of  President  Anwar  Sadat 
(1970-1981).  With  Sadat’s  “Open  Door  Policy”,  which  encouraged  foreign  investment 
generally, including in the education sector, a two-class education system was effectively 
re-established,  similar  to  the  one  that  had  existed  during  colonial  times.  The  majority 
income-poor population had to rely on the resource-poor public system, while wealthier 
families  could  educate  their  children  in  the  growing  number  of  private  and  “language 
schools” (madaris lughat), which became a prerequisite for obtaining a well-paying job in 
the emerging private sector of the economy (Cochran, 1986).  
In  1981,  the  period  of  compulsory  education  was  extended  from  six  to  nine  years. 
Education policies under President Hosni Mubarak (1981-2011) were intended to create 
advancements in all areas of education, with the goal of developing the whole person as a 
means  to  elevate  Egyptian  society  economically.  Growth  in  enrolments  continued  to 
outpace  the  capacity  of  the  system,  and  class  sizes  exploded.  Growth  in  the  number  of 
graduates from universities and secondary schools far exceeded the capacity of the labour 
market  to  absorb  them,  causing  graduate  unemployment  and  underemployment  to 
accelerate. The civil service had become overstaffed, and teaching in particular had had to 
absorb  many  graduates  who  would  otherwise  not  have  chosen  this career. The  graduate 
employment guarantee was phased out in the early 1990s (see Box 2.1).  
Box 2.1 The graduate employment guarantee 
Governments in the Middle East have felt responsible for providing employment for those with intermediate and 
higher education who cannot find a job in the private sector, partly as a means of dampening unrest among educated 
urban youth. This “last resort” option became a driver of household investment in education, given the relatively high 
pay in the public sector and non-wage benefits such as job stability and social security. 
Egypt  introduced  its  employment  guarantee  scheme  for  secondary  and  university  graduates  in  the  early  1960s. 
The scheme became increasingly untenable in the 1980s as graduate numbers swelled and public sector employment 
contracted.  Provisions  of  the  guarantee  were  gradually  modified,  such  as  increased  waiting  periods  for  secondary 
school  leavers.  By  the  end  of  the  1980s  the  waiting  period  exceeded  five  years.  Since  the  early  1990s  the  job 
guarantee has become defunct. 
Source:  Binzel,  C.  (2011),  “Decline  in  social  mobility:  Unfulfilled  aspirations  among  Egypt’s  educated  youth”,  IZA 
Discussion Paper, No. 6139, IZA (Institute for the Study of Labour), Bonn. 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

 CHAPTER 2: EGYPT'S EDUCATION SYSTEM – 35 
 
 
 
An  agenda  for  comprehensive  educational  reform  was  detailed  in  the  National 
Education Strategic Plan 2007-2012. 
The structure of educational provision 
The  current  structure  of  Egypt’s  educational  system  presents  a  complex  and 
interdependent series of cycles (see Figure 2.1 and Box 2.2) accommodating the needs of 
a diverse population, unequally distributed regionally, and with wide variations in terms 
of socio-economic status and cultural differences. 
Pre-primary  education  is  not  currently  part  of  the  formal  education  system. 
Nevertheless, there are a number of providers offering some level of service at this stage 
of education. Current providers include the Ministry of Education, the Ministry of Social 
Solidarity,  the  National  Council  for  Childhood  and  Motherhood  (NCCM),  the  al-Azhar 
system,  a  number  of  international  and  local  non-governmental  organisations  (NGOs), 
some co-operatives and the private sector. 
The  formal  pre-university  education  system  consists  of  three  levels:  primary 
(ibtida’i), preparatory (‘adadi) and secondary (thanawi).  
Prior to 1988, basic education consisted of six years of primary school and three years 
of  preparatory  education.  After  1988,  primary  education  was  shortened  to  five  years, 
while preparatory education remained at three years. Educational reforms also prolonged 
the school year from 32 weeks to 38-40 weeks, depending on Ramadan. As the number of 
years  spent at school  diminished,  the  real  amount  of study  hours  increased.  Prior  to the 
1988 reforms, students attended school for 288 weeks over a period of 9 years, whereas 
afterwards they spent 304 weeks at school over 8 years. In 1994, a new curriculum was 
introduced that added more study hours per week during the 5 years of basic education. 
Egypt aims to offer universal basic education for all children aged 6 to 14 years. To 
complete this cycle, students must pass an end-of-level examination at the end of primary 
education.  It  is  a  high-stakes  exam,  and  those  that  do  not  pass  after  two  attempts  must 
either  move  to  a  vocational  preparatory  school  or  withdraw  from  education  altogether. 
Those who pass this exam enter preparatory (lower secondary) education which lasts for 
three  years.  At  the  completion  of  this  level  students  receive  the  Basic  Education 
Completion Certificate. At the end of the preparatory cycle students must pass a national 
exam.  Based  on  their  performance  in  the  preparatory  level  final  exam,  students  are 
steered  into  a  series  of  possible  secondary  education  tracks:  general  secondary  school, 
vocational/technical secondary institutions, or withdrawing from formal education. 
 
 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

36 – CHAPTER 2: EGYPT'S EDUCATION SYSTEM 
 
 
Figure 2.1 The Egyptian education system 
 
Labour Market and society 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Vocational preparatory or 
 
 
 
 
workforce 
 
 
Vocational 
secondary 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Non-university 
 
 
 
higher and 
Postgraduate 
5 years 
middle 
students 
technical 
technical 
 
 
secondary 
institutes 2, 4 
and 5-year 
programmes 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
3 years 
 
 
technical 
secondary 
 
 
   
 
Nurseries and 
 
 
General 
 
Universities 
Primary 
Preparatory 
kindergartens 
secondary 
4, 5 and 6-year programmes 
 
 
 
 



4  5 




 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 



 



9  10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
 
15 
16 
17 
 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
Pre-school 
 
 
Basic education (compulsory) 
 
Secondary 
Higher education 
education 
Education 
Source: Ministry of Education (2011), Pre-University Education System in Egypt: Background Report, Ministry of Education, 
Cairo. 
Promotional  examinations  are  held  at  all  levels  except  in  Grades  3,  6  and  9  at  the 
basic  education  level,  and  Grade12  in  the  secondary  stage,  which  apply  standardised 
regional or national exams. 
Box 2.2 Stages and types of pre-university education in Egypt 
Basic education (primary and preparatory): basic education (six years of primary and three years of preparatory) 
is a right for Egyptian children from the age of six. After Grade 9, students are tracked into one of two strands: general 
secondary schools or technical secondary schools.  
General secondary education: this 3-year stage starts from Grade 10 and aims at preparing students for work and 
further  education.  Graduates  of  this  track  normally  join  higher  education  institutes  in  a  highly  competitive  process 
based mainly on their results of the secondary school leaving exam (thanawiya amma).  
Technical secondary education (industrial, agricultural and commercial): technical secondary education has two 
strands.  The  first  provides  technical  education  in  3-year  technical  secondary  schools.  The  second  provides  more 
advanced technical education in an integrated 5-year model; the first three years are similar to those of the former type 
and the upper two years prepare graduates for work as senior technicians. Graduates of both tracks may access higher 
education  depending  on  their  results  in  the  final  exam.  However,  their  transition  rates  are  low  in  comparison  to 
graduates of general secondary education.  
Al-Azharite education: al-Azharite education follows the same direction as general education with regard to hours 
of study for each school subject. However, al-Azhar providers offer religious instruction as part of the curriculum. 
 
 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

 CHAPTER 2: EGYPT'S EDUCATION SYSTEM – 37 
 
 
Table 2.1 Schools, classes and students, by level of education and provider type, Egypt 2012/13 
 
Number of schools 
Number of classes  Number of students  Number of teachers 
Pre-primary 
9 209 
28 523 
972 078 
34 639 
 
Government 
7 446 
20 149 
725 835 
23 945 
 
Private 
1 763 
8 374 
246 243 
10 694 
General primary 
17 399 
227 153 
9 832 516 
390 749 
 
Government 
15 587 
200 340 
8 959 343 
356 259 
 
Private 
1 812 
26 813 
873 173 
34 490 
Preparatory 
10 608 
105 077 
4 279 909 
240 393 
 
Government 
9 154 
95 698 
3 858 897 
225 993 
 
Private 
1 454 
9 379 
276 773 
14 400 
General secondary 
2 874 
36 913 
1 390 262 
102 235 
 
Government 
1 974 
31 415 
1 230 225 
98 819 
 
Private 
900 
5 498 
160 037 
5 416 
Technical secondary 
1 929 
46 939 
1 686 859 
147 191 
 
Agricultural 
188 
4 756 
179 013 
13 875 
 
Commercial 
794 
17 200 
651 720 
36 874 
 
Industrial 
947 
24 983 
856 126 
96 442 
Source: Ministry of Education (2014), Statistical Yearbook 2012/2013, Ministry of Education, Cairo. 
Table 2.1 shows that the pre-university education system – including government and 
private  providers  –  caters  in  total  for  some  18.2  million  students.  The  largest  stage  of 
education  is  general  primary  education,  which  accounts  for  54.1%  of  total  student 
enrolments.  
Table 2.2 Al-Azhar institutes, classes, students and teachers, Egypt 2011/12 
 
Number of Institutes 
Number of classes 
Number of students  Number of teachers 
Kindergarten 
 
 
63 842 
3 747 
Primary 
3 465 
33 457 
1 158 721 
67 718 
Preparatory  
3 131 
15 051 
484 594 
41 833 
Secondary 
2 068 
11 899 
339 347 
37 686 
 
Source:  CAPMAS  (2013),  Egypt  Statistical  Yearbook,  2013,  CAPMAS  (Central  Agency  for  Public 
Mobilisation and Statistics), Cairo. 
Table  2.2  shows  that  al-Azhar  education  system  caters  for  over  2  million  students. 
The  al-Azhar  system  provides  for  6.5%  of  pre-primary  enrolments,  11.8%  of  primary 
enrolments,  11.3%  of  preparatory  enrolments  and  24.4%  of  general  secondary 
enrolments. 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

38 – CHAPTER 2: EGYPT'S EDUCATION SYSTEM 
 
 
Private  schools  cater  for  25.3%  of  pre-primary  students,  8.9%  of  primary  students, 
6.5%  of  preparatory  students,  11.5%  of  general  secondary  students  and  17.9%  of 
technical  secondary  students  (0.4%  are  industrial  secondary  students  and  17.5% 
commercial secondary students) (Ministry of Education, 2014).  
Types of public schools 
There  are  two  main  types  of  government  schools:  Arabic  schools  and  experimental 
language schools. 
  Arabic  schools  follow  the  government  national  curriculum  in  the  Arabic 
language.  In  addition,  an  English  language  curriculum  is  taught  starting  in  the 
first year of primary education, and French language is added as a second foreign 
language beginning in general secondary education. 
  Experimental  language  schools  teach  part  of  the  government  curriculum 
(science, mathematics and computer science) in English. They later add French as 
a  second  foreign  language  in  the  preparatory  education  cycle.  An  advanced 
English language curriculum is taught during all educational levels. Social Studies 
are  always  taught  in  Arabic.  These  schools  admit  students  to  Grade  1  at  age 
seven, a year older than in regular Arabic schools. 
Types of private schools 
There are four types of private schools: 
  Ordinary  schools  have  quite  a  similar  curriculum  to  that  of  the  public  Arabic 
schools,  but  cater  more  to  the  students’  personal  needs  and  in  general  dedicate 
more resources to the school facilities and infrastructure. 
  Language  schools  teach  most  of  the  official  curriculum  in  English,  and  add 
French  or  German  as  a  second  foreign  language,  although  some  schools  use 
French  or  German  as  their  main  language  of  instruction.  They  are  considered 
better than the other schools (better facilities), but their fees are much higher.  
  Religious  schools  include  the  al-Azhar  schools  (administered  by  the  Islamic 
al-Azhar  University  and  open  only  to  Muslim  students),  Catholic  schools  and 
schools of other denominations. 
  International  schools  are  private  schools  that  follow  another  country’s 
curriculum  (e.g.  the  American,  British,  French  or  German  systems).  These 
schools offer the American high school diploma, the British International General 
Certificate  of  Secondary  Education  (IGCSE),  the  French  baccalauréat,  the 
German  Abitur  or  the  International  Baccalaureate.  Their  qualifications  must 
receive official government certification from the Ministry of Education in order 
for the students to be eligible to enrol in Egyptian universities. These schools are 
perceived as offering even better facilities and more extracurricular activities than 
regular  private  schools  with  higher  fees.  This  notwithstanding,  they  are  also 
perceived as providing a much easier level of education compared to the general 
official curriculum.  Some  Egyptian  universities require  higher  grades than  those 
of  students  coming  from  other  types  of  schools,  or  an  external  high  school 
certification  such  as  SAT  College  Board  test  results  (Ministry  of  Education, 
2010). 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

 CHAPTER 2: EGYPT'S EDUCATION SYSTEM – 39 
 
 
Table  2.3  shows  a  comparison  of  the  net  intake  in  each  type  of  school  between 
2002/03  and  2008/09.A  slight  increase  can  be  seen  across  all  types  of  private  or  more 
“elite” school registration, alongside a trend decline in conventional government school 
enrolments. 
Table 2.3 Share of intake by type of school (%) 
Academic Year 
Type of School 
 
Public 
Experimental 
Private Arabic 
Private language 
TOTAL 
2002/03 
79.7 
1.0 
3.8 
0.6 
85.1 
2008/09 
78.4 
1.4 
4.1 
0.7 
84.6 
Source:  Ministry  of  Education  (2011),  Pre-University  Education  System  in  Egypt:  Background  Report, 
Ministry of Education, Cairo. 
The role of the Ministry of Education 
The role of the MOE is mainly developing national policies, legislation and standards, 
based  on  the  reports  coming  out  of  governorates.  These  roles  include  monitoring  and 
evaluation  of  policy  implementation,  developing  curricula,  and  setting  up  a  system  to 
develop and manage human resources. The stated intent is to fulfil these tasks in a way 
that  emphasises  decentralisation  and  transparency.  In  addition,  the  MOE  establishes 
policies  to  provide  professional  incentives  for  teachers  to  improve  their  level  of 
professional  work  and  educational  outcomes.  Accordingly,  the  current  structure  of  the 
MOE  is  focused  on  six  specific  tasks:  1) policies  and  strategic  planning;  2) monitoring 
and  evaluation  (quality  management);  3) curriculum  and  education  technology; 
4) information  and  technology  development;  5) developing  human  resources;  and 
6) financial  and  administrative  affairs. The  ministry  is  responsible  for  making  decisions 
about  the  education  system  with  the  support  of  three  centres:  the  National  Centre  of 
Curricula  Development,  the  National  Centre  for  Education  Research,  and  the  National 
Centre for Examinations and Educational Evaluation (NCEEE). Each centre has its own 
focus in formulating education policies with other state-level committees.  
A separate ministry, the Ministry of Higher Education (MOHE), supervises the higher 
education  system,  including  universities  with  faculties  of  education  which  prepare 
teachers for Egyptian schools. The level of autonomy accorded to universities appears to 
constrain the ability of the MOHE to bring into any alignment the government’s efforts to 
raise the quality of the stock and flow of the teaching workforce. 
The role of governorates (muddiriyas
The  role  of  the  muddiriyas  consists  mainly  of  organisational,  analytical  and 
monitoring  tasks,  such  as  compiling  comprehensive  situation  analyses  of  the  districts’ 
performance  in  light  of  standards  determined  by  the  Ministry  of  Education,  providing 
technical  support  to  the  districts,  developing  the  educational  plans  at  the  governorate 
level,  co-ordinating  the  decentralisation  of  the  curriculum,  managing  the  printing  and 
distribution of books, and maintenance of the educational buildings with the idaras. The 
muddiriyas are responsible for developing an annual report into the state of education in 
the governorate which registers and analyses the variables and learning outcomes in light 
of  the  districts’  reports.  They  also  provide  teacher-training  programmes,  and  they  are 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

40 – CHAPTER 2: EGYPT'S EDUCATION SYSTEM 
 
 
responsible  for  the  development  of  end-of-cycle  examinations  for  primary  school  and 
preparatory  school  levels,  based  on  the  directives  and  blueprints  developed  by  the 
Ministry  of  Education  through  the  work  of  the  National  Centre  for  Examination  and 
Education Evaluation. 
Technical and vocational education and training 
Formal technical and vocational education and training (TVET) in Egypt is provided 
through preparatory vocational education, secondary technical and vocational, and higher 
education  in  technical  colleges  (formerly  known  as  Middle  Technical  Institutes),  and 
Institutes  of  Industrial  Education  (IECs).  Technical  secondary  education  and  its 
agricultural,  industrial  and  commercial  streams  represent  the  bulk  of  TVET  supply  in 
Egypt – some 1.6 million students, and around 140 000 teachers. 
Secondary school TVET 
The Ministry of Education (MOE) administers about 1 600 technical and vocational 
schools  that  lead  to  a  3-year  diploma  or  5-year  advanced  diploma.  Until  recently, 
government policies have limited access to higher education by tracking more than 60% 
of preparatory school graduates into technical secondary schools, whose graduates mostly 
enter the labour market directly and have very limited opportunities to access universities. 
Poor  employment  outcomes  for  technical  and  vocational  students,  coupled  with  the 
higher unit cost of the sector, led the government to reconsider the policy of tracking into 
technical education. As part of broader reforms in education, the MOE has begun to cut 
back  the  technical  and  vocational  stream,  beginning  with  the  350  or  so  commercial 
schools.  Between  2002  and  2006  these  commercial  schools  were  converted  to  general 
education.  The  curricula  of  most  technical  secondary  schools  are  being  redesigned  to 
place greater emphasis on general subjects and to reduce the hours spent on technical and 
vocational subjects. 
For  those  students  following  the  technical/vocational  secondary  route,  the  most 
common  outcome  is  direct  entry  to  the  workforce  (95%)  at  the  end  of  their  secondary 
studies. A small minority of technical school students (the top 5%) attend further studies 
at higher education institutes, or occasionally further university training.  
While technical education is the mainstream option, vocational education represents a 
small  segment  of  the  sector.  Comprising  vocational  preparatory  schools  and  secondary 
vocational education, it educates around 200 000 students (Abrahart, 2003). At secondary 
level  it  operates  only  in  two  fields  –  paramedical  (3-year  schools)  and  tourism-hotel 
(3- and  5-year  schools)  aimed  mainly  at  graduating  skilled  workers,  often  performing 
manual work (MOE, 2011). In Egypt’s vertically segmented education system, vocational 
education  is  considered  as  a  “third  choice”  after  the  general  secondary  and  technical 
education  options.  Students  who  were  already  in  the  vocational  track  (in  vocational 
preparatory schools, at the basic education level) or who failed general preparatory school 
can only join vocational secondary schools. Only those who succeed with higher marks 
can  enter  the  general  or  technical  education  stream,  which  provide  access  to  higher 
education.  Information  on  the  employment  outcomes  of  vocational  education  does  not 
seem to be available. 
Beyond  mainstream  technical  and  vocational  education  there  are  also  a  number  of 
apprenticeship schemes and experimental models, although at a small scale. Most of these 
can be delivered formally and non-formally, through both public and private providers. 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

 CHAPTER 2: EGYPT'S EDUCATION SYSTEM – 41 
 
 
Vocational education and training pathways 
Apart from the Ministry of Education, a large number of ministries (17 in total) offer 
vocational training for various target groups specific for their sector. This form of training 
is often associated with Vocational Training Centres (VTCs). There are no accurate data 
on this sector and various reports show different, incomplete or not comparable figures. 
While  UNDP  (2010)  estimates  that  around  1 200  VTCs  belong  to  7  ministries,  another 
report  (El-Ashmawi,  2011)  lists  some  800  training  centres  belonging  to  12  ministries 
(including NGOs and others), providing formal and non-formal training for some 480 000 
participants  through  13 000  trainers  in  2010.  The  duration  of  vocational  education  and 
training  (VET)  programmes  ranges  from  one  month  to  two  years  of  training,  mostly 
technical  training  and  usually  centre-based.  Generally,  the  longer  programmes  target 
skilled workers, while shorter programmes are designed for semi-skilled occupations and 
skills  upgrading.  Although  target  groups  vary,  delivery  often  overlaps  but  there  are  no 
common  training  standards  or  certification  requirements  (UNDP,  2010).  In  most  cases 
certificates are issued by the ministry providing the training. Among the main providers 
are the Ministry of Industry, Trade and Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises; Ministry of 
Manpower  and  Migration;  Ministry  of  Housing;  Ministry  of  Agriculture;  Ministry  of 
Tourism;  and Ministry  of Health  and  Population.  In  addition,  there  are several agencies 
like  the  National  Authority  for  Quality  Assurance  and  Accreditation  of  Education 
(NAQAAE),  the  Social  Fund  for  Development  and  sector-specific  institutions  offering 
training  (e.g.  training  councils  within  industry,  building  and  construction,  and  tourism). 
The Egyptian Tourism Federation and the Tourism Training Council, for instance, have 
launched major training initiatives for the sector (training of fresh graduates, development 
of  hospitality  education  and  workforce  skills  development).  Internationally  accredited 
certificates  are  awarded  in  co-operation  with  international  training  and  education 
associations (ETF, 2011). 
Increasingly,  private  firms  are  establishing  their  own  in-company  training  units. 
Community-based  training  centres  are  offering  training  to  enhance  employability  for 
women,  the  unemployed  and  disabled  (ETF,  2003).  These  private  and  community 
initiatives currently represent a small proportion of the national training effort. 
Work-based learning and apprenticeship schemes 
Formal  work-based  learning  programmes  are  estimated  to  cater  to  2%  of  secondary 
technical education students (ETF, 2009).  
Informal apprenticeships 
In  several  sectors  such  as  construction,  retail  and  some  services,  informal 
apprenticeships still prevail (as they did in ancient times). Such apprenticeships have only 
verbal  agreements  (a  social  contract  instead  of  a  legal  contract)  and  no  structured 
learning,  duration  or  stages.  Informal  apprenticeships  are  also  not  combined  with 
school-based learning and do not lead to a formal qualification or certificate (ETF, 2009). 
They are also referred to as “traditional apprenticeships” since they are deeply rooted in 
Egyptian  history.  Traditionally  they  were  the  major  form  of  skills  formation  until  VET 
institutions expanded in the 20th century. Skills are transmitted within the family or clan 
and  are  sometimes  open  to  apprentices  from  outside  the  family  or  kin  group.  The 
International Labour Organization (ILO) has a policy to upgrade informal apprenticeships 
(ILO,  2012).  Pilot  projects  in  Egypt  and  other  countries  are  developing  the  off-the-job 
component and institutionalising the on-the-job component of these apprenticeships, so as 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

42 – CHAPTER 2: EGYPT'S EDUCATION SYSTEM 
 
 
to  monitor  skills  acquisition  through  skills  logbooks  and  skills  assessments  (Azzoni, 
2009). Data on the scale and characteristics of informal apprenticeship in Egypt are not 
available.  The  team  gained  the  impression  that  they  absorb  some  of  those  who  are 
“pushed out” of general education. Informal apprenticeships are prevalent among  many 
illiterate low-income families who often must pay the master craftsman for the privilege 
of teaching a useful trade (UNDP, 2010). 
Ministry of Industry, Trade and Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises’ alternance 
scheme 

The  oldest  formal  apprenticeship-type  scheme  (talmaza  sina’eyah)  in  Egypt, 
operating from the mid-1950s, is organised by the Productivity and Vocational Training 
Department  (PVTD)  of  the  Ministry  of  Industry,  Trade  and  Small  and  Medium-Sized 
Enterprises  (MOITS,  previously  the  Ministry  of  Industry  and  Foreign  Trade).  With 
around 22 000 participants annually (representing just over 1% of upper secondary VET 
students), it remains small scale but nonetheless represents one of the larger schemes in 
Egypt. It focuses exclusively on the industrial sector, mainly large public enterprises (500 
enterprises  are  involved),  encompassing  trades  such  as  mechanical  and  electrical 
maintenance,  plumbing,  leather,  weaving  and  textiles,  plastics,  printing,  and 
petrochemicals. Young people typically enter at 15 years of age. Selection is managed by 
the  PVTD  and  VTCs,  which  allocate  trainees  to  enterprises  (which  have  no  role  in 
selection). The scheme lasts for three years. The first two years are spent in a VTC and in 
the third year students spend the majority of time in an enterprise, with one day a week in 
the  VTC.  The  content  is  strongly  vocational  and  practical:  about  one-third  of  total 
learning time is spent in the enterprise, one-third on practical work in the VTC, one-fifth 
on  vocational  theory  and  slightly  less  than  one-tenth  on  general  education.  Graduates 
acquire  a  certificate  issued  by  MOITS  which  is  equivalent  to  the  one  obtained  by 
graduates  from  technical  secondary  schools.  It  can thus  qualify  them  within the  general 
limits  for  higher  education,  can  shorten  the  duration  of  military  service  and  leads  to 
defined  pay  grades  in  the  civil  service.  Based  on  a  training  contract  (between  the 
participant,  PVTD,  VTC  and  employer)  trainees  are  paid  a  small  allowance,  perhaps 
15-20%  of  an  adult  worker’s  wage,  to  help  them  with  transport  and  food  costs  (ETF, 
2009). 
Ministry of Education’s apprenticeship scheme 
The  MOE  runs  a  similar  scheme  in  terms  of  contract  and  allowances  for  students, 
although with around 7 400 participants it is much smaller. It is focused on the public and 
industrial  sector,  including  construction  and  service-sector  areas  such  as  commerce  and 
hotels but also agriculture and fishing. Some 35 larger public-sector enterprises affiliated 
to  25  ministries  and  public-sector  institutions  participate  in  this  scheme.  Participants 
spend two days a week in a VTC or secondary technical school and the remainder in the 
enterprise. In total, around 25% to 30% of the learning time is devoted to a combination 
of general education and vocational theory, around 10%-15% to practical work in a VTC, 
and the remainder to work and training within an enterprise. Graduates receive a technical 
secondary  school  certificate,  with  the  best  achievers  having  the  chance  to  enter  higher 
education. 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

 CHAPTER 2: EGYPT'S EDUCATION SYSTEM – 43 
 
 
Dual system (previously the Mubarak-Kohl Initiative) 
Modelled  on  the  German  dual  system  (a  TVET  model  which  takes  place  in  both 
schools and enterprises), the Mubarak-Kohl Initiative (MKI) involves some 1 800 private 
firms which are affiliated to the Egyptian Union for Investors’ Associations (EUIA). Over 
80% of participants are in industrial companies, more than 10% in the service sector and 
a small number in agriculture. Trainees are selected by specially created Regional Units 
of the Dual System, sometimes involving individual companies as well. In its early phase, 
partly for marketing purposes, the MKI targeted students with middle-class backgrounds. 
When too many continued to higher education, it shifted its focus to trainees from lower 
socio-economic backgrounds.  
During the 3-year programme, students spend two days per week in a VTC technical 
vocational  school  and  the  rest  within  an  enterprise.  Roughly  25%  of  the  total  time  is 
devoted  to  a  combination  of  general  education  and  vocational  theory,  15%  to  practical 
training in a training centre or technical secondary school, and the remainder to work and 
training  within  an  enterprise.  According  to  MOE  data,  the  number  of  students  enrolled 
under  the  dual  system  almost  doubled  from  14 000  to  over  25 000  between  2009  and 
2012.  Similarly  the  number  of  schools  increased  from  59  to  152  over  the  same  period 
(ETF, 2013). The scheme is a recognised part of secondary technical education options. 
Graduates  have  to  sit  the  technical  secondary  school  diploma  examination,  leading  to  a 
qualification  awarded  by  MOE.  In  addition,  they  are  awarded  a  practical  experience 
certificate  offered  by  the  EUIA  and  registered  by  the  Arab-German  Chamber  of 
Commerce.  
Employment outcomes are positive: about 86% of graduates have so far been offered 
jobs  in  the  companies  where  they  received  training,  but  only  56%  took  up  the  offer,  a 
good  number  still  preferring  to  pursue  the  higher  education  track  (ETF,  2009). 
Representatives of the MOE technical education sector are confident that this scheme has 
the potential to grow to provide for 10% of secondary VET students in the long term. The 
draft  VET  strategy  has  set  a  target  by  2017  to  launch  a  revised  apprenticeship  scheme 
with a minimum of 10 000 new apprentices recruited (TVET Reform Programme, 2012). 
It remains unclear if this refers only to MKI apprenticeships, or includes other schemes as 
well. 
Continuous Apprenticeship 
The  Continuous  Apprenticeship  scheme,  developed  by  the  International  Labour 
Organization (ILO) in 2002, runs in co-operation with Egypt’s Ministry of Manpower and 
Migration  and  closely  involves  employers  and  other  key  stakeholders.  Starting  in  three 
governorates  it  was  later  extended  to  six  governorates  but  still  had  a  small  number  of 
participants (around 350 in 2008). The design featured social goals, based on factors such 
as high local rates of poverty, illiteracy and unemployment. Occupations covered include 
mechanical  and  electrical  maintenance,  welding  and  metal  construction,  carpentry, 
garment  making,  and  construction.  Students  spend  the  first  two  years  in  practical 
instruction in training centres for some 24 hours a week, and for one to two years undergo 
on-the-job training in an enterprise. Similar to other schemes, a contract is signed by their 
employer,  parent  or  tutor  and  a  public  authority.  Graduates  receive  a  diploma  that  is 
equivalent to those of graduates from technical secondary school (ETF, 2009). 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

44 – CHAPTER 2: EGYPT'S EDUCATION SYSTEM 
 
 
French alternance model 
As  part  of  a  European  Union  funded  project  (the  TVET  Reform  Programme)  the 
MOITS  signed  an  agreement  in  2008  with  the MOE  to  reform  100  technical  secondary 
schools, in partnership with the Industrial Training Council (ITC). This initiative included 
the introduction of a new pathway adopted from the French alternance education model. 
Technical  secondary  education  students  alternate  between  schools  and  companies  for 
modules or blocks. Students can complete modules related to specific jobs at school and 
the workplace. At the end a certificate is obtained from the Enterprise TVET Partnership 
(ETP)  and  the  related  chamber.  Upon  graduation  students  have  a  number  of  these 
certificates  in  addition  to  the  diploma  issued  by  MOE.  Dropouts  thus  at  least  have  a 
certificate  approved  by  a  body  representing  industry,  albeit  not  accredited.  The  model 
also introduced career guidance and offers incentives to motivate trainees to continue at 
the training company instead of pursuing further education. The first phase of the project 
covered 41 schools in 5 main industrial sectors (ready-made garments, engineering, food 
processing, building materials and furniture production) in 12 governorates where there is 
strong  concentration  of  industry  related  to  these  sectors.  Industry  is  closely  involved 
through  ETPs  in  all  aspects  of  the  reform:  selecting  schools,  developing  curricula, 
training  teachers  and  specifying  equipment  (El-Ashmawi,  2011).  The  first  cohort  of 
graduates has been well received by industry. 
Schools within enterprises 
A  recent  initiative  of  the  MOE  currently  has  some  11  schools  embedded  in  larger 
companies,  such  as  the  Arab  Contractors,  BTM  (Bishara  Textile  and  Garment 
Manufacturing Company) and MCV (Manufacturing Commercial Vehicles). The latter is 
an  internationally  linked  Egyptian  manufacturer  of  trucks  and  buses  with  around  6 000 
employees.  MCV  decided  to  run  two  in-house  VET  tracks  (one  technical,  the  other 
administrative)  as  students  were  found  to  adjust  more  readily  to  the  more  disciplined 
culture  of  the  firm  when  they  start  their  training  in  the  firm  rather  than  a  school 
environment.  The  company  selects  the  students.  Trainees  are  given  a  government 
payment and an additional bonus, based on their performance. The “off-the-job” teachers 
are  appointed  by  government  from  public  schools  but  they  work  on  site  (El-Ashmawi, 
2011). 
Several  other  initiatives  aiming  at  strengthening  linkages  between  the  private  sector 
and  secondary  schools  (e.g.  Arab  Contractors  Company)  offer  similar  or  modified 
schemes.  For  example,  in the  fast-food  and  food-processing  industry,  one  of  the  largest 
companies in  Egypt,  Americana,  created  a  specialisation in fast food  which  was  new to 
the  education  system.  Governed by  co-operation  agreements  with the related  ministries, 
the course is implemented in technical secondary and post-secondary technical colleges. 
The  company  develops  curricula,  provides  practical  training  in  their  restaurants,  funds 
laboratories and kitchens in schools, pays the students a monthly allowance, and issues a 
certificate of experience to graduating students (ETF, 2011; MOE, 2011). 
A  number  of  VET  institutions,  schools  and  training  centres  try  to  arrange  some 
work-based learning for students during the summer vacation, often as part of the study 
plan. However, implementation of this is not enforced because it is extremely difficult to 
find enough workplace training opportunities for the large number of students in the VET 
system. Many of these initiatives are not apprenticeship schemes but rather a shop-floor 
or work-tasting experience for students (ETF, 2009). 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

 CHAPTER 2: EGYPT'S EDUCATION SYSTEM – 45 
 
 
The education workforce 
Current teaching workforce 
As  shown  in  Table  2.1  above,  there  are  686 945  teachers  in  the  formal  education 
system,  including  public  and  private  schools. There are  another  146 824  teachers  in  the 
al-Azhar schools. There are an additional 30 280 pre-school teachers in public and private 
institutions  and  2 846  in  al-Azhar  kindergartens.  Altogether,  the  teaching  workforce 
across 
all 
education 
sectors 
(but, 
significantly, 
excluding 
TVET) 
totals 
868 895 personnel. The team was unable to obtain statistics on the teaching workforce in 
technical schools although the draft National Strategic Plan for Pre-University Education 
2014-2030  suggests  a  student-teacher  ratio  in  technical  secondary  education  of  9:1 
compared  with  12:1  in  general  secondary  education.  The  site  visits  also  suggested  that 
technical schools are more intensively staffed than general schools, although the division 
between  teaching  and  support  staff  is  unclear.  On  a  conservative  assumption  that 
technical  secondary  schools  have  the  same  ratio  of  teachers  to  students  as  general 
secondary  schools  (0.08),  there  would  be  at  least  131 000  technical  secondary  teachers. 
Thus  the  total  Egyptian  teaching  workforce  currently  is  of  the  order  of  1  million 
personnel.  
Teachers  in  government  schools  are  part  of  the  Egyptian  civil  service.  The  current 
(2011) government-sector teacher workforce is one of the few sectors where women have 
proportionate representation in the workforce. As Figure 2.2 shows, women account for 
54%  of  the  public-sector  teaching  workforce  overall.  Women  make  up  98%  of 
pre-primary  teachers  and  56%  of  primary  ones,  whereas  they  represent  only  37%  of 
general  secondary  teachers  (excluding  technical  secondary  teachers,  whose  profile  is 
overwhelmingly male). 
Figure 2.2 Distribution of the government-sector teaching workforce by sector and gender, 2011 (%) 
120
98 
100
80
63 
60
54 
56 
Male
46 
44 
Female
37 
40
20

0
Overall
Secondary
Primary
Pre-primary
 
Source:  Ministry  of  Education  (2011),  Pre-University  Education  System  in  Egypt:  Background 
Report, Ministry of Education, Cairo. 
 
 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

46 – CHAPTER 2: EGYPT'S EDUCATION SYSTEM 
 
 
Table 2.4. Student-Teacher ratios for government primary, preparatory and general secondary schools by 
governorate, 2010-11 
Governorate 
Primary 
Preparatory 
General secondary 
ElWadi ElGidid 
5.9 
4.9 

Port Said 
14.5 
12.2 
8.4 
North Sinai 
15.3 
10.1 
6.6 
Damietta 
16.2 
11.8 
8.4 
Luxor 
18.9 
21.4 
13.7 
South Sinai 
18.9 
8.4 
5.7 
Red Sea 
19.2 
12.3 
8.8 
Aswan 
20 
17.4 
11 
Suez 
20.3 
16.1 
9.3 
Menoufia 
22.4 
16.2 
11.1 
Dakahlia 
22.6 
16.5 
11.8 
Sharkia 
24.5 
18.1 
9.2 
Kafr El-Sheikh 
24.7 
17.1 
12 
Ismailia 
24.9 
18.5 
10.1 
Qena 
25 
23.3 
10.9 
Suhag 
26.1 
21.2 
13.8 
TOTAL 
27.1 
19.3 
12.2 
Beni-Suef 
27.8 
24.4 
13.8 
Cairo 
28.1 
15.4 
11 
Kalyubia 
28.1 
24.7 
15.2 
Gharbia 
29.3 
16 
12.3 
Behera 
30.3 
23.4 
14 
Helwan 
30.5 
22 
15.9 
Asyout 
30.8 
24.9 
14.5 
Fayoum 
32.1 
27.2 
13.3 
Matrouh 
33.8 
30.6 
14.2 
Alexandria 
33.9 
15 
11.6 
Giza 
34 
22.1 
17.6 
Menia 
39.6 
23.8 
12.5 
06-Oct 
46.7 
36 
22.8 
Source: CAPMAS (2012),  Labour Force Survey 2012, CAPMAS (Central Agency  for 
Public Mobilisation and Statistics), Cairo. 
The  mean  student  teacher  ratio  for  Egypt  at  the  general  secondary  level  (12.2) 
compares  favourably  internationally,  even  against  many  developed  economies.  The 
average preparatory ratio (19.3) and, especially, the mean primary ratio (27.1), however, 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

 CHAPTER 2: EGYPT'S EDUCATION SYSTEM – 47 
 
 
are  on  the  high  side.  Nevertheless,  there  is  no  obvious  need  for  a  major  effort  to  boost 
teacher numbers in Egypt to serve the current national student cohort. 
As shown in Table 2.4, excluding the outliers of ElWadi ElGidid and Port Said, the 
primary student teacher ratio ranges from a low of 16.2 in the governorate of Damettia to 
a  high  of  46.7  in  the  governorate  of  6  October.  To  bring  student  teacher  ratios  in  6 
October up to the mean, the number of teachers would have to be increased from 7 453 to 
12 844 – an addition of 5 391 or a rise of 72%. Conversely, to bring Menoufia down to 
the national mean, the number of teachers would have to be reduced from 11 415 to 6 840 
– a fall of 4 575 or -40%. 
For  the  preparatory  stage,  and  excluding  the  governorates  with  enrolments  below 
20 000,  the  student  teacher  ratio  ranges  from  a  low  of  11.8  in  Damietta  to  36.0  in  6 
October,  with  the  national  mean  at  19.3.  If  Cairo  were  staffed  to  the  national  mean  its 
number of teachers would fall from 16 924 to 13 495 – a loss of 3 429 or -20%. 
For  the  general  secondary  stage,  excluding  the  governorates  with  enrolments  below 
25 000, the student teacher ratio ranges from a low of 9.2 in Sharkia to a high of 22.8 in 
6 October. If Cairo were staffed at the national mean it would lose 1 177 teachers (-10%). 
These simple calculations indicate there is some scope for improving the allocation of 
teachers within Egypt. The team was advised in its discussions with several  muddiriyas 
and idaras that there are significant discrepancies within as well as among governorates 
in the allocation of teachers and other resources. The team was also advised that there is 
no  under-supply  of  teachers  in  aggregate  but  rather  a  poor  distribution  of  the  national 
teacher pool. Thus some classes have much higher ratios of pupils to teachers than 40:1 at 
the primary level while others have well below 20:1.  
In 2010, the average number of students per class in government schools was 43 for 
primary,  40  for  preparatory,  and  37  for  general  secondary  (CAPMAS,  2012).  These 
average  class  sizes  are  much  larger  than  the  student-teacher  ratios  shown  in  Table  2.4 
(27.1,  19.3  and  12.2  respectively).  The  difference  may  be  explained  by  the  large 
proportion of the teaching force in administrative positions. At the preparatory level, the 
teacher to administrator ratio is almost 1:1. The number of permanent teachers recorded 
by  CAPMAS  as  working  in  public  schools  in  2012/13  totaled  867 051.  However,  the 
number  of  teachers  working  under  a  contract,  that  is,  those  actually  teaching  in 
classrooms, totaled a mere 115 281, or 13.3% of the total number of teachers employed in 
the government school sector. 
Teacher quality 
The  problem  of  large  class  sizes  is  exacerbated  by  the  relative  decline  in  full-time 
professional  teachers  in  the  classroom.  As  a  consequence  of  the  recruitment  freeze  on 
teachers for government schools, the proportion of teachers on non-permanent contracts 
have risen to around 45% (Ministry of Education, 2010). These teachers are meant to be 
engaged  on  a  trial  basis.  However,  without  any  systematic  assessment  or  selection 
examination, they may remain in the system indefinitely before being confirmed. 
Future teacher quality will be affected not only by the capacity of current practising 
teachers  to  upgrade  their  knowledge  and  teaching  skills,  but  also  by  the  calibre  of  new 
entrants to the profession. 
Entry into university is determined by the score (magmu’) at the thanawiya amma on 
completion  of  general  secondary  schooling.  This  is  the  only  determining  factor  for 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

48 – CHAPTER 2: EGYPT'S EDUCATION SYSTEM 
 
 
university  entrance,  with  the  prestigious  faculties  like  medicine,  pharmacy  and 
engineering taking the best students. Admission into medical school requires a secondary 
school exam grade of 96%-98%. In contrast, to be admitted into the faculty of education, 
the  average  grades  required  are  between  80-88%  for  a  science  and  mathematics  major, 
75%-85%  for  literature  majors,  and  as  low  as  60%-70%  for  the  faculty  of  law.  
See Chapter 5 for more detail on the pre-service training of teachers in Egypt. 
Graduate  teachers  from  the  faculty  of  education  complete  a  graduate  degree 
programme–BSc (Ed) or BA (Ed) – or an education diploma in a given subject speciality. 
Overall,  68%  of  all  teachers  in  Egypt  have  a  bachelor’s  degree  or  above,  with  78%  of 
those having graduated from education faculties and 22% from other faculties. Of those 
without a  degree qualification, 84%  have some  educational  training  while  16% have  no 
training (Ministry of Education, 2010). 
Demand for teachers 
The  key  determinant  of  the  demand  for  teachers  is  student  enrolments.  While  the 
intake rate at Grade 1 is dependent on the population of children of school age, progress 
to  subsequent  levels  is  determined  by  transition  policies  and  other  internal  efficiency 
measures  such  as  repetition  rates,  and,  most  importantly,  on  the  physical  availability  of 
spaces. The net intake rate in 2008/09 was 85% with the public school system absorbing 
78%  of  the  intake,  suggesting  that  a  significant  number  of  school-age  children  do  not 
have  access  to  education.  Reaching  the  optimal  target  of  all  children  being  in  school 
would  require  either  additional  teachers  or  a  more  efficient  redistribution  of  the  current 
teaching workforce. Resolving the disparities in enrolment between governorates should 
serve  as  a  basis  for  a  more  equitable  distribution  of  teachers.  It  is  acknowledged  that 
those  children  currently  out  of  school  are  from  the  poorest,  less-urbanised,  least 
motivated  and  most  vulnerable  backgrounds  (MOE,  2010) and hence  constitute a  major 
challenge for the system. 
Teacher supply and demand balances 
According  to  the  Ministry  of  Education,  between  January  and  December  2012, 
25 214  teachers  retired  on  the  grounds  of  age.  In  2010/11,  there  were  28 955  graduates 
from teacher education faculties, including al-Azhar facilities. This suggests a net surplus 
of 3 741 new teachers that year. However, a proportion of these graduates leave teaching 
after  getting  married  or  enter  careers  other  than  teaching.  The  number  of  teachers 
reaching retirement age has also been increasing; in 2014 some 32 286 will have reached 
the  age  of  60,  the  retirement  age.  As  enrolments  expand,  the  current  rate  of  graduate 
entrants to the teaching workforce would appear to be falling moderately below the levels 
needed. However, there are a number of graduates not yet employed in teaching, and their 
availability could ameliorate annual shortfalls in the number of graduates. The team was 
unable  to  ascertain  the  real  balance  between  teacher  demand  and  supply  in  quantitative 
terms. Of more concern were qualitative supply issues, where students go into faculties of 
education  by  default,  meaning  they  have  low  levels  of  motivation  for  teaching  and 
graduates  may  lack  capacity  and  confidence  in  critical  areas  needed  for  student  skills 
formation, such as in mathematics (see Chapter 5 for more details). It would be useful for 
a national audit to be conducted of teacher supply and demand balances, disaggregated by 
level and field of education.  
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

 CHAPTER 2: EGYPT'S EDUCATION SYSTEM – 49 
 
 
Structural elements shaping the market for teachers 
Recruitment  of  teachers  is  undertaken  by  the  Central  Agency  for  Organisation  and 
Administration  (CAOA)  but  teachers  are  managed  by  the  respective  provincial 
governorate.  Examination-based  recruitment  was  dropped  in  1994,  with  the  subsequent 
disappearance in practice of the career-based performance system. The current system’s 
management  does  not  link  performance  and  merit  with  career  advancement  and 
promotion. 
Membership  of  the  teachers’  union,  the  Teachers  Syndicate,  is  mandatory  for  all 
teachers  and  hence  the  union  has  coverage  of  teachers  from  government,  private  and 
al-Ahzar schools. The main issues of concern for the syndicate are teachers’ salaries and 
their professional development. The syndicate opposes performance-based assessment of 
teachers  while  condoning  the  transfer  of  low-performing  teachers  to  administrative 
responsibilities and maintaining their benefits. 
Technology in education 
While Egypt strives to allocate as many computers to pedagogy as possible, its efforts 
to spread a culture of ICT-assisted instruction are constrained by a basic lack of devices 
and  Internet  connectivity  (Broadband  Commission,  2013).  Although  91%  of  the 
computers  in  primary  schools  and  96%  in  preparatory  and  upper  secondary  schools  are 
devoted  to  learning,  computer  resources  are  greatly  overstretched,  with  140  primary 
pupils sharing a single computer on average (Table 2.5). The national policy has been to 
provide computer laboratories in schools at the rate of 1 laboratory for every 15 classes 
(Hamdy, 2007). Despite this, computer laboratories are relatively scarce, in just 12% of 
primary schools, 42% of preparatory schools and 23% of secondary schools. More recent 
data were not available to the team. In addition, only a low percentage of the computers 
that are available are connected to the Internet. Just 25% of the computers in primary and 
preparatory schools are online, and 11% of computers at secondary level. Fewer than half 
of Egypt’s educational institutions have an Internet connection, compared with more than 
two-thirds in Oman and Jordan. 
Table 2.5 Student-to-computer ratio and average computers per school, Egypt, 2009-10. 
School level 
Students per computer 
Average computers per school 
Pre-primary. 
54.33 
1.46 
Primary 
141.18 
3.95 
Preparatory 
25.65 
17.19 
General secondary 
27.77 
19.64 
Technical and vocational secondary 
28.45 
26.05 
Note: according to MOE (2011), there are around 278 000 computers in some 40 000 schools. This averages 
about 7 computers per school. 
Source:  Ministry  of  Education  (2010),  Conditions  of  Education  in  Egypt  2010.  Report  on  the  National 
Education Indicators,
 Ministry of Education, Cairo, pp.15, 152-3 
Given that connectivity is a prerequisite for the integration of ICT-assisted instruction 
using  the  Internet,  an  analysis  of  basic  Internet  connectivity  is  key  to  determining  a 
country’s level of preparedness. Increasingly, broadband connectivity and high bandwidth 
are  needed  to  effectively  support  instruction  over  the  Internet,  particularly  for  two-way 
synchronous communication (e.g. video conferencing), streaming videos, or using online 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

50 – CHAPTER 2: EGYPT'S EDUCATION SYSTEM 
 
 
applications  and  databases  that  have  high  capacity  requirements  (Broadband 
Commission,  2013).  Nevertheless,  narrowband  Internet  connections in  certain situations 
might  be  considered  a  temporary  solution  for  institutions  that  would  otherwise  be 
unconnected.  
Older  forms  of  ICT-assisted  instruction  are  being  challenged  and  enriched  by  the 
Internet.  In  the  1980s,  computer-assisted  instruction  (CAI)  was  based  on  programmed 
learning  or  “drill  and  practice”  software  but  both  CAI  and  Internet-assisted  instruction 
(IAI) have evolved at an exponential rate, combining with older ICT tools to create new 
platforms  for  learning  and teaching.  Many  new  devices  have been  specifically  designed 
for  or  are  being  adopted  into  classrooms,  such  as  laptops  (regular  and  low-cost), 
interactive whiteboards, tablets, e-readers and smart phones. One of the hallmarks of both 
CAI  and  IAI  is  the  increased  opportunity  to  interact  with  teachers  and  other  pupils  in 
ways  that  were  not  possible  through  one-way  radio  and  television  broadcasts.  This 
interaction may enhance educational quality if used appropriately. On the other hand, the 
increased  level  of  technical  sophistication  associated  with  CAI  and  IAI  means  start-up 
and  maintenance  costs  are  substantially  higher  than  using  older  technologies  such  as 
broadcasts. Despite this, it is necessary to consider the gains that CAI and IAI might have 
in schools, given their potential impact on learning, performance and motivation of both 
students and teachers, as well as on school management and system-wide organisation. 
Although the number of computers available is not keeping pace with enrolment, and 
Internet  connectivity  is  lagging  behind,  the  country  nonetheless  continues  to  emphasise 
the  integration  of  CAI  into  schools.  As  such,  86%  of  primary  and  96%  of  secondary 
educational institutions have access to this type of ICT-assisted instruction. Older types of 
ICT-assisted instruction are not a priority in Egypt, even though large populations live in 
rural  or  remote  areas  where  they  are  frequently  found  to  serve  a  useful  function. 
Radio-assisted  instruction  (RAI)  is  available  in  40%  of  primary  and  secondary  schools, 
while  television-assisted  instruction  (TAI)  is  available  in  59%  and  55%  of  primary  and 
secondary  schools,  respectively,  often  through  the  use  of  mobile  technology  equipped 
with  transmission  receivers  to  the  Egyptian  Satellite  (Nile  Sat)  television  broadcasts, 
which  air  educational  programmes  for  children  and  general  literacy  programmes.  There 
are no data available on the provision of IAI at the institutional level in Egypt, but given 
the  low  proportion  of  schools  with  access  to  the  Internet,  it  is  unlikely  that  IAI  is 
available in more than a half of all schools in Egypt. 
Issues in Egyptian education 
Five major issues gained the attention of the team: 1) the content-based nature of the 
curriculum  and  associated  pedagogy;  2) the  persistence  of  inequalities;  3) the  adverse 
consequences  of  the  tracking  system;  4) the  dependency  on  private  tutoring;  and  5) the 
fragmented nature of governance.  
The content-based nature of the curriculum and associated pedagogy 
Egyptian  schooling  is  dominated  by  an  approach  to  instruction  that  is 
teacher-dominated,  repetitive,  and  concentrates  too  much  on  rote  learning  and  literal 
recall  of  information.  As  discussed  in  more  detail  in  Chapter  5,  when  teachers  ask 
questions in the classroom they are mostly closed, lower-order questions requiring direct 
factual replies, often in unison by whole classes. The limitation of the learning experience 
is  not  only  that  what  students  are  taught  bears  little  connection  to  real  life  and 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

 CHAPTER 2: EGYPT'S EDUCATION SYSTEM – 51 
 
 
contemporary circumstances, it is that the way most students are taught and how they are 
learning is not developing their cognitive skills.  
A student in an international school in Cairo, reflecting on his time in a government 
school there, noted: “The curriculum here requires you to concentrate and revise. But in 
the  national  system,  I  just  had  to  go  home  and  memorise  a  lot  of  facts.  In  the 
government-set studies I have to know a lot of details that I would not normally need. I 
have  to  study  lots  of  dates,  lots  of  city  names...  but  in  the  Canadian-set  studies  I  learn 
stuff I can retain, benefit from and convey to others” (cited in Loveluck, 2012). 
The persistence of inequalities in Egyptian education 
Not only has access to basic and secondary education in Egypt been expanding, but 
importantly,  the  completion  rate  for  preparatory  education  (the  end  of  compulsory 
education)  has  risen  from  43%  to  69%  between  1998  and  2006.  The  secondary 
completion  rate  has  also  risen  over  the  same  period  from  38%  to  65%.  The  greatest 
expansion has occurred for girls, youth in cities, and the children of educated parents.  
Meanwhile,  a  significant  proportion  of  children  still  do  not  attend  school.  In  2006, 
some  26%  of  girls  and  16%  of  boys  had  never  enrolled  in  school.  The  never-enrolled 
proportion was higher for children in rural areas (34% for rural Upper Egypt and 24% for 
rural Lower Egypt), compared with 10% for urban areas. Concurrently, among those who 
are participating, there are lower rates of completion of basic education by girls generally, 
and  rural  students  both  male  and  female.  The  expansion  of  post-basic  enrolment  has 
benefitted  youth  from  more  privileged  backgrounds,  and  there  is  evidence  that  gaps  in 
attainment between the least and most advantaged have widened in the first decade of the 
21st century  (Ersado et al.,  2012).  Chapter  7 considers  particular aspects  of educational 
inequality. 
The adverse consequences of the tracking system 
The  tracking  of  pupils  into  technical  or  general  education  is  deeply  embedded  in 
Egypt’s  cultural  traditions,  as  the  foregoing  brief  history  of  Egypt’s  educational 
development shows. Tracking is based on high-stakes examinations in Grade 6 and Grade 
9 of basic education, and in Grade 12, for admission to university courses (the issues of 
assessment are considered in detail in Chapter 6). It has become a distorting influence on 
student  learning,  and  a  major  barrier  to  equality  of  opportunity.  It  reflects  an  outdated 
view  of  employment  prospects  and  is  unfit  for  Egypt’s  changing  labour  market 
requirements.  
Currently,  about  40%  of  secondary  school  students  attend  technical  secondary 
schools. TVET participation has continued to decline between 2010 and 2014, falling by 
almost 4% between 2012 and 2014 (ETF, 2015). This track is regarded as less prestigious 
than the general secondary track which normally leads to university access. The technical 
track  is  a  terminal  one  for  the  majority  of  participants.  More  than  three-quarters  of 
children from the poorest quintile families enter the technical track, compared with about 
one-quarter from the wealthiest quintile (Shady, 2013). The labour market outcomes for 
graduates are considered in Chapter 4. 
The  tracking  system  functions  to  exacerbate  the  unequal  provision  of  resources  for 
student learning across Egypt: 
“Inequalities in learning opportunities appear at early levels, and result from 
both heterogeneous family cultural and financial resources, and the institutions of 

SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

52 – CHAPTER 2: EGYPT'S EDUCATION SYSTEM 
 
 
the Egyptian schooling system, with tracking reinforcing unequal family 
resources and early learning gaps.” 
Ersado et al. (2012) 
Those  who  can  afford  it  can  avoid  forced  tracking  by  continuing  their  education  in 
private  schools  and  universities.  Even  in  government  schools,  students  can  sometimes 
make  up  for  a  low  score  by  paying  extra  fees  (Barsoum,  2004).  This  “service  system” 
(nizam  al-khadamat)  allows  students  with  low  scores  to  attend  classes  in  the  afternoon 
shift of a government school for an annual fee of around EGP 400-800.  
The  background  report  (Ministry  of  Education,  2011)  prepared  for  this  report  noted 
“concerns  about  inequities  underlying  enrolment  in  the  general  secondary  track”.  It 
pointed  to  the  fact  that  “Egypt  has  a  very  high  proportion  of  secondary  students  in 
technical  and  vocational  education  compared  to  other  countries  with  similar  income 
levels”.  It  also  noted  that  technical  education  in  secondary  schools  “is  of  questionable 
quality  and  many  students  do  not  appear  to  learn  the  trades  for  which  they  are  being 
trained”.  The  background  report  indicated  that  the  Education  Ministry  is  working  to 
ameliorate  the  adverse  effects  of  the  tracking  system.  It  has  proposed  a  three-pronged 
strategy: 
1.  Develop  a  core  curriculum  between  general  and  technical  education  that  would 
guarantee  that  students  in  both  tracks  have  a  common  base  of  knowledge,  culture 
and skills. 
2.  Develop  the  technical/vocational secondary  schools  and  improve  the  quality  of the 
academic, technical and vocational education services they provide. 
3.  Explore the development of a blended “third way” in which the two tracks are better 
integrated  and  students  have  a  range  of  choices  at  various  times  in  their  school 
careers that better suit their needs and goals (while also better serving the needs of 
Egypt’s labour markets) (Ministry of Education, 2011, p. 27). 
The background report noted further that the proposed three-pronged solution would 
require a number of actions including: “linking all secondary level outcomes  – whether 
general  or  technical/vocational  –  to  labour  market  needs  in  a  much  more  dynamic  way 
than  is  presently  followed”;  “changing  the  way  in  which  students  enter 
technical/vocational  schools”  with  reduced  reliance  on  exam  scores  at  the  end  of  the 
preparatory  stage;  and  “supplying  quality  teachers,  equipment  and  raw  materials” 
(Ministry of Education, 2011, p. 28).  
The dependency on private tutoring 
According  to  the  2009  Survey  of  Young  People  in  Egypt  (SYPE),  some  58%  of 
primary  students  and  64%  of  preparatory  students  received  paid  tutoring.  Most  took 
private lessons either at their home or the tutor’s home. Some participated in after-school 
study  groups  (magmu‘at).  Whereas  group  tutoring  lessons  in  public  schools  after  the 
regular  school  day  are  officially  sanctioned  by  MOE,  private  lessons  in  the  home  are 
technically illegal but widespread.  
Private tutoring is typically much more expensive than public tutoring. Costs vary by 
year  of  study  and  subject  area.  The  highest  cost  points  are  in  the  years  leading  to  the 
promotional exams, notably at Grades 9 and 12. 
 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

 CHAPTER 2: EGYPT'S EDUCATION SYSTEM – 53 
 
 
“An over-burdened and under-funded public education system fails to provide 
quality education to an ever growing number of students. Structural deficits like 
overcrowded classrooms and poor facilities often impede effective teaching and 
learning. This situation is aggravated by a very dense and rigid syllabus, an 
emphasis on rote learning and the exam orientation of the education system. 
Teachers, who are among the lowest paid employees in the public sector, are 
often unmotivated due to their low salaries and social status as well as their poor 
working conditions and, deliberately or not, fail to fulfil their duties during 
regular class hours. While students thus resort to private tutoring in order to cope 
with the curriculum and prepare for centralised exams that determine their future 
career opportunities, teachers depend on the additional income offered by this 
informal practice in order to make a decent living.” 
(Hartmann, 2008). 
Table 2.6 Average household expenditure per child on education by type and family income,  
Egypt, 2005-06 (EGP) 
All education-
Family income 
Expenditure on 
Expenditure on fees 
Other educational 
related 
quintile 
tutoring 
expenditures 
expenditure 
Lowest 
137 
50 
172 
359 
Second 
177 
42 
186 
405 
Middle 
246 
39 
212 
497 
Fourth 
476 
69 
260 
805 
Highest 
708 
286 
331 
1 325 
Source: Shady, (2013), Gender, Tutoring and Track in Egyptian Education, Social Research Center, American 
University in Cairo. 
Table 2.6 shows that the rate of all education-related spending for households in the 
highest quintile was 3.7 times that of the lowest. Spending on tutoring, which is strongly 
linked  with  a  student’s  background,  is  likely  to  contribute  to  learning  achievement 
inequities. Indeed, analysis conducted by the World Bank suggests that “differentials in 
expenditures  do  contribute  to  inequities  in  achievements  at  completion  of  basic 
education” (Ersado et al., 2012). Controlling for tutoring expenses, performance in exams 
was found to vary only slightly across household types. The inference is that “were all 
parents  to  spend  the  same  amount  on  tutoring,  gaps  in  achievements  at  the  preparatory 
completion  exam  between  children  of  different  background  would  diminish  by  about 
13-per cent.” (Ersado et al., 2012). 
As  students  and  teachers  concentrate  their  efforts  on  private  lessons,  regular 
schooling becomes almost redundant. Perversely, the informal practice which has evolved 
as  a  means  of  coping  with  deficiencies  of  the  formal  system  effectively  functions  to 
prevent substantial improvements to formal schooling (Hartmann, 2008). 
 “The high and unequal levels of household expenditures in private tutoring do 
drive a significant share of achievement inequalities.” 
(Ersado et al., 2012) 
The  team  was  advised  that  private  lessons  are  widespread  and  almost  universal,  in 
basic  and  secondary  education.  Parents  said  they  were  spending  between  EGP 300  and 
1000 per month. The cost of lessons is most expensive in Cairo and Alexandria. 
The  reasons  given  for  the  dependency  on  private  tutoring  were  insufficient  time  at 
school  to  cover  the  curriculum  to  the  level  of  student  understanding,  and  inadequate 
explanations  by  classroom  teachers.  It  has  also  become  a  supplement  to  teachers’ 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

54 – CHAPTER 2: EGYPT'S EDUCATION SYSTEM 
 
 
incomes. These explanations need to be set alongside the need for parents to supplement 
the paucity of resources for schooling.  
Parents  commented  that  the  consequences  of  private tutoring  include:  incentives  for 
teachers not to teach well at school; high financial costs to parents, necessitating cutbacks 
in  other areas  of  family  spending;  high  time  costs  to students; tired  classroom  teachers; 
and  widening  inequality.  Uneven  means  to  purchase  private  lessons  was  seen  as 
undermining the merit principle of educational access.  
Students advised the team of the double burden of going to school and taking private 
lessons (see Box 2.3). 
Box 2.3 My typical day (girls’ secondary school) 
6.00: breakfast & help around home 
7.45: morning assembly and 4 periods (50 minutes each) 
11.30: break (includes activities chosen by student) 
12.00: further periods (depending on grade) 
return home for short nap 
13.30-16.00: study 
1630-18.30: private lessons 
19.00- 23.00: study 
23.30: bed 
Source: team interview with a student. 
The fragmented nature of governance 
Despite  a  strong  tendency  towards  centralisation  in  state  affairs,  Egypt  suffers  from 
fragmentation  in  education  policy,  financing  and  administration.  The  fragmentation  is 
both  horizontal,  across  ministerial  portfolios,  and  vertical  between  central,  governorate 
and district level agencies.  
On  the  horizontal  dimension,  as  noted  above,  some  17  ministries  are  involved  in 
vocational  training  while  the  MOE  controls  the  technical  colleges.  Egypt  has  no 
co-ordinated TVET strategy, nor is there any alignment between Egypt’s goals and plans 
for general education and technical education and training. There are no systematic means 
for  informing  the  education  and  training  systems  of  Egypt’s  changing  labour  market 
conditions.  Employers  appear  to  have  no  formal  means  of  influencing  education  and 
training policy considerations.  
On the vertical dimension, the team learned of various gaps and overlaps between the 
functions  of  the  central  government,  the  governorates  (muddiriyas)  and  the  district 
administrations  (idaras).  A  clear  example  of  the  lack  of  joined-up-ness  is  the  unclear 
roles  of  school  principals,  such  as  for  teacher  supervision.  There  are  central  MOE 
supervisors,  muddiriya  supervisors  and  idara  supervisors  and  school  principals  with 
supervisory responsibilities for the teachers on their staff. The overlap adds to costs and 
bureaucracy but not to teaching or student performance improvement. 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

 CHAPTER 2: EGYPT'S EDUCATION SYSTEM – 55 
 
 
References 
 
Abrahart, A. (2003), Egypt: Review of Technical and Vocational Education and Training
DFID and World Bank Collaboration on Knowledge and Skills in the New Economy, 
London, Washington, DC. 
Azzoni,  L.  (2009),  “Transforming  a  child  labour  scheme  into  a  modern  apprenticeship 
one:  The  role  of  NGOs  and  government.  The  apprenticeship  component  of  the  CCL 
Project”,  in,  F.  Rauner,  E.  Smith,  U.  Hauschildt  and  H.  Zelloth  (eds.)  Innovative 
Apprenticeships: Promoting Successful School-to-Work-Transitions
, LIT, Muenster. 
Barsoum,  G.F.  (2004),  “The  employment  crisis  of  female  graduates  in  Egypt:  An 
ethnographic  account”,  Cairo  Papers  in  Social  Science,  Vol.  25/3,  The  American 
University in Cairo Press, Cairo. 
Binzel,  C.  (2011),  “Decline  in  social  mobility:  Unfulfilled  aspirations  among  Egypt’s 
educated  youth”,  IZA  Discussion  Paper,  No.  6139,  IZA  (Institute  for  the  Study  of 
Labour), Bonn. 
Broadband  Commission  (2013),  The  State  of  Broadband  2013:  Universalising 
Broadband,  UNESCO  (United  Nations  Education,  Scientific  and  Cultural 
Organization) and ITU (International Telecommunication Union), Geneva. 
CAPMAS  (2013),  Egypt  Statistical  Yearbook,  2013,  CAPMAS  (Central  Agency  for 
Public Mobilisation and Statistics), Cairo. 
CAPMAS (2012), Labour Force Survey 2012, CAPMAS, Cairo. 
Cochran, J. (1986), Education in Egypt, Croom Helm, London. 
David, A.R. (2015), A Year in the Life of Ancient Egypt, Pen & Sword Books, Barnsley. 
El-Ashmawi,  A.  (2011),  “TVET  in  Egypt”,  background  paper  prepared  for  the  MENA 
Regional  Jobs  Flagship  Report  Jobs  for  a  Shared  Prosperity,  World  Bank, 
Washington, DC. 
Ersado,  L.  et  al.  (2012),  Arab  Republic  of  Egypt:  Inequality  of  Opportunity  in 
Educational Achievement, Report No. 70300-EG, World Bank, Washington, DC. 
ETF  (2015),  TorinoProcess  2014:  Egypt,  ETF  (European  Training  Foundation),  Turin,   
www.etf.europa.eu/web.nsf/pages/TRP_2014_Egypt. 
ETF  (2013),  “Independent  assessment  report  of  the  European  Union  Education  Sector 
Policy Support Programme (ESPSP)”, unpublished report, prepared for the delegation 
of the European Union to Egypt, ETF (European Training Foundation), Turin.  
ETF (2011), Education & Business: Egypt, ETF, Turin, www.etf.europa.eu/webatt.nsf/0/
88A82E26E3A48905C12579130031E714/$file/Education%20and%20Business%20St
udy%20-%20Egypt.pdf.
 
ETF (2009), Work-Based Learning Programmes for Young People in the Mediterranean 
Region:  Comparative  Analyses,  Office  for  Official  Publications  of  the  European 
Communities, Luxembourg. 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

56 – CHAPTER 2: EGYPT'S EDUCATION SYSTEM 
 
 
ETF  (2003),  Innovative  Practices  in  Teacher  and  Trainer  Training  in  the  Mashrek 
Region, Office for Official Publications of the European Communities, Luxembourg. 
ETF  and  The  World  Bank  (2006),  Reforming  Technical  Vocational  Education  and 
Training in the Middle East and North Africa: Experiences and Challenges, Office for 
Official Publications of the European Communities, Luxembourg. 
Hamdy, A. (2007), Survey of ICT and Education in Africa: Egypt Country Report, World 
Bank, Washington, DC. 
Hartmann, S. (2008), “The informal market of education in Egypt: Private tutoring and its 
implications”,  Working  Paper,  No.  88,  Department  of  Anthropology  and  African 
Studies, The Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz. 
Heyworth-Dunne, J. (1939), An Introduction to the History of Education in Egypt, Luzac 
& Co, London. 
Hyde, G. (1978), Education in Modern Egypt: Ideals and Realities, Routledge & Kegan 
Paul. London. 
ILO  (2012),  Upgrading  Informal  Apprenticeships.  A  Resource  Guide  for  Africa,  ILO 
(International Labour Organization), Geneva. 
Loveluck, L. (2012), Education in Egypt: Key Challenges, Middle East and North Africa 
Programme, Chatham House, London. 
Ministry  of  Education  (2014),  Statistical  Yearbook  2012/2013,  Ministry  of  Education, 
Cairo. 
Ministry  of  Education  (2011),  Pre-University  Education  System  in  Egypt:  Background 
Report, Ministry of Education, Cairo. 
Ministry  of  Education  (2010),  Condition  of  Education  in  Egypt  2010:  Report  on  the 
National Education Indicators, Ministry of Education, Cairo. 
Rossi, C. (2004), Architecture and Mathematics in Ancient Egypt, Cambridge University 
Press. 
Santiago,  P.  (2002),  “Teacher  demand  and  supply:  Improving  teaching  quality  and 
addressing  teacher  shortages”,  OECD  Education  Working  Papers,  No  1,  OECD 
Publishing, Paris, http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/232506301033.  
Shady,  E.  (2013),  Gender,  Tutoring  and  Track  in  Egyptian  Education,  Social  Research 
Center, American University in Cairo. 
Starrett,  G.  (1998),  Putting  Islam  to  Work:  Education,  Politics  and  Religious 
Transformation in Egypt, University of California Press, Berkeley.  
TVET Reform Programme (2012),Time for Change: Draft Egyptian TVET Reform Policy 
2012-2017. Sustainable Development and Employment through Qualified Workforce, 
TVET Reform Programme, co-funded by the European Union and the Government of 
Egypt. 
UNDP (2010), Egypt Human Development Report 2010 – Youth in Egypt: Building Our 
Future,  Institute  of  National  Planning,  Egypt  and  UNDP  (United  Nations 
Development Programme). 
Walker, P.E. (2002), Exploring an Islamic Empire: Fatimid History and Its Sources, I.B. 
Tauris in association with the Institute of Ismaili Studies.
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

57 – CHAPTER 3: THE NATIONAL EDUCATION STRATEGIC PLAN 2007 - 2012 
 
 
Chapter 3. 
 
The National Education Strategic Plan 2007-2012  
 
 
This chapter outlines the goals and initiatives of Egypt’s first national strategic plan for 
education.  It  assesses  the  success  of  the  plan  and  raises  issues  about  the  processes  of 
planning  and  implementation.  The  chapter  also  identifies  lessons  to  be  drawn  from  the 
experience and achievements of the first plan, including foundations for future action.
 
 
 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

58 – CHAPTER 3: THE NATIONAL EDUCATION STRATEGIC PLAN 2007 - 2012 
 
 
The National Education Strategic Plan 2007-2012 was an unprecedented undertaking 
to  improve  Egypt’s  schooling  system  with  the  declared  ambition  “to  promote  the 
sustainable growth of the economy and consolidate democracy and freedom” (Ministry of 
Education,  2007).  Several  attempts  were  made  to  engage  key  stakeholders  (national 
experts,  ministries,  governorates  and  international  agencies) in  the  process,  though  with 
varying levels of success.  
The scope of the plan 
The  plan  sought  to  address  a  wide  range  of  issues:  low  enrolment  in  secondary 
education coupled with high dropout rates; a wide gender gap; a low teacher-student ratio 
and  high  “classroom  density”;  poor  teacher  and  teaching  quality;  low  teacher  salaries; 
inadequate teacher professional development; inadequate student achievement; inequality 
of  access and  quality  at  all  educational levels;  pervasive  private  tutoring,  particularly  in 
secondary  education;  inefficient  budgeting  and  expenditure  allocation;  low  levels  of 
transparency  and  accountability;  underdeveloped  monitoring  and  evaluation  systems, 
with unclear performance measures; over-centralisation of functions, resulting in lack of 
responsiveness to local needs; and limited community and parental involvement. 
The plan set out a vision to provide high quality education for all; to prepare children 
and youth for “healthy and enlightened citizenship in a knowledge-based society, under a 
new  social  contract  based  on  democracy,  freedom  and  social  justice”;  and  to  adopt  “a 
decentralised  educational  system  that  enhances  community  participation,  good 
governance and effective management at the school level as well as at all administrative 
levels” (Ministry of Education, 2007). 
The plan envisaged a wide range of reforms, achieved through the implementation of 
twelve  priority  programmes,  classified  into  three  groups,  and  broken  down  into  key 
objectives: 
I.  Quality programmes 
1.  Comprehensive curriculum and instructional technology reform  
a.  Introduce a modern standard-based curriculum and syllabus. 
b.  Develop and produce blueprints and/or guidelines for new textbooks and instructional 
materials in line with the newly developed curriculum. 
c.  Enhance the instruction of Arabic language. 
d.  Enhance the performance of staff implementing the new curriculum. 
e.  Develop the process of textbook authoring. 
f.  Improve the efficiency of procurement, printing and delivery of textbooks. 
g.  Restructure the Centre for Curriculum and Instructional Development. 
h.  Develop a professional cadre of curriculum and instructional materials designers. 
2.  School-based reform, accreditation and accountability 
a.  Put the school at the heart of the reform. 
b.  Performance-based approach. 
c.  Good governance and effective partnership. 
3.  Human resources development and professional development (HRD/PD) 
a.  Establish a Teachers’ Academy to issue licenses for the teaching profession. 
b.  Capacity building of a new training sector within the new HRD/PD system. 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

 CHAPTER 3: THE NATIONAL EDUCATION STRATEGIC PLAN 2007 - 2012– 59 
 
 
c.  Establish  a  new  training  system  for  educators,  especially  on  new  curricula,  for  all 
levels of education. 
d.  Strengthen distance training. 
e.  Training directed to the actual needs of individuals as scheduled in the plan. 
 
II.  System support and management programmes 
4.  Institutionalisation of decentralisation 
a.  Support  the  institutional  capacity  of  the  Ministry  of  Education  (MOE)  in  decision 
making, public relations and evaluation. 
b.  Restructure/merge the supportive authorities, entities and centres. 
c.  Support training centres in governorates. 
d.  Support school-based management. 
e.  Develop an administrative supervision system. 
f.  Support school administrative authority. 
g.  Increase the effectiveness to implement laws and decisions. 
h.  Support the institutional capacity of the MOE in financial and administrative affairs. 
i.  Develop  an  institutional  system  for  financial  decentralisation  to  schools,  linking 
budget to performance. 
5.  ICT  for  management:  technological  development  and  information  systems  (education 
management information systems and school management systems) 
a.  Modernise and strengthen the technology infrastructure in all schools. 
b.  Activate the role of information system management in the educational process. 
c.  Support the best use of technology in distance learning and training. 
d.  Build capacity in the ICT domain. 
e.  Merge different technology departments in one sector to achieve unity and efficiency. 
6.  Establishing a monitoring and evaluation system 
a.  Monitor  and  evaluate  learners’  growth  and  performance  in  light  of  achievement 
indicators. 
b.  Monitor and evaluate school performance according to the effective school indicators. 
c.  Monitor and evaluate administrative and financial systems at all levels. 
d.  Restructure the monitoring and evaluation system. 
e.  Support  the  institutional  capacity  of  the  National  Centre  for  Examinations  and 
Educational Evaluation (NCEEE). 
7.  School construction 
a.  Design schools according to specific standards. 
b.  Improve the school building planning procedures. 
c.  Improve  decentralisation  through  a  mechanism  for  site  selection,  school  construction 
and maintenance. 
d.  Set up a plan to manage school construction at decentralised level. 
e.  Establish  a system  to  engage  the  private and  public  sector  in  the  school  construction 
process. 
f.  Decentralise the school construction system across the entire cycle. 
 
 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

60 – CHAPTER 3: THE NATIONAL EDUCATION STRATEGIC PLAN 2007 - 2012 
 
 
III. 
Level-based programmes 
8.  Early childhood education 
a.  Enhance the quality of the educational process. 
b.  Develop an early childhood management system. 
9.  Basic education reform 
a.  Enhancing quality of pupils’ life in basic education. 
b.  Developing a basic education flexible curriculum and instructional materials in light of 
the national standards. 
c.  Completing the ongoing modernisation of pedagogical methods and assessment. 
d.  Solve the problem of teacher shortages and uneven deployment. 
e.  Develop societal awareness of the basic education reform. 
10.  Modernisation of secondary education 
a.  Transform  general  and  technical  secondary  education  systems  into  an  open  system 
based on current global trends. 
b.  Modernise the secondary education curriculum. 
c.  Achieve a pedagogical paradigm shift. 
d.  Enhance the quality of secondary education students. 
e.  Provide professional development for secondary teachers. 
f.  Build the institutional capacity of secondary schools. 
g.  Improve the general secondary education certification system. 
h.  Improve the examination and assessment system of technical secondary education. 
i.  Integrate specialisations into technical secondary education. 
j.  Integrate the vocational secondary schools to the technical secondary schools. 
k.  Provide innovative models to be the bases for future technical secondary education. 
11.  Education for girls and out-of-school children 
a.  Establish schools in co-operation with local communities. 
b.  Provide sufficient number of trained managers, supervisors, facilitators and workers. 
c.  Produce instructional materials within the national curriculum. 
d.  Provide a school feeding programme for all children. 
e.  Develop an effective management system. 
12.  Education for special groups – children with special needs 
a.  Include 10% of children with mild disabilities in mainstream basic education schools. 
b.  Improve the quality of education in existing special education schools. 
c.  Establish  a  supportive  inclusive  environment  within  mainstream  basic  education 
schools. 
Achievements of the plan 
Overall, the National Education Strategic Plan 2007-2012 (NESP) was an important 
step in establishing a forward-looking framework for reform in Egypt. The effort in itself 
set  new  benchmarks  in  terms  of  coherent,  longer-term  planning,  multiple  stakeholder 
engagement,  and  a  structured,  data-based  approach  to  monitoring  progress  towards 
measurable goals.  
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

 CHAPTER 3: THE NATIONAL EDUCATION STRATEGIC PLAN 2007 - 2012– 61 
 
 
Given  the  ambitious  scope  and  scale  of  the  plan,  its  achievements  are,  not 
unexpectedly, uneven. The team was not able to conduct a full evaluation of the plan, but 
had to rely on limited data and the reported views of participants and clients of the plan 
during its site visits and consultations. In the light of the available evidence, the planned 
improvements  can  be  divided  into  three  levels  of  achievement:  1) reasonably  good 
progress; 2) partial progress; 3) no real progress.  
Planned improvements with reasonably good progress 
Raising awareness of the possibilities for change 
The  strategic  planning  effort  involved  in  developing  the  NESP  was  unprecedented. 
The  comprehensive  exercise  of  analysing  gaps  and  prioritising  programmes  to  address 
them  has  evidently  raised  the  awareness  of  the  possibilities  for  change.  The  cultural 
impact  of  the  planning  process  also  made  the  trade-offs  and  challenges  involved  in 
pursuing ambitious targets with constrained resources more transparent. Significantly, the 
plan  provided  the  stimulus  necessary  to  make  tangible  progress  in  important  and 
previously  neglected  areas  requiring  reform  of  long-standing  educational  policies  and 
practices. 
Improving access and success 
The most direct benefits deriving from the government’s commitments to the plan are 
increases in student access to education at all levels. Egypt has achieved higher rates of 
participation  in  the  compulsory  and  post-compulsory  years.  Student  progression  rates 
have risen and attrition rates have fallen. 
The  programmes  geared  to  education  for  girls  and  out-of-school  children  have 
increased  access  significantly,  while  efforts  focusing  on  children  with  special  needs 
(more  effective  identification  and  inclusion  in  regular  schools)  have  come  up  against 
physical and attitudinal barriers. 
Regional  disparities  remain,  as  do  differences  in  participation  by  gender  and 
household income levels. 
School-based reform 
The  initiation  of  school  improvement  plans  represented  an  important  shift  from  a 
top-down,  one-size-fits-all  model  of  reform  to  one  that  allowed  and  encouraged  some 
bottom-up development. The team was impressed by initiatives in several of the schools 
visited.  For  example,  in  one  secondary  school  for  girls,  the  principal  had  made  use  of 
donor funds to extend the curriculum in ways that developed a range of analytic, creative 
and teamwork skills among students, as well as widening their perspectives on a range of 
issues.  
Medium-term expenditure budget 
The  education  plan  gave  rise  to  a  new  initiative  for  the  Egyptian  budgeting  system 
generally,  in  the  form  of  a  medium-term  expenditure  budget.  The  education  plan  was 
developed  by  adapting  the  analysis  and  projection  (AnPro)  model  from  the  United 
Nations  Educational,  Scientific  and  Cultural  Organization  (INESM,  UNESCO).  This 
model  can  be  applied  across  all  phases  of  the  planning  process:  sector  analysis,  target 
setting, assessment of resource requirements, priority setting, financial analysis (including 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

62 – CHAPTER 3: THE NATIONAL EDUCATION STRATEGIC PLAN 2007 - 2012 
 
 
assessment  of  funding  gaps  and  preparation  of  financing  plans)  and  implementation 
monitoring. The AnPro model for Egypt employed a 5-year planning horizon, including 
for  costing  and  budgeting.  It  was  employed  in  education  as  part  of  Egypt’s  broader 
modernisation  of  public-sector  management.  The  medium-term  expenditure  budget 
provides  better  integration  of  policy,  planning  and  budgeting.  It  provides  a  resource 
envelope  to  cover  the  estimated  cost  of  delivering  agreed  programme  roll-outs.  It  gives 
agencies greater predictability and allows them greater flexibility in the use of resources. 
Education budgeting is considered in detail in Chapter 7. 
Improved use and collection of data 
The  development  of  the  plan  itself  and  the  processes  developed  for  monitoring  its 
roll-out  and  achievement  of  targets  has  led  to  a  more  comprehensive  and  systematic 
approach  to  data  collection,  analysis  and  reporting  by  the  MOE.  The  Condition  of 
Education  Report  (Ministry  of  Education,  2010),  for  instance,  could  not  have  been 
produced  before  the  plan  and  associated  data  systems  were  designed.  The  Public 
Expenditure Tracking Survey is a further example of a useful new policy monitoring tool.  
Planned improvements with partial progress 
National Qualifications Framework 
The  Strategic  Planning  Unit  of  the  Ministry  of  Higher  Education  (MOHE)  is 
progressing work on a National Qualifications Framework for Egypt. The development of 
a  National  Qualifications  Framework,  and  associated  work  to  describe  the  learning 
outcomes  expected  for  each  level  of  educational  qualification,  is  an  important  building 
block. In can provide a basis for outcomes-based assessment, curriculum articulation, and 
the  development  of  learning  pathways  and  recognition  of  prior  learning  through  credits 
for future qualifications. Thus it can enable lifelong learning without redundant learning 
of knowledge and skills acquired previously. 
National Curriculum Framework 
The  Centre  for  Curriculum  and  Instructional  Materials  Development  (CCIMD)  is 
progressing  work  on  a  National  Curriculum  Framework.  The  draft  for  the  general 
secondary  stage  sets  out  goals  for  the  secondary  stage,  criteria  for  selecting  curriculum 
content and expected generic learning outcomes, including knowledge, skills, and values, 
beliefs  and  attitudes.  The  work,  while  at  an  early  stage  of  development,  is  oriented  to 
more  relevant learning  for life  and  work,  including  the  development  of  cognitive  skills, 
interpersonal  skills  and  technological  competencies.  It  is  also  developing  a 
standards-based approach and a variety of assessment methods.  
Professionalisation of teaching 
Significant  efforts  have  been  made  to  improve  the  status  of  teachers.  These  include 
the  development  of  National  Standards  for  Education  (2003);  the  establishment  of  the 
Teachers’  Cadre  (2007),  the  development  of  a  career  path  and  promotional  system  for 
teachers, along with a 50% increase in basic pay (2007) and bonuses for each promotional 
level  (from  2008);  and  the  establishment  of  the  Professional  Academy  for  Teachers 
(PAT) in 2008. The Teachers’ Cadre is a five-laddered professional licensing system for 
teachers.  To  gain  a  professional  licence  and  join  the  Cadre,  teachers  have  to  pass  an 
examination.  The  five  categories  are:  1) teacher  assistants  (contracted  teachers); 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

 CHAPTER 3: THE NATIONAL EDUCATION STRATEGIC PLAN 2007 - 2012– 63 
 
 
2) teachers;  3) senior  teachers;  4) senior  teachers  A;  and  5) expert  teachers  (Ministry  of 
Education, 2010: 126, Indicator 20). 
However,  the  status  of  teachers  remains  low  and  the  effort  to  improve  teaching 
performance  through  PAT  reaccreditation  of  teachers  was  diluted  in  response  to 
opposition  from  the  syndicate  of  teachers.  From  all  that the team  observed,  with  only  a 
few  exceptions,  teaching  in  schools  remains  outmoded  in  terms  of  curriculum  and 
pedagogy, unreconstructed in terms of encouraging more active learning, and uninformed 
by  research  and  dissemination  of  good  practice.  This  matter  is  considered  in  detail  in 
Chapter 5. 
Changing the thanawiya amma 
From  the  2013/14  academic  year,  the  secondary  school  leaving  exam  (thanawiya 
amma) has been reduced from a 2-year course to a 1-year syllabus. In the first year of the 
three  years  of  senior  secondary  education,  students  undertake  a  range  of  scientific  and 
literary  studies.  In  the  second  and  third  years,  students  choose  their  subject 
concentrations. Prior to the 2013 change, exams were taken in two stages, one at the end 
of second year of senior secondary (Grade 11) and the other at the end of the third year 
(Grade 12).  
The  change  to  a  single  assessment  point  is  intended  to  reduce  the  pressures  on 
students and the burdens on families. Previously, students could score high marks in their 
second  year  but  score  poorly  in  their  third  year.  When  both  scores  are  averaged,  the 
student could receive a low overall score. The new system allows students to focus their 
efforts  on  one  stage.  In  doing  so,  the  stakes  are  raised  even  higher,  in  what  remains  a 
content-based curriculum and a recall-based exam, with so much dependent on students’ 
performance at a single point in time. The cost of private lessons may also be reduced by 
limiting  the  thanawiya  amma  to  one  year,  as  the  period  of  cramming  for  the  test  is 
shortened. With the stakes raised, and the range of testable subjects broadened, however, 
there may be some inflation of private lesson prices. 
The change also allows a secondary school diploma, granted to students who pass all 
subjects in their third-year exams, to be used in the job market. This reverses a previous 
law  that  did  not  recognise  secondary  school  diplomas  for  administrative  or  technical 
positions. The  change  also  allows  students  who  obtain  a  secondary  school  certificate  to 
apply  for  university  admission  up  to five  years  after  graduating  from  secondary  school. 
Previously,  the  law  required  students  to  commence  university  studies  immediately 
following  graduation  from  secondary  school,  prohibiting  any  student  from  postponing 
studies. The transition of graduates from education to employment is considered in detail 
in Chapter 4.  
Quality enhancement initiatives 
The “quality” programmes have achieved only partial results. Out of the three priority 
programmes in this category, the curriculum reform agenda is lagging, as major changes 
still  need  to  be  made  to  the  curriculum  for  it  to  drive  student-centred  learning  as 
envisioned. School-based reform has made some progress, but not sufficient to meet the 
accreditation targets, as schools have struggled to meet standards under the “buildings” 
category.  Important  achievements  have  been  made  to  improve  governance  through  the 
establishment of Boards of Trustees in schools, and the concomitant training of members. 
Similarly, the human resources and professional development programmes have resulted 
in increased training offerings (in inspection, leadership, ICT and pedagogy), as well as 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

64 – CHAPTER 3: THE NATIONAL EDUCATION STRATEGIC PLAN 2007 - 2012 
 
 
the  establishment  of  the  Professional  Academy  for  Teachers.  Matters  of  teacher 
education, accreditation and professional development are considered in Chapter 5. 
Monitoring and evaluation procedures 
The National Education Strategic Plan outlined a set of initiatives for monitoring and 
evaluating student learning against achievement indicators. The learning skills were to be 
both  generic  and  subject  related.  Sets  of  measurement  instruments  were  to  be  available 
for diagnostic assessment and student performance monitoring in 2009/10.  
The plan also envisaged supporting the institutional capacity of the NCEEE in light of 
the requirements of  education reform.  This included restructuring  of the  NCEEE  by  the 
end  of  2008/09,  preparing  a  base  of  at  least  30  national  evaluation  experts  in 
psychometrics  and  school  content  by  the  end  of  2009/10,  and  the  preparation  of  a 
National Standardised Achievement Test (NSAT) for school subjects. Aptitude tests were 
to be designed to focus on critical thinking and problem-solving skills. This agenda also 
required  updating  of  the  National  Standards  for  Education  according  to  national  and 
international indicators for evaluating learner performance. 
The  plan  further  envisaged  evaluating  the  process  of  teacher  professional 
development  by  the  end  of  2008/09.  It  also  aimed  to  overhaul  the  monitoring  and 
evaluation  system,  establish  school-based  quality  and  training  units,  establish  quality 
units at the idara and muddiriya levels, and restructure the Inspection Authority and other 
related bodies into one structure called Quality Sector by the end of 2007/08. 
Little  progress  appears  to  have  been  made  on  the  initiatives  outlined  above. 
Moreover,  the  team  was  advised  of  some  confusion  with  regard  to  respective  roles  at 
school,  district,  governorate,  MOE  central,  and the  PAT  with  regard  to  inspection,  staff 
appraisal and training. 
Decentralisation of responsibilities and resources 
Decentralisation  was  accorded  a  high  priority  by  the  government  in  its  quest  to  be 
more  responsive  to  constituents  across  the  nation,  to  further  engage  them  in  the  reform 
process, and to increase accountability and ownership. The Ministry of Finance advised 
the  team  that  education  was  a  pioneer  in  this  regard,  with  the  vision  that  other 
government sectors would follow.  
Government  budget  lines  for  maintenance,  and  capital  investment  were  initially 
selected  for  devolution  from  central  agencies  (e.g.  the  General  Authority  for  Education 
Buildings  –  GAEB)  to  governorates,  districts  and  schools.  Pilots  were  first  launched  in 
three  governorates  (Ismalia,  Luxor  and  Fayoum)  in  2008/09,  and  a  countrywide 
implementation  followed.  A  Decentralisation  Support  Unit  was  also  established  and 
support committees at the muddiriyas and idaras and to co-ordinate these efforts. 
School principals appear to have generally welcomed the decentralisation of funds for 
maintenance. Some have voiced concerns that only maintenance budgets (focused on the 
upkeep  of  school buildings)  have  been  devolved,  leaving  out  other important  budgetary 
items,  including teacher  training  and teaching  and learning  materials  such  as  equipment 
and chemicals for laboratory experiments. They have also expressed their frustration with 
the short timeframe for receiving and using the transferred funds. They told the team that 
transferred  amounts  were  often  not  fully  used  but  that  they  could  not  be  reassigned  to 
other  budget  categories  (such  as  equipment  and  laboratory  consumables),  or  used  at  a 
later  date.  However,  the  team  was  advised  by  the  Ministry  of  Education  that  school 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

 CHAPTER 3: THE NATIONAL EDUCATION STRATEGIC PLAN 2007 - 2012– 65 
 
 
principals have a full fiscal year to determine what they want to do and, once they receive 
the funds, a further two months to make the necessary purchases.  
With respect to capital investment, the team was informed on the one hand, that the 
devolution  of  the  funds  to  the  muddiriyas  without  their  ownership  of  the  bidding  and 
vendor selection process (which remains at the central level) has resulted in unclear lines 
of  accountability  and  large  numbers  of  projects  for  new  buildings  put  on  hold.  On  the 
other hand, the Ministry of Education advised that both the bidding and vendor selection 
processes had been devolved to the muddiriyas. Grouping ownership and functions either 
at  GAEB  central  office  or  at  the  muddiriya  level  may  be  more  effective  than  splitting 
them. 
Planned improvements with no real progress 
The disappointing aspect of the plan’s implementation is that the least progress has 
been  made  on  the  most  important  policy  challenges:  modernising  secondary  education 
and reforming assessment.  
Modernising secondary education 
The  strategic  plan  called  for  the  modernisation  of  the  secondary  education  level 
(general and technical) in order to “provide students with the necessary skills, knowledge, 
and scientific and practical competencies for lifelong learning, active citizenship, and the 
modern labour market”. The plan proposed to phase out vocational preparatory schools, 
recognising that assigning children who had failed their end of primary school level exam 
to vocational preparatory schools was not acceptable: “all students must obtain at least the 
cognitive and academic skills of the preparatory school curriculum to function in society 
and the labour market as life-long learners” (Ministry of Education, 2007).  
The  plan  envisaged  a  system  allowing  students  to  switch  from  general  secondary 
education to technical secondary and vice versa. The general and technical streams would 
thus  be  less  rigid,  and  provide  equal  opportunities  to  students  from  all  socio-economic 
backgrounds  in  the  two  tracks  to  opt  for  higher  education  or  enter  the  labour  market 
directly  with  a  stronger  knowledge  and  skills  base.  Parity  of  esteem  would  be  achieved 
between  secondary  schools  and  technical/vocational  schools.  Significant  curriculum 
reform was seen to be necessary. In addition to a 50% core curriculum for all streams, the 
plan envisaged harmonisation of the literature/arts and scientific streams, and allowing up 
to  10%  of  the  curriculum  for  elective  subjects  among  both  streams.  This  would  have 
required the revision of the formal links between the two streams of secondary education 
and  the  preparatory  level,  and  establishing  a  more  inclusive  admissions  approach  to 
secondary education, rather than tracking into technical schools on the basis of the Grade 
9  exam  score.  The  strategic  plan  expected  to  pilot  this  approach  during  2007-08, 
generalising its application during 2009-10, and completing it by 2011-12.  
The dimensions of the planned secondary education reform involved a manifold and 
massive agenda, including far-reaching changes to technical and vocational education and 
training (TVET): 
  gradual phasing out of vocational preparatory education 
  reducing the proportion of students in technical secondary 
  raising the status of TVET rather than seeing it as a “dead end” or “second class” 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

66 – CHAPTER 3: THE NATIONAL EDUCATION STRATEGIC PLAN 2007 - 2012 
 
 
  building  up  strong  institutional  links  between  general  secondary  and  technical 
education 
  finding new mechanisms for students to enter universities and higher institutes 
  adopting an interdisciplinary curriculum 
  expanding  new  technical  specialisations  in  the  field  of  electronics,  plastics 
industry, tourism and others 
  ceasing the building of technical schools with traditional specialisations 
  expanding 2-year Technology Community Colleges 
  improving business and private industry involvement 
  having  multiple  models  of  technical  education  in  place  (such  as  a  productive 
school  model  operating  as  a  factory  system;  expanding  the  dual  system  model 
(Mubarak-Kohl  Initiative);  developing  a  cluster  schools  model  for  pooling 
resources; establishing centres of excellence models through transforming 5-year 
industrial  schools  into  advanced  technology  schools,  and  establishing  an 
agricultural mobile school model (MOE, 2007). 
However,  the  team  saw  few  signs  of  progress  on  this  central  agenda.  A  general 
reduction in the share of technical secondary enrolments was apparent. Tourism as a new 
specialisation  was  observed  in  some  schools.  However,  there  seems  to  have  been  no 
movement  towards  a  common  core  curriculum,  mobility  between  the  general  and 
technical tracks, and the raised status and resourcing of TVET. 
Reforming assessment 
In  term  of  assessment  at  the  secondary  level,  the  plan  aimed  to  improve  the 
pre-university  education certification  system  (thanawiya  amma)  in a  close  collaboration 
between  the  MOE and the  MOHE. This  would  involve  the  modernisation  of the  testing 
and assessment system of the general secondary certificate, and the basis for admission to 
university.  The  plan  envisaged  achieving  this  goal  through  the  development  of 
proficiency  tests,  psychometric  tools  and  objective  measures  by  the  NCEEE  (within 
3 years after the expected start of the project in 2008/09). 
The examinations and assessment system for technical secondary education was also 
to be improved. It was to be based on the evaluation of technical competencies, and create 
a  link  between  technical  secondary  and  higher  education  institutes  and  community 
colleges. It was to involve the development of new instruments to assess the proficiency 
level of the students with modern psychometric tools to allow for objective assessments 
developed  by  NCEEE  within  the  new  system,  within  a  timetable  of  3  years  starting  in 
2008/09. The plan also considered streamlining the number of specialisations in technical 
secondary  education  into  a  smaller  number  of  coherent  areas  oriented  to  the  modern 
labour  market,  and  compatible  with  the  national  skills  standards  set  by  the  Ministry  of 
Labour. This project also envisioned the integration of vocational secondary schools into 
the technical secondary level with stronger links to labour markets, in collaboration with 
various stakeholders in business, industry and the public sector.  
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

 CHAPTER 3: THE NATIONAL EDUCATION STRATEGIC PLAN 2007 - 2012– 67 
 
 
Deficiencies in the design and execution of the plan 
Problems with the approach to planning 
Given  the  effort  invested  in  developing  the  National  Education  Strategic  Plan 
2007-2012,  it  is  important  to  take  stock  of  its  shortcomings  in  conception,  design  and 
execution.  
First, the plan’s goals were overly ambitious. On the one hand, there were too many 
“priorities”;  so  many,  indeed,  that  there  were  none.  The  extensive  agenda  hindered  the 
government’s ability to execute focused and effective interventions. The long list of goals 
was not conducive to intuitive understanding and effective communication to internal and 
external  stakeholders.  This  complexity  limited  the  government’s  ability  to  build  and 
sustain  support  for  the  reforms.  It  also  made  it  difficult  to  monitor  performance  and 
address  gaps  as  they  emerged.  On  the  other  hand,  the  targets  set  for  each  of  the 
programmes and objectives to be achieved throughout the five years of the plan were, in 
most cases, unrealistic. The Policy and Strategic Planning Unit (PSPU) explained that the 
cause  of  such  miscalculations  was  the  misuse  of  the  AnPro  model  which  overvalued 
existing  capabilities  and  resources  (a  key  input  for  estimating  projections),  resulting  in 
unreachable  targets.  However,  the  major  reason  for  the  mismatch  between  goal  and 
attainment was the shortfall in the provision of funding by the Ministry of Finance against 
the resource requirements assessment of the AnPro model. 
Second,  the  implementation  plan  developed  for  the  roll-out  of  programmes  was 
lengthy,  cumbersome  and  often  lacking  clarity  about  expected  results  and  measures  of 
success.  This  ambiguity  impeded  regular  and  consistent  evaluation,  and  prompt 
remediation  for  lagging  initiatives.  The  plan  also  lacked  a  considered  approach  to  pilot 
testing and scalability, and the proper sequencing of initiatives.  
Third,  these  deficits  in  goal  setting,  prioritisation,  implementation  planning,  change 
management and overall governance of the reform, were compounded by lack of policy 
coherence  and  cross-agency  co-ordination.  The  reform  drive  had  critical  gaps  in 
horizontal co-ordination and accountability, exhibiting a component rather than systemic 
approach  to  change.  There  were  also  critical  gaps  in  vertical  integration  and 
accountability, with a top-down approach to reform and little ownership by those charged 
with  putting  the changes into  effect in  schools  and  classrooms.  Curiously,  there  was  no 
risk assessment and no contingency plans in the event that elements of the plan came up 
against technical problems or political resistance.  
The neglect of technical and vocational education and training 
With  regard  to  TVET,  the  plan  included  detailed  proposals  for  scaling  up  some 
current initiatives (the dual system), developing other models such as “Cluster-Schools, 
Centres  of  Excellence,  Specialised  Experimental  Technical  Schools,  Unified  Schools, 
Productive  Schools  and  establishing  an  Agricultural  Mobile  School”  (Ministry  of 
Education,  2007);  and  a  further  proposal  to  concentrate  “on  building  5-year  system 
technical schools and expanding 2-year Technology Community colleges in collaboration 
with MOHE” (Ministry of Education, 2007). Apart from the development of two cluster 
schools, the team did not find evidence of implementation of these proposals. 
Most importantly, however, the plan lacked a comprehensive and integrated vision for 
the TVET sector as a whole. It focused exclusively on the technical education provided 
by the MOE, and in that domain promoted cross-cutting programmes, but it did not take 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

68 – CHAPTER 3: THE NATIONAL EDUCATION STRATEGIC PLAN 2007 - 2012 
 
 
account  of  TVET  provision  by  other  ministries  and  training  providers.  By  excluding 
non-formal  learning  it  missed  the  opportunity  to  position  and  reform  TVET  within  a 
lifelong learning perspective. Concurrently, the TVET sector developed its own isolated 
strategy, which was neither linked to the NESP nor formally adopted by the government, 
thereby  contributing  to  confusion  over  the  future  role  and  direction  for  TVET  (ETF, 
2011). 
Problems with the implementation 
Such  an  ambitious  plan required  well-designed  implementation architecture.  Annual 
Operational Plans, to be reviewed every quarter, were developed to cascade and monitor 
implementation closely. Overall progress would be determined through annual review. A 
National  Education  Plan  Implementation  Committee  was  set  up  by  the  Minister  of 
Education,  supported  by  the  PSPU.  In  each  governorate  an  Educational  Planning  and 
Implementation Committee was formed to implement and monitor the plan. 
In practice, plans and targets were in many cases not cascaded to the governorate or 
muddiriya  level,  and  progress  was  not  regularly  monitored.  Nevertheless,  data  obtained 
through  interviews  in  some  governorates  and  at  the  MOE  allowed  the  team  to  see  that 
measures were initiated in  many of the plan’s categories, although with wide variances 
across programmes and regions. These differences in implementation included decisions 
being  taken  to  scale  up  particular  programmes  before  their  cost-effectiveness  had  been 
evaluated. 
The  team’s  consultations  with  people  involved  in  the  planning  and  implementation 
stages,  at  central  and  local  levels,  indicate  that  the  plan  was  seen  by  many  as  a  reform 
agenda  imposed  on  a  community  of  educational  practitioners  who  were  not  convinced 
about its merits or feasibility and not motivated or able to embrace it. 
As  noted  above,  there  was  no  risk  assessment  of  the  plan’s  workability  or  the 
possibility  of  implementation  within  the  timeframe.  Without  some  assessment  of  likely 
sources,  bases  and forms  of  resistance to  the  objectives  and  measures of the  plan,  there 
were no reference points for developing a change management strategy.  
Foundations for future action  
Given  the  expansive  ambition  and  scope  of  the  plan,  including  its  challenges  to 
deeply-ingrained  cultural  underpinnings  of  the  education  status  quo,  it  is  not  surprising 
that its implementation had modest results. 
It was not only that the objectives and targets set by MOE were overly ambitious and 
under-resourced,  but  also,  and  importantly,  that  comprehensive  secondary  education 
reform never took grip. The reform process met predictable resistance and became stuck 
in endless discussions with a lack of consensus in key areas, such as teacher performance 
appraisal and retraining, and political sensitivities around the  thanawiya amma. Without 
clarity,  commitment  and  leadership,  ownership  of  the  plan,  already  weak  from  the 
beginning, faded away as did the momentum for reform. 
In  looking  to  the  future,  the  key  lesson  from  the  experience  of  the  past  plan  is  the 
need  to  focus  on  the  things  that  matter  most.  Much  of  the  analysis  of  needs  and 
deficiencies underlying the previous plan resonate with the team’s understanding of the 
immediate  imperatives  for  reform  of  Egyptian  education.  Many  of  the  directions  for 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

 CHAPTER 3: THE NATIONAL EDUCATION STRATEGIC PLAN 2007 - 2012– 69 
 
 
reform  outlined  in  the  plan  accord  with  the  team’s  assessment  of  policy  change  that  is 
now even more urgently required.  
Above all, future policy must focus on the modernisation of secondary education and 
associated  issues  of  labour-market  relevance,  and  high-stakes  educational  assessment, 
along with teacher professionalisation and teaching practice improvement. 
In  this  regard,  there  appear  to  be  a  number  of  building  blocks  available,  including 
work undertaken by: 
  The MOHE, on the development of a National Qualifications Framework. 
  The CCIMD, on a National Curriculum Framework. 
  The  NCEEE,  on  aptitude  tests,  generic  skills  exams  and  capacity  building  in 
large-scale  assessment  methods,  including  training  in  Item  Response  Theory, 
statistical  models  and  their  applications  for  test  development,  scoring  and 
reporting. 
  The PAT, on the identification of teaching competencies and associated tests and 
teacher training modules. 
The  following  chapters  deal  with  the  nature  of  the  future  reforms  needed  in  some 
detail. 
 
 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

70 – CHAPTER 3: THE NATIONAL EDUCATION STRATEGIC PLAN 2007 - 2012 
 
 
References 
INESM,  UNESCO  (Inter-Agency  Network  on  Education  Simulation  Models,  United 
Nations  Educational,  Scientific  and  Cultural  Organization  ),  AnPro  (ANalysis  and 
PROjection 
Model), 
http://inesm.education.unesco.org/en/esm-library/esm/anpro, 
accessed 13 August, 2015.   
ETF  (2011),  Torino  Process  Egypt  2010,  ETF  (European  Training  Foundation),  Turin, 
www.etf.europa.eu/web.nsf/pages/Torino_Process_Egypt. 
Ministry  of  Education  (2010), Condition  of  Education  in  Egypt  2010: Report  on  the 
National Education Indicators, Ministry of Education, Cairo. 
Ministry  of  Education  (2007),  National  Strategic  Plan  for  Pre-University  Education  in 
Egypt  2007/08-2011/12:  Towards  an  Educational  Paradigm  Shift,  Ministry  of 
Education, Cairo. 
 
 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

71 – CHAPTER 4: EDUCATION AND THE CHANGING LABOUR MARKET 
 
 
 
Chapter 4. 
 
Education and the Changing Labour Market 
This chapter outlines the characteristics and dynamics of Egypt’s formal and informal 
labour markets. It explores the relationships between education and employment. It also 
considers the relevance of the curriculum, the effectiveness of skills formation, the 
balance between general and technical education, and the need for active labour market 
measures.
 
 
 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

72 – CHAPTER 4: EDUCATION AND THE CHANGING LABOUR MARKET 
 
 
Education  and  labour  market  policies  in  the  Arab  world  have  had  a  devastating 
impact  on  many  young  people  and  have  contributed  to  religious  and  political  tensions 
throughout the region. The Middle East is a test case in how dangerous it can be to create 
aspirations  among  the  young  and  their  families  by  providing  increased  access  to 
education  without  undertaking  corresponding  measures  to  strengthen the  labour market. 
(Binzel, 2011). 
Current Egyptian labour market characteristics 
Along  with  many  developing  economies,  including  other  Middle  East  and  North 
Africa  (MENA)  economies,  Egypt  has  a  dual  economy  and  a  complex  set  of  labour 
markets,  with  overlapping  formal  and  informal  economic  sectors.  In  1998,  the  formal 
economy  was  estimated  to  account  for  some  60%  of  total  employment,  around  40%  of 
which was in the government sector. The informal economy accounted for some 82% of 
all Egyptian enterprises and 40% of total employment (El-Mahdi and Amer, 2005; Attia, 
2009). Egypt’s informal economy was estimated to be worth USD 350 billion in 2000, or 
35% of gross national product (Schneider, 2002). 
The informal economy is a subset of the “hidden economy” which comprises a wide 
range of productive activities from housework to organised crime. These can be grouped 
into four main categories: the illegal sector, the underground sector, the household sector 
and the informal sector (Bernabè, 2002). 
Informal  activities  are  not  illegal  but  they  are  unmeasured,  untaxed  and/or 
unregulated, not because of deliberate attempts to evade the payment of taxes or infringe 
labour or other legislation, but because they are undertaken to meet basic needs (e.g. petty 
trade and barter, household agricultural production, ambulant street vending, unregistered 
taxi services, and undeclared paid domestic employment). 
There  are  some  blurred  boundaries  between  the  four  non-formal  sectors,  and  some 
overlap with the formal sector. Subsistence farming, for instance, may be seen as part of 
the  household  sector  in  economies  where  it  does  not  significantly  contribute  to  total 
agricultural  production,  whereas  it  may  be  regarded  as  part  of  the  informal  economy 
when  it  does  make  a  substantial  contribution  to  total  output.  There  may  be  crossover 
leakage of outputs from and into the formal sector. 
The informal sector 
The  informal  sector  (see  Table  4.1)  includes  informal  enterprises  and  all  forms  of 
“informal employment” – that is, employment without formal contracts (i.e. not covered 
by  labour  legislation),  worker  benefits,  or  social  protection  –  both  inside  and  outside 
informal enterprises. This includes: 
  Self-employment  in  informal  enterprises:  workers  in  small  unregistered  or 
unincorporated  enterprises,  including  employers,  own-account  operators,  and 
unpaid family workers. 
  Wage  employment  in  informal  jobs:  workers  without  formal  contracts,  worker 
benefits or social protection for formal or informal firms, for households, or those 
employees  with  no  fixed  employer,  such  as  employees  of  informal  enterprises; 
other  informal  wage  workers  (for  example,  casual  or  day  labourers);  domestic 
workers; industrial outworkers, notably home workers; unregistered or undeclared 
workers; and temporary or part-time workers. 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

 CHAPTER 4: EDUCATION AND THE CHANGING LABOUR MARKET – 73 
 
 
Table 4.1 Definitions of the informal sector, economy, enterprises and employment 
Category of informal work 
Definition 
Own-account workers, unremunerated family workers, domestic servants and individuals 
Informal sector 
working in production units of between 1 and 10 employees. 
Informal wage workers and unpaid family workers who may work in the formal or informal 
Informal employment 
sector. These workers are defined as informal if they lack a contract, specific health and 
pension benefits, and social security coverage. 
Informal enterprises 
Defined by the nature of regulation in each context: the availability of a license, and the 
payment of licenses, taxes and fees. 
Includes both private informal workers and the informal self-employed as well as employers in 
Informal economy 
informal enterprises. 
Source:  Avirgan,  T.,  L.J.  Bivens  and  S.  Gammage  (eds.)  (2005),  Good  Jobs,  Bad  Jobs,  No  Jobs:  Labor 
Markets and Informal Work in Egypt, El Salvador, India, Russia and South Africa
, Global Policy  Network, 
Economic Policy Institute. Washington, DC. 
Informal  employment  in  Egypt  was  estimated  to  total  around  6.5  million  in  1998 
(El-Mahdi  and  Amer,  2005).  Some  5  million  of  these  were  then  engaged  as  street 
vendors, the majority of whom were self-employed, with some working for entrepreneurs 
or  groups.  People  engaged  in  the  informal  sector  worked  an  average  of  51.6  hours  per 
week compared with 44.6 hours on average in the formal sector. Some 85% of workers in 
Greater  Cairo  were  working  without  a  contract,  and  74%  of  workers  were  covered  by 
Social  Security  contributions,  including  those  whose  secondary  job  was  in  the  informal 
sector  while  their  primary  job  was  in  the  formal  sector.  Women’s  average  wages  were 
86% of men’s in the formal economy but only 53% in the informal economy (El-Mahdi 
and Amer, 2005).  
Rates  of  informal  employment  are  highest  among  15-24  year-olds,  and  among 
workers with only primary or basic education (Gatti et al., 2011). Around 5% of workers 
in Egypt’s informal economy in 1998 had a university or post-graduate degree (El-Mahdi 
and  Amer,  2005).  The  indications  are  that  informal  employment  has  been  expanding 
since  2009  as  a  consequence  of  the  global  financial  crisis  (ETF,  2012),  labour  market 
mismatches and declines in formal employment as tourism and other economic activities 
have been adversely affected by political instability. In this context, the question arises as 
to  the  function  of  the  informal  sector  and  the  purpose  and  direction  of  public  policy, 
including education and training policy, in relation to it. 
It is necessary to understand what the informal economy is, how it functions and why 
it exists. The  informal  economy  cannot  be regarded as  a  temporary  phenomenon.  It  has 
been around for decades and it is not evidently in decline. It has a more noticeably fixed 
character in countries where income and assets are unequally distributed (Becker, 2004) 
and  where  access  to  formal  jobs,  primarily  in  the  government  sector,  is  a  function  of 
association with influential social networks (Avirgan et al., 2005).  
The informal economy is largely characterised by low entry requirements in terms of 
capital  and  professional  qualifications,  small-scale  operations,  labour-intensive  methods 
of  production,  and  skills  acquired  outside  of  formal  education  (Becker,  2004).  The 
persistence  and  expansion  of  the  informal  economy  may  be  attributed  to  a  range  of 
factors,  including  the  limited  capacity  of  the  formal  economy  to  absorb  surplus  labour 
alongside  rapid  and  substantial  growth  in  the  number  of  job  seekers,  rising  demand  for 
low-cost  goods  and  services,  and  deficiencies  in  education  and  training.  The  obvious 
benefits for entrepreneurs who operate in the informal economy are avoiding costly and 
burdensome  government  regulations  as  well  as  high  and  complex  taxes.  The  primary 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

74 – CHAPTER 4: EDUCATION AND THE CHANGING LABOUR MARKET 
 
 
reason why the informal sector is so large in developing countries is that the benefits of 
formality are dwarfed by its costs (Becker, 2004). 
It  is  also necessary  to understand  the  extent to  which  the  informal  sector is  harmful 
and/or beneficial. On the one hand, informal employment may be seen to be harmful in 
two ways. First, the informal sector can reduce individual and household security. It is a 
form of socio-economic marginalisation. It can trap families in inter-generational poverty. 
The poor are locked out of the formal economy through lack of access to property rights 
and other institutions of a market economy, such as social safety net protection, access to 
credit,  and  licence  to  practise,  including  accreditation  and  recognition  of  skills.  Among 
working  youth,  a  recent  survey  showed  that  only  15.7%  had  a  work  contract  and  only 
14.8%  had  social  insurance.  Second,  the  informal  economy  can  undermine  national 
capacity  and  security.  Untaxed  economic  activities  constrain  government  revenue  and 
thereby  the  government’s  ability  to  provide  social  services.  Unregulated  activities  also 
undermine  government  authority  and  community  respect  for  the  rule  of  law  (Bernabè, 
2002).  
On  the  other  hand,  informal  commercial  activities  provide  an  important  source  of 
income and social security in the absence of formal social protection. They may be also 
an  important  source  of  economic  growth,  particularly  where  government  bureaucracy, 
regulation and corruption may stifle formal private entrepreneurial activity. The informal 
sector  provides  an  array  of  services  to  the  community,  and  parts  of  it  function 
interdependently  with  the  formal  sector.  The  informal  sector,  although  unmeasured,  is 
part of the nation’s overall productive capacity. Expansion of the informal sector may not 
be just  a  problem  for  national  economic  and  social  development,  but  also an  asset  with 
the potential to ameliorate economic crises and poverty (Bernabè, 2002). The total value 
of unlicensed and unregistered capital, businesses and real estate in Egypt is significant, 
perhaps of the order of USD 250 billion in 2009 (De Soto, 2011).  
However,  informal-sector  firms  have  limited  growth  potential  by  dint  of  being 
constrained by the costs of informality and the absence of functioning asset markets. The 
informal  sector  cannot  collateralise  capital  assets  and  inventory  to  obtain  credit  for 
expansion  of  its  operations  nor  can  it  tap  government  services  (Checchi-Louis  Berger 
International, 1999). The opportunity cost of what De Soto calls “dead capital” (see Box 
4.1)  suggests  the  need  for  a  balanced  policy  approach  to  the  informal  economy  and  its 
connections with the formal economy. 
 
 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

 CHAPTER 4: EDUCATION AND THE CHANGING LABOUR MARKET – 75 
 
 
 
Box 4.1. Egypt’s economic apartheid 
The entrepreneurs who operate outside the legal system are held back.  They do not have access to the business 
organisational forms (partnerships, joint stock companies, corporations, etc.) that would enable them to grow the way 
legal  enterprises  do.  Because  such  enterprises  are  not  tied  to  standard  contractual  and  enforcement  rules,  outsiders 
cannot  trust  that  their  owners  can  be  held  to  their  promises  or  contracts.  This  makes  it  difficult  or  impossible  to 
employ  the  best  technicians  and  professional  managers  –  and  the  owners  of  these  businesses  cannot  issue  bonds  or 
IOUs to obtain credit. 
Nor  can  such  enterprises  benefit  from  the  economies  of  scale  available  to  those  who  can  operate  in  the  entire 
Egyptian  market.  The  owners  of  extra-legal  enterprises  are  limited  to  employing  their  kin  to  produce  for  confined 
circles of customers. 
Without clear legal title to their assets and real estate, in short, these entrepreneurs own what I have called ‘dead 
capital’ – property that cannot be leveraged as collateral for loans, to obtain investment capital, or as security for long-
term contractual deals. And so the majority of these Egyptian enterprises remain small and relatively poor. The only 
thing that can emancipate them is legal reform.”  
Source: De Soto, H. (3 February 2011), “Egypt’s economic apartheid”, The Wall Street Journal
Given  the  economic  contribution  of  the  informal  economy,  governments  need  to 
consider  policies  that  recognise  its  importance,  restrict  and  regulate  it  when  necessary, 
but  primarily  seek  to  increase  the  productivity  and  improve  the  working  conditions  of 
those who work in it (Becker, 2004). Indeed, enterprises in the informal economy have an 
entrepreneurial potential that could flourish if some major obstacles to growth were to be 
removed. If only a fraction of Egypt’s informal enterprises could upgrade their capacity, 
then they could make a significant contribution to economic growth. Egypt may be able 
to  unlock  sources  of  its  “dead  capital”  while  providing  participants  in  the  informal 
economy  greater  security  and  the  chance  to  move  up  the  value  chain.  If  parts  of  the 
informal sector were better integrated into the legal regime, its participants would benefit 
from the protection of Egyptian laws and standards. Egypt’s economy would also be seen 
to be stronger were more of its commercial activity calculated and included in its national 
accounts. 
Measures to integrate the informal sector include the protection of property rights; the 
extension  of  credit  and  insurance  to  small,  medium-sized  and  micro  enterprises;  and 
transparent  and  consistently  applied  regulation.  Reform  of  governance  is  essential, 
including measures to deal with corruption and regulatory cost burdens. Even so, a policy 
of deliberate legal and financial integration would need to be grounded in understanding 
the varying potential of different informal enterprises for growth and the extent to which 
they  contribute  to  a  loss  of  human  capital  by  deskilling  what  is  a  relatively  skilled  and 
educated labour force (Bernabè, 2002).  
The formal sector 
Government  continues  to  play  a  significant  role  in  the  formal  labour  market, 
accounting  for  23.7%  of  the  employed  labour  force  (2011).  This  share  has  fallen  from 
40% in 1982 as a consequence of policy measures to reduce public-sector functions and 
develop  private-sector  activity.  In  2011,  there  were  5.4  million  people  employed  in  the 
government  sector  and  0.8  million  employees  in  the  public  business  sector  (CAPMAS, 
2012).  
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

76 – CHAPTER 4: EDUCATION AND THE CHANGING LABOUR MARKET 
 
 
Table  4.2  indicates  that  there  has  been  a  relative  expansion  of  employment  in  the 
construction sector in recent years, along with some growth in property-related services. 
Power  and  water  utilities  and  transport  and  communications  have  also  shown  modest 
increases.  Primary  industries  have  been  relatively  flat  and  manufacturing  has  shown  a 
slight rise.  
Table 4.2 Composition of employment by economic activity, 2002, 2006 and 2010 (%) 
Economic Activity 
2002 
2006 
2010 
Agriculture, fishing, and forestry, logging and fishing 
27.6 
31.2 
28.2 
Mining and quarrying 
0.2 
0.3 
0.2 
Manufacturing 
11.6 
11.6 
12.1 
Electricity, gas and water supply 
1.4 
1.2 
1.7 
Construction 
7.4 
8.9 
11.3 
Wholesale and retail trade 
13.0 
10.6 
11.3 
Food and accommodation services 
1.9 
2.0 
2.2 
Transport, storage and communications 
6.4 
6.6 
7.1 
Financial intermediation and insurance 
1.2 
0.9 
0.8 
Real estate, renting and business services 
1.9 
2.1 
2.4 
Public administration and defence 
10.8 
9.3 
7.8 
Education 
10.8 
9.6 
8.8 
Health and social work 
3.3 
2.7 
2.6 
Community services and personal services  
2.1 
2.5 
2.7 
Personnel services for domestic service for families 
0.3 
0.2 
0.6 
Organisations, international bodies and regional and foreign embassies and consulates 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
Other 
0.0 
0.2 
0.2 
Total 
100 
100 
100.0 
Source: Ministry of Higher Education (2011), “PVET in Egypt: Country Background Report”, unpublished, Ministry of Higher 
Education, Cairo. 
Egypt  has  continued  to  move  towards  a  market  economy,  reducing  the  size  of  the 
state-owned sector and promoting the private sector. Since 2004, nearly half of the public 
companies within the production sector have been privatised. Egypt’s Asset Management 
Programme aims to improve efficiency, particularly management, financial and technical 
practices and develop public/private partnerships. However, more recently private-sector 
job  growth  has  been  hampered  by  the  economic  downturn  and  unrest  in  the  country 
(El-Wassal, 2013).  
Recent shifts in job creation 
As  shown  in  Figure  4.1,  the  majority  of  new  jobs  created  between  1998  and  2006 
were in the informal sector. Growth in informal employment represented 71% of total job 
growth over that period. The second source of jobs growth was  the private sector of the 
formal  economy,  contributing  18%  of  overall  employment  growth.  The  government 
sector  contributed  the  least  (11%).  Figure  4.1  also  indicates  that  formal  jobs  are 
increasingly  unavailable  to  labour  market  entrants  without  technical  secondary  or 
post-secondary general education qualifications.  
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 


 CHAPTER 4: EDUCATION AND THE CHANGING LABOUR MARKET – 77 
 
 
Figure 4.1 Net job creation between 1998 and 2006, urban Egypt, by sector and educational achievement 
1,600,000
1,478,408
1,600,000
New Formal Jobs
New Informal Jobs
1,400,000
1,400,000
New Informal Jobs
New Formal Jobs
777,405
1,200,000
1,200,000
1,000,000
1,000,000
800,000
320,313
800,000
600,000
600,000
358,879
321,991
400,000
263,216
400,000
421,047
155,289
200,000
306,476
21,466
200,000
-81,249
-38,622
-50,160
0
0
Government
Public Enterprise
Private firms
-200,000
Prim. or below
Prep./Sec. Gen.
Sec. Vocational
Tertiary
-200,000
 
Source:  Angel-Urdinola,  D.  and  A.  Semlali  (2010),  Labour  Markets  and  School-to-Work  Transition  in  Egypt:  Diagnostics, 
Constraints and Policy Framework, World Bank, Washington, DC. 
Unemployment and joblessness 
The  official  unemployment  rate  (Figure  4.2)  in  Egypt  is  of  concern;  almost 
3.4 million  out  of  a  workforce  of  26.8 million  were  out  of  work  in  2012  (CAPMAS, 
2012).  The  actual  level  of  unemployment  may  well  be  much  higher  especially  in  some 
regions  and  age  cohorts,  as  well  as  among  women.  The  issue  is  complex  with  multiple 
and  inter-related  causes.  For  instance,  the  Egyptian  National  Competitiveness  Council 
(2012) identified the following major deterrents of growth: “high rates of unemployment 
among  highly  educated  job  seekers,  low  private  rates  of  return  on  education,  the  high 
level of informality in the labour market, the continuation of the public sector as the main 
job provider and low levels of labour productivity.”  
Figure 4.2 Egyptian unemployment rate, 2001-13 
 
Source: IMF (2012), World Economic Outlook: Growth Resuming, Dangers Remaining, IMF (International Monetary Fund), 
Washington, DC.  
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

78 – CHAPTER 4: EDUCATION AND THE CHANGING LABOUR MARKET 
 
 
The potent mix of the demographic “youth bulge” in Egypt (the large proportion of 
the  population  aged  under  15  years  moving  into  working  age)  combined  with  a  high 
unemployment rate among youth has serious implications both for individuals’ transition 
to adulthood and quality of life, as well as for Egypt’s economic growth and productivity. 
Table 4.3 shows three dimensions to the challenge for Egypt. First, unemployment rates 
are  highest  for  those  with  the  highest  levels  of  educational  attainment  and  lowest  for 
those with the least education. Given the high correlation between educational attainment 
levels  and  household  income  levels,  those  with  higher  qualifications  have  greater 
financial  means  than  others  to  persist  in their  search for  formal  employment  and  so  are 
recorded in the official unemployment statistics, whereas those with fewer resources have 
to  give  up  their  job  search  and  make  an  earlier  entry  into  the  informal  labour  market 
(UNDP,  2010).Second,  those  aged  20-24  years  are  the  worst  affected.  Third,  there  are 
significant  gender  differences  in  the  unemployment  rates  for  all  age  groups.  Young 
women  with  post-basic  education  fare  much  worse  than  young  men  with  equivalent 
qualifications. Whereas the unemployment rates fall sharply for young men aged 25 and 
above, the decline is much less steep for young women. 
Table 4.3. Unemployment rates by educational attainment and gender, age 15-29, 2012 (%) 
Educational attainment 
Males 
Females 
 
Age 
15-19  20-24  25-29  15-19  20-24  25-29   
Illiterate 
12.8 
11.1 
3.0 
4.5 
0.9 
1.0 
 
Reads & writes with literacy certificate 
12.5 
12.7 
2.8 
6.0 
8.3 
5.8 
 
Preparatory education 
23.1 
18.7 
5.8 
30.2 
8.2 
6.8 
 
General or al-Azhar secondary education  37.8 
33.4 
15.1 
77.8 
57.8 
36.1 
 
Technical average 
34.7 
30.1 
8.1 
78.3 
66.5 
55.1 
 
Above average and less than university 
52.3 
38.5 
17.6 
45.0 
65.7 
52.0 
 
Qualified university and above 
n/a 
57.2 
25.4 
n/a 
71.2 
44.4 
 
Total 
22.5 
30.4 
11.6 
46.6 
59.7 
39.6 
 
Source: CAPMAS (Central Agency for Public Mobilisation and Statistics), data prepared for the team 
The International Labour Organization (ILO) defines “unemployment” as meaning an 
individual  must  be  capable,  available  and  seeking  work.  The  jobless  rate  captures  how 
much of the not-in-school population is either unemployed or “inactive” (those who are 
capable and available but not actively seeking work  for whatever reason). For example, 
many women no longer seek work once they marry.   
Statistics on joblessness also include young people who have given up searching for a 
job due to limited opportunities. This group of “discouraged” youth is significant and is 
particularly  high  in  rural  areas  in  Egypt  as  many  young  people  realise  that  they  are 
unlikely to find employment. Analysis of recent survey data on Egypt’s youth shows that 
the  joblessness  rate  among  young  people  aged  15-29  reaches  60%.  That  is  almost 
two-thirds  of  young  people  in  this  age  group  who  are  neither  in  school,  nor  employed. 
Unemployment statistics, while significant, thus refer only to a sub-group among jobless 
youth. 
The OECD and World Bank Review of Higher Education in Egypt (2010) referred to 
the  phenomenon  of  “educated  unemployment”  –  excess  university  graduate  supply 
(particularly  in  the  social  sciences)  over  labour  market  demand.  Traditionally  graduates 
found  employment  in  the  public  sector  and  that  accounts  for  their  inclusion  in  the 
unemployment  figures  for  an  initial  period.  However,  with  fewer  opportunities  now 
available  in  the  contracting  public  sector,  they  then  look  to  the  informal  economy  for 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

 CHAPTER 4: EDUCATION AND THE CHANGING LABOUR MARKET – 79 
 
 
employment and cease to be part of the official unemployment statistics. Without a job, 
young men cannot get married so they cannot wait forever for public sector employment 
and  the  private  sector  has  not  created  sufficient  opportunities.  About  one-third  of  first 
jobs  for  males  are  in  the  informal  sector,  with  another  one-third  in  self-employment  or 
unpaid family work (UNDP, 2010). 
Anticipated changes in labour market structure and conditions 
In addition to its traditional industries of agriculture, textiles and tourism, Egypt has a 
fast-growing  domestic  market  in  sectors  such  as  information  and  communications 
technology,  business  services,  green  technology,  and  training.  There  is  scope  for 
expansion in all of these economic sectors.  
In  a  recent  study  by  The  Egyptian  Observatory  for  Education,  Training  and 
Employment, (Assaad et al., 2012), the projections are that “manufacturing, utilities and 
[the]  mining  industry  group  will  experience  the  fastest  growth  in  the  forecast  period, 
followed  by  the  transport, storage  and  communications  industries. The  construction and 
real  estate  and  business  services  industries  are  projected  to  grow  much  more  slowly”. 
Consequently  they  expect  growth  in  “the  production-related  blue  collar  skilled  and 
semi-skilled  occupations  associated  with  the  manufacturing  industry”.  These  include 
carpenters  and  cabinet  makers,  textile  and  garment  workers,  food  processing  workers, 
machine  operators,  glass  makers,  and  blacksmiths  and  metal  workers  plus  associated 
professionals, such as engineering technicians. 
The  team  was  interested  in  understanding  the  possible  future  trajectory  of 
employment opportunities in Egypt. The prospects for future growth or contraction in the 
major employment sectors, and their education and training requirements, are mixed. 
Agribusiness 
Agribusiness,  agriculture  and  food  processing  account  for  12%  of  Egypt’s  exports 
and  employs  around 30% of the  workforce. The  Delta  region  and  the  banks  of the  Nile 
river are the traditionally cultivated, small farm areas where most of Egypt’s population 
lives.  Egypt  plans  to  develop  both  the  domestic  and  export  markets  for  agriculture  by 
reclaiming desert land into farmland, using modern cultivation techniques and developing 
new products. Success will depend on irrigation projects being financed by international 
donors. To effect such a transformation would require modern agricultural skills as well 
as  the  technical  skills  needed  for  irrigation  plants,  but  the  potential  for  new  jobs  is 
substantial. 
The  food  processing  industry  also  has  strong  economic  potential  for  growth  but  to 
sustain and improve competitiveness it needs to diversify production to meet demand and 
improve  quality.  The  informal  sector  is  involved  in  about  80%  of  food  processing 
activities which will make this difficult, not least because of the lack of training and skills 
in that sector (ETF 2011a). The other aspect of modernising the food processing industry 
is  the  link  between  sectors  such  as  industrial  production,  storage  and  transport,  which 
would also increase employment potential. 
 
 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

80 – CHAPTER 4: EDUCATION AND THE CHANGING LABOUR MARKET 
 
 
Manufacturing 
The  textile  industry  is  one  of  the  key  economic  sectors  of  Egypt  (ETF  2011a).  It 
accounts for 3.5% of GDP, 27% of industrial outputs, and 14% of non-petroleum exports 
(2009). The  production  processes and  organisation of  the industry  need to  be  upgraded, 
including management and technical competencies.  
Tourism 
The Egyptian National Competiveness Council Report (2009) identified tourism as a 
key economic sector. Egypt’s tourism industry has been battered by the security situation, 
with Egypt dropping from 75th to 85th most competitive destination in the world in 2013. 
Yet  Egypt  has  huge  potential  for  tourism  growth  in  its  leisure  facilities  as  well  as  its 
antiquities,  and  tourism  is  a  large  employment  sector.  The  World  Travel  and  Tourism 
Competitiveness  Report  (World  Economic  Forum,  2013)  identified  human  resource 
development  as  a  major  need,  specifically  education and training  and  the  availability  of 
qualified labour (in both areas, Egypt ranked 126 out of a total of 140 countries). 
Information and communications technology 
ICT  is  a  growth  sector  with  great  potential.  In  January  2009,  the  London  School  of 
Economics  (LSE)  reported  that  Egypt  “provided  the  highest  market  potential  of  any 
country” studied in the report, due to its cultural fit with Western European economies, its 
strong language fluency, its “convenience for cost-effective ‘near shoring’ for European 
business”  and  as  a  gateway  to  the  Arabic  world  (Willcocks  et  al.,  2009).  AT  Kearney 
Ltd’s Global Service Location Index (2011) placed Egypt as the leader in the region and 
fourth  in  the  world  for  its  attractiveness  as  an  offshore  location  using  criteria  based  on 
financial  attractiveness,  people  skills  and  availability,  and  business  environment. 
However  that  was  before  the  recent  political  unrest.  The  co-operation  between  the 
government and foreign and local companies has been a model for development, and in 
the  event  of  a  return  to  stability,  should  place  Egypt  in  a  very  competitive  position  to 
undertake “outsourcing” activities from developed economies. 
The  creation  of  science  parks  and  targeted  programmes  such  as  EDUEGYPT 
(Education  Development  for  Universities  in  Egypt  programme)  (ETF  2011a),  which 
offers  students  training  in  soft  skills,  languages  and  technical  competence,  has 
successfully produced qualified staff for companies and about 40 000 jobs per annum for 
graduates. 
Building and construction 
Although this sector employs over 10% of the workforce, it offers a prime example of 
how the informal economy acts as a brake on development. International companies are 
looking to use modern technologies but the majority of Egyptian construction workers are 
from  the  informal  economy  and  are  untrained.  Like  the  textile  industry,  the  sector  also 
lacks management and technical skills. 
Possible future directions for Egyptian economic growth and diversification 
Egypt  has  comparative  advantages  from  its  strategic  geographical  location  and 
youthful population. It is not inconceivable that Egypt could develop using its transit hub 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

 CHAPTER 4: EDUCATION AND THE CHANGING LABOUR MARKET – 81 
 
 
position  to  become  an  integral  part  of  the  global  supply  chain  in  services  and 
manufacturing,  such  as  consumer  goods  and  pharmaceuticals  and  medical  devices.  To 
move  sustainably  in  these  directions,  Egypt  would  need  to  increase  its  attractiveness  to 
foreign  capital  investment  and  co-investment,  encourage  entrepreneurship  and  increase 
the skills of its workforce. 
To  this  end,  reforms  to  governance,  finance  and  regulation  will  be  required. 
Importantly,  improvements  will  be  necessary  in  education  and  training,  particularly  by 
expanding and connecting upper secondary and post-secondary education and vocational 
training  to  the  needs  of  the  job  market.  The  effects  of  the  global  financial  crisis,  taken 
together with the progress of globalisation and technological change could benefit Egypt 
if it recovers macroeconomic stability sufficiently quickly. The advanced economies may 
look  to  relocate  some  of  their  industries  and  activities  to  developing  economies  and 
emerging markets if the labour force offers an attractive and competitive labour force. 
Problems in the transition from education to work 
The school-to-work  transition  period,  which is  crucial  in  shaping  financial  freedom, 
reproductive  health  and  civic  participation  during  adulthood,  has  become  ever  more 
fraught with risk and uncertainty (World Bank, 2012a).  
Unlike most parts of the world, unemployment rates in the MENA region are highest 
amongst the more educated youth. This situation is typical in economies where education 
and  training  systems  are  not  adequately  linked  to  the  skills  required  by  the  economy, 
including its most promising growth sectors. The economies of the region have not been 
able to create the jobs needed to meet the needs of an increasing labour force. In addition, 
the Arab world has produced more people with college diplomas than they can make use 
of. This, and the skills mismatch between what the labour market offers and what young 
people  expect,  continues  to  grow.  Indeed,  graduates,  misinformed  about  the  country’s 
working conditions and requirements, have educational profiles that are inconsistent with 
reality.  Jobs  that  offer financial  stability,  employment  security  and  social  protection  are 
rare in Egypt.  
Until  around  1990,  all  university  graduates  unable  to  find  a  job  were  guaranteed 
employment by the government. While this commitment had worked well in the past, it 
became particularly onerous at that time: the economic recession had reduced the demand 
for  technicians  and  skilled  workers,  and  more  females  were  becoming  economically 
active (De Luca, 1994). Since 1990, graduate unemployment has become a more visible 
problem,  especially  as  public-sector  employment  has  not  continued  to  expand  and  the 
private sector has not filled the employment gap. 
The  government  remains  the  employer  of  choice  for  young  people  in  Egypt  as 
confirmed by many polls and youth-focused studies, particularly among women, for the 
benefits that it offers to its employees. Interviews with young people show that access to 
social  security  and  work  stability  are  the  main  reasons  for  wanting  a  job  in  the 
government.  Public-sector  jobs  in  Egypt  are  regarded  as  secure  jobs  for  life,  with 
generous  medical  and  retirement  benefits.  This  distorts  the  market,  encouraging  the 
brightest  and  best  to  “queue”  for  them  and  preventing  the  potential  expansion  of  the 
private sector. 
In  discussions  with  secondary  students,  the  team  found  that  only  some  10%  of  the 
students indicated an interest in a private-sector job. This mismatch between expectations 
and real  prospects  not  only  makes  the first  attempt  at  labour  market  entry  very  difficult 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

82 – CHAPTER 4: EDUCATION AND THE CHANGING LABOUR MARKET 
 
 
for  young  people,  it  also  can  lead to  poor  choices  of  study  options  at  school. The  team 
could  not  find  any  structured  provision  of  information  for  students  about  labour  market 
dynamics,  skills  shortages  and  surpluses,  nor  guidance  to  help  students  make  informed 
study  choices  at  any  of  the  schooling  stages,  including  general  and  technical  secondary 
education. 
Based  on  a  survey  of  1 500  youth  and  1 500  employers  in  Egypt,  Jordan,  Morocco, 
Saudi Arabia, and Yemen, a report by the IFC and the Islamic Development Bank (IFC, 
2011) shows that the skills and knowledge taught in Arab schools often have little or no 
connection to labour market needs. 
Though the current generation is the best educated ever, opportunities and prospects 
have  not  improved  for  all  youth.  Egyptians  have  identified  a  delay  in  the  transition  to 
adulthood, describing this interim period, which can last up to five years, as “waithood” 
where they simply wait for their lives to begin without jobs and living with their parents, 
delaying  family  formation  and  the  building  of  assets  (UNDP,  2010).  Waithood  risks 
creating  a  “scarred  generation”  where  youth  pay  a  lifelong  price  as  the  result  of 
deterioration  of  skills  and  foregone  experience  with  all  the  economic,  social  and 
psychological consequences that brings (Morsy, 2012). 
Youth  are  unable  to  market  their  education  to  gain  their  reservation  wage  and  are 
delayed in their career progression. A substantial percentage of them, especially from the 
lower  income  strata,  never  complete  the  transition  and  become  adults  in  transition, 
remaining  unemployed  long  after  graduation,  resulting  in  underutilisation  of  human 
capital  and  poor  returns  on  public  investment  (ILO,  2010).  Young  educated  women  in 
particular,  participate  less  in  the  labour  market  despite  the  growing  number  of  female 
graduates,  and  their  employment  prospects  have  worsened  over  time  (Amer,  2007;  El 
Hamidi and Said, 2008). The available evidence indicates that upward social mobility has 
declined in Egypt, suggesting that the goals of the policy of Education for All, as well as 
the aspirations of a generation of educated youth, have not been met (Binzel, 2011). 
Employer views about the relevance of schooling and the employability of graduates 
“We can recruit our front office, kitchen and ground staff from the local 
hospitality college. We can get plumbers and electricians through the Tourism 
Ministry. We can recruit for professional positions, such as accounting, from 
Cairo. But we have to go outside Egypt for training managers, children’s club 
workers and guest relations personnel.” (Hospitality sector employer, outside 
Cairo) 

 
Employers in Egypt have expressed their need for a more competent labour pool. One 
of the main constraints, mentioned by 18% of Egyptian enterprises, was an inadequately 
trained  workforce  (World  Bank,  2008).  Such  constraints  are  often  in  high-value 
high-growth sectors and if not addressed, Egypt could get left behind in these sectors and 
lose ground in existing sectors such as tourism. 
Employers are unable to hire young workers who are immediately productive because 
they  do  not  develop  adequate  employment  skills  in  school.  As  Table  4.4  shows, 
employers are more satisfied with young workers’ writing and communication skills than 
their  technical,  practical  and  knowledge  application  skills.  The  consequence  is  that 
employers have unfilled vacancies, hire overqualified workers or spend more on training. 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

 CHAPTER 4: EDUCATION AND THE CHANGING LABOUR MARKET – 83 
 
 
Table 4.4 Employers’ assessment of Egyptian young workers’ skills (%) 
Youth workers’ skill 
Very good 
Fair 
Poor 
Required technical skills 
18.2 
50.5 
31.3 
Practical training in school 
10.1 
42.4 
47.5 
Communication skills 
38.6 
49.4 
12.0 
Writing skills 
39.2 
41.0 
19.8 
Ability to apply knowledge learned at school 
22.4 
37.0 
40.6 
Commitment and discipline 
62.9 
28.9 
8.2 
Overall preparedness 
13.5 
66.1 
20.5 
Source:  ILO  (2007),  School  to  Work  Transition:  Evidence  from  Egypt,  Employment  Policy  Department,  International  Labour 
Office, Geneva. 
A more recent survey of employer satisfaction conducted by the Alexandria Business Association (2011) 
reveals high levels of employer dissatisfaction with the employability of applicants for work. As 
Table 4.5 shows, most concerns arise in respect of skills, both for white- and blue-collar jobs. Poor 
educational quality and insufficient availability of workers with the right specialisation were identified as 
major concerns in respect of white-collar workers. 
Table 4.5 Employer satisfaction with the availability, cost and employability of workers, 2011 
 
Agriculture 
Industry 
Construction 
Services 
A. Constraints to employing white-collar workers 
1.Total cost of labour 
1.15 
1.32 
1.52 
1.45 
2.Finding white-collar workers 
2.25 
2.06 
1.94 
2.26 
3.Constraints to employing senior white-collar workers 
3.1 Skills 
1.8 
1.8 
1.78 
2.04 
3.2 Attitude to work 
1.47 
1.59 
1.49 
1.84 
3.3 Staff turnover 
1.69 
1.73 
1.52 
1.77 
4. Constraints to employing junior white-collar workers 
4.1 Education quality 
2.15 
2.14 
2.17 
2.42 
4.2 Availability of relevant 
1.90 
2.01 
1.89 
2.15 
specialisations 
4.3 Skills 
2.10 
2.05 
2.01 
2.33 
4.4 Attitude to work 
1.90 
1.92 
1.71 
2.13 
B. Constraints to employing blue-collar workers 
1.Total cost of labour 
1.70 
1.06 
1.22 
1.14 
2. Finding blue-collar workers 
2.25 
1.80 
1.64 
1.78 
3. Skills  
2.05 
1.85 
1.51 
1.79 
4. Attitude to work 
2.30 
1.81 
1.56 
1.92 
Key: Satisfactory = 0 – 1.2; Neutral = 1.21 – 1.8; Unsatisfactory = 1.81 – 3.0 
Source: Alexandria Business Association (2011), The Egyptian Business Climate Reform Index – Islah 2, Alexandria Business 
Association. 
In their interactions with the team, Egyptian employers complained that students were 
“not educated to learn”, “lacked initiative” and had bad work attitudes, and that they were 
“in  a  hurry”,  having  overly  high  expectations  as  a  result  of  their  educational 
qualifications. They were unwilling to start at lower levels and work upwards.  
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

84 – CHAPTER 4: EDUCATION AND THE CHANGING LABOUR MARKET 
 
 
From the various studies into the Egyptian labour market and education system, it is 
clear that employers look for basic and generic skills to be taught in schools. They want 
employees  who  can  read  and  write,  who  can  analyse  issues  and  use  problem-solving 
techniques.  They  are  looking  for  employees  who  have  “employability”  skills  such  as 
self-management, the ability to work in a team, communications skills and the ability to 
apply numeracy and information technology (IT) skills. These basic and cognitive skills 
are  required  by  employers  everywhere,  not  just  in  Egypt;  and  they  are  wanted  from 
students  at  all  levels  of  education,  whether  they  are  have  a  basic  education,  or  general 
secondary, technical education or tertiary education. 
Employers in Egypt tend to be highly critical of the quality of graduates of vocational 
education  in  terms  of  skills  and  relevance  of  their  knowledge.  Employers  frequently 
express  deep  concern  not  only  about  their  technical  skills  but  also  their  communication 
skills,  team  work,  problem  solving,  work  attitude  and  in  some  cases  even  literacy 
(El-Ashmawi,  2011).  This  view  is  confirmed  by  several  surveys  and  assessments, 
although  mostly  limited  in  scope  and  scale  (see  Boxes  4.2  and  4.3).  Earlier  enterprise 
surveys by the World Bank also identified an inadequately educated workforce as one of 
the main obstacles to economic development and competitiveness (World Bank, 2008). In 
2008, 50% of firms viewed low labour skills levels as a major constraint for business in 
Egypt, among the highest share of comparable low- and middle-income countries (ETF, 
2013). 
Box 4.2 Views of employers in the tourism and ICT sectors  
A 2009 European Training Foundation (ETF) survey of some 300 employers in tourism and ICT revealed that the 
majority  of  employers  (85%  in  tourism  and  84%  in  ICT)  complained)  about  skills  deficiencies  among  young 
employees and recent graduates, in particular in relation to technical (professional) skills as well as practical aspects 
of work. Inadequate language and “soft” skills (such as communication and team working) scored high as well. 
All  the  companies  surveyed  agreed  on  the  importance  of  language  skills  and  service  attitude  (100%  said  they 
were very important or important). The other most important characteristics were intellectual abilities (99%), followed 
by university degree (98%), availability to work overtime (96%), ability to work in teams (94%) and work experience 
(91%). 
Source:  ETF (2010), Women and Work in Egypt: Tourism and ICT Sectors: A Case Study, ETF, Turin. 
Views of employers in the tourism and ICT sectors  
As  a  response  to  skills  gaps  and  skills  shortages,  some  employers  are  looking  for 
alternative  solutions.  Several  large  international  enterprises,  such  as  Mercedes  Benz 
Egypt,  have  initiated  company-based  vocational  education  and  training  (VET) 
programmes  in  order  to  ensure  an  appropriate  supply  of  skills.  Another  approach,  for 
example among SMEs, has been to engage in public-private partnerships such as the dual 
system, alternance model, or other forms of co-operative relationship with VET providers 
outlined  in  Chapter  2.  The  third  and  major  category  of  companies  has  no  option  other 
than to retrain new recruits internally, so that they can do their jobs. 
In  response  to  the  glaring  mismatch  between  labour  demand  and  supply,  and  in 
recognition  of  the  aforementioned  initiatives,  school-based  VET  provision  is  coming 
under  increasing  pressure  to  become  more  relevant  to  workplace  realities  and  promote 
stronger employer involvement and work-based learning approaches. 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

 CHAPTER 4: EDUCATION AND THE CHANGING LABOUR MARKET – 85 
 
 
Box 4.3 Local labour market mismatch in agriculture, construction and tourism 
An  ETF  survey  in  2009  found  skills  shortages  and  skills  gaps  in  the  three  sectors  investigated  (450  interviews 
conducted in total).  
In  tourism,  the  76%  of  employers  identified  skills  shortages  for  waiters,  73%  for  room  attendants  and  57%  for 
front desk and reception staff. While most employers reported skills gaps, the proportion of all employees seen to be 
not fully skilled in their jobs was highest among waiters and room-service staff (49% and 55%, respectively), with the 
main deficiencies in communication and service skills.  
Most  construction  employers  identified  skills  gaps  among  their  employees  (highest  among  bricklayers,  37%, 
plasterers,  34%  and  carpenters,  30%).  Almost  96%  of  employers  confirmed  a  widespread  need  for  general  skills 
unrelated to any specific task, including autonomy, responsibility, and personal and workplace safety.  
Similarly  in  agriculture,  the  proportion  of  staff  not  fully  skilled,  according  to  employers,  was  highest  among 
skilled labourers in pruning (37%), horticultural workers (33%) and to a lesser extent specialists in the maintenance of 
farm machinery (19%). 
Source: ETF (2011b), Skills Matching for Legal Migration in Egypt, ETF, Turin. 
Education and preparation for the world of work 
“The reality is that neither higher education nor technical and vocational 
education and training have offered a critical level of skill enhancement that 
qualifies young people in the search for jobs in the formal economy.” 
(UNDP, 2010) 
The  labour  market  changes  and  associated  requirements  outlined  above  have 
far-reaching implications for education and training in Egypt, for two main reasons. First, 
young people are not acquiring relevant skills for the available and emerging jobs  – that 
is,  the  training  component  of  schooling  is  dysfunctional.  Employers  have  pointed  to 
quantitative  and  qualitative  skill  deficiencies,  in  both technical  areas  (e.g.  students  have 
weak numerical skills, and they are trained on obsolete equipment and cannot use modern 
technology) and soft skills (e.g. poor communication and teamwork skills, and low levels 
of  personal  responsibility).  Second,  many  young  people  are  not  developing  the  broader 
reasoning,  discerning,  imagining  and  adapting  capacities  needed  for  coping  in  the 
changing  world  in  which  they  live  and  work  –  that  is,  the  educative  component  of 
schooling is ineffective. 
Both challenges need to be addressed. On the one hand, greater attention needs to be 
given to effective skills formation in areas that are relevant to the job market and increase 
the employability of all school leavers. On the other hand, deeper education is required to 
enable  individuals  –  whether  pursuing  technical  trades,  professional  careers,  creative  or 
entrepreneurial  endeavours  –  to  develop  generic  cognitive  capacities,  understand  the 
limitations  of  their  knowledge,  appreciate  diversity  and  build  interest  in  learning 
continuously. 
Inadequate  outcomes  from  schooling  reduce  an  individual’s  future  acquisition  of 
knowledge  and  skills.  People  leaving  education  without  a  sufficient  base  for  further 
learning  have  a  diminished  ability  to  adapt  to  change.  Labour  force  participants  who 
cannot adapt are left behind by the evolving economy, and the economy itself may well 
slip behind its competitors.  
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

86 – CHAPTER 4: EDUCATION AND THE CHANGING LABOUR MARKET 
 
 
Adaptability  requires  the  education  system  to  shift  its  focus  from  credentials  to 
competence. Competence may be understood as the application of knowledge, skills and 
attributes  that  allow  individuals  to  perform  at  an  acceptable  level  to  meet  complex 
demands,  however  novel  or  messy,  at  work  and  in  the  community  and  throughout  life. 
Competence assures that unlearning, continuous updating and new learning is possible. 
In several countries, co-operative processes involving government bodies, employers, 
unions,  educators  and  trainers  have  worked  to  refine competencies,  employability  skills 
or “core skills for work” (see Box 4.4). These generic skills complement subject-specific 
knowledge and occupation-specific technical skills. 
Box. 4.4 Employability skills in Australia 
Core Skills for Work Framework, Australia 
The Australian government has funded the development of the Core Skills for Work Framework which describes 
the  non-technical  skills,  knowledge  and  understanding  (often  referred  to  as  employability  or  generic  skills)  that 
underpin successful participation in work. 
The Core Skills for Work Framework groups generic or employability skills into three Skill Clusters and ten Skill 
Areas while using a developmental approach to describe these skills at five different levels from novice to expert. The 
Skill Clusters and Skill Areas described in the framework are: 
Cluster 1 – Navigate the world of work 
a. Manage career and work life.  
b. Work with roles, rights and protocols. 
Cluster 2 – Interact with others 
a. Communicate for work. 
b. Connect and work with others. 
c. Recognise and utilise diverse perspectives. 
Cluster 3 – Get the work done 
a. Plan and organise. 
b. Make decisions. 
c. Identify and solve problems. 
d. Create and innovate. 
e. Work in a digital world. 
Employability skills in secondary schools 
  literacy 
  numeracy 
  information and communication technology (ICT) capability 
  critical and creative thinking 
  personal and social capability 
  ethical behaviour 
  intercultural understanding. 
  Employability skills for training package qualifications. 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

 CHAPTER 4: EDUCATION AND THE CHANGING LABOUR MARKET – 87 
 
 
Box. 4.4 Employability skills in Australia (continued) 
Employability  skills  are  also  sometimes  referred  to  as  generic  skills,  capabilities,  enabling  skills  or  key 
competencies. In Australia employability skills are:  
  communication skills,  which contribute to productive and harmonious relations between employees and 
customers 
  teamwork skills, which contribute to productive working relationships and outcomes 
  problem-solving skills, which contribute to productive outcomes 
  initiative and enterprise skills, which contribute to innovative outcomes 
  planning and organising skills, which contribute to long-term and short-term strategic planning 
  self-management skills, which contribute to employee satisfaction and growth 
  learning  skills,  which  contribute  to  ongoing  improvement  and  expansion  in  employee  and  company 
operations and outcomes 
  technology skills, which contribute to effective execution of tasks. 
Sources:  Australian  Government  (2013),  Core  Skills  for  Work:  Developmental  Framework:  Overview,  Department  of 
Industry, Innovation, Climate Change, Science, Research and Tertiary Education and Department of Education, Employment 
and Workplace Relations, Canberra, http://industry.gov.au/skills/ForTrainingProviders/CoreSkillsForWorkDevelopmentalFr
amework/Documents/CSWF-Overview.pdf)
 
Box  4.4  also  lists  the  generic  skills  identified  for  development  during  schooling. 
These  are  primarily  the  underlying  learning  abilities developed through  interaction  with 
learning materials, teachers and other students.  
Finally,  a  set  of  generic  skills,  more  integrated  with  the  knowledge  and  technical 
skills  formation  of  on-the-job  learning,  have  been  identified  as  part  of  formal  training, 
including  some  training  within  schools  (Box  4.4).  Australia’s  Employability  Skills 
Framework also includes 13 personal attributes. These are: loyalty, personal presentation, 
common  sense,  positive  self-esteem,  sense  of  humour,  ability  to  deal  with  pressure, 
adaptability, commitment, honesty and integrity, enthusiasm, reliability, balanced attitude 
to work and home life, and motivation. 
The need for a skilled and adaptable workforce 
Investment in education and skills “helps to pivot an economy towards higher value-
added activities and dynamic growth sectors” (ILO, 2008). As enterprises modernise and 
move up the value chain, labour productivity will depend on higher-order cognitive skills 
(analysis,  problem  solving)  and  behavioural  skills  (initiative,  work  effort). The shortage 
of  educated  workers  with  such  skills  constrains  competitiveness,  productivity  and 
innovation (World Bank, 2010). 
Development  and  modernisation  of  the  industrial  and  service  sectors  mean  a  move 
towards jobs which require medium technology skill levels, and a smaller number of jobs 
requiring  higher  technical  and  managerial  skills  levels.  With  the  ICT  sector,  the 
government  of  Egypt  has  shown  that  it  can  provide  the  climate  to  develop  and  grow  a 
modern, productive sector of the economy and educate and train the personnel needed to 
attract  investment.  The  lessons  learned  can  be  applied  to  other  sectors,  particularly  the 
success story of co-operation between government, employers and education institutions.  
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

88 – CHAPTER 4: EDUCATION AND THE CHANGING LABOUR MARKET 
 
 
Employers demand from employees a composite of generic skills, occupation-specific 
skills  and  the  ability  to  learn  and  apply  new  knowledge  and  skills.  To  be  successful, 
enterprises  need  their  workers  to  be  competent  and  productive  but  also  to  be  able  to 
innovate,  to  apply  new  processes  and  to  operate  new  technologies.  This  necessitates  a 
dynamic  view  of  competence  and  work  experience.  “High-performance  workplaces” 
based  on  their  highly  skilled  workforce  have  a  more  positive  prognosis  in  the  global 
market. 
To  meet  the  need  for  a  skilled  and  adaptable  workforce,  contemporary  education 
systems themselves have to be responsive to changing needs and varying circumstances. 
The education system also needs to recognise the fact that their graduates will be working 
in  jobs  that  do  not  yet  exist,  and  that  they  may  have  to  change  employers  and  even 
industries and occupations over their working lives. 
Approaches to learning based on mastering only what is taught can lead to outdated 
knowledge  and  know-how.  Teaching  methods  that  engage  students  in  learning  through 
inquiry, experimentation and discovery are more likely to build capacity for self-directed 
learning. 
Additionally,  and  especially  for  transforming  economies,  having  a  more  resilient 
workforce  minimises  the  displacement  costs  from  lost  jobs  due  to  restructuring, 
automation  or  off-shoring,  as  the  affected  workers  are  more  able,  as  a  consequence  of 
having generic and transferable skills, to retrain for alternative jobs. 
The  main  policy  inference  is  that  the  need  for  broader  life  skills  and  generic, 
adaptable  skills  for  work,  necessitates  curriculum  orientations,  teaching  practices,  and 
assessment methods which foster the development of those personal attributes in students. 
Education as preparation for life, work and further learning 
It has long been recognised that education has both intrinsic and instrumental value. 
On the one hand, its purpose is the development of the person, the cultivation of the mind 
and the formation of character, and the liberation of young people from the limits of their 
backgrounds.  On  the  other  hand,  education  is  part  of  the  socialisation  of  individuals  as 
responsible  members  of  the  community,  through  the  transmission  of  knowledge, 
induction  into  social  norms  and  inculcation  of  shared  values.  Thus  there  is  a  tension 
between the individualistic and societal purposes of education. The ability of individuals 
to  learn  about  innovations  elsewhere;  their  capacity  to  create,  analyse  and  reason;  and 
their  confidence  to  question  and  argue,  can  challenge  accepted  assumptions  and 
mainstream practices. It is in this way that societies have progressed, albeit at times not 
without difficulty. 
School-based  education  aims  to  enhance  the  performance  of  future  adult  roles  – 
productive worker, continuous learner, nurturing parent and participatory citizen. To this 
end the years at school should be formative – developing curiosity and reasoning, finding 
a  cosmopolitan  rather  than  parochial  outlook,  building  an  understanding  of  the 
environmental  heritage  and  the  dynamics  of  change,  and  appreciating  plurality. 
Education,  when  it  is  well-functioning,  builds  judgement,  ethical  behaviour  and 
co-operative effort among youth which can contribute to national benefits that flow back 
to  the  individual,  such  as  safety,  culture,  sense  of  community  and  good  governance 
(UNDP, 2010). 
The  value  of  public  education  lies not  only  because  individuals  are  provided  with a 
good  foundation  of  knowledge  that  they  can  use  to  maximise  the  opportunities 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

 CHAPTER 4: EDUCATION AND THE CHANGING LABOUR MARKET – 89 
 
 
encountered in their lives but also because there is a national benefit to living in a society 
of  educated  people.  This  public  benefit  arises  from  a  prospering  economy  fuelled  by 
entrepreneurship  and  innovation,  informed  consumers  that  create  a  demand  for 
sustainable  and  socially  valuable  products,  and  the  election  of  just  and  democratic 
governments. 
Among  the  economic  benefits  are  increased  tax  revenues,  reduced  reliance  on 
government  social  support,  greater  productivity,  greater  diversity  of  market  goods  and 
consumption and greater choice of human capital for public and private activities. Social 
benefits  include  social  cohesion  and  national  interest,  reduced  crime  and  greater  trust, 
increased  quality  of  life,  increased  charitable  giving,  volunteering  and  community 
service,  and  greater  ability  to  adopt  new  ideas  and  technology  (Institute  for  Higher 
Education Policy, 1998). 
Education as a necessary but not a sufficient condition of progress 
Egypt’s  challenge  of  catering  for  large  and  rapid  growth  in  student  demand  has 
dominated  policy  attention  over  the  last few  decades.  Consequently,  the  focus  has  been 
on supplying increased education services and facilities. That function has been seen as a 
public policy responsibility of the Education portfolio, regarded as part of social policy, 
related  to  family  formation,  community  stabilisation  and  social  induction.  Education 
appears not to have been viewed from an economic perspective, other than from its public 
finance requirements.  
A  particular  challenge  is  to  build  more  effective  links  between  strategies  for 
improving education and training with strategies for integrating segments of the informal 
labour market into Egypt’s formal economy. The team, having only a peripheral brief in 
this respect, was not able to investigate the issues and options in any depth, but formed a 
broad view that three avenues may be worth further exploration. 
First, there are skills in demand in Egyptian society – such as trade skills in carpentry, 
bricklaying, electrical wiring, hairdressing, motor vehicle repairs and plumbing. Lack of 
proper skills formation and recognition poses several problems. On the one hand, there is 
a  dangerous  lack  of  standards,  quality  control,  licensing  and  safeguards  for  Egyptian 
consumers. On the other hand, Egypt’s capacity for innovation and attractiveness to the 
foreign direct investment the nation so desperately needs is at risk. A joined-up effort to 
raise  standards  and  accredit  skills  in  key  areas  of  the  informal  economy  could  yield 
positive  results.  A  revitalised  TVET  sector,  with  much  greater  private-sector 
involvement, could be enjoined to improve training in secondary schools for new entrants 
to the labour market, and offer convenient advanced training outreach services for young 
people and adults working in the informal economy.  
Second, the informal sector provides multiple services in response to market demand, 
including  professional  services  such  as  childcare,  health  care  and  hospitality.  Serious 
public health risks arise from the absence of standards and quality control in areas such as 
the  prescription  and  production  of  “remedies”  and  the  amateur  “treatment”  of  physical 
symptoms.  Offering  a  pathway  to  formal  credentials  for  workers  experienced  in  the 
informal  labour  market,  and  involving  education  in  the  rudiments  of  professional 
knowledge  and  know-how,  could  help  to  reduce  the  community’s  exposure  to  risk. 
Tailored  programmes  in  secondary  schools,  alongside  generic  curriculum  offerings  in 
areas such as nutrition, might also better prepare school leavers for diverse occupational 
destinations and living circumstances.  
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

90 – CHAPTER 4: EDUCATION AND THE CHANGING LABOUR MARKET 
 
 
Third,  better  preparation  in  school  for  self-employment  and  micro-business 
management  may  enable  individuals  to  adapt  in  the  informal  sector  and  improve  their 
prospects for bridging across or transitioning to the formal sector. 
Schooling for education 
As noted above, schooling functions as a social control device in several respects, not 
least  as  a  framework  for  ordered  household  activity.  Routines  of  school  attendance 
structure a range of individual and family activities and relationships. For Egypt, a major 
challenge  is  to  move  beyond  this  social  function  of  schooling  to  its  educative  role  – 
enabling  students  to  learn  and  value  learning.  This  is  to  place  policy  emphasis  on  the 
effectiveness of schooling, and to frame policy choices and priorities against the question: 
how well does schooling function to achieve expected learning outcomes? 
Answers  to  that  question  require  a  clear  delineation  of  expectations  of  student 
learning  outcomes.  In  many  countries,  the  vehicle  for  articulating  learning  outcomes  is 
the national qualifications framework. 
Active labour market measures 
In  addition  to  a  macroeconomic  environment  that  is  conducive  to  sustainable  jobs 
growth,  the  challenge  of  absorbing  an  increasing  supply  of  labour  requires  a  range  of 
active measures. These measures can also assist the transition from school to work, and 
thereby raise the overall rate of labour absorption. 
Career guidance 
Career  guidance  can  help  to  reduce  school  dropout  rates,  and  help  students  make 
informed  and  considered  study  choices.  Career  advice  is  particularly  useful  for  those 
young people who are most vulnerable when making the transition from school (Rothman 
and  Hillman,  2008).  Good  career  guidance  provides  accurate,  comprehensive  and 
up-to-date information on all the options available to a student, both within the school and 
elsewhere,  at  key  points  of  transition,  and  on  the  progression routes  leading  from  those 
options.  The  team  found  no  instances  of  career  guidance  being  available  to  secondary 
school students in Egypt.  
Job search assistance 
Most  countries  have  dedicated  services  designed  to  help  school  leavers,  technical 
college  and  university  graduates,  and  unemployed  persons  find  employment.  Multiple 
factors are involved in effective job search, for example  knowing what to look for and 
where to look, realistically assessing personal fitness to job prospects and requirements, 
preparing  applications,  presenting  at  interview,  and  keeping  motivated  after  being 
rejected.  The  team  found  no  policies  or  services  in  Egypt  for  job-search  assistance, 
neither in local areas nor educational institutions. 
Labour market information 
Job search and career guidance need to be supported by comprehensive labour market 
intelligence about current and potential future jobs. While employers are the most likely 
source  of  such  information  there  appears  to  be  no  structured  labour  market  information 
system  at  national  or  local  levels  in  Egypt.  A  number  of  Egyptian  government 
departments and agencies (e.g. CAPMAS and the Ministry of Manpower and Migration) 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

 CHAPTER 4: EDUCATION AND THE CHANGING LABOUR MARKET – 91 
 
 
as well as foreign donors (such as the EU) collect some information but it is not brought 
together  and  disseminated  in  useful  ways,  for  either  policy  development  or  job  search 
effectiveness.  The  Egyptian  Observatory  for  Education,  Training  and  Employment, 
responsible  to  the  Prime  Minister,  was  set  up  with  support  from  the  European  Training 
Foundation  to  address  these  issues  and  included  all  key  ministries,  agencies,  private 
sector representatives and NGOs on their steering group. However the Observatory does 
not  appear  to  have  had  much  support  or  funding.  The  government  is  not  “joined  up” 
across its departments and agencies in recognising the need for labour market intelligence 
in  order  to  attract  foreign  investment,  reform  the  education  system,  improve  job  search 
outcomes and reduce unemployment. 
An  initial  conceptual  framework  for  career  guidance  in  education  and  TVET  (ETF, 
2010b was prepared by a National Task Force and adopted by four ministries (Education, 
Higher  Education,  Trade  and  Industry,  and  Manpower  and  Migration)  in  2010  but  has 
since  been  neglected.  Several  subsequent  reports  (El-Ashmawi,  2011;  TVET  Reform 
Programme,  2012;  World  Bank,  2013)  have  stressed  the  need  for  a  national  system  of 
career guidance at an early stage of a learner’s schooling, not least as an integral element 
of a strategy to improve the image and status of TVET (Zelloth, 2013, 2014). 
Models  in  other  countries  suggest  there  is  much  to  be  gained  from  structurally 
engaging employer bodies and other stakeholders at a high level in setting directions and 
goals  for  career  guidance  and  providing  intelligence  and  feedback  on  progress  towards 
them (see Box 4.4). 
Work-based training for skills in demand 
Employability  can  be  enhanced  via  training  programmes  including  work-based 
learning, formation of market relevant skills and building of social networks necessary for 
finding jobs. 
Raising  the  level  of  technical  skills  is  very  much  connected  to  opportunities  for 
practical  training  in  school  workshops and  work-based  learning  in enterprises.  Egyptian 
TVET,  in  particular  technical  education  is  strongly  school-based,  whereas  work-based 
learning is greatly under-represented. Work-based learning is the form of TVET closest to 
the labour market and a unique way of providing learners with both technical and social 
competences  through  a  real  life  and  work  environment.  As  technological change  occurs 
so  rapidly,  TVET  institutions  will  be  less  and  less  able  to  keep  pace  with  the  rate  of 
change and to afford costly replacement of equipment. Work-based learning will become 
more important and any future strategy will have to find a better balance between these 
two  fundamental  types  of  learning  in  TVET  which  may  contribute  to  raise  its 
attractiveness as well. In particular, work-based learning could also be applied to higher 
levels of qualifications and to white-collar jobs. 
Entrepreneurship promotion 
A substantial amount of literature suggests that entrepreneurship and self-employment 
are effective ways to foster economic progress and reduce unemployment among young 
people  (see  for  instance,  Thurik  et  al.,  2007;  Nieman  and  Nieuwenhuizen,  2009). 
Accordingly,  targeting  groups  of  young  people  through  specific  programmes  to  support 
entrepreneurship,  and  to  promote  entrepreneurial  values  and  norms,  could  make 
employment policies more effective. In addition, improving access to the financial sector 
to meet the needs of micro-, small- and medium-sized enterprises is necessary to support 
young entrepreneurs. Entrepreneurship promotion for youth employment has been one of 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

92 – CHAPTER 4: EDUCATION AND THE CHANGING LABOUR MARKET 
 
 
the  most  widely  implemented  programmes  in  Egypt.  Egypt’s  Social  Fund  for 
Development provided loans to youth to support project start-up and expansion. Between 
1991  and  2007,  the  fund  provided  loans  to  small  enterprises  totalling  EGP  7.1  billion. 
While  venture  capital  provision  is  necessary,  what  is  fundamentally  important  to  an 
agenda  for  encouraging  entrepreneurship  is  a  cultural  and  legal  acceptance  of  failure, 
including bankruptcy treatment. 
While  some  young  people  who  are  unable  to  find  employment  might  not  be 
successful  entrepreneurs,  given  their  limited  skills  and  experience  (Barsoum,  2013),  in 
view  of  the  scarcity  of  jobs  in  the  formal  economy,  self-employment  and 
entrepreneurship are valuable, and often the only, career options for many school leavers. 
However,  neither  the  general  and  technical  education  curricula  and  related  teacher 
training  programmes  cover  entrepreneurship  sufficiently.  Preliminary  findings  of  an 
assessment by the Euro-Mediterranean Charter for Enterprise (ETF, 2013) indicates that 
understanding  of  entrepreneurship  as  a  key  competence  is  not  well  developed  by  the 
teaching profession and society at large. Egypt also has one of the lowest penetrations of 
entrepreneurship  education  in  the  formal  education  system  of  the  31  economies 
participating in the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor in 2008 (Sheta, 2012). Introducing a 
broader  skills  mix  in  TVET  while  raising  the  quality  of  technical  skills  would  enhance 
both its effectiveness and attractiveness. 
Future directions and policy options 
From  the  foregoing  discussion,  a  forward-looking  agenda  for  Egypt  might  include 
consideration of the following initiatives: 
  Set out an agenda to transform and integrate parts of the disproportionately large 
informal employment sector into the formal economy through targeted training to 
raise skill levels in key trades and service occupations. 
  Establish a standing forum for consultation with employer bodies and their active 
engagement in design and evaluation of education and training interventions. 
  Give much greater priority to updating and upgrading TVET; 
  Establish a Labour Market Information Service reporting on trends in demand and 
supply  for  jobs  by  industry  and  occupation,  and  by  governorate  and  district; 
indicators of areas of skills shortage and surplus; and other information relating to 
job opportunities and employment conditions. 
  Develop a programme for making careers guidance available to secondary school 
students. 
  Build the development of generic cognitive skills and broad employability skills 
into the secondary curriculum. 
  Trial a programme to help people develop skills for self-employment. 
 
 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

 CHAPTER 4: EDUCATION AND THE CHANGING LABOUR MARKET – 93 
 
 
References 
 
Adams, A. (2010), The Mubarak Kohl Initiative – Dual System in Egypt: An Assessment 
of  its  Impact  on  the  School  to  Work  Transition,  German  Technical  Co-operation 
(GTZ),  Vocational  Education,  Training  and  Employment  Programme  (MKI-vetEP), 
Cairo.  
Alexandria Business Association (2011), The Egyptian Business Climate Reform Index – 
Islah 2, Alexandria Business Association. 
Amer,  M.  (2007),  “The  Egyptian  youth  labor  market  school-to-work  transition  1998-
2006”, Working Paper Series, No. 0702, Cairo University.  
Angel-Urdinola,  D.  and  A.  Semlali  (2010),“Labour  Markets  and  School-To-Work 
Transition in Egypt: Diagnostics, Constraints and Policy Framework”, World Bank, 
Washington, DC, https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/bitstream/handle/10986/1305
0/693060ESW0P1200it0220120dau000Copy.pdf?sequence=1.
 
Assaad, R. et al. (2012),  Forecasting Labour Demand in Egypt (2006/2007-2011/2012)
Egyptian Cabinet Information and Decision Support Centre, Egyptian Observatory for 
Education, Training and Employment. 
AT Kearney  Ltd.  (2011),  Offshoring  Opportunities Amid  Economic  Turbulence:  Global 
Services Location Index, 2011, AT Kearney, Chicago, IL. 
Attia,  S.M.  (2009),  “The  informal  economy  as  an  engine  for  poverty  reduction  and 
development  in  Egypt”,  MPRA  Paper,  No.  13034,  MPRA  (Munich  Personal  RePEc 
Archive), University of Munich, http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/13034/. 
Australian  Government  (2013),  Core  Skills  for  Work:  Developmental  Framework: 
Overview,  Department  of  Industry,  Innovation,  Climate  Change,  Science,  Research 
and  Tertiary  Education,  and  Department  of  Education,  Employment  and  Workplace 
Relations, Canberra, http://industry.gov.au/skills/ForTrainingProviders/CoreSkillsFor
WorkDevelopmentalFramework/Documents/CSWF-Overview.pdf.
 
Avirgan, T., L.J. Bivens and S. Gammage (eds.) (2005), Good Jobs, Bad Jobs, No Jobs: 
Labor  Markets  and  Informal  Work  in  Egypt,  El  Salvador,  India,  Russia  and  South 
Africa
, Global Policy Network, Economic Policy Institute. Washington, DC. 
Barsoum,  G.  (2013),  “No  jobs  and  bad  jobs”,  The  Cairo  Review  of  Global  Affairs, 
www.aucegypt.edu/GAPP/CAIROREVIEW/Pages/articleDetails.aspx?aid=280. 
12 July 
Becker, K.F. (2004), The Informal Economy: Fact Finding Study, Sida, Stockholm. 
Bernabè,  S.  (2002),  “Informal  employment  in  countries  in  transition:  A  conceptual 
framework”, CASE Paper, No. 56, Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion, London 
School of Economics, London. 
Binzel,  C.  (2011),  “Decline  in  social  mobility:  Unfulfilled  aspirations  among  Egypt’s 
educated  youth”,  IZA  Discussion  Paper,  No.  6139,  IZA  (Institute  for  the  Study  of 
Labour), Bonn. 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

94 – CHAPTER 4: EDUCATION AND THE CHANGING LABOUR MARKET 
 
 
CAPMAS  (2012),  Labour  Force  Survey  2012,  CAPMAS  (Central  Agency  for  Public 
Mobilisation and Statistics), Cairo. 
CIA (2012), The CIA Factbook, CIA (Central Intelligence Agency), Washington, DC.  
Checchi-Louis  Berger  International  Inc.  (1999),  Jobs,  Employment  and  the  Egyptian 
Labor Market: Final Report, USAID/Egypt, Washington, DC. 
Coulombe,  S.  and  J.F.  Tremblay  (2006),  “Literacy  and  growth”,  Topics  in 
Macroeconomics, Vol. 6(2), article 4. 
De Luca, C. (1994), The Impact of Examination Systems on Curriculum Development: An 
International Study, UNECSO, Paris 
De Soto, H. (2011), “Egypt’s economic apartheid”, The Wall Street Journal., 3 February.  
Egyptian  National  Competitiveness  Council  (2012),  Eighth  Report:  A  Sustainable 
Competitiveness  Strategy  for  Egypt,  Egyptian  National  Competitiveness  Council, 
Cairo.  
El-Ashmawi,  A.  (2011),  “TVET  in  Egypt”,  background  paper  prepared  for  the  MENA 
Regional  Flagship  Report,  “Jobs  for  a  Shared  Prosperity”,  World  Bank,  Washington 
DC. 
El  Hamidi,  F.  and  M.  Said  (2008),  “Have  economic  reforms  paid  off?  Gender 
occupational inequality in the new millennium in Egypt”,  Working Papers, No. 128, 
Egyptian Centre for Economic Studies. 
El-Mahdi,  A.  and  M.  Amer  (2005),  “Egypt:  Growing  informality,  1990-2003”,  in  T. 
Avirgan, L.J. Bivens and S. Gammage (eds.) (2005), Good Jobs, Bad Jobs, No Jobs: 
Labor  Markets  and  Informal  Work  in  Egypt,  El  Salvador,  India,  Russia  and  South 
Africa
, Global Policy Network, Economic Policy Institute. Washington, DC. 
El-Wassal, K.A. (2013), “Public  employment dilemma in Egypt: Who pays the bill?”, in 
Proceedings of the 20th International Business Research Conference, 4-5 April 2013, 
Dubai,  UAE
,  ISBN:  978-1-922069-22-1,  www.wbiworldconpro.com/uploads/dubai-
conference-2013-april/economics/1364460321_220-Kamal.pdf. 
 
ETF  (2013),  Moving  Skills  Forward:  From  Common  Challenges  to  Country-Specific 
Solutions:  A  Cross-Country  Report,  Torino  Process  2012,  ETF  (European  Training 
Foundation), Turin. 
ETF  (2012),  Union  for  the  Mediterranean  Regional  Employability  Review:  The 
Challenge  of  Youth  Employment  in  the  Mediterranean,  Publications  Office  of  the 
European Union, Luxembourg. 
ETF  (2011a),  Description  of  the  current  state  of  affairs  and  identification  and 
justification for possible EU Support 2012-15 in the area of education: Draft analytical 
report”,  Egypt  Identification  Report,  Education.  Sector  Policy  Support  Programme 
(ESPSP-Phase 2)
, unpublished/internal document prepared by E. Carrero Perez et al., 
ETF (European Training Foundation), Turin. 
ETF (2011b), Skills Matching for Legal Migration in Egypt, ETF, Turin. 
ETF  (2011c),  Building  a  Competitiveness  Framework  for  Education  and  Training  in 
Egypt, Working Paper, ETF, Turin. 
ETF  (2011d),  Australian  Government  (2013),  Core  Skills  for  Work:  Developmental 
Framework: Overview, Department of Industry, Innovation, Climate Change, Science, 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

 CHAPTER 4: EDUCATION AND THE CHANGING LABOUR MARKET – 95 
 
 
Research  and  Tertiary  Education,  and  Department  of  Education,  Employment 
and Workplace Relations, Canberra, http://industry.gov.au/skills/ForTrainingProviders
/CoreSkillsForWorkDevelopmentalFramework/Documents/CSWF-Overview.pdf.
 
ETF (2010a), Women and Work in Egypt: Tourism and ICT Sectors: A Case Study, ETF, 
Turin. 
ETF  (2010b),  Proposal  for  Introducing  Career  Guidance  in  Egypt:  The  Need  for  a 
Strategic  and  Integrated  Approach  to  Career  Guidance  Development,  results  of  the 
work of the National Task Force on Career Guidance in Egypt, ETF, Turin. 
Gatti, R., D. Angel-Urdinola, J. Silva and A. Bodor (2011), “Striving for better jobs: The 
challenge  of  informality  in  the  Middle  East  and  North  Africa  region”,  MENA 
Knowledge and Learning Quick Notes Series
, No. 49, World Bank, Washington, DC. 
Green,  A.  and  L.  Martinez-Solano  (2011),  “Leveraging  training:  Skills  development  in 
SMEs: An analysis of West Midlands, UK”, OECD Local Economic and Employment 
Development  (LEED)  Working  Papers,  
No.  2011/15,  OECD  Publishing,  Paris, 
http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/5kg0vststzr5-en. 
Heckman,  J.J.  (2008),  “Schools,  skills,  and  synapses”,  Economic  Inquiry,  Vol.  46(3), 
pp. 289-324, http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1465-7295.2008.00163.x.   
IFC  (2011),  Education  For  Employment  (e4e):  Realizing  Arab  Youth  Potential,  IFC 
(International Finance Corporation), Washington, DC. 
ILO  (International  Labour  Organization)  (2010),  “Characterizing  the  school-to-work 
transitions  of  young  men  and  women:  Evidence  from  the  ILO  school-to-work 
transition surveys”, Employment Working Paper, No. 51, International Labour Office, 
Geneva. 
ILO  (2008),  “Skills  for  improved  productivity,  employment  growth  and  development”
Report V, International Labour Conference, 97th Session, International Labour Office, 
Geneva. 
ILO  (2007),  School  to  Work  Transition:  Evidence  from  Egypt,  Employment  Policy 
Department, International Labour Office, Geneva. 
IMF  (2012),  World  Economic  Outlook:  Growth  Resuming,  Dangers  Remaining,  IMF 
(Interntional Monetary Fund), Washington, DC. 
iMOVE  (2012),  Marktstudie  Aegypten  fuer  den  Export  beruflicher  Aus  und 
Weiterbildung,  iMOVE  (International  Marketing  of  Vocational  Education), 
Bundesinstitut fuer Berufsbildung (BIBB), Bonn. 
INSEAD  (2012),  The  Global  Innovation  Index  2012:  Stronger  Innovation  Linkages  for 
Global  Growth,  INSEAD  and  WIPO  (World  Intellectual  Property  Organization), 
Fontainebleau. 
Institute  for  Higher  Education  Policy  (1998),  Reaping  the  Benefits:  Defining  the  Public 
and  Private  Value  of  Going  to  College,  Institute  for  Higher  Education  Policy, 
Washington, DC.  
Ministry  of  Higher  Education  (2011),  “PVET  in  Egypt:  Country  Background  Report”, 
unpublished, Ministry of Higher Education, Cairo. 
Morsy,  H.  (2012),  “Scarred  generation”,  Finance  and  Development,  Vol.  49/1, 
www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/fandd/2012/03/morsy.htm.   
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

96 – CHAPTER 4: EDUCATION AND THE CHANGING LABOUR MARKET 
 
 
Nieman,  G.  and  C.  Nieuwenhuizen  (2009),  Entrepreneurship:  A  South  African 
Perspective, 2nd Edition, Van Schaik Publishers, Pretoria. 
OECD 
(2011), 
Towards 
an 
OECD 
Skills 
Strategy
OECD, 
Paris, 
www.oecd.org/edu/47769000.pdf.  
OECD (2010a), Education at a Glance 2010: OECD Indicators, OECD Publishing, Paris, 
http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/eag-2010-en. 
OECD (2010b), Improving Health and Social Cohesion through Education,  Educational 
Research and Innovation, OECD Publishing, Paris, http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/9789264
086319-en.
 
OECD (2006), Education at a Glance 2006: OECD Indicators, OECD Publishing, Paris, 
http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/eag-2006-en.  
OECD  and  World  Bank  (2010),  Reviews  of  National  Policies  for  Education:  Higher 
Education in Egypt 2010, OECD Publishing, Paris, http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/9789264
084346-en.
 
Peeters,  M.  (2011),  “Demographic  pressure,  excess  labour  supply  and  public-private 
sector  employment  in  Egypt:  Modelling  labour  supply  to  analyse  the  response  of 
unemployment,  public  finances  and  welfare”,  MPRA  Paper,  No.  31101,  MPRA, 
University of Munich, http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/31101/1/MPRA_paper_31101.
pdf.
 
Population  Council  (2011),  Survey  of  Young  People  in  Egypt:  Final  Report,  Population 
Council West Asia and North Africa Office, Cairo. 
Quintini,  G.  (2011),  “Over-qualified  or  under-skilled:  A  review  of  existing  literature”, 
OECD  Social,  Employment  and  Migration  Working  Papers,  No.  121,  OECD 
Publishing, Paris, http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/5kg58j9d7b6d-en. 
Rothman, S. and K. Hillman (2008), “Career advice in Australian secondary schools: Use 
and  usefulness”,  Research  Report,  No.  53,  Australian  Council  for  Educational 
Research. Melbourne. 
Schneider, F. (2002), “Size and measurement of the informal economy in 110 countries 
around  the  world”,  paper  presented  at  a  workshop  of  the  Australian  National  Tax 
Centre, The Australian National University, Canberra, 17 July. 
Sheta, A. (2012), “Developing an entrepreneurship curriculum in Egypt: The road ahead”, 
Journal of Higher Education Theory and Practice, Vol. 12/4, pp. 51-65. 
State  Information  Service  (undated),  “Tourism  in  Egypt”,  State  Information  Service 
website, www.sis.gov.eg/en/story.aspx?sid=1042, accessed 15 April 2013. 
Tang,  J.  and  W.  Wang  (2005),  “Product  market  competition,  skill  shortages  and 
productivity: Evidence from Canadian manufacturing firms”,  Journal of Productivity 
Analysis
, Vol. 23(3), pp. 317-339. 
Thurik,  A.R.,  M.A.  Carree,  A.  van  Stel  and  D.B.  Audretsch  (2007),  “Does  self-
employment  reduce  unemployment?”,  Jena  Economic  Research  Papers,  No. 
2007-089, Freidrich-Schiller University and Max Planck Institute of Economic, Jena, 
Germany. 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

 CHAPTER 4: EDUCATION AND THE CHANGING LABOUR MARKET – 97 
 
 
Tomasevski,  K.  (2001),  “Free  and  compulsory  education  for  all  children:  The  gap 
between promise and performance”, Right to Education Primers, No. 2, Sida, Lund, 
Sweden. 
TVET  Reform  Programme  (2012),  Time  for  Change:  Draft  Egyptian  TVET  Reform 
Policy  2012-2017:  Sustainable  Development  and  Employment  through  Qualified 
Workforce,  TVET  Reform  Programme
,  co-funded  by  the  European  Union  and  the 
Government of Egypt. 
UNDP  (2013),  Human  Development  Report  2013.  The  Rise  of  the  South:  Human 
Progress  in  a  Diverse  World,  UNDP  (United  Nations  Development  Programme), 
Paris. 
UNDP (2010), Egypt Human Development Report, 2010 – Youth in Egypt: Building our 
Future, Institute of National Planning, Egypt and UNDP.  
Willcocks,  L.,  C.  Griffiths  and  J.  Kotlarsky  (2009),  Beyond  BRIC:  Offshoring  in  Non-
BRIC  Countries:  Egypt  –  A  New  Growth  Market,  An  LSE  Outsourcing  Unit  report, 
LSE 
(London 
School 
of 
Economics 
and 
Political 
Science), 
http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/42759/1/ITIDA_Beyond_BRIC_Report.pdf.  
World Bank (2012a),  Arab Republic of Egypt: Inequality of Opportunity in Educational 
Achievement, Report No. 70300-EG, Human Development Sector Unit, World Bank, 
Washington, DC. 
World  Bank  (2012b),  World  Development  Indicators  2012,  World  Bank,  Washington, 
DC, http://data.worldbank.org/data-catalog/world-development-indicators/wdi-2012. 
World Bank (2010), Stepping Up Skills: For More Jobs and Higher Productivity, World 
Bank, Washington, DC. 
World  Bank  (2008),  Enterprise  Surveys  (database),  World  Bank,  Washington,  DC, 
www.enterprisesurveys.org/data. 
World Bank (2007), The Road Not Traveled: Education Reform in the Middle East and 
North Africa, MENA Development Report, World Bank, Washington, DC. 
World  Economic  Forum  (2013),  World  Travel  and  Tourism  Competitiveness  Report 
2013:  Reducing  Barriers  to  Economic  Growth  and  Job  Creation,  World  Economic 
Forum, Geneva. 
World Economic Forum (2012), The Global Competitiveness Report, 2012-2013, World 
Economic Forum, Geneva. 
Zelloth, H. (2013), “No choice – No guidance? The rising demand for career guidance in 
EU  neighbouring  countries  and  its  potential  implications  for  apprenticeships”,  in  L. 
Deitemer  et  al.  (eds.),  The  Architecture  of  Innovative  Apprenticeship,  Springer,  pp. 
69-87. 
Zelloth, H. (2014), “Technical and vocational education and training (TVET) and career 
guidance:  The  interface”,  in  G.  Arulmani  et  al.  (eds.),  Handbook  of  Career 
Development, 
Springer, New York, pp. 271-290. 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 


99 – CHAPTER 5: THE QUALITY OF TEACHERS AND TEACHING 
 
 
 
Chapter 5. 
 
The quality of teachers and teaching 
This  chapter  covers  the  evolution  of  views  and  associated  research  findings  relating  to 
the role of teachers and models of teaching. It also covers pre-service, in-service teacher 
education, and the continuing professional development of teachers. The chapter applies 
these  perspectives  in  assessing  current  Egyptian  practices  and  identifying  areas  for 
improvement in the selection, preparation and development of teachers.
 
 
 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

100 – CHAPTER 5: THE QUALITY OF TEACHERS AND TEACHING 
 
 
Teaching’s claim to professional status and recognition 
Much has been written on teaching’s claim to professional status (see Burke,  2002). 
Many authors have treated “profession” as a descriptive term and analysed teaching from 
a  largely  sociological  perspective.  Frequently,  they  have  applied  checklists  of 
characteristics culled from the long-established professions to other occupations, such as 
teaching, to gauge their professional status. The sociologist, Dreeben (1970) regarded this 
approach  as  singularly  sterile  since  it  treats  all  characteristics  as  equally  important  and 
fails to distinguish sufficiently between core generating traits and derivative ones. 
The professional status of an occupation can be gauged on the basis of an analysis of 
the area in question and on an examination of the level at which claimants to professional 
recognition are operating, and their competence to do so. For Dreeben (1970) “the core of 
the issue is whether the members of an occupation have mastery of a viable technology 
applicable  to  human  problems,  and  whether  they  can  supply  the  resources  ...  which  are 
necessary  to  keep  that  technology  alive”  (pp.  200-01).  For  him  professionals  profess 
competence  and  trade  competence  for  recognition.  For  Dreeben  these  are  the  core 
requirements and generating traits of a profession.  
Any  attempt  to  gauge  teaching’s  claim  to  professional  recognition  must  respond  to 
the following questions: 1) is teaching/learning complex and is its complexity known and 
understood?  2) Is  it  supported by  an  adequate  knowledge/research  base  to  guide  current 
approaches and practice? 3) Is that knowledge base necessary for the successful execution 
of the job? 4) Are the individuals claiming professional recognition operating at a critical 
decision-making level or do they routinely carry out the instructions of others?1 There is 
widespread agreement among educationalists that the answers to these questions are now 
all “yes”. And if the professional person is the one that makes and implements the critical 
decisions,  in  the  classroom  context  that  is  clearly  the  teacher  irrespective  of  how 
well-equipped or ill-equipped he or she is (Burke, 1996).  
In some developed countries and many developing countries teaching is still viewed 
as routine and teachers are regarded as technicians. That view, however, has been widely 
rejected by very many prominent educationalists. It is argued that the knowledge base of 
teaching,  our  insights  into  the  complexity  of  the  teaching/learning  process,  and  our 
understanding  of  child/adolescent  development  have  reached  a  level  that  puts  teachers, 
potentially  at  least,  within  the  professional  arena  (Berliner,  2000;  Burke,  2000,  2002; 
Crowe,  2008;  Good,  Biddle  and  Goodson,  1997;  Shulman,  1987b,  1998).  Teachers’ 
decisions can now be informed by knowledge and directed by theory to an extent that was 
not possible up to recent times. Clarke (1988) claims that research on teacher thinking has 
“documented the heretofore unappreciated ways in which the practice of teaching can be 
as  complex  and  cognitively  demanding  as  the  practice  of  medicine,  law,  or 
architecture” (p.8). Shulman (1984) goes further when he argues that the teacher dealing 
with  one  of  the  reading  groups  in  her  class,  while  keeping  a  number  of  other  groups 
gainfully engaged, is simultaneously performing a  more complex set of tasks than  most 
doctors would face in a lifetime of practice. In a later article he concludes: “The only time 
a  physician  [doctor]  could  possibly  encounter  a  situation  of  comparable  complexity  [to 
that of a teacher] would be in the emergency room of a hospital during or after a natural 
disaster” (Shulman, 1987a: 376).  
In  support  of  these  contentions,  Howey  and  Zimpler  (1999)  claim  that,  at  its  best, 
teaching  is  highly  clinical  in  nature  and  rooted  in  an  intellectual  exercise  that  has 
distinctive properties of teacher reasoning. Teachers, according to Griffin (1999), need to 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

 CHAPTER 5: THE QUALITY OF TEACHERS AND TEACHING – 101 
 
 
be  able to  make  “multiple,  often  simultaneous,  decisions,  related  to  content,  pedagogy, 
student  relationships,  praise  and  censure,  materials  of  instruction,  interactions  with 
colleagues and others …” (p. 8). In his review of the relevant research, Berliner (1987) 
concluded that teachers make up to 30 non-trivial work-related decisions every hour in a 
classroom  context  where  an  estimated  1 500  interactions  may  take  place  daily  between 
teachers and their pupils. Such decisions, like any other clinical decision about children, 
are  critically  important  to  the  pupils  who  are  directly  affected  by  them,  and  to  their 
parents. If there is any doubt in this regard, one has simply to reflect on the impact of an 
unfair, unjust or wrong decision that a teacher made about oneself or simply observe the 
effects of even the most “insignificant” teacher decisions on one’s own children. 
The  foregoing  is  not  a  claim  that  all  teachers,  any  more  than  all  members  of  other 
professions,  can  justifiably  claim  professional  recognition.  If  professionals  trade 
competence  for  recognition,  as  Dreeben  (1970)  says,  then  incompetent  members  of  any 
profession  are  not  entitled to  such  recognition.  Herein  lies  the  challenge  to  all  teachers, 
and  to  teacher  educators  in  pre-service  education  of  teachers  (PRESET),  in-service 
education of teachers (INSET) and continuing professional development (CPD), to ensure 
levels  of  up-to-date  knowledge  and  expertise  that  will  enable  classroom  practitioners to 
competently take and implement the many critical decisions that confront them on a daily 
and  hourly  basis.  The  challenge  is  even  more  extensive  when  we  remember  that  all 
teachers  –  competent/incompetent,  trained/untrained,  well  trained/badly  trained  –  make 
the same decisions but with different levels of competence/incompetence. This brings the 
challenge  of  professionalism  and  professional  education  more  clearly  into  focus.  In  this 
regard Denmark (1985) said: “Professional status is important not because of what that 
status  will  mean  for  us  individually  but  rather  because  of  its  import  for  the  quality  and 
character of teaching in our schools” (p. 47).  
This  chapter  will  examine  current  PRESET,  INSET  and  CPD  in  Egypt  against  this 
mirror  of  international  thinking  and  current  good  practice  in  the  initial  preparation  and 
ongoing professional development of teachers. 
Arguments and evidence supporting teaching reform 
Impact of teachers on the learning of pupils 
While the findings of earlier research on the factors affecting student learning, and the 
outcomes of decades of reform efforts in different countries, were mixed, the evidence is 
mounting  that  teachers  are  the  single  most  important  influence  on  student  achievement 
(Cochran-Smith and Zeichner, 2005; Fullan, 2006; Swille and Dembéle, 2007; Cochran-
Smith et al., 2012). Furthermore, research evidence also indicates that at both college and 
school  levels,  how  lecturers/teachers  teach  is  an  important  determinant  of  how  students 
learn (Beausaert et al., 2013). 
The OECD (2005) sees teacher quality as the most important determinant of student 
learning  that  is  under  the  direct  control  of  policy  makers.  For  Feiman-Nemser  (2001) 
“what students learn, is directly related to what and how teachers teach; and how teachers 
teach depends on the knowledge, skills, and commitments they bring to their practice...” 
(p. 1013). This, she says, has direct implications for initial and ongoing teacher education 
for “if we want good schools to produce more powerful learning on the part of students, 
we  have  to  offer  more  powerful  learning  opportunities  to  teachers  [in  their  training]” 
(pp. 1023-14).  Hawley  and  Valli  (1999)  agree  with  many  others  that  the  training  and 
professional development of teachers is the keystone to educational improvement. In their 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

102 – CHAPTER 5: THE QUALITY OF TEACHERS AND TEACHING 
 
 
thematic  synthesis  of  pedagogical  renewal  and  teacher  development  in  sub-Saharan 
Africa,  Dembélé  and  Miaro-Il  (2003)  conclude:  “Quality  will  happen  at  the  classroom 
and  school  level  or  it  will  not.  Ultimately,  quality  education  is  a  function  of  the 
interactions between teachers and students in classrooms”. 
A study by Wenglinsky (2002) marked a significant advance over previous research 
on the impact of teachers. Using data from the 1996 National Assessment of Educational 
Progress (NAEP) in mathematics for Grade 8 students in the United  States, he explored 
the  link  between  teacher  classroom  practices  and  student  academic  performance.2  The 
study  found  that  the  impact  of  classroom  practices  on  student  learning,  when  added  to 
those  of  other  teacher  characteristics,  are  comparable  in  size  to  student  socio-economic 
status, indeed even somewhat greater. He also found that teacher classroom practices had 
the  greatest  impact  on  student  achievement,  out  of  all  the  ingredients  that  comprise 
teacher quality. Professional development related to these practices was the next greatest, 
while teacher characteristics external to the classroom (such as the educational attainment 
of teachers), had the least impact. 
Wenglinsky concluded that schools matter because they provide a platform for active, 
rather than passive, teachers. Passive teachers, he says, leave students to perform as well 
as  their  own  resources  allow  whereas  active  teachers,  using  good  teaching  tactics  and 
classroom practices, press all students to achieve regardless of their backgrounds. Where 
schools lack a critical mass of active teachers, he says, students will be no more or less 
able to meet high academic standards that their own resources and home resources allow, 
whereas schools with a critical mass of active teachers can help students to reach higher 
levels  of  academic  achievement  than  they  would  otherwise  have  done.  Wenglinsky 
concludes:  “Through  their  teachers,  schools  can  be  the  key  mechanism  for  helping 
students meet high standards” (p. 26). 
Greaney  (1996)  and  Torres  (1996)  claim  that,  because  of  illiteracy  among  parents, 
dependence  on  teachers  is  much  greater  in  developing  than  in  developed  countries.  In 
similar  vein  Bacchus  (1996)  argued  that,  given  the  lack  of  teaching/learning  resources, 
the  poorer  a  country,  the  greater  the  impact  teacher  quality  is  likely  to  have  on  student 
achievement  (cited  in  KK  Consulting  Associates,  2001).  According  to  Dembélé  et  al. 
(2003), “there is a consistent finding across studies that school has a stronger influence on 
student  achievement  than  home  and  other  external  factors  in  developing  countries, 
compared with developed countries...[since] the sources of school-sanctioned knowledge 
and skills are more varied in developed countries than in developing countries” (p. 27). 
As  in  developed  countries,  research  in  developing  countries  also  found  that  better 
qualified  teachers  had  a  greater  impact  on  student  learning  than  poorly  trained  or 
untrained  teachers.  Results  from  the  Southern  and  Eastern  Africa  Consortium  for 
Monitoring  Educational  Quality  for  Mozambique,  for  instance,  found  that  the 
achievement levels of pupils of teachers with lower qualifications, and those of untrained 
teachers, tended to  be lower than  the  results  of  pupils  taught  by  fully  trained  and  better 
qualified  teachers  (Mozambique  Country  Report,  2008).  Other  studies  using  meta-
analysis  have  also  concluded  that  the  influence  of  schools/teachers  on  pupil  learning  in 
developing countries is more important than the effect of other external factors (Riddell, 
1989,  1997;  Scheerens,  1999,  2000).  Carron  and  Chau  (1996)  argue  that  such  evidence 
provides  grounds  for  considering  the  school  as  “the  best  level  of  intervention  for 
improving quality education” in developing countries. 
 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

 CHAPTER 5: THE QUALITY OF TEACHERS AND TEACHING – 103 
 
 
“Teachers, as this report repeatedly emphasises, are the strongest influence on 
learning. … As the experience of countries that have achieved high learning 
outcomes clearly shows. … investment in teachers and their professional 
development is critical. ... Teachers, critical to any reforms to improve quality, 
represent the most significant investment in the public sector budget.”  
(UNESCO, 2004). 
Impact of teacher educators on the teaching of teachers 
If,  as  the  research  indicates,  teachers’  knowledge  and  expertise  are  significant 
determinants  of  school  effectiveness,  then  teacher  education  would  seem  to  assume  a 
position of critical importance in the delivery of high-quality education by teachers.  
Dembélé  and  Miaro-Il  (2003)  claim  that,  while results  are  mixed,  “most  studies  did 
agree  that  teacher  education  makes  a  difference  in  developing  countries,  including  the 
African region” (p.21). They cite a number of older studies in support of this claim. More 
recently the READ Educational Trust study in South Africa found improved reading on 
the part of students taught by teachers who had been trained to use specific skills for the 
teaching of reading (Schollar, 2001). Similarly, teachers trained to use paired reading for 
20  minutes  a  day  in  Sri  Lanka  led  to  significant  gains  by  the  pupils  involved  – 
approximately 3 times greater than the control group (Kuruppu, 2001). 
Research has also found that the most competent teachers are those who have a good 
mastery  of  the  content  knowledge  to  be  taught  and  have  also  studied  education 
(Greenberg, 1983; Erekson and Barr, 1985; Evertson, Hawley and Zlotnik, 1985; Ashton 
and  Crocker,  1987;  National  Commission  on  Teaching  and  America’s  Future,  1996; 
Darling-Hammond,  1998;  see  also  Cochran-Smith  et  al.,  2012).  Darling-Hammond 
(2000) claims that, contrary to common belief, there is strong research evidence to show 
that knowledge of teaching and learning processes is more closely associated with student 
achievement than content knowledge of the subjects being taught.  
Teachers  with  greater  training  in  teaching  methodology  have  proved  to  be  more 
effective than those with less (Guyton and Farokhi, 1987; Kennedy, 1991). Teachers who 
have spent more time studying teaching have proved to be better teachers, especially in 
the fostering of higher-order thinking skills among students and in catering for individual 
needs  (National  Commission  on  Teaching  and  America’s  Future,  1996;  Darling-
Hammond, 1998). In this regard the Wenglinsky (2002) study has this to say: “Students 
of teachers who can convey higher-order thinking skills as well as lower-order thinking 
skills  outperform  students  whose  teachers  are  only  capable  of  conveying  lower-order 
thinking  skills”  (p.  5).  Furthermore,  schools  where  teachers  receive  professional 
development  in  higher-order  thinking  skills  are  more  likely  to  have  students  engage  in 
hands-on,  rather  than  routine,  learning,  and  students  who  so  engage  score  higher  in 
mathematics  assessments.  In  addition,  students  whose  teachers  received  professional 
development  in  learning  how  to  teach  different  groups  of  students  substantially 
outperformed other students. 
The  bulk  of  accumulated  evidence  shows  that  beginning  teachers  who  are  provided 
with  continuous  support  by  skilled  mentors  are  less  likely  to  leave  the  profession,  are 
more likely to get beyond personal and class management concerns quickly, and come to 
focus on student learning sooner. The absence of such support has been found to lead to 
higher attrition rates and lower levels of teaching effectiveness (National Commission on 
Teaching and America’s Future, 1996; Darling-Hammond, 1998).  
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

104 – CHAPTER 5: THE QUALITY OF TEACHERS AND TEACHING 
 
 
In  addition,  there  has  been  considerable  comment  on  the  critical  importance  of 
teacher  education  from  personnel  with  long  experience  in  and  research  on  education  in 
developing countries. Over 40 years ago Beeby (1966) argued that, if attempts to change 
education  in  developing  country  schools  were  to  be  effective,  they  would  have  to  be 
linked to improvements in the training of teachers and that the pace of change in teacher 
training  would  determine  the  speed  of  change  in  education  systems.  Following  their 
Multi-Site Teacher Education Project in Ghana, Lesotho, Malawi, South Africa, Trinidad 
and  Tobago,  Lewin  and  Stuart  (2003a),  concluded  that  teacher  education  had  received 
little attention from policy makers, donors or researchers. They state: 
Primary teacher education policy has often been seen as an afterthought to policy 
on education for all. It is almost as if it is a residual concern that has to be 
addressed in the wake of policy on universalising schooling, which has a much 
higher public profile and much catalysis for development agencies. 
(p. 183) 
While  there  is  some  evidence  of  changing  attitudes  towards  teachers  and  teacher 
educators  in  developing  countries,  there  are  not  as  yet  enough  concrete  examples  of 
increased investment in them to demonstrate deep conviction on the part of policy makers 
and funding agencies as to the critical importance of part they play in the determination of 
school effectiveness. However, with the change of emphasis in developing countries from 
quantity  to  quality  in  education,  questions  of  how  well  pupils  are  taught,  and  how  well 
teachers are trained, are beginning to be seen as important. The Education for All Global 
Monitoring Report, 2005 acknowledged this when it stated: “It seems highly likely that 
the achievement of universal primary education will be fundamentally dependent on the 
quality of education available. … How well pupils are taught and how much they learn 
can have a crucial impact on how long they stay in school and how regularly they attend” 
(UNESCO, 2004: 28). 
However, the Joint Evaluation of External Support to Basic Education: Final Report 
(Netherlands  Ministry  of  Foreign  Affairs  2003)3  is  critical  of the role  played  to  date  by 
education policy makers in developing countries, of their failure to recognise the critical 
role  teachers  play  in  the  determination  of  school  effectiveness,  and  their  consequent 
failure to support it accordingly. It states: 
Teachers  are  obviously  at  the  centre  of  national  efforts  to  use  external  support  to 
accelerate progress towards EFA [Education for All] goals [but] efforts to improve basic 
education  receiving  external  support  most  often  fail  to  take  account  of  the  needs  and 
interests  of  teachers.  …Teachers  seem  to  be  more  acted  upon  than  acting.  …They  are 
viewed fairly often as an asset to be managed … an impediment to be overcome, rarely as 
change  agents  at  the  centre  of  efforts  to  improve  basic  education  …  a  consequence  of 
thinking  about  education  as  service  delivery  and  teachers  as  those  who  deliver  services 
developed by others; rather than seeing the teachers as an integral part of the design and 
development  of  approaches  to  education.  (Netherlands  Ministry  of  Foreign  Affairs, 
2003: 51). 
The  report  concludes  that,  if  externally  supported  basic  education  is  to  be  more 
effective, “greater credence must be given to the principle of teachers as partners and as 
owners in the development of primary education” (p. 54).  
What is notable in the Education for All Global Monitoring Reports (UNESCO, 2004, 
2005),  and  in  Dean  Nealson’s  evaluation  of  World  Bank  support  to  primary  education 
(World Bank, 2006), is a lack of recognition of the critical role that teachers play in the 
determination of school effectiveness, of the potentially very significant contribution that 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

 CHAPTER 5: THE QUALITY OF TEACHERS AND TEACHING – 105 
 
 
teacher educators can make to the effectiveness of teachers, and of the need to invest in 
pedagogical  capacity  building  for  teacher  educators.  Continuation  of  this 
short-sightedness  and  neglect  can  scarcely  be  countenanced  if  Rosa  Maria  Torres 
(Education  Advisor  at  UNICEF  Headquarters,  New  York)  is  correct  in  her  contention. 
“Without reform of teacher education” she argues, “there will be no reform of education” 
(1996). Her critique is so relevant in the present context of Egyptian education that it is 
worth quoting at some length. She wrote: 
What many policy-makers and reformers have not yet understood is that teacher-
education reform is a sine qua non [indispensable] condition for educational 
reform and vice versa. … While policy formulation elicits the ideal teacher, policy 
implementation does not take the required steps to build such a teacher. … 
Teacher education continues to have a marginal place in educational policies, 
generally far behind – in terms of interest and budget allocation – school 
buildings and educational technology (including textbooks). … The issue of 
teachers, and that of teacher education in particular, emerges as one of the most 
critical challenges of educational development. 

The modern discourse on teachers – which proclaims autonomy, empowerment 
and professionalisation – has come together with a deterioration of the teachers’ 
status, salary, knowledge and self-esteem. Teachers are viewed as one more input 
together with textbooks, time of instruction or homework.  
(Torres, 1996: 447-8 ,451) 
In  view  of  the  foregoing,  capacity  building  for  teacher  educators  would  seem 
critically  important.  In  the  allocation  of  resources,  however,  such  capacity  building 
targeted  at  teachers,  and  especially  teacher  educators,  has  generally  fared  badly  (Lewin 
and Stuart, 2003). Highly visible interventions that lend themselves to tight management 
and  quick  measurement  seem  more  attractive  to  ministries  of  education  and  funding 
agencies than less eye-catching and more difficult-to-quantify interventions, like capacity 
building, that require more sustained and long-term inputs (see Box 5.1).  
 
Box 5.1 Investing in “things” rather than teachers. 
“The  conventional  education  model  has  shown  a  clear  predilection  for  investing  in  things  rather  than  people. 
Educational  infrastructure  has  been  afforded  a  higher  status  in  the  budget  …  than  the  human  resources  for  the 
education sector. Human development and capacity building are complicated endeavours, not easily quantifiable, and 
do not yield tangible results in the short-term. 
There  is  an  overall  trend  that  aims  at  compensating  teachers’  deficient  general  education  and  professional 
training, not with more and better teacher education, but with educational technology … While teachers and teacher 
education tend to be underestimated, textbooks [and one might add, ICT] currently tend to be overestimated. In many 
developing countries, instructional materials occupy the second and even first place in terms of allocation of resources 
… teacher training usually ranks third or even fourth. 
Good  textbooks  without  competent  teachers  are  fruitless  investments.  ...  [However]  it  is  not  possible  to  choose 
between  investing  in  textbooks  and  educational  technology  or  investing  in  teachers.  Good  education  requires  both. 
However, from the point of view of learning and its improvement, teacher education undoubtedly has priority.  
Source:  Torres,  R.M.  (1996),  “Without  the  reform  of  teacher  education  there  will  be  no  reform  of  education”,  Prospects
Vol. 26/3, pp. 447-467. 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

106 – CHAPTER 5: THE QUALITY OF TEACHERS AND TEACHING 
 
 
The  fundamental  error  in  debates  on  the  relative  impact  of  various  factors  on  the 
effectiveness of teaching and learning is to treat teachers as just one “input” among all 
other  “inputs”.  It  must  be  remembered,  however,  that  teachers  are  educational  agents 
while  textbooks,  technology,  teaching  materials,  and  other  aids  of  this  kind,  are 
educational  tools  the  value  of  which  is  determined  by  the  expertise  of  those  who  use 
them. Just as good woodwork tools are of little use to a non-carpenter, so textbooks and 
other  aids/equipment  are  of  little  value  to  teachers  who  have  not  been  trained  in  their 
effective use.  
The foregoing information on teaching, teachers and teacher educators provides a lens 
through which current approaches in Egyptian schools and teacher education institutions 
can be viewed.  
Critique of traditional approaches to pre-service education of teachers 
The  preparation  and  professional  development  of  teachers  is  a  contested  area 
worldwide and debate in this area has been intense for several decades. While there has 
been and still is a  diversity  of  provision,  clear  patterns  of  good,  research-based  practice 
have emerged and have been well documented (Hargreaves, 2003; OECD, 2005; Schwille 
and  Dembélé,  2007;  O’Donoghue  and  Whitehead,  2008;  Conway  et  al.,  2009).  The 
shortcomings  of traditional  approaches  are highlighted  by  the  emerging  consensus  as to 
what  constitutes  good  practice  in  teacher  preparation  and  development.  Together  they 
provide a measure against which current practices in Egyptian teacher education can be 
judged. 
Lack of integration in programmes 
In  their  review  of  93  empirical  studies  of  how  beginning  teachers  learn  to  teach, 
Wideen  et  al.  (1998)  concluded  that  the  implicit  theory  underlying  traditional  teacher 
training  was  based  on  the  view  that  learning  to  teach  is  a  process  of  acquiring 
propositional  knowledge  about  teaching  in  college/university  and  applying  it  later  in 
schools.  Research  studies  lend  little  support  to  the  effectiveness  or  appropriateness  of 
models  of  teacher  preparation  based  on  that  view  (Zeichner  and  Tabachnick,  1981; 
Fisher,  1992;  Sprinthall,  Reiman  and  Thies-Sprinthall,  1996;  Kortagen  and  Kessels, 
1999). 
Traditional programmes have suffered from a critical lack of integration between the 
component elements. In this regard Feiman-Nemser (2001) has noted: 
The typical pre-service programme is a collection of unrelated courses and field 
experiences [and] is a weak intervention compared with the influence of teachers’ 
own schooling and their on-the-job experience. ... Professional development 
consists of discrete and disconnected events. ... Conventional programmes of 
teacher education and professional development are not designed to promote 
complex learning by teachers or students. ... Too often teacher educators do not 
practice what they preach. Classes are either too abstract to challenge deeply 
held beliefs or too superficial to foster deep understanding. ...All of this reinforces 
the belief that the classroom is the place to learn to teach. 
(p. 1049) 
Not only has there been a lack of integration between the courses that constitute the 
professional  element  of  PRESET  programmes,  but  there  is  a  lack  of  critical  connection 
between  those  courses  and  what  happens  in  teaching  practice  placements.  In  teacher 
education,  as  in  other  professional  programmes,  the  practicum  cannot  be  developed 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

 CHAPTER 5: THE QUALITY OF TEACHERS AND TEACHING – 107 
 
 
effectively in isolation from the overall training programme. It must be an integral part of 
the overall programme and reflect its approach and orientation. This means that the entire 
programme should feed into, support and inform what is done in the teaching practicum. 
No faculty members, therefore, can be exempted from involvement in such an integrated 
programme. For this reason, a critical element in determining the effective integration and 
long-term  impact  of  PRESET  programmes  will  be  pedagogical  capacity  building  for 
faculty and all others involved in programme delivery and teaching practice supervision. 
In  many  countries,  including  Egypt,  the  study  of  academic  subjects  in  traditional 
PRESET  programmes  usually  takes  place  in  other  faculties  or  departments  and,  by  and 
large, operates separately from what goes on in the faculties of education. This helps to 
create  a  dichotomy  between  subject-matter  knowledge  and  pedagogy.  Academic 
departments  tend  to  focus  solely  on  the  mastery  of  content  knowledge  in  their  courses, 
believing  that  that  those  who  succeed  in  this  regard  will  be  able  to  teach  that  content 
effectively  to  school  students.  The  assumption  that  mastery  of  content  is  the  major 
prerequisite for successful teaching is still fairly widespread (cf. Adler, 1982; Ball et al.
2008;  Education  Next,  2002).  While  teachers  cannot  teach  what  they  do  not  know,  and 
are  in  danger  of  misrepresenting  material  to  students  if  they  do  not  understand  how 
scholars  in  different  fields  think  differently  about  their  subject  areas,  research  indicates 
that  content  knowledge  on  its  own  is  no  guarantee  of  effective  teaching  (Ball  and 
McDiarmid, 1990; Murray, 2008; Weiland, 2008).  
The assumption that the university study of academic subjects will cross-fertilise the 
subsequent  teaching  of  those  subjects  in  schools  has  been  so  strong  that,  until  recent 
times, there seemed to be no need of proof to verify something widely regarded as self-
evident. However, with the exception of secondary school mathematics teaching (and in 
some  cases,  science),  research  has  shown  this  relationship  to  be  weak  or  non-existent 
(Menand, 1997, 2001; Floden and Miniketti, 2008; Weiland, 2008; Cochran-Smith et al., 
2012).  Furthermore,  a  number  of  studies  have  found  that  students  who  majored  in 
academic  subjects  at  university  do  not  teach  those  subjects  better  in  schools  than  non-
majors  (Kennedy,  1991;  Greaney  et  al.,  1999).  Bennett  and  Carré  (1993)  summarise 
current  thinking  in  this  regard  well  when  they  say:  “Subject-matter  knowledge  is  a 
necessary but not sufficient ingredient for competent teaching performance” (p. 215). 
Pedagogical content knowledge 
The  most  notable  attempt  to  address  the  dichotomy  between  pedagogy  and 
subject-matter  knowledge  in  teacher  education  has  been  made  by  Hasweh  (1985,  2005, 
2013) [in press]) and Shulman (1986, 1987b, 1998) with their development of the concept 
of  pedagogical  content  knowledge  (PCK).  For  them  PCK  is  a  specialised  kind  of 
knowledge that distinguishes teachers from others who study the same subject areas but 
not  with  a  view  to  teaching  them.  PCK  includes  not  only  mastery  of  the  content  to  be 
taught,  but  also  the  development  or  construction  of  a  range  of  skills  for  teaching  that 
content  to  students  by  means  of  illustrations,  demonstrations,  examples,  analogies  and 
other proven teaching techniques that make the subject comprehensible to others. PCK is 
essentially a collection of teachers’ pedagogical constructions. These enable teachers to 
build  bridges  between  their  sophisticated  understanding  of  subject  matter  and  their 
students’ developing understanding, and to adapt their instruction to the varying ability 
levels  and  other  characteristics  of  students.  Success  in  teaching,  therefore,  requires  not 
just  knowledge  of  content  of  particular  subjects  but,  rather,  an  understanding  of  their 
central  conceptual  and  organising  principles  in  sufficient  depth  to  construct  ways  of 
teaching them and taking students to the heart of them in a manner appropriate their age 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

108 – CHAPTER 5: THE QUALITY OF TEACHERS AND TEACHING 
 
 
and  context.  For  this  reason  Goodlad  (1990)  says  that  “teachers  learn  the  necessary 
subject matter twice – the first time in order that it be part of their being, the second time 
in  order  to  teach  it”  (p.52).  From  the  perspective  of  becoming  an  effective  teacher, 
Shulman  (1998)  sees  as  much  value  accruing  from  situated  teaching  practice,  and 
research related thereto, as from the study of the academic subjects themselves (see also 
Weiland, 2008). In an earlier publication Shulman (1986) said: “Mere content knowledge 
is  likely  to  be  as  useless  pedagogically  as  content-free  skill”  (p.8).  Kennedy  (1991) 
suggested that one of the reasons for her finding that student teachers who have majored 
in certain academic subject areas do not teach those subjects better than non-majors, is a 
lack of emphasis on subject-related PCK in their training. 
For Darling-Hammond (2008), becoming a teacher entails not only learning to “think 
like  a  teacher”  but  also  to  “act  as  a  teacher”.  This  will  require  the  integration  of  the 
theoretically  based  knowledge,  normally  taught  in  college  or  university  in  the  form  of 
coursework, with experience-based knowledge located in the practice of teachers and the 
realities  of  schools.  Establishing  and  maintaining  the  “connective  tissue”  between 
coursework  and  clinical  work  in  teacher  preparation  programmes  is,  according  to 
Feiman-Nemser  (2001),  a  perennial  challenge  for  teacher  educators.  This  challenge 
became  more  acute  with  the  absorption  of  teacher  education  into  the  university  sector 
where  the  tendency  has  been  to  concentrate  on  and  frontload  coursework  and  pay 
insufficient  attention  to  clinical  experience.  A  growing  body  of  research  confirms  that 
where  coursework  and  fieldwork  are  undertaken  simultaneously,  it  supports  student 
learning  more  effectively  and  student  teachers  understand  both  theory  and  practice 
differently (Darling-Hammond and Bransford, 2005). Failure to maintain this connection 
is  likely  to  “render  the  coursework  much  less  powerful  and  productive  than  might 
otherwise be the case” (Darling-Hammond, 2008: 1321). 
The  foregoing  would  seem  to  indicate  the  need  for  a  radical  rethinking  of  teacher 
education  programmes  in  Egypt  (as  in  other  countries)  and  a  restructuring  of  their 
component  parts  to  provide  students  with  an  integrated  experience  of  coursework  and 
classwork  that  are  critically  and  transparently  connected  with  each  other.  Integration  of 
the  academic  subjects  studied  by  student  teachers  and  the  professional  components  of 
PRESET  programmes  needs  to  be  addressed.  The  integration  of  the  theoretical 
components, practical courses, and school-based practicum experiences that constitute the 
professional  part  of  programmes  needs  particular  attention.4  It  is  unrealistic  to  expect 
inexperienced  student  teachers  (or  even  practising  teachers)  to  successfully  accomplish 
such  integration  if  those  planning  and  providing  the  programmes  have  not  themselves 
addressed  the  issue  and  have  not  transparently  organised  the  courses  to  fit  in  with  a 
clearly  articulated  conceptual  framework  for  the  initial  preparations  and  further 
professional development of teachers. 
It is clear that critical and difficult policy decisions regarding the foregoing issues will 
have to be contemplated by those responsible for the development of teacher education in 
Egypt  and  unprecedented  reforms  will  have  to  be  considered  by  those  involved  in  the 
delivery of PRESET, INSET and CPD to trainee and practising teachers.  
Critique of traditional approaches to INSET and CPD5 
High-quality professional development is a central component in almost every effort 
to reform and improve teaching and learning. The aim of such professional development 
is  usually  threefold:  1) to  improve  teachers’  classroom  practices;  2) to  update  teachers’ 
professional knowledge; and 3) to improve student learning outcomes. 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

 CHAPTER 5: THE QUALITY OF TEACHERS AND TEACHING – 109 
 
 
While current provision for teacher professional development in Egypt is impressive 
in  some  respects,  it  does  exhibit  characteristics  of  approaches  to  INSET  and  CPD  that 
have  been  implemented  in  other  countries  with  disappointing  results.  This  report  will 
examine  successful  and  unsuccessful  approaches,  citing  expert  opinion  and  research 
relevant to each, and identifying the implications of findings for the further development 
of INSET and CPD in Egypt. 
Focus on quality rather than quantity 
In developing countries the logistics of delivery structures for INSET and CPD, along 
with  provisions  for  accrediting,  supporting,  monitoring  and  evaluating  them,  often  take 
precedence over concerns about the quality of what is being delivered and its relevance to 
the  identified  needs  of  teachers.  While  logistical  arrangements  are  necessary  to  ensure 
effective delivery of training, they do not in themselves guarantee the quality of what it 
being delivered. Furthermore, both experience and research indicate that while legislation 
or  regulation  may  ensure  compliance  with  INSET/CPD  requirements,  they  are  not 
effective in motivating teachers towards professional development (Guskey 1995, 2002). 
Putting  delivery  structures  in  place  and  formulating  laws  to  regulate  the  entire 
training/retraining  process  is,  in  reality,  the  easier  part  of  the  entire  reform  process. 
Ensuring  the  quality  and  relevance  of  what  is  being  delivered  is  the  most  challenging 
element  of  the  undertaking  since  this  will  require  ongoing,  up-to-date  pedagogical 
capacity building on the part of those developing and delivering the programmes and the 
administrators overseeing that delivery. 
Conditions for successful training/retraining 
There is cogent research evidence to support the claim that teachers experience much 
more  powerful  learning  when  INSET/CPD  is  related  to  their  felt  needs,  directly 
connected to their work with students, linked to the subject matter and the concrete tasks 
of teaching, organised around problem solving, informed by research, and sustained over 
time by regular contacts and inputs (Darling-Hammond and McLaughlin, 1995; Guskey, 
1995;  National  Commission  on  Teaching  and  America’s  Future,  1996;  Darling-
Hammond, 1998: Hawley and Valli, 1999; Guskey, 2002; Schwille and Dembéle, 2007). 
Set against this, the research evidence also suggests that INSET/CPD generally tends to 
be top down and provider driven and that the majority of teachers have little say in what 
or  how  they  learn  on  the  job  (Blackburn  and  Moisan,  1987;  U.S.  Department  of 
Education, 1994; Eraut, 1994; EURYDICE, 1995; Burke, 1995; National Commission on 
Teaching and America’s Future, 1996; Guskey, 2002; Schwille and Dembélé, 2007). 
Reviews  of  research  on professional  development  provision have  consistently  found 
that  most  programmes  are  ineffective  (Cohen  and  Hill,  1998,  2000;  Kennedy,  1991; 
Wang  et  al.,  1993).  Guskey  (2002)  suggests  that  the  majority  of  programmes  do  not 
succeed  because  they  fail  to  take  account  of  two  critical  factors:  1) what  motivates 
teachers to engage in professional development; and 2) the process through which change 
in  teachers  typically  occurs.  While  engagement  in  INSET/CPD  is  often  mandatory,  the 
vast  majority  of  teachers,  he  says,  engage  in  professional  development  to  increase  their 
effectiveness  judged  by  the  outcomes  that  teachers  use  to  gauge  their  level  of  success. 
These include not only achievement indices, but also students’ behaviour, motivation to 
learn and attitudes to school. In developing country contexts, financial incentives and/or 
other  rewards  may  be  significant  factors  in  motivating  teachers  to  participate  in 
INSET/CPD. 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

110 – CHAPTER 5: THE QUALITY OF TEACHERS AND TEACHING 
 
 
It  has  been  argued  (Hawley  and  Valli,  1999)  that,  just  as  schools  must  be 
student-centred,  INSET  and  CPD  must  be  learner  (i.e.  teacher)  centred  and  focused  on 
teachers’ identified needs. In this regard, Fullan and Miles (1992) claim that teachers tend 
to be quite pragmatic in what they expect or hope for from professional development, that 
is, specific, concrete, and practical ideas that directly relate to the day-to-day operation of 
their  classrooms.  They  argue  that  professional  development  programmes  that  fail  to 
address these felt needs of teachers are unlikely to succeed. Furthermore, Guskey (2002) 
argues  that  the  manner  in which  effective  change  occurs  among  teachers  is  not  a  linear 
process  from  theoretical  persuasion  to  practical  implementation.  Rather,  teachers  are 
persuaded  of  the  value  of  proposed  changes  when  they  experience  successful 
implementation of those changes and witness improvement in student outcomes. In other 
words,  change  is  primarily  an  experientially  based  learning  process  for  teachers.  While 
theoretical arguments and research evidence in favour of change are important, the actual 
process of teacher change is more cyclical than linear with attitudes altering in the face of 
concrete, experienced evidence of positive outcomes. Simply put, for teachers “seeing is 
believing” and any professional development programme that neglects this is unlikely to 
motivate  teachers  adequately  or  be  effective  in  its  impact  on  classroom  practices  of 
participating teachers. 
The  traditional  mode  of  in-service  provision  tends  to  be  short  one-off  courses  of 
lectures, workshops, seminars, and qualification programmes with  little or no follow-up. 
For  Fullan  (1993)  such  offerings  have  been  the  norm  in  traditional  INSET/CPD.  They 
have involved “experts” exposing teachers to, or training them in, new practices often in 
one-off in-service sessions. The success of these events was usually gauged on the basis 
of  a  “happiness  quotient”  which  measured  teachers’  satisfaction  with  the  in-service 
experience rather than the actual impact on teaching and learning in their classrooms. He 
concluded: “Nothing has promised so much and has been so frustratingly wasteful as the 
thousands  of  workshops  and  conferences  that  led  to  no  significant  change  in  practice 
when teachers returned to their classrooms” (Fullan, 1991: 315).  
Current thinking on INSET/CPD envisages the kind of professional conversation that 
leads to the development of “communities of practice” among teachers. Feiman-Nemser 
(2001) describes this well when she says: 
The kind of conversation that promotes teacher learning differs from the usual 
modes of teacher talk which feature personal anecdotes and opinions... 
Professional discourse involves rich descriptions of practice, attention to 
evidence, examination of alternative interpretations and possibilities. ... What 
distinguishes professional learning communities from support groups ... is their 
critical stance and commitment to inquiry. ... As teachers learn to talk about 
teaching in specific and disciplined ways and to ask hard questions of themselves 
and others, they create new understandings and build a new professional culture. 
Over time, they develop a stronger sense of themselves as practical intellectuals, 
contributing members of the profession, and participants in the improvement of 
teaching and learning. 
(p. 1043) 
Those developing policy for INSET/CDP provision in Egypt and the related delivery 
strategies would be well advised to take these research findings into account and develop 
programmes that are less top down and more teacher focused in their content and delivery 
mode. If the focus shifts more to catering for teachers’ identified needs, in time the locus 
of change/reform will have to shift more to schools and/or clusters of schools which, in 
turn,  will  have  to  be  given  more  responsibility  and  funding  for  planning  and  arranging 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

 CHAPTER 5: THE QUALITY OF TEACHERS AND TEACHING – 111 
 
 
their  own  professional  development.  This,  however,  is  a  challenging  transition  for 
centralised systems of education to make.  
Guiding principles for reform of PRESET, INSET and CPD 
The following principles reflect changes in the knowledge base of teaching, new thinking on the training 
of professionals, and good practice in the preparation and professional development of teachers. Each has 
implications for the reform of teacher education in Egypt. 
Recognition of the complexity of teaching, learning and teacher education 
The  structure  and  content  of  teacher  education  programmes  should  reflect  the 
complex  nature  of  teaching  as  it  is  now  understood  and  focus  on  providing  student 
teachers  with  the  resources  (knowledge,  skills  and  dispositions)  for  carrying  out  this 
activity.  This  will  involve  “strategic  understanding”,  “the  careful  confrontation  of 
principles with cases, of general rules with concrete documented events… a dialectic of 
the general with the particular in which the limits of the former and the boundaries of the 
latter are explored” (Shulman, 1986: 13). 
Since  uncertainty,  complexity  and  change  are  core  characteristics  of  all  professions 
(including teaching), professional programmes must equip trainee and practising teachers 
to cope with the reality of a constantly evolving knowledge base and develop, as Dewey 
(1904) said, as “students of teaching” and not merely as classroom technicians. 
Since  the  transition  from  coursework  to  classroom  (from  theory  to  practice)  is  no 
longer considered a linear process that trainee teachers can themselves handle, competent 
mentoring  is  now  seen  as  a  prerequisite  to  the  effective  education  of  all  professionals. 
However, if mentors are to assist student teachers in seeing the interconnections between 
the  various  components  of  a  professional  programme  and  their  implications  for  school 
functioning  and  actual  classroom  practice,  they  themselves  must  have  a  comprehensive 
and  up-to-date  understanding  of  overall  programme  content  and  rationale.  This  is 
problematic  in  most  professional  programmes  since  individual  faculty  members  tend  to 
concentrate  largely  on  their  own  areas  of  expertise.  Provision  of  competent  mentoring, 
and the professional development of  mentors within faculties, within schools and in the 
MOE,  will  be  a  major  long-term  challenge  for  all  involved  with,  or  responsible  for, 
PRESET, INSET and CPD in Egypt. 
Focus on classroom practice 
According  to  Griffin  (1999),  the  ultimate  goal  should  be  to  build  context-sensitive 
teacher education programmes (i.e. related to real-life teaching and learning situations), in 
which  components  are  inter-related  and  cumulative,  and  that  are  reflective.  Classroom 
practice  should  be  the  fulcrum  around  which  PRESET,  INSET  and  CPD  revolve  and 
provide a point of reference for integrating all the elements (theoretical and practical) of 
individual  courses  into  a  coherent  whole.  In  the  case  of  PRESET,  teaching  practice 
should  grow  out  of  and  feed  back  into  an  overall  integrated  programme.  If  teacher 
educators do not accomplish the task of transparent and integrated planning, there is little 
prospect  of  PRESET  students  or  INSET  teachers  being  exposed  to  or  knowingly 
experiencing a coherent programme of professional development. 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

112 – CHAPTER 5: THE QUALITY OF TEACHERS AND TEACHING 
 
 
Developing a repertoire of understanding and skills 
The  goal  of  teacher  education  is  not  merely  the  mastery  of  specific  skills  but 
developing  the  ability  to  use  multiple  skills  flexibly,  consistently  and  appropriately  in 
whatever  situation  teachers  find  themselves,  whatever  subjects  they  are  teaching,  and 
whatever pupils they are dealing with. In keeping with this approach, Alexander, (1995) 
has described the goal of teacher education as “fitness for purpose”. This implies that “the 
effective teacher is someone with …a repertoire of diverse organisational strategies and 
teaching  techniques,  grounded  in  clearly-articulated  goals  and  secure  knowledge  of 
subject-matter  and  pupil  learning,  who  then  selects  from  this  pedagogical  repertoire 
according  to  the  unique  practical  needs  and  circumstances  of  his  or  her  professional 
situation rather than the dictates of educational fashion, ideology or habit” (p. 2). 
Teachers  in  developing  countries  seldom,  if  ever,  see  a  variety  of  teaching  skills 
either in school or in college or university. They therefore model their own  teaching on 
the  teacher-centred,  transmission-oriented  approaches  through  which  they  themselves 
were taught (Lewin and Stuart, 2003; Schweisfurth, 2011). On learning of child-centred, 
discovery-oriented  methods  of  teaching  and  learning,  the  tendency  (often 
encouraged/mandated  by  policy  makers,  sometimes  with  the  support  of  ill-advised 
consultants) is to abandon traditional approaches altogether (see Schweisfurth, 2011 and 
Thompson,  2013).  Yet  the  reality  of  teaching  in  developing  countries  like  Egypt  is  that 
classes are often large, facilities poor, teaching aids scarce, and that societies tend to be 
more  authoritarian  and  adult-centred  than  child-centred.  In  face  of  such  realities  and  in 
the  interests  of  implementing  realistic  change,  it  is  important  that  teachers  develop  a 
repertoire of teaching skills, including traditional teacher-centred teaching skills, and that 
teacher educators produce teachers who are fit for purpose in the contexts in which they 
are likely to be teaching (see Box 5.2). In Egypt’s case this will involve teaching large 
classes for the foreseeable future. 
Box 5.2 The need for a repertoire of teaching skills 
Having worked for a year in a teacher training college in Tanzania, Vavrus (2009) concluded that it might have 
been better to try to find ways of improving the quality of teacher-centred pedagogy rather than attempting to replace 
it  completely  with  a  child-centred,  constructivist,  approach.  What  was  needed,  she  argued,  was  a  more  “contingent 
constructivism” adapted to local conditions and circumstances. 
A study by Hardman et al. (2008) in Nigeria reached a similar conclusion. They argued that teacher programmes 
should  address  the  realities  in  Nigerian  classrooms  and  prepare  teachers  to  use  a  broad  repertoire  of  skills  some  of 
which will be learner centred and others more teacher centred. 
In  Namibia,  O’Sullivan  (2004)  found  that  learner-centred  teaching  was  beyond  the  capacity  of  a  group  of 
unqualified  teachers  with  whom  she  was  working.  This  was  due  to  their  lack  of  understanding  of  its  theoretical 
underpinnings  and  inadequate  resources  for  its  implementation.  She  proceeded  to  develop  approaches  which  better 
matched their circumstances and concluded that a  learning-centred rather than a learner-centred approach would be 
more appropriate for their circumstances. 
The continuum of teacher education 
Since  entering  a  profession  entails  a  commitment  to  becoming  a  student  of  one’s 
chosen  area  (Dewey,  1904),  initial  training  must  be  regarded  as  the  first  phase  in  a 
lifelong pursuit of well-informed, up-to-date and competent service in that area. PRESET, 
therefore,  should  be  thought  of  and  planned  as  the  first  phase  of  a  professional 
development  continuum  that  will  span  the  entire  working  lives  of  teachers.  In  a  very 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

 CHAPTER 5: THE QUALITY OF TEACHERS AND TEACHING – 113 
 
 
informative  discussion  of  what  a  professional  learning  continuum  for  teacher  education 
should  look  like,  Feiman-Nemser  (2001)  points  out  that,  to  date,  it  has  suffered  from 
fragmentation  and  conceptual  impoverishment  and  has  lacked  the  connective  tissue  to 
hold  things  together  within  and  across  the  different  phases  of  learning  to  teach.  For 
Howey  and  Zimpler  (1989),  “no  point  in  the  continuum  has  more  potential  to bring  the 
worlds of the school and the academy together into a true symbiotic partnership than the 
induction stage” since, during that transition period, schools need teacher educators  and 
teacher  educators  need  schools.  They  add,  however,  that  “nowhere  is  the  absence  of  a 
seamless  continuum  in  teacher  education  more  evident  …”  (p.  297).  This  notion  of 
teacher education as a continuum poses a major challenge for policy makers and teacher 
educators  in  the  Egyptian  context  where,  in  the  absence  of  a  clear  and  specific  policy 
framework,  PRESET,  and  INSET/CPD  operate  largely  in  isolation  from  each  other 
(Dewidar, 2012). 
Addressing the apprenticeship of observation 
Since  student  teachers  come  to  PRESET  having  observed  about  14 000  hours  of 
actual  teaching  during  their  school  years,  it is  critical  that  they  be  provided  with  ample 
opportunities to analyse their experiences: 1) to identify the rationale underlying the type 
of teaching and learning they were exposed to; and 2) to evaluate the arguments for and 
against different approaches to teaching. 
Clarity of vision 
Effective teacher education programmes are characterised by a clear vision or mission 
statement  with  agreed  goals  linked  to  comprehensive  professional  standards  that  reflect 
the complexity of teaching. They avoid defining it solely in terms of narrow, measurable, 
competencies that make simplistic connections between teaching behaviour and learning 
outcomes (e.g. examination results). 
What  is  being  widely  advocated  and  implemented as good  practice  in  many  teacher 
education  programmes  today  closely  parallels  what  is  happening  in  modern  medical 
training, which is student centred, problem based, integrated and evaluation focused with 
an emphasis on formative feedback to aid professional development (Spenser and Jordan, 
1999; Conway et al., 2009). 
Characteristics of teaching in Egyptian schools 
The  evidence  suggests  that  teaching  in  Egyptian  schools  is  characterised  by  traits 
similar to those in many other developing-country schools in Africa, Asia and the Middle 
East. It is out-of-keeping with good practice as currently understood and operated in more 
developed systems and does not serve pupils well. Recognition of this led the Ministry of 
Education  (MOE)  to  establish  the  Centre  for  Curriculum  and  Instructional  Material 
Development (CCIMD) in 1988. 
With some notable and encouraging exceptions, teaching in Egyptian schools is still 
characterised by: 
  An  approach  to  pupil  instruction  that  is  teacher-dominated,  mechanical,  unduly 
repetitive, and over-concentrated on rote learning and literal recall of information. 
  An  instructional  style  which  tends  to  treat  pupils  as  passive  imbibers  of 
information rather than active problem solvers. 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

114 – CHAPTER 5: THE QUALITY OF TEACHERS AND TEACHING 
 
 
  Undue, monotonous and thoughtless repetition of material by entire classes. 
  Little or no emphasis on the development of critical thinking skills. 
  A tendency to over-emphasise esoteric details and unimportant distinctions and to 
pay insufficient attention to core concepts and ideas. 
  Too little connection of learning to real life and contemporary circumstances. 
  Scarcity and/or under-use of teaching aids. 
  Absence  or  underdevelopment  of  appropriate  teaching  techniques  to  cater  for 
individual pupil needs and differences. 
  Little if any attempt to develop appropriate learning strategies. 
  Rapid-fire questions with little or no wait time to allow students to ponder their 
answers (see Box 5.3). 
  A  preponderance  of  lower-order  questions  and  the  underuse  (or  non-use)  of 
higher-order questions. 
  Too  much  answering  in  unison  by  whole  classes  and  too  little 
questioning/challenging of individual pupils. 
  Failure to match teaching techniques to pupils’ learning styles. 
  Too much gender differentiation, with girls often limited to learning skills for a 
gender-defined set of domestic activities. 
Box 5.3 Wait time 
Wait  time  is  the  length  of  time  a  teacher  waits  after  asking  a  higher-order  question  before  allowing  pupils  to 
volunteer answers. In his review of several studies on this issue, Tobin (1987) found that the average wait time was 
0.8 seconds. When teachers waited three seconds or more the following significant changes in student reactions took 
place: 
  The length of student responses increased. 
  The quality of student responses improved. 
  The number of students who failed to respond decreased while the number of unsolicited but appropriate 
responses increased. 
  The number of alternative answers and explanations also increased. 
  The number of inter-student interactions increased. 
Source:  Tobin,  K.  (1987),  “The  role  of  wait  time  in  higher  cognitive  level  learning”,  Review  of  Educational  Research, 
Vol. 57/1, pp. 69-96. 
 
 
Such  teaching  is  clearly  out-of-keeping  with  current  good  practice  and  out  of  line 
with  current  understanding  of  and  research  on  effective  teaching  and  learning.  The  end 
result of this kind of teaching is that there is a considerable gap between the rhetoric of 
new curricular approaches and activity-oriented methodologies enshrined in the National 
Standards  for  Education  in  Egypt  (Ministry  of  Education,  2003)  and  advocated  by  the 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

 CHAPTER 5: THE QUALITY OF TEACHERS AND TEACHING – 115 
 
 
CCIMD,  and  the  reality  of  what  is  actually  happening  in  school  classrooms  and  in 
faculties  of  education  (FOEs).  The  evidence  indicates  that  approaches  to  both  teaching 
and  assessment  in  FOEs  are  similar  to  what  is  happening  in  schools  and,  rather  than 
helping to change them, serve instead to perpetuate the current approaches. While faculty 
might  preach  the  new  approaches,  they  tend  not  to  practise  them  in  their  own  teaching 
and,  thereby,  fail  to  provide  models  of  good,  up-to-date,  practices  for  their  student 
teachers to emulate. 
A number of reports have been issued in recent years on the status of and challenges 
facing PRESET, INSET and CPD in Egypt. These include: the SABER Country Report 
on  Egypt  (World  Bank,  2010),  the  Ministry  of  Education’s  Background  Report  for  the 
OECD-World Bank review of pre-university education in Egypt (Ministry of Education, 
2011a); Ginsburg and Megahed’s report into the reform of faculties of education in Egypt 
(2011); and  Ahmed  Dewidar’s  regional  study  on teacher  policies  (2012). These are the 
main source of the concerns about the quality of PRESET, INSET and CPD in Egypt that 
follow,  coupled  with  information  gleaned  from  interviews  carried  out  by  the  authors  of 
the foregoing reports, and by members of the OECD/World Bank team, with faculties of 
education,  the  PAT,  personnel  in  several  schools,  the  Teachers  Syndicate,  MOE 
personnel, school trustees, parents of school-going students, and trainee teachers. 
Pre-service teacher education in Egypt 
Overview 
Pre-service student teachers in Egypt are trained in faculties of education (FOEs) in 
the  muddiriyas  (governorates).  In  all  there  are  26  major  faculties  of  education  in  the 
country.  In  the  academic  year  2010/11 these  accounted  for  63%  of  trainee teachers  and 
65%  of education  graduates  (Table  5.1).  In  addition there  are  several  minor faculties  of 
education which train teachers for kindergarten, special education, physical education, art 
education,  music  education  and  industrial  education,  though  each  university  is  likely  to 
have  just  a  few  of  them.  In  2010/11  these  latter  faculties  catered  for  37%  of  trainee 
teachers and accounted for 35% of education graduates (Table 5.1).  
Table 5.1 Faculties of education: Enrolments and graduations, PRESET programmes 2010-11 
Providers 
No. of students enrolled 2010 -2011 
No. of graduates 2011 
Faculties of education 
78 543 
23 781 
Faculties of specific education 
13 000 
4 403 
Faculties of physical education 
20 937 
5 583 
Faculties of kindergarten 
4 390 
1 017 
Faculties of industrial education 
5 550 
1 493 
Faculties of art education 
1 321 
327 
Faculties of music education 
374 
92 
Total 
124 115 
36 696 
Source:  CAPMAS,  (2012),  Egypt  in  Figures  2012,  CAPMAS  (Central  Agency  for  Public  Mobilisation 
and Statistics), Cairo. 
The  FOEs  provide  concurrent  BSc  (Ed)  or  BA  (Ed)  programmes,  in  which  student 
teachers pursue their professional studies while also studying academic subjects in their 
areas  of  specialisation.  These  4-year  programmes  compare  favourably  in  length  with 
international  good  practice  (see  Table  5.2).  The  FOEs  also  provide  1-year  diploma 
programmes  for  students  with  non-education  degrees  who  want  to  become  teachers. 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

116 – CHAPTER 5: THE QUALITY OF TEACHERS AND TEACHING 
 
 
Many TVET teachers and others in music, fine arts and physical education take this route 
into  teaching.  At  the  postgraduate  level  FOEs  provide  special  diplomas  along  with 
masters’  and  doctoral  degrees.  INSET  and  CPD  have  been  the  responsibility  of  the 
Professional Academy for Teachers (PAT) since its establishment in 2008. The envisaged 
level  of  collaboration  and  co-operation  between  FOEs  and  the  PAT  in  all  aspects  of 
teacher  education  have  not  materialised.  Delays  in  this  regard  are  hampering  much 
needed reforms in PRESET, INSET and CPD. 
Table 5.2 Length of PRESET programmes in European countries 
No. of countries / education 
Education level 
Number of programmes (by length) 
systems 
 
 
3 years  
3.5 years  
4 years   5 or more years  
Primary 
35 


17 

Lower secondary 
35 


12 
16 
Upper secondary 
34 


10 
23 
Source:  European  Commission/EACEA/Eurydice  (2013),  Key  Data  on  Teachers  and  School  Leaders  in 
Europe,  
2013  Edition,  Eurydice  Report,  Publications  Office  of  the  European  Union,  Luxembourg, 
http://eacea.ec.europa.eu/education/eurydice/documents/key_data_series/151EN.pdf, (Figure A2b). 
A typical major faculty of education has seven education departments: 1) foundations 
of  education;  2) comparative  education;  3) educational  management  and  policy; 
4) educational  psychology;  5) mental  health;  6) curriculum  and  instruction;  and 
7) information  and  communication  technology  (ICT).  In  addition  each  major  faculty  of 
education usually has six teaching specialisation departments: Arabic; foreign languages 
(English  and/or  French  and/or  German);  social  sciences  (sociology,  psychology, 
philosophy,  history,  and  geography);  mathematics;  nature,  physics  and  chemistry;  and 
biological  and  geological  sciences.  Table  5.1  provides  the  total  number  of  students 
enrolled in PRESET programmes and the number that graduated in the year 2010/11. 
Like  many  other  countries,  teacher  preparation  in  Egypt  remained  at  the 
pre-university  level  until  the  mid-20th  century.  In  the  decades  following  the  1952 
revolution,  teacher  education  was  gradually  incorporated  into  the  university  sector.  The 
traditional 2-year training period was extended to a 4-year university degree programme 
with additional 1- or 2-year programmes for graduates of arts and sciences who wanted to 
qualify as teachers (Ginsburg and Magahed, 2006, 2011). Ain Shams University was the 
first to establish a faculty of education when it incorporated two existing teacher training 
programmes  (one  male  and  one  female)  into  the  university.  The  curriculum  framework 
developed by the Ain Sham’s FOE for undergraduates, and a similar one for the training 
of  postgraduate  (pre-service)  teachers,  were  adopted  by  other  university  faculties 
throughout  Egypt.  Apart  from  the  specific  academic  teaching  subjects  majored  in  by 
individual  students,  the  core  professional  programme  taken  by  all  students  included  the 
following (Dewidar, 2012):  
  Educational foundations and problems in Egyptian society. 
  History  of  education.  History  of  education  in  Egypt.  The  education  system  of 
Egypt. 
  Learning psychology and psychology of childhood, individuals and society. 
  Psychological hygiene and mental abilities. 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

 CHAPTER 5: THE QUALITY OF TEACHERS AND TEACHING – 117 
 
 
  Health education. 
  General principles of curriculum and teaching methods. 
  Field experiences – one day per week throughout the programme and three-week 
block placements during the final two years. 
The  programmes  were,  and  still  are,  very  traditional,  comprising  a  collection  of 
free-standing  courses and  field  experiences. This lack  of  integration  is reflected in  FOE 
documentation  and  in  the  overall  breakdown  of  programmes:  20%  pedagogy,  75% 
academic subjects and 5% languages (World Bank, 2010). 
As  access  to  education  in  Egypt  expanded,  the  demand  for  teachers  grew  and  the 
number  of  students  entering  teacher  education  programmes  increased  dramatically.  By 
2003 the number of major faculties of education had grown to its present number of 26 
and the total enrolment of student teachers in that year had reached 185 353. In spite of 
such changes little had altered in the teacher education programmes since the 1950s and 
from  the  mid-1990s  calls  for  reform  were  heard  from  some  Egyptian  educators, 
government  officials,  and  in  particular  from  USAID-Egypt  and  the  World  Bank. 
According  to  Ginsburg  and  Megahed  (2011)  “various  actors  seemed  to  appropriate  the 
global discourse on such reforms... [and] there appeared to be a consensus among [them] 
about the need to reform faculties of education in Egypt” (p. 9). Under the auspices of its 
Higher Education Enhancement Project (HEEP), the World Bank funded both the Faculty 
of  Education  Enhancement  Project  (FOEP)  and  the  Secondary  Education  Enhancement 
Project (SEEP,) both of which were aimed at enhancing teacher education in universities 
and  teaching  in  schools.  At  the  same  time  the  United  States  Agency  for  International 
Development  (USAID)-Egypt  launched  its  Faculty  of  Education  Reform  Project  under 
the umbrella of its Education Reform Programme. Although some progress was made by 
these  interventions,  the  evidence  from  multiple  sources  (including  the  funding  agencies 
behind  them)  is  that  the  changes  in  PRESET  have  been  minimal  and  that,  in  view  of 
significant advances in the professional training of teachers in many countries, the need 
for reform in Egypt’s faculties of education is all the more urgent today (see Box 5.4). 
While  the  National  Education  Strategic  Plan  2007-12  (NESP)  clearly  recognised  this 
need,  it  is  notable  that  none  of  the  FOEs  has  yet  been  accredited  by  the  National 
Authority for Quality Assurance and Accreditation of Education (NAQAAE) which was 
established  in  2006  as  an  independent  juridical  body  directly  affiliated  to  the  Prime 
Minister. 
 
 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

118 – CHAPTER 5: THE QUALITY OF TEACHERS AND TEACHING 
 
 
 
Box 5.4 USAID’s Education Sector Strategy Proposal (2002) 
Having noted that the Ministry of Higher Education (MOHE), along with deans and professors of 
education, acknowledged the need for reform, this report went on to comment as follows on PRESET 
in Egypt:    
“Pre-service teacher training [should be] radically reformed in the faculties of education to meet 
new  professional  standards  ....  [including]  new  admissions,  screening,  basic  skills  testing,  and 
graduation requirements. ... The massive numbers of students lead [to] large lecture classes, with 
a  heavy  emphasis  on  theory  rather  than  practice.  There  is  a  totally  inadequate  amount  of  time 
spent in school classrooms for observation, assisting or teaching. ... There has been no attempt to 
review  or  upgrade  teacher  preparation  programs  at  teachers’  colleges  since  the  first  college  ... 
was established in the 1950s” 
Source:  Aguirre  International  (2002),  Quality  Basic  Education  for  All:  Strategy  Proposal,  Volume  I, 
Submitted to USAID/Egypt. 
Critique of PRESET in Egypt 
In light of international good practice, the foregoing evidence and the findings of the 
team,  the  following  areas  of  Egypt’s  PRESET  programmes  are  out  of  keeping  with 
current  good  practice  in  teacher  education  and  are  regarded  as  being  in  urgent  need  of 
reform: 
Admission to teacher education  
Applicants for university entry in Egypt are admitted and/or assigned to programmes 
on the basis of their scores in the Ministry of Education’s final examination (thanawiya 
amma
)  taken  at  the  end  of  Grade  12.  Students  who  pass  satisfactorily  can  apply  to  the 
Central  Placement  Office  (CPO)  for  a  university  place.  The  number  of  students  to  be 
admitted  to  each  institution  and  programme  is  decided  by  the  Supreme  Council  of 
Universities  in  consultation  with  the  MOE.  The  entire  process  is  co-ordinated  by  The 
Admission Co-ordination Bureau of Egyptian Universities (ACBEU).6 
University  candidates  submit  their  institution  and  programme  preferences  to  the 
ACBEU  and,  in  theory,  are  matched  to  their  preferred  programme  and  institution 
according  to  their  examination  results.  In  practice,  however,  they  are  assigned  to  their 
local  institutions  which  cannot  refuse  to  accept  them.  If  there  are  more  students  than 
places  for  a  given  programme,  surplus  students  are  compulsorily  assigned  to  other 
programmes within the same institutions and are not allowed to opt for other preferences 
within  or  outside  those  institutions.7  Many  students  complain  that  they  are  assigned  to 
programmes for which they had not applied, in which they have little or no interest, and 
for  which  they  are  not  suited.  This  is  particularly  true  of  large  numbers  of  students  in 
faculties of education who are assigned to teacher education programmes as a last resort 
since  their  examination  results  do  not  warrant  entry  to  more  high-profile  and  desirable 
programmes. (For an account of overcrowding of teacher education programmes in other 
developing countries, see Coultas and Lewin, 2002; Lewin, 2004). The ultimate effect of 
this  practice  is  to  make  faculties  of  education the  “dumping  grounds” for academically 
weak  students  with  obvious  long-term  negative  implications  for  Egypt’s  education 
system. 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

 CHAPTER 5: THE QUALITY OF TEACHERS AND TEACHING – 119 
 
 
These entry procedures are largely responsible for thousands of students ending up in 
individual faculties of education across the country in spite of the fact that many of them 
do  not  want  to  be  there  and  nor  do  the  faculties  of  education  want  to  have  them  there. 
According  to  the  World  Bank  report  on  Egyptian  education  (2010),  the  result  is  large 
numbers of redundant teaching graduates in most subjects with the exception of areas like 
science and mathematics. It may be that, in Egypt as in other similar countries, politicians 
and ministry personnel are reluctant to close off this avenue for students who, on the basis 
of their thanawiya amma examination results, have few, if any, other options for gaining 
a  university  education.  While  this  may  be  understandable  from  their  perspective,  the 
consequences for teacher education, and ultimately for schooling in Egypt, are so serious 
that options other than teacher education must be sought for students who want to  go to 
university but do not wish to become teachers. 
The  downside  of  these  university  placement  procedures  is  that  many  FOEs  have 
students numbering in their thousands, which renders the effective professional education 
of  teachers  virtually  impossible.  FOE  staff  are  condemned  to  dealing  constantly  with 
huge  numbers  in  large  lecture  halls  and  seldom  (if  ever)  in  small  workshops/seminar 
situations.  Under  such  constraints  the  entire  training  process  tends,  of  necessity,  to  be 
lecturer-centred,  transmission-oriented  and  theoretical  rather  than  practical.  As  in  other 
developing-country programmes it fails to provide suitable models of up-to-date teaching 
and learning for student teachers to emulate (Schweisfurth, 2011). Because of the nature 
of  professions  and  the  complexity  of  professional  practice,  the  preparation  of 
professionals  must,  of  necessity,  involve  frequent  small  group  workshops/seminars, 
considerable  individualised  attention  and  coaching,  and  extended  well-mentored 
on-the-job  training.  This  is  not  remotely  possible  in  the  current  conditions  in  Egypt’s 
faculties  of  education.  Neither  professional  nor  public  opinion  would  tolerate  such  a 
situation in any other profession that prepares personnel to serve the public need. 
FOEs  reported that  many  of  their  graduates  cannot  find  teaching  positions in  public 
schools  and  seek  employment  in  private  institutions.  It  is  apparent  that  surpluses  of 
unemployed  FOE  graduates  have  accumulated.  Figures  provided  by  Dewidar  (2012) 
indicate that, while there are serious shortages of teachers in some subjects and in certain 
geographical  areas,  especially  at  the  preparatory  and  secondary  levels,  there  is  a  net 
surplus of 10 838 teachers in the education system as a whole, amounting to 1.2% of the 
total  teaching  workforce  of  887 251  (Table  5.3).  He  concludes  that  “there  is  more 
misdistribution than shortage of teachers” in Egypt (p. 38). However, the apparent surplus 
of teachers is at the primary level, and it is not self-evident that they could all be retrained 
for  effective  teaching  at  higher  levels,  especially  in  subject-specific  areas  such  as 
mathematics, sciences and languages. 
Table 5.3 Surpluses and shortages of teachers, aggregated by level of schooling 
School level 
Aggregated gross 
Aggregated gross 
Net surplus (+)/ 
surpluses of teachers 
shortages of teachers 
shortage (-) 
Primary 
44 736 
21 155 
+23 581 
Preparatory 
5 332 
22 156 
-16 824 
Secondary 
701 
18 296 
-17 595 
Total 
50 769 
61 607 
+10 838 
Source: Statistics supplied by MOE for 2011-12, in Dewidar, A. (2012), Regional Study on Teacher Policies – 
Phase II: Egypt Case Study
, World Bank, Washington, DC. 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

120 – CHAPTER 5: THE QUALITY OF TEACHERS AND TEACHING 
 
 
Long-term  planning  matching  PRESET  intakes  to  anticipated  national  needs  would 
be more helpful for FOEs and would facilitate better long-term planning of programmes. 
Box 5.5 describes one model of such supply and demand planning from Scotland. Such 
planning  will  have  to  take  into  account  the  number  of  teachers  retiring  annually,  the 
increase in student enrolments, the teacher-pupil ratio, the number of actual hours/classes 
taught  by  teachers  each  week,8  the  number  of  students  per  classroom,  shortages  and 
surpluses  of  teachers  in  specific  subject  areas,  and  the  level  of  funding  available. 
Different scenarios, and the implications of each for teacher supply and demand, are dealt 
with  in  detail  in  Chapter  8.  One  plausible  scenario,  based  on  anticipated  demographic 
growth,  increased  participation  rates,  reduced  attrition  rates,  and  higher  levels  of 
transition across schooling stages, estimates that the overall increase in school enrolments 
for  the  years  2015-2025  would  be  1.75  million,  or  175 000  on  average  per  year.  At  a 
pupil-teacher  ratio  of  25:1,  this  would  require  an  extra  7 000  teachers  annually,  putting 
further  pressure  on  already  overcrowded  FOEs  and  rendering  teacher  education  reform 
even more difficult. 
It is clear that critical and courageous policy decisions on teacher supply and demand 
will  be  required.  “Best-fit”  solutions  will  have  to  balance  quantity  with  quality 
considerations and take cognisance of the implications (positive or negative) for teacher 
education of any strategy being contemplated.  
Box 5.5 Planning for teacher supply and demand in Scotland 
According  to  a  Eurydice  (2013)  report  the  Scottish  government  annually  carries  out  a  teacher 
workforce planning exercise, in consultation with an advisory group comprising representatives of the 
General Teaching Council for Scotland, the local authorities, teacher unions and the universities. The 
basis of this exercise is a model which takes into account different variables such as pupil numbers, 
the number of teachers required as well as those expected to leave or return to the profession in the 
coming year. It then calculates the student teacher intake required to fill the gap between supply and 
demand. At the end of this process, the government issues a letter of guidance to the Scottish Funding 
Council. It is a matter for the Council to determine the overall student intake to teacher education and 
its distribution between universities. 
Source:  European  Commission/EACEA/Eurydice  (2013),  Key  Data  on  Teachers  and  School  Leaders  in 
Europe,  
2013  Edition,  Eurydice  Report,  Publications  Office  of  the  European  Union,  Luxembourg, 
http://eacea.ec.europa.eu/education/eurydice/documents/key_data_series/151EN.pdf. 
The structure of programmes and the content of courses 
The evidence indicates that there have not been significant changes in the content of 
teacher  education  programmes  in  Egypt  for  decades.  There  is  an  urgent  need  to  review 
the  objectives  and  content  of  pre-service  programmes  in  light  of  international  trends  in 
teacher education, the current needs of the system of education in Egypt, and the needs of 
the country as a whole.  
PRESET  in  Egypt  is  characterised  by  a  separation  of  theory  from  practice:  the 
frontloading of “actionless” theory in university in the belief that student teachers will put 
it  into  practice  later  in  schools.  Feiman-Nemser’s  (2001)  critique  of  traditional 
programmes  of  teacher  training  is  true  of  PRESET  in  many  developing  countries, 
including Egypt. She says:  
“The typical pre-service program is a collection of unrelated courses and field 
experiences.  ... [It] is a weak intervention compared with the influence of 

SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

 CHAPTER 5: THE QUALITY OF TEACHERS AND TEACHING – 121 
 
 
teachers’ own schooling and their on-the-job experience. ... The charge of 
fragmentation and conceptual impoverishment applies across the board. There is 
no connective tissue holding things together within and across the different 
phases of learning to teach” 
(pp. 1014, 1049).  
This  approach,  has  been  superseded  in  many  other  professional  programmes  and 
countries  by  a  research-based  belief  that  effective  professional  learning  needs  to  be 
inculcated through integrated programmes and mastered in situations similar to those in 
which  the  professional  service  will  subsequently  be  provided.  Good  practice  in 
established  professional  training  programmes  focuses  on  the  integration  of  theory  with 
practice,  which  feeds  out  of  and  feeds  back  into  the  university-based  programmes.  For 
teachers this requires extended well-mentored placements in actual classrooms, including 
team teaching placements (see below). The reconceptualisation of teacher education and 
the integration of training programmes is an imperative for Egypt.  
The teaching practicum 
The  total  amount  of  school-based  experience  afforded  to  each  student  teacher  in 
Egypt is very small by international standards (see Box 5.6). At best, it entails one day or 
part  of  a  day  each  week  in  all  years  of  a  4-year  programme  and  two  2-3  week  block 
placements at the end of the third and fourth years. It is estimated that, at most, student 
teachers  might  teach  20-30  lessons  during  their  entire  programme.  In  the  majority  of 
cases it is likely to be far less than this due to the logistical difficulties involved in placing 
huge numbers of students in schools. This is very much out of keeping with good work 
placement  practices  in  other  professions  and  in  teacher  education  programmes  in  other 
countries.  Good  PRESET  programmes  require  students  to  spend  up  to  25%  of  a  4-year 
programme  (i.e.  28-30  weeks)  in  well-mentored  school  placements  progressing  from 
individual,  to  group,  to  full-class  teaching  at  various  grade  levels  and,  finally,  to 
full-responsibility,  whole-day  teaching  for  an  extended  period.  This  practice  reflects 
practicum placement procedures in medical and other developed professions. 
It  was  not  a  surprise  to  learn  from  several  sources  (including  faculty  members 
themselves) that students teach very little during their training and that the placement and 
mentoring of such large numbers in schools is a well-nigh impossible task. For the same 
reason, the extent and quality of supervision of students during school placements is very 
unsatisfactory.  Here  again,  difficult  policy  decisions  cannot  be  avoided  if  there  is  any 
realistic hope of reforming and improving the initial preparation of teachers in Egypt. 
 
 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

122 – CHAPTER 5: THE QUALITY OF TEACHERS AND TEACHING 
 
 
 
Box 5.6 Teaching practicum placements in European countries 
The following data on school placement practices in 23 OECD education systems for which teaching practicum 
data are available, is provided in the Eurydice Report (2013) on education and training. 
Primary teacher education: in 8 of the 23 systems trainee teachers had extended placements, spending between 
600  and  1 065  hours  in  schools.  Taking  a  teaching  week  as  25  hours,  the  duration  of  practicum  placements  ranges 
from 24-43 weeks. The average in these 8 systems is 820 hours or the equivalent of 33 weeks. In the other 15 systems 
the teaching practicum length varies from 480 hours (19 weeks) to 78 hours (16 days), and in one case less. In 7 of the 
8 systems with extended teaching practicum placements, the programme length is 4 years. In the other it is 5 years.  
Lower  secondary  teacher  education:  in  10  of  the  23  systems  trainee  teachers  spend  between  400  and  1 065 
hours in schools. Taking a teaching week as 25 hours, the duration of practicum placements ranges from 16-43 weeks. 
The average is between 23 and 24 weeks. In the other 13 systems teaching practicum length varies from 390 hours (16 
weeks) to 67 hours (13 days), and in one case less. 
Of the 10 systems in question 5 have 4- to 5-year PRESET programmes, 3 range from 5.5 to 7 years, while one is 
of 3 years duration. 
Upper secondary teacher education: for 9 of the 23 systems, the situation is the same as for lower secondary 
programmes. The average is 596 hours – the equivalent of 23-24 weeks in school placements. In the other 14 systems 
the teaching practicum varies from 390 hours (16 weeks) to 67 hours (13, days) and in one case less. 
Of the nine systems with extended teaching practicums, four have 4-year PRESET programmes. In the remaining 
five, programme length varies from 5.5 to 7 years. 
Source:  European  Commission/EACEA/Eurydice  (2013),  Key  Data  on  Teachers  and  School  Leaders  in  Europe,  2013 
Edition, Eurydice Report, Publications Office of the European Union, Luxembourg, http://eacea.ec.europa.eu/education/eury
dice/documents/key_data_series/151EN.pdf (Figure A3). 
 
Liaison with schools and other stakeholders 
Apart  from  the  minimal  contact  with  schools  and  teachers  related  to  the  teaching 
practicum,  there  appears  to  be  a  lack  of  effective  working  relationships  between  the 
faculties  of  education  and  schools.  This  is  as  unacceptable  for  teacher  educators  as  it 
would be for medical trainers if they failed to liaise with, work in, and carry out research 
related to actual practice in clinics and hospitals.  
Not  only  are  co-operation  and  communication  between  faculties  of  education  and 
schools  weak,  but  it  appears  that  relations  with  the  Professional  Academy  of  Teachers 
(PAT) have not been developed as envisaged in the PAT’s official brief (Dewidar, 2012). 
The future welfare of both the teaching profession and teaching and the quality/relevance 
of  PRESET,  INSET  and  CPD  will  critically  depend  on  close  working  relationships 
between FOEs, the PAT and the Teachers’ Syndicate. 
Assessment 
There are no assessment centres in the faculties of education to evaluate performance 
and  set  accountability  measures.  Student  assessment  is  traditional  in  nature  focusing  on 
content knowledge and knowledge of theory. Educational assessment is not taught as an 
essential  competency  for  future  teachers  (Dewidar,  2012).  Given  the  deficiencies  in  the 
assessment  processes  at  every  level  of  education,  teacher  education  programmes  will 
need to give much greater emphasis to training teachers in modern assessment practices, 
including  for  diagnostic  purposes  in  identifying  students  learning  needs  and  aptitudes, 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

 CHAPTER 5: THE QUALITY OF TEACHERS AND TEACHING – 123 
 
 
monitoring  student  progress,  and  interpreting  results  from  large-scale  national  and 
international assessment exercises. 
Calibre of teacher education faculty 
More than a decade ago the World Bank’s Faculty of Education Project identified the 
following weaknesses in FOEs: low or uneven faculty quality, inadequate facilities, weak 
instructional resources, uneven management, poor quality controls governing entry, out-
of-date  standards,  and  lack  of  incentive  for  institutions  to  improve  the  quality  of  their 
teacher  education  programmes  (Dewidar,  2012).  There  is  little  evidence  to  suggest  that 
significant  improvements  in  faculties  of  education  have  taken  place  since  then.  In 
addition,  there  seems  little  conviction  about  the  need  to  change,  with  the  paltry  funds 
available reflecting this attitude. With a few notable exceptions, not much has been or is 
being done by way of capacity building to bring faculty of education members up to date 
with international trends in teacher education. Professional development programmes for 
FOE  members  have  been  weak  or  non-existent  and  funding  for  them  is  hopelessly 
inadequate.  Such  capacity  building  for  faculty  is  an  essential  prerequisite  if  teacher 
preparation in the universities and teaching in the schools is to be reformed. While there 
has been opposition to change by some faculty of education members, old policies, such 
as  those  governing  university  admissions  have  also  curtailed  the  freedom  of  FOEs  to 
make the necessary changes in teacher education. 
One of the functions of the PAT is to set standards for pre-service teacher education 
and  it  is  meant  to accredit all teacher  education  programmes  and  programme  providers.  
However, this has not happened for a number of reasons: 1) lack of co-operation between 
faculties  of  education  and  PAT;  2) PAT  has  no  legal  basis  to  interfere  in  the  work  of 
university faculties of education; 3) the fact that PAT operates under the MOE while the 
FOEs come under the authority of the MOHE, which contributes to the difficulties. 
Stuart  (2002)  argued  that  “any  attempt  to  introduce  reforms  in  school  curricula 
without  paying  attention  to  those  who  educate  the  teachers  seem  doomed”  (p.  378).  As 
has been previously noted, there is cogent research evidence and professional opinion to 
support  the  centrality  of  the  teachers’  role  in  the  determination  of  school  effectiveness 
and  of  the  role  of  teacher  educators  in  determining  the  effectiveness  of  teachers.  In 
reality,  teacher  educators  constitute  the  major  channel  through  which  pedagogical 
expertise  is  “fed  into”  the  schooling  system.  The  cogency  of  this  contention  might  be 
more  apparent  when  applied  to  another  professional  area,  such  as  medicine.  Improving 
the  quality  of  medical  care  in  a  country  critically  requires  (in  addition  to  medicines, 
equipment, hospitals etc.) well-trained doctors. The quality of their training, however, is 
determined in large part by the expertise of their trainers. If this latter area is neglected, 
the  quality  of  medical  services  will  be  seriously  jeopardised.  The  same  is  true  in  every 
other  professional  area,  including  teaching,  though  in  the  latter  case,  it  is  often  much 
more  difficult to convince policy  makers  and  funding  agencies  of this  argument.  Policy 
decisions in this regard are critical to any future reform efforts in teacher education and 
teaching. 
Induction, INSET and CPD in Egypt 
New recruits to teaching are first hired as “assistant teachers”. Within two years from 
the  date  of  their  initial  contract  they  are  required  to  apply  to  the  PAT  for  a  teaching 
licence  and  undergo  tests  in  Arabic,  English,  general  education  and  their  academic 
subject  specialisation.  Since  2009/10  MOE  personnel  and  the  PAT  have  provided  an 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

124 – CHAPTER 5: THE QUALITY OF TEACHERS AND TEACHING 
 
 
Assistant Teacher Programme to induct the new recruits into teaching and prepare them 
for the licensing examination. This programme covers general orientation. It also includes 
provision  for  on-going  mentoring  by  a  “Senior  A  Teacher”  or  an  “Expert  Teacher”. 
A teaching  skills  training  programme  focused  on  active  learning,  use  of  ICT  and  other 
teaching  aids,  and  assessment  is  also  provided  (World  Bank,  2010;  Dewidar,  2012). 
While  international  good  practice  advocates  a  continuum  of  professional  development 
from initial to induction to in-service teacher education, in Egypt such continuity between 
induction  and  PRESET  does  not  exist.  As  a  consequence  there  is  a  disconnect  between 
these two phases of teacher development which can only damage and limit the impact of 
the training.  
INSET  and  CPD  are  provided  by  personnel  at  governorate  (muddiriya),  district 
(idara)  and  school  levels  and,  in  particular,  by  the  PAT.  The  PAT  was  established  in 
2008 with the main brief, according to the National Education Strategic Plan, of “quality 
control  of  all  training  programmes  based  on  quality  standards”  (Ministry  of  Education, 
2007: p.84). Its functions include the development of standards for teachers, supervisors 
and  other  education  professionals;  the  testing  and  certification  of  teachers;  the 
accreditation  of  PRESET  and  INSET/CPD  programmes;  the  licensing  of  faculty  of 
education  and  other  trainers;  and  the  support  of  educational  research.  In  spite  of 
challenges  it  has  faced,  the  PAT  has  made  significant  progress  in  several  areas:  the 
accreditation  of  professional  development  providers,  the  carrying  out  of  needs 
assessments  among  teachers  and  other  professionals,  the  testing  and  licensing  of  very 
large  numbers  of  teachers,  the  provision  of  professional  development  courses  related  to 
the initial licensing of assistant teachers, and the promotion of existing teachers within the 
teachers’ cadre. In this latter case, 600 000 teachers (some two-thirds of the total number 
in  service)  attended  promotion-related  courses  in  the  8-  month  period  from  February  to 
March  in  2012  (Dewidar,  2012).  This  amounts  to  an  average  throughput  of  75 000 
teachers per month. Such mass training/retraining of professionals in one-off sessions of a 
few  days  duration  raises  serious,  research-based,  questions  about  the  quality,  practical 
relevance and impact of this kind of INSET/CPD. There is also the danger that teachers 
will  not  take  such  courses  seriously  but  simply  treat  them  as  routine  and  unavoidable 
requirements for promotion. Interviews with teachers lend credence to the belief that this 
attitude does exist. 
The  PAT  has  not  been  as  successful  in  fulfilling  some  of  its  other  stipulated 
responsibilities.  There  has  been  a  serious  lack  of  the  kind  of  collaboration  between  the 
PAT  and  the  faculties  of  education  envisaged  by  the  National  Education  Strategic  Plan 
(Ministry of Education, 2007) apart from the involvement of some faculty members in the 
provision of occasional INSET courses for the PAT. For this reason the PAT has not been 
able to fulfil its brief of accrediting PRESET programmes. Neither have the FOEs availed 
themselves of the PAT’s research findings on shortcomings in almost all areas of subject 
specialisation at each level of education. Such information, though critical to the design 
of both PRESET and INSET/CPD programmes, has gone unused (see Dewidar, 2012 for 
a  detailed  account  of  the  PAT’s  extensive  work  to  date,  as  well  as  its  operational 
difficulties).  
The  PAT’s  agenda  going  forward  includes:  the  establishment  and  accreditation  of 
training centres all over the country; the certification of at least 1 000 trainers in each area 
of specialisation; the professional development of MOE supervisors, school managers and 
administrative  staff;  the  accreditation  and  regular  updating  of  training  programmes;  the 
administration  of  regular  and  well-targeted  needs  assessments  in  each  area  of 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

 CHAPTER 5: THE QUALITY OF TEACHERS AND TEACHING – 125 
 
 
specialisation;  and  the  development  of  a  strong  monitoring  and  evaluation  system 
(Dewidar, 2012). 
The achievements of PAT were formally recognised in 2011 when it was identified as 
an  Arab regional  centre  of  distinction for  professional  development.  In  addition  a  small 
survey  of  147  teachers  who  participated  in  PAT  programmes  over  a  three-year  period 
rated the courses as “satisfactory” (i.e. an average score of 3.19 out of 4.00 on a 4-point 
scale  from  “strong  disagreement”  to  “strong  agreement”  with  12  questionnaire 
statements). Participants also made a number of suggestions for future PAT INSET/CPD 
courses.  The  most  frequent  recommendations  made  by  participants  related  to  the 
importance of conducting needs assessments related to teachers’ areas of specialisation, 
the subsequent design of professional development courses based on the needs identified 
and  the  selection  of  trainers  best  suited  to  meeting  those  needs.  Some  respondents  also 
suggested  the  need  to  focus  on  practical  teaching  issues.  A  significant  number  of 
respondents  recommended  the  scheduling  of  INSET/CPD  programmes  during  school 
breaks and summer holidays when teachers are free. A number of also stressed the need 
for continuity of professional development and follow-up support for the implementation 
of “lessons learned” in INSET/CPD courses. 
According to the World Bank (2010) report, INSET and CPD in Egypt fit largely into 
the  traditional  mode  of  in-service  provision  –  short  one-off  courses  of  lectures, 
workshops,  seminars,  and  qualification  programmes  with  little  or  no  follow-up.  The 
World  Bank  descried  it  as  “wide  in  content  but  narrow  in  sharing  good  practice 
throughout the system” (World Bank, 2010: p. 9). Most of the INSET/CPD provided by 
the  PAT  is  in  response  to  meeting  mandatory  requirements  for  initial  certification  and 
licensing  and  subsequent  promotion.  And  while  research  indicates  that  effective 
in-service  provision  is  sustained  over  time  by  regular  contacts  and  inputs,  in  Egypt 
provision  is  limited  largely  to  the  annual  20-25  hours  (around  3  days)  of  in-service 
training required for advancement to the next promotional level on the cadre ladder.9 This 
scarcely  constitutes  the  type  of  “continuous  professional  development”  that  is  the 
lifeblood of all mature professions. 
Members  of  the  OECD/World  Bank  team  received  mixed  reactions  from  school, 
ministry  and  other  personnel  to  queries  about  the  value  and  impact  of  various 
INSET/CPD  courses  attended.  A  significant  number  felt  that  since  many  PAT 
programmes had, of necessity, a particular focus on meeting the requirements for teacher 
certification and cadre promotion, this adversely affected the nature of their courses and 
the  relevance  of  material  covered  to  the  specific  needs  of  individual  teachers  and  the 
practical  needs  of  actual  teaching.  There  was  not  much  evidence  of  enthusiasm  among 
teachers  regarding  the  value  of  INSET/CPD  courses  provided  at  mudiriya  and  idara 
levels or about the ministry officials (supervisors and inspectors) who provided them.  
In  contrast  to  these  mixed  reactions,  there  was  stronger  affirmation  of  the 
effectiveness  and  relevance  of  in-service  courses  provided  within  schools  by  senior 
teachers  or  other  qualified  personnel  compared  to  other  forms  of  in-service  provision. 
However,  while  there  is  need  for  a  stronger  focus  on  schools  and  teachers  than  in 
traditional in-service provision, schools cannot operate on their own resources. They will 
need outside, up-to-date inputs if INSET/CPD is to engender effective reform of current 
approaches  in  line  with  international  good  practice.  There  is  evidence  that  such  outside 
inputs can act as catalysts for change within schools (Lieberman and Grolnick, 1996).  
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

126 – CHAPTER 5: THE QUALITY OF TEACHERS AND TEACHING 
 
 
Training for technical and vocational education and training in Egypt 
As  discussed  above,  the  quality  of  the  teaching  profession  is  critical  to  effective 
learning  in  education.  This  is  equally  true  for  TVET,  despite  its  more  diverse  and 
complex character. There are at least four different categories of TVET teaching staff: 1) 
teachers  of  general  education  subjects;  2)  teachers  of  vocational  education  subjects;  3) 
vocational teachers and external trainers in practical learning context within schools; and 
4)  in-company  trainers  in  work-based  learning  arrangements  (Zelloth,  2014).  Different 
kinds of TVET teaching staff  have different competence requirements, posing challenges 
for  TVET  PRESET  and  INSET  teacher  training  systems.  Advanced  policy  thinking 
argues for the basic roles and practical and pedagogical competences of TVET teachers 
and  trainers  to  converge.  This  would  mean  a  TVET  trainer  in  a  company  gaining  more 
pedagogical  competence  and  playing  a  supportive  and  mentoring  role,  while  a  TVET 
teacher  in  a  school  will  need  to  gain  a  better  understanding  of  work  (European 
Commission,  2010).  Similarly,  the  OECD  points  to  the  need  for  trainers  in  TVET 
institutions  (and  to  a  lesser  extent  VET  theory  teachers),  to  be  familiar  with  the  fast-
changing requirements of modern workplaces. Research confirms that trainers who have 
both pedagogical skills and workplace experience are most effective (OECD, 2010). 
Egypt appears to lack a vision for the training of trainers. A total  of 50% of trainers 
and instructors have no pedagogical training at all and more than 30% have received no 
training other than their general education to prepare them for their posts (ETF, 2003). In 
the  1950s  they  were  required  to  have  two  years  practical  training  in  addition  to  their 
education  degree,  followed  by  five  years  practical  work  experience  in  industry  and  one 
year  as  an  assistant  trainer.  Currently  the  formal  training  is  a  minimum  of  eight  weeks 
and  practical  work  experience  is  not  required.  There  is  also  pressure  to  use  trainers  in 
completely different disciplines from their qualification, with minimal “transformational” 
training, because of the ban on recruitment in the public sector. 
Competency-based  and  learner-centred  approaches  are  more  difficult  to  establish  in 
technical  and  vocational  education.  The  PAT’s  role  in  providing  professional 
development programmes and accreditation certificates to TVET teachers and trainers is 
yet  to  be  developed.  The  major  difficulties  are  large  class  sizes,  the  lack  of  modern 
equipment  or  enough  working  equipment  in  training  centres,  and  the  lack  of  employer 
involvement  in  providing  work-based  opportunities  to  keep  trainers  up-to-date  in  their 
disciplines.  During  the  site  visits  for  this  report,  the  Alexandria  Business  Association 
raised the issue of technical trainers’ lack of applied knowledge, and out-of-date methods 
and textbooks. They were clearly willing to be involved in updating skills which would 
ultimately benefit their members by producing students to meet their labour market needs. 
Triple challenge for TVET teachers and trainers in Egypt 
In  Egypt,  the  image  of  teachers  as  low-paid,  low-skilled  and  inexperienced  persists 
(UNEVOC, 2013). This is equally true for TVET teachers and trainers, whose status and 
career prospects are viewed to be lower than that of general education teachers (ETF and 
World  Bank,  2006).  TVET  teachers  have  lower  earnings  as  they  cannot  generate 
additional income from private tutoring, which is more common in general education. In 
2010,  the  share  of  teachers  who  were  not  yet  tested  and  licensed  is  highest in  technical 
secondary  education  (around  12%)  compared  to  primary,  preparatory  and  general 
secondary  education  (MOE,  2011).  Interlocutors  reported  that  TVET  teachers  in 
vocational  preparatory  schools  are  evaluated  less  than  general  education  teachers.  The 
main  part  of  teachers’  training  programmes  still  goes  on  general  education  rather  than 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

 CHAPTER 5: THE QUALITY OF TEACHERS AND TEACHING – 127 
 
 
technical education and teachers in practical workshops face many problems due to lack 
of  resources  to  update  equipment,  labs,  devices  and  materials  (Ministry  of  Education, 
2007).  
Although  national  education  policy  has  paid  increased  attention  to  improving  the 
situation  of  the  teaching  force  overall  and  some  progress  has  to  be  acknowledged  (i.e. 
goals and targets set by the 5-year NESP, establishment of the Teachers’ Cadre, creation 
of  the  Teachers’  Academy)  there  have  not  yet  been  any  major  changes.  Besides  the 
persistent structural problems that face all teachers in Egypt, TVET teachers and trainers 
face  a  triple  interconnected  challenge:  weak  pre-service  training,  coupled  with 
inappropriate  in-service  professional  development,  connected  with  limited  workplace 
experience.  
Pre-service teacher education 
In Egypt no principal distinction is made between the pre-service teacher education of 
general  education  and  TVET  teachers.  The  main  problems  identified  for  general 
education equally apply to TVET. Pre-service teacher training of TVET teachers is under 
the  responsibility  of  the  Ministry  of  Higher  Education  (MOHE)  and  most  teachers  in 
TVET schools have studied at public or private universities offering a teachers’ education 
programme.  Some  TVET  teachers  receive  their  qualification  at  middle-level  technical 
institutes  (MTIs),  which  offer  a  4-year  “Bachelor  of  Technology”  degree.  Very  few 
TVET teachers have additional qualifications to cover the technical part of the curriculum 
or practical experience in companies; most come directly from university to the schools 
(iMOVE, 2012). According to the team’s discussion with the Teachers’ Syndicate, early 
selection of teachers is needed in order to get the best candidates to go to university and 
raise the  quality  of teaching.  At  present  the combination  of the  low status  of  the TVET 
teaching  profession,  low  salaries  and  the  fact  that  FOEs  are  admitting  those  with  lower 
scores, creates a vicious circle and barrier for change. 
Teachers  and  trainers  for  practical  subjects  (“instructors”)  are  usually  graduates  of 
secondary technical schools and have little work experience of their own. Instructors who 
have  acquired  skills  through  work  experience  tend  to  have  no  formal  training  or 
preparation as certified trainers (Abrahart, 2003). 
In-service professional development 
In  general,  any  CPD  for  TVET  teachers  is  provided  outside  the  MOHE,  by  the 
Ministry of Education, various other ministries, the PAT and related providers. However, 
Egypt has no comprehensive teacher development programme targeted at TVET teachers 
and  trainers.  Instead,  there  are  numerous  fragmented  initiatives.  When  the  PAT  was 
created  in  2011  as  an  attempt  to  provide  a  systemic  response  to  the  deficiency  of  the 
system,  it  was  initially  unclear  if  it  would  also  cater  for  the  needs  of  TVET  teachers. 
Currently its mandate includes TVET but provision of training for TVET teachers is rare 
and  said  to  be  of  low  standard.  In  particular,  training  targeted  at  technical  expertise  in 
occupational  fields  and  practical  training  is  a  major  shortcoming.  The  Teachers’ 
Syndicate  has  plans  to  establish  its  own  training  centre  for  teacher  development 
(including TVET) to be accredited by the PAT. Governorates (muddiriyas) have a role in 
professional  development as  well  but  in  general their  activities  are limited  in  scope  and 
scale. 
Due to resourcing, certain ministries and sectors are in a stronger position. There are 
around 1 800 TVET teachers and trainers affiliated to the Ministry of Industry, Trade and 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

128 – CHAPTER 5: THE QUALITY OF TEACHERS AND TEACHING 
 
 
Small  and  Medium-Sized  Enterprises  (MOITS)  who  benefit  from  the  Staff  Training 
Institute  (STI)  and  the  Technical  Competency  Centre  (TCC)  operated  under  the 
Productivity  and  Vocational  Training  Department  (PVTD).  It  offers  continuing  training 
for PVTD staff as well as internships for new teaching and training staff through a unique 
“Experimental Centre” (Amerya) which also tests newly developed curricula and training 
materials  before their  introduction  into  regular  training.  Similarly,  other  ministries  have 
their  own  instructor  training  centre  or  train  instructors  in  vocational  training  centres 
belonging to them (ETF, 2003). In addition, countless donor projects, usually small-scale, 
involve  teacher  training  activities  introducing  new  approaches,  but  can  address  only 
selected  branches  or  pilot  schools.  An  example  of  larger  scale  is  the  EU  TVET  Project 
(2005-2013)  through  which  some  10 000  VET  teachers  and  trainers  received  further 
training. 
Limited workplace experience 
Current  PRESET and  INSET  provision leaves  little or  no  space for  teachers  to  gain 
practical  experience  within  a  real  working  environment.  A  typical  TVET  teacher 
graduates  from  school-based  TVET,  turns  to  academic  teacher  studies  at  university  and 
then  settles  back  in  a  TVET  institution.  A  further  obstacle  is  the  lack  of  an  adequate 
teacher recruitment and retention strategy. There are very few examples of teachers being 
recruited and trained from companies. Donor-supported initiatives may demonstrate good 
practice but remain “islands of excellence”, such as the EU TVET Project which created 
more  than  500  in-house  training  facilities  in  1 500  companies  in  the  garment, 
construction, food and tourism industries. Many of the Enterprise and TVET Partnerships 
(ETPs)  discussed  in  Chapter  2,  for  example  in  food  processing,  also  involve  activities 
related to training of trainers (teachers, industry and training providers) in the sector. 
Training of trainers for PRESET, INSET and CPD 
Since Egypt is unlikely to have the full range of up-to-date pedagogical expertise, it 
will have to be built up over an extended period of time, using the best available experts 
within  the  Egyptian  education  system  supplemented  by  significant  assistance  from 
outside  sources.  Such  capacity  building  is  critical  to  reform  since,  arguably,  the  most 
effective  conduit  through  which  pedagogical  expertise  is  channelled  into  any  education 
system is through teacher educators who service PRESET, INSET and CPD. Lewin and 
Stuart (2003a) commented as follows on the important role of teacher educators and the 
institutions they serve:  
In principle they could be powerhouses of change for PRESET, INSET and 
training of trainers. ... As developmental institutions they should be centres of 
support, inspiration and innovation for newly qualified teachers and experienced 
teachers as well. ...Teacher educators could be the fulcrum for raising standards 
among teachers and therefore in schools but … as a group they have been 
ignored [and] neglected by policy makers. 
(pp. 131, 177)  
This  calls  for  long-term  planning  and  considerable  investment  in  the  training  of 
teacher trainers in Egypt. It seems clear that, to date, their indispensable role in education 
reform has not been adequately recognised and their urgent need for up-to-date capacity 
building has been largely ignored and grossly underfunded. In this regard Torres’ (1996) 
warning,  that  “Without  the  reform  of  teacher  education,  there  will  be  no  reform  of 
education”, already cited in full, is apt. For Beeby (1966) the pace of change in teacher 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

 CHAPTER 5: THE QUALITY OF TEACHERS AND TEACHING – 129 
 
 
education will determine the speed of reform in education. Neither will succeed without 
highly qualified and up-to-date teacher educators. 
The need for and challenge of reform 
The  difficulty  of  engendering  educational  reform  through  teacher  education 
(PRESET,  INSET  and  CPD),  especially  in  developing  countries,  must  not  be 
underestimated  since  it  entails  a  change  of  “mindset”  as  well  as  the  development  of 
up-to-date  repertoires  of  teaching  and  learning  skills.  As  Fullan  (1993)  put  it: 
“Educational change depends on what teachers do and think – it’s as simple and complex 
as that. It would all be so easy if we could legislate changes in thinking”.  
As  has  been  noted,  the  evidence  clearly  suggests  that  both  teachers  and  teacher 
educators  are  indispensable  to  successful  educational  reform.  Beeby  (1980)  warns, 
however,  of  the  pitfalls  and  challenges  involved  in  attempts  to  break  the  cycle  of  poor 
teaching practices in developing countries. He says: 
Teacher trainers in low income countries who try to break with the old patterns 
usually get their ideas from travel in rich countries, or from books written there, 
and often hand them on, in the form of indigestible theory, to teachers who need 
practical guidance to take even simple steps forward. The reformer’s most 
puzzling question frequently is: ‘Who is to re-train the teacher trainers?’ 
(pp. 465-6). 
In  this  regard  Lewin  and  Stuart  (2003)  concluded  that,  while  “the  forces  of 
conservatism  seem  very  strong  in  teacher  education  generally,  …  where  good  practice 
was found, … it was usually as a result of initiatives by the teacher educators concerned, 
who  had  acquired  new  perspectives  through  formal  or  informal  study,  rather  than 
innovations being imposed on the colleges from outside” (p. 79). These findings, along 
with  the  arguments  already  made  for  the  potential  impact  of  teacher  trainers  in 
determining  the  quality  of  PRESET,  INSET  and  CPD,  constitute  a  cogent  case  for 
pedagogical capacity building that is in keeping with current wisdom and good  practice 
and that responds to the felt needs of teacher education staff in the historical and cultural 
context within which they are currently operating in Egypt. 
At this juncture in Egypt’s educational history the critical challenge is 1) to develop a 
comprehensive  teacher  strategy  framework  for  the  continuum  of  teacher  education;  and 
2) to  design  and  begin  to  implement  realistic,  incremental,  time-lined,  strategies  for 
reform.  These  should  reflect  up-to-date  thinking  on  the  professional  preparation  and 
continuing  professional  development  of  teachers  and  be  in  line  with  good  practice  in 
more  developed  systems.  In  the  Egyptian  context  the  advice  of  Francis  of  Assisi  is 
realistic,  apt,  and  encouraging:  “Start  by  doing  what’s  necessary,  then  what’s  possible, 
and soon you will be doing the impossible”. 
Integration of teacher education programmes 
As  seen  above,  the  typical  PRESET  programme  in  some  developed  and  many 
developing countries is a collection of unrelated courses and field experiences (Feiman-
Nemser,  2001).  Theoretical  or  “actionless”  knowledge  about  teaching  is  provided  in 
college/university  and  students  are  expected  to  apply  it  subsequently  in  classrooms 
(Shulman, 1998). In this regard Feiman-Nemser (2001) says: 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

130 – CHAPTER 5: THE QUALITY OF TEACHERS AND TEACHING 
 
 
Knowledge for teaching cannot remain in separate domains if it is going to be 
usable in practice. An important part of learning to teach involves transforming 
different kinds of knowledge into a flexible, evolving set of commitments, 
understandings, and skills 
(p. 1048). 
As knowledge from various courses and sources must come together in teaching, so it 
must be brought together (i.e. integrated) in teacher education.  
The traditional approach to teacher education has been superseded in more developed 
countries  and  teacher  education  programmes  by  a  research-based  belief  that  effective 
professional learning needs to be inculcated through integrated programmes and mastered 
in practical situations similar to those in which the professional service will subsequently 
be delivered. For pre-service teachers this requires extended well-mentored placements in 
actual classrooms.  
PRESET  in  Egypt  is  seriously  limited  by  the  lack  of  adequate,  realistic  and  well-
mentored  school-based  experience  against  which  the  relevance  of  professional  courses 
can be adjudicated, the usefulness of practical courses can be gauged and, in the context 
of  which,  individual  students  can  begin  to  develop  their  own  vision  of  education  and 
construct their own version of “teacher”. In current PRESET programmes the “cart” of 
theory  is  firmly  before  the  “horse”  of  practical  experience.  Even  in  the  case  of 
methodology  and  curricular  courses,  college-based  presentations  and  demonstrations 
inevitably take on the air of “theory” unless and until trainees gain sufficient on-the-job 
experience  against  which  to  judge  the  relevance  of  such  courses  and  realise  that  all  of 
them must individually construct their own versions of what they hear for application in 
their particular teaching situations (Schwille and Dembélé, 2007; Hasweh 1985, 2013 [in 
press]); Shulman 1986, 1987b, 1998). 
School placements should be planned to provide a strategic pedagogical experience in 
a  range  of  class  grades  and  school  types  over  an  extended  period  of  time.  It  should 
include  both  single-class  and  whole-school  experiences.  Goodlad  (1990)  argues  that 
student teachers should be treated as junior staff members, participate in and be exposed 
to  the  full  range  of  events  that  occur  in  schools  –  actual  teaching,  staff  meetings, 
curriculum  planning  sessions,  parent-teacher  consultations, and  other  school-community 
events.  While  the  tradition  of  placing  trainees  in  individual  classes  with  individual 
teachers  for  short  periods  of  time  does  meet  some  of  the  important  needs  of  future 
teachers  (e.g.  lesson  preparation,  presentation  and  class  control),  the  levels  of 
involvement and learning envisaged here are not possible during short school placements. 
Short,  single-class,  placements  insulate  student  teachers  from  the  larger  context  of 
schools as complex and going concerns and do little to prepare them for later membership 
in  school-based  communities  of  practice.  They  also  helps  to  perpetuate  the  notion  that 
teachers only have responsibility for their own classes and can generally operate as if the 
rest of the school does not exist (Lortie, 1975). 
Overcrowding in faculties of education 
Current  procedures  for  the  admission  and  assignment  of  students  to  faculties  of 
education have resulted in gross overcrowding of teacher education programmes and the 
inclusion  of  large  numbers  of  students  who  have  no  interest  in  becoming  teachers  and 
whom faculty do not want in their programmes. The result of such overcrowding is that it 
renders the effective professional development of teachers virtually impossible. Faculties 
of  education are forced to deal  with  huge  numbers  in  large  lecture halls, and  seldom  in 
small workshops/seminars. There is little or no scope for the kind of clinical tutoring and 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

 CHAPTER 5: THE QUALITY OF TEACHERS AND TEACHING – 131 
 
 
coaching  that  is  required  in  professional  programmes.  Under  such  constraints  the  entire 
training process, even when covering teaching methodology, tends to be theoretical rather 
than  practical  in  nature.  In  many  respects  the  current  arrangement  in  PRESET 
programmes is the antithesis of good international practice in teacher education. 
Rectifying  this  is  a  critical  prerequisite  to  the  reform  of  PRESET  in  Egypt  and 
presents  a  formidable  challenge  to  both  policy  makers  and  teacher  educators. 
Furthermore, until PRESET is reformed and updated, induction, INSET and CPD will, of 
necessity, be remedial in nature, as they will have to compensate for the inadequacy and 
outdatedness of initial teacher education. This approach perpetuates the problem. 
Pedagogical capacity building for teacher educators 
In  all  professional  areas  trainers  constitute  the  major  channel  through  which  up-to-
date knowledge and expertise are “fed into” the system. In the case of education, teaching 
and learning, this has been repeatedly stressed by educationalists, especially in the case of 
developing  countries.  Implementing  reform  policies  through  the  preparation  of  teachers 
falls  largely  on teacher educators.  On this issue  Schwille  and  Dembélé  (2007) conclude 
their  book  as  follows:  “Whether  teacher  preparation  is  university-,  college-,  or 
school-based,  teacher  educators  have  a  critical  role  to  play.  They  can  also  provide 
leadership  for  teachers’  continuing  professional  development.  Improving  their 
recruitment, preparation, performance and retention is therefore a priority” (p. 129). 
To  date,  however,  teacher  educators  as  a  group  have  been  largely  ignored  and 
represent  a  neglected  resource  and  opportunity  missed  (Beeby,  1966;  Torres,  1996; 
Stuart,  2002;  Stuart  and  Lewin,  2002;  Netherlands  Ministry  of  Foreign  Affairs,  2003). 
The  evidence  strongly  suggests  that,  in  Egypt,  teacher  education  and  teacher  educators 
continue to suffer from serious neglect. 
Beeby  (1980)  identified  the  reformer’s  most  puzzling  question:  “Who  is  to  re-train 
the  teacher  trainers?”  Egypt  is  most  unlikely  to  have  the  level  of  expertise  required  to 
accomplish this task  in the  country.  As  a  result,  considerable  assistance  must  be  sought 
from  outside  sources  and  more  developed  systems.  Accomplishing  the  task  of  training 
and  re-training  teacher  educators  will  require  major  policy  changes,  extensive  planning 
and substantial funding. If these are not forthcoming, progress will prove impossible and 
the  current  situation  will  continue.  As  the  National  Commission  on  Teaching  and 
America’s Future (1996) stated: 
New courses, tests, curriculum reforms can be important starting points, but they 
are meaningless if teachers cannot use them productively. Policies can improve 
schools only if the people in them are armed with the knowledge, skills and 
supports they need 
(p. 5). 
Finally, it is sometimes argued that, because the vast majority of teachers are already 
in  schools,  reform  initiatives  should  focus  largely  on  INSET/CPD  and  the  trainers 
providing  it,  rather  than  on  PRESET.  Lewis  and  Stuart  (2003)  point  out,  however,  that 
there  are  often  not  the  same  conceptual  and  practical differences  between  PRESET  and 
INSET in developing countries as there are in high-income ones. In developing countries, 
full  responsibility  teaching  may  precede,  or  in  some  case  coincide  with,  formal  (initial) 
teacher  education  through  INSET.  Furthermore,  Dewey  (1904),  Feiman-Nemser  (2001) 
and  many  others  argue  that  teacher  education  should  be  viewed  as  a  continuum  of 
professional  development  with  PRESET  as  its  first  phase.  It  would  seem  unwise, 
therefore, to treat PRESET and INSET/CPD as separate entities because the needs of both 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

132 – CHAPTER 5: THE QUALITY OF TEACHERS AND TEACHING 
 
 
are most likely to be met in the same way, i.e. the development and training of competent 
trainers  through  pedagogical  capacity  building.  Of  teacher  trainers  and  the  institutions 
they serve, Lewin and Stuart (2003) had this to say: 
In principle they could be powerhouses of change for PRESET, INSET and training of 
trainers.  ...  They  should  be  centres  of  support,  inspiration  and  innovation  for  newly 
qualified  teachers  and  experienced  teachers  as  well.  ...Teacher  educators  could  be  the 
fulcrum for raising standards among teachers and therefore in schools.
 (pp. 131, 177). 
Information and communication technology in teaching and teacher education. 
In  developing  countries  there  are  often  unrealistic  expectations  about  the  impact  of 
information and communication technology (ICT) on education. The frequent assumption 
is that if the ICT hardware is supplied, and teachers get some training in its use, a positive 
impact  on  teaching  and  learning  is  assured.  The  evidence  in  this  regard  in  developed 
countries is mixed and has fallen short of initial expectations (see Box 5.7).  
Box 5.7 Pedagogy and ICT use in schools 
Law  et  al.  (2008)  reported  on  the  use  of  ICT  by  mathematics  and  science  teachers  in 
22 high-income  countries.  They  concluded:  “Computer  access  is  a  necessary  but  not  sufficient 
condition  for  ICT  use  in  learning  and  teaching.  ...  Almost  100%  of  the  schools  had  computer  and 
Internet  access  for  pedagogical  use,  but  the  extent  to  which  teachers  adopted  ICT  differed  greatly 
across systems, varying from below 20% to over 80%” (p. 275).  
Of the 22 systems, 15 had no ICT-related requirements for certification; 13 had no professional 
ICT development requirements; and 12 had no programmes for stimulating new pedagogies. Teachers 
with a strong 21st century outlook were the most likely to use ICT while traditional teachers were the 
least  likely.  Two  factors  were found  to  have  a  critical  impact  on  the  level  of  ICT  use:  1) the  vision 
that  school  principals  have  in  its  regard;  and  2) the  technical  and  pedagogical  support  available  to 
teachers and students. It was found that teachers were much more willing to attend pedagogical rather 
than technical ICT-related INSET.  
The  researchers  concluded  that  INSET  should  give  precedence  to  the  former  over  the  latter  in 
teacher in-service and professional development courses. Finally, they recommended that ICT should 
be viewed as an integral part of the overall education programme rather than focusing on one or two 
strategic areas and that it should work in tandem with the curriculum framework.  
Source  :  Law,  N.,  W.J.  Pelgrim  and  T.  Plomp  (2008),  Pedagogy  and  ICT  Use  in  Schools  Around  the 
World: Findings from IEA SITES 2006 study,  
CERC Studies in Comparative Education, 23, Comparative 
Education Research Centre, University of Hong Kong, Springer. 
In developing countries the outlook for ICT use and impact on teaching and learning 
is  less  positive  for  several  reasons:  lack  of  financial  resources,  inadequate  supply  of 
hardware  (see  Chapter  2  for  the  situation  in  Egypt),  insufficient  technical  and  budget 
support  to  maintain  ICT  equipment  on  an  ongoing  basis,  intermittent  and  unreliable 
electricity supply, lack of adequate training in ICT use, poor quality of teacher training, 
greater  incidence  of  untrained  teachers,  and  the  urgent  need  for  pedagogical  capacity 
building on the part of teacher educators (including training in use of ICT in teaching and 
learning).  
As with any tools, the impact of ICT on teaching and learning depends on the ability 
the teachers to use it appropriately. While ICT is a marvellous tool in the hands of a good 
teacher, it can be a poor, time-wasting, instrument in the hands of an untrained or poorly 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

 CHAPTER 5: THE QUALITY OF TEACHERS AND TEACHING – 133 
 
 
trained one. The ability to use ICT well depends also on the quality of training teachers 
have received and the relevance of their ICT-related instruction to teaching and learning. 
In  reality,  supplying  the  hardware  is  the  easy  part  of  the  process.  Professional 
development of teacher trainers and teachers in its potential educational use is by far the 
greater and more long-term challenge (see Box 5.8).  
Box 5.8 Preparing PRESET teachers to integrate ICT in their classroom practice 
A study carried out in Belgium highlights the challenges involved in moving from ICT as a stand-
alone  course  in  teacher  education  to  embedding  it  across  the  PRESET  curriculum.  In  a  cross-case 
analysis, this study examined the ways in which the development of technological pedagogical content 
knowledge (TPACK) was promoted in three teacher education programmes.  
The  study  concluded  that  the  three  programmes  had  not  yet  succeeded  in  adequately  equipping 
teachers  with  TPACK  and  suggested  two  reasons  for  this:  1) the  failure  of  teacher  educators  to 
adequately  model  the  use  of  ICT  in  their  own  teaching/lecturing,  due  in  part  to  their  limited 
technological  competence  and/or  their  lack  of  understanding  of  the  potential  of  ICT;  2) the  lack  of 
adequate  pedagogical  knowledge  on  the  part  of  student  teachers.  The  need  for  an  in-depth 
understanding on the part of both faculty members and student teachers of the pedagogical reasons for 
and potential of ICT use in teaching and learning is forcibly put by one ICT co-ordinator and head of 
department when he said: “You can easily replace a pen by a laptop, even without a vision. But the 
main question here is: what is the added value [of doing it]? Where is the educational innovation?"  
The  study  concluded:  “ICT  should  be  infused  into  the  entire  curriculum  so  that  pre-service 
teachers  have  the  opportunity  to  (a)  understand  the  educational  reasons  for  using  ICT  and  (b) 
experience how ICT can support teaching and learning across different subject domains. Without such 
integrated  approaches,  the  knowledge  and  the  skills  pre-service  teachers  gain  are  likely  to  remain 
isolated and unexploited” (p. 242). 
Source : Tondeur, J. et al.  (2013), “Technological pedagogical content knowledge in teacher education: In 
search of a new curriculum”, Educational Studies, Vol. 39/2, pp. 239-243. 
 
There are some encouraging examples of positive use of ICT in the developing world. 
In the case of a World Bank-supported Teacher Education Improvement Project in West 
Bank  and  Gaza  Strip,  participating  in-service  teachers  in  one  West  Bank  territory 
university  are  submitting  all  their  “homework”  electronically,  sharing  videos  of  their 
teaching  and  exchanging  documentation  with  colleagues,  and  engaging  in  ongoing 
discussion  using  chat  room  facilities.  In  another  component  of  the  same  project, 
pre-service students in the Gaza Strip have taken the initiative of setting up a Facebook 
page with a student manager. They use this page, Skype and mobile phone connections to 
stay  in  constant  contact  with  each  other,  with  college  faculty,  and  with  their  mentor 
teachers  regarding  their  college  and  school  work.  Such  use  of  ICT  is  very  beneficial. 
Incorporating ICT into actual teaching and learning in classrooms, however, will call for 
detailed planning and adequate capacity building for both teacher educators in particular 
and, through them, for teachers.  
Generally  speaking,  the  possibilities  and  pitfalls  associated  with  the  use  of  ICT  in 
low-income economies is well summarised by a World Bank (2005) publication. It states: 
In low-income countries the strategic use of ICT potentially provides a means of 
leapfrogging in educational development. The mere availability of computers and 
other technology, however, does not replace the core business of teaching and 
learning, nor is it in itself a guarantee of gains in educational quality. Education, 

SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

134 – CHAPTER 5: THE QUALITY OF TEACHERS AND TEACHING 
 
 
not connectivity, is the challenge here, but the two need not be sequential or in 
conflict. 

There is still a long way to go before the potential of ICT in actual classroom 
learning processes is realized. In both developed and developing countries there 
is mounting scepticism about the learning outcomes of massive investment in ICT  

The challenge concerning full utilization of ICT in education closely concerns the 
teaching profession. ... The ICT training needs of teachers with no or little 
knowledge of ICT in teaching and learning are enormous. ... [Because] the supply 
of ICT education can potentially be of the highest quality but also of the poorest, 
... quality control and quality assurance mechanisms become crucial 
(pp. 110-111). 
While  the  potential  of  ICT  in  education  is  huge,  the  problems,  challenges  and 
constraints Egypt is currently facing mean that undue focus on, excessive funding of, or 
overconfidence in  ICT to  engender the desired reforms  in  teaching  and  learning  are not 
warranted  since  ICT  will  not  replace  the  core  business  of  teaching  and  learning.  While 
both  should  proceed  in  tandem,  the  major  focus  should  continue  to  be  on  the 
improvement of teacher education and teaching. 
A policy framework for teacher education 
Development  of  a  policy  framework  for  teacher  education  is  essential.  It  should 
enable clear and specific plans to be made for establishing and maintaining a continuum 
of teacher development from PRESET to INSET and CPD. According to Dewidar (2012), 
no  teacher  policy  framework  has  yet  been  developed  for  Egypt.  Consideration  of  the 
following  will  be  critical  to  the  development  of  an  effective  and  relevant  policy 
framework for the education and professional development of teachers in Egypt. 
Clarify management of teacher education 
Consideration should be given to the establishment of a defined and effective locus of 
control  for  teacher  education  within  the  responsibilities  of  the  Minister  of  Education, 
preferably  with  a  department  of  its  own  rather  than  being  a  subsidiary  function  within 
another  department.  In  light  of  their  research  in  five  developing  countries  Lewin  and 
Stuart  (2003)  advise  “The  constructive  and  effective  development  of  teacher  education 
requires  direct  access  to  Ministerial  authority,  clear  lines  of  administrative  control  and 
accountability,  and  strategic  delegation  of  some  measure  of  autonomy  to  training 
institutions, at least in professional arenas” (p. 183). 
Develop a clear theoretical basis for the reform of PRESET 
Successful teacher education programmes are based on a coherent rationale, integrate 
coursework and clinical work well, build towards a deeper understanding of teaching and 
learning, use common standards to guide practice and evaluate coursework, have a shared 
vision of what constitutes good teaching, are based on a set of educational ideals that are 
constantly  revisited  and  reinforced,  and  have  a  shared  set  of  beliefs  with  co-operating 
schools (Darling-Hammond, 1999). 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

 CHAPTER 5: THE QUALITY OF TEACHERS AND TEACHING – 135 
 
 
Control intake to teacher education 
The  intake  to  PRESET  programmes  should  be  balanced  against  the  number  of 
teachers  needed to  meet  the  anticipated  short-  and  long-term  demand  for  teachers  in all 
school types and subject areas. A better balance of supply and demand would be likely to 
improve  the  calibre  of  student  entrants.  Smaller  courses  would  facilitate  more 
professional programmes, including more group/seminar work, fewer large lectures, more 
individualised attention and coaching, and longer, well-mentored school placements – all 
in keeping with international good practice in the preparation of professionals, including 
teachers. 
Create a teaching practice template 
A teaching practicum template should be designed to facilitate and guide the extended 
placement  of  student  teachers  in  schools  with  appropriate  support  by  mentors  (faculty 
supervisors,  MOE  inspectors,  school  principals  and  class  teachers)  who  understand  the 
rationale for the overall PRESET programme and who have been well prepared for their 
support role with student teachers. 
Pedagogical capacity building for teacher educators 
Egypt needs long-term, adequately resourced plans to provide up-to-date pedagogical 
capacity  building  for  faculties of education involved  in  both  initial  and  ongoing teacher 
education.  This,  however,  will require  a response to  Beeby’s  (1980)  question: who  will 
train the teacher trainers? To this end consideration might be given to forming extended 
twinning or other co-operative arrangements with reputable international institutions with 
up-to-date  teacher  education  programmes,  whether  PRESET  or  INSET/CPD.  Such  an 
arrangement  could  involve  study  visits  and  interchanges  of  faculty.  All  personnel 
involved  in  teacher  education  will  need  considerable  training  or  retraining  by  a 
combination of local and international experts. Such an arrangement is currently working 
well  in  a  World  Bank-supported  PRESET  and  INSET  projects  in  the  West  Bank  and 
Gaza Strip (Burke and Cuadra, 2013). 
Enhance the image of teaching 
Glazer (2008) argues that “all professions, if they are to remain viable, must monitor 
and  attend  to  the  relationship  between  practice  and  evolving  client  needs  and  social 
context” (pp.185-6). If both teaching and teacher education do not respond appropriately 
to current day needs and changed circumstances, they will be vulnerable to what Glazer 
calls  “jurisdictional  decline”  i.e.  reduction  in  public  recognition  and  respect.  For  this 
reason  Grossman  (2008)  argues  that,  if  teacher  educators  are  to  command  respect  and 
successfully counteract their declining influence, they must “aggressively investigate the 
practice  of  teacher  education  and  offer  professional  education  that  reflects  the  needs  of 
our students and the needs of our schools” (p. 22). 
Significant efforts have been made to improve the status of teachers in  Egypt. These 
include the development of National Standards for Education (2003); the establishment of 
the Teachers Cadre (2007), the development of a career path and promotional system for 
teachers, along with a 50% increase in basic pay (2007) and bonuses for each promotional 
level from (2008); and the establishment of PAT (2008). In spite of these advances, the 
status  of  teaching  as  an  occupation  is  still  low  –  a  fact  that  becomes  very  evident  in 
conversations  with  secondary  school  students,  very  few  of  whom  want  to  become 
teachers.  In  view  of  this,  an  ongoing  public  relations  exercise  might  be  considered  to 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

136 – CHAPTER 5: THE QUALITY OF TEACHERS AND TEACHING 
 
 
improve the image of teaching as a profession and to confirm the indispensable role that 
teachers play in the cultural life and economy of the country. Affirmation of teaching and 
teachers  should  come  from  the  highest  levels  of  government  and  the  Ministry  of 
Education. Such public recognition of teaching would cost little but mean a lot and might 
in  time  attract  a  good  proportion  of  better  qualified  candidates  into  the  profession.  In 
some countries a National Teachers’ Day has become an annual event. 
Improving TVET 
Ten years ago an international VET review on Egypt stated that “the lack of suitably 
qualified  and  experienced  instructors  is  probably  the  over-riding  factor  limiting  the 
effectiveness of technical and vocational education and training” (Abrahart, 2003). Since 
then  not  much  has  changed  and  the  capacity  of  TVET  institutions  remains  severely 
limited. The latest Torino Process report found that TVET teachers receive less CPD than 
other teachers in terms of CPD and that the implementation of the Teacher Cadre had less 
impact  on  their  career  progression.  “In  2012/13  only  20%  of  teachers  in  technical 
education were in the two highest levels of the Cadre (Senior Teacher, Expert Teacher) 
(19% for three-year and 22% for five-year school teachers) whereas in general secondary 
education over 40% of teaches were in these categories” (ETF, 2015). Without substantial 
improvements  in  teacher  and  trainer  development  it  is  likely  that  even  with  appropriate 
standards and new curricula, the capacity of the TVET system to deliver good outcomes 
will remain uncertain and questionable.  
Future  TVET  teachers  and  trainers  need  to  be  prepared  for  ever-changing  demands 
stemming  from  new  technologies,  expanding  knowledge  in  fields  such  as  ICT  and 
increasing social expectations. The draft TVET strategy is promising as it acknowledges 
teachers  as  the  most  important  institutional-related  factor  influencing  learner 
achievement.  The  document  stresses  the  urgent  need  to  enhance  the  competence  of 
teachers  and  trainers  in  order  to  raise  the  quality  of  TVET:  “The  improvement  in  the 
delivery of vocational competences for employment and citizenship will be achieved only 
if there is an improvement in the quality, effectiveness and relevance of TVET teaching” 
(TVET Reform Programme, 2012). The lack of investment over the years is seen as main 
cause  for  “…out-dated  pedagogical  approaches….that  require  revision,  teachers  and 
trainers who lack the skills and experience to prepare people for contemporary  working 
conditions” (TVET Reform Programme, 2012). This TVET strategy thus plans to address 
a range of issues. Among the most prominent are a review of the relevance, quality and 
effectiveness  of  PRESET  and  INSET  programmes;  the  introduction  of  personal 
assessments  and  regular  training-needs  analysis  for  teaching  staff;  ensuring  that  TVET 
teachers  and  trainers  understand  the  labour  market  orientation  of  TVET;  reviewing 
employment  conditions  to  attract  and  retain  qualified  and  experienced  people;  and,  last 
but not least, developing partnerships with employers to gain access to their facilities to 
support  practical  training  and  the  skills  upgrading  of  TVET  teachers  and  trainers.  The 
plan sets a number of ambitious targets to be achieved by 2017. A minimum of 55% of 
TVET  teachers  and  trainers  are  to  have  completed  upgrading  programmes,  new  initial 
training  programmes  are  to  have  started,  and  new  grades  and  qualifications  agreed  for 
TVET teachers and trainers, as well as a new CPD programme. 
The  strategy  however  leaves  open  how  these  goals  are  to  be  met  and  which  major 
obstacles need to be tackled. Implementation will be a challenging process, in particular 
since  TVET  teachers  and  trainers  were  not  really  involved  in  preparing  the  reform 
agenda.  A  key  question  will  also  be  if  the  reform  can  succeed  at  all  with  the  current 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

 CHAPTER 5: THE QUALITY OF TEACHERS AND TEACHING – 137 
 
 
teaching  and  training  force  in  TVET  or  if  the  impact  of  reform  can  be  only  linked  to 
long-term generational change. 
In the short term, Egypt would need special measures to encourage the recruitment of 
TVET teaching staff and to ensure they have up-to-date workplace and pedagogical skills. 
Possible solutions can be found through learning from inspiring examples of international 
experience, such as diversifying routes into the TVET teaching profession (i.e. facilitating 
recruitment  of  practitioners  from  industry),  introducing  a  flexible  provision  of 
pedagogical  training  (including  collective  reflection  of  current  teaching),  and  practical 
training  (i.e.  trainers  spending  some  of  their  time  in  workplaces,  participation  in  social 
networks,  better  team  work  between  theoretical  teachers  and  practical  instructors), 
improving  data  collection  on  TVET  teachers  and  trainers,  and  finally,  giving  a  higher 
priority to TVET teachers and trainers within the PAT. 
Notes
 
1.  
The comparison here is between the electrician and the electrical engineer; the book-
keeper  and  the  auditor;  the  draftsperson  and  the  architect;  the  nurse  and  the  doctor; 
the teacher’s aide and the class teacher. 
2.  
NAEP’s nationally representative database included information, not only on students 
test scores, but also on teacher classroom practices and on other teacher and student 
characteristics.  The  availability  of  this  data  and  the  use  of  statistical  multilevel 
modelling techniques in analyses enabled the researcher to overcome the shortcoming 
of  earlier  quantitative  research  and  to  measure  the  impact  of  school/teacher  level 
effects as well as student background factors. 
3.  
This  evaluation  of  external  support  to  basic  education  was  carried  out  on  behalf  of 
thirteen  international  and  national  funding  and  technical  assistance  organisations  in 
co-operation  with  four  developing  countries  –  Bolivia,  Burkina  Faso,  Uganda  and 
Zambia. 
4.  
Other  professions  (e.g.  medicine)  also  face  the  challenge  of  integrating  multiple 
courses  taught  independently  by  different  individuals  in  the  same  programme  and 
establishing  an  adequate  interface  between  these  and  clinical  placement  experiences 
(see Burke, 2002). 
5. 
In  the  past  “in-service  training”  generally  referred  to  ministry-mandated  courses 
provided  for  teachers  by  outside  experts.  Such  courses  were  usually  related  to  the 
implementation  of  new  curricula  or  programmes.  In  more  recent  times,  “continuing 
professional development” (CPD) is taken as subsuming and extending the concept of 
in-service training to include the transformation of teacher knowledge, understanding 
and skills in light of up-to-date developments in knowledge and current good practice 
within the profession. In this chapter “INSET/CPD” will be used to cover the whole 
spectrum of teacher professional development, including INSET. 
6.  
See  OECD/World  Bank  (2010),  Report  on  Higher  Education  in  Egypt  for  a  full 
account and critique of the university admissions system. 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

138 – CHAPTER 5: THE QUALITY OF TEACHERS AND TEACHING 
 
 
 
7.  
Some  faculties  of  education  do  interview  students,  but  such  interviews  amount  to 
little  more  than  a  cursory  check  to  confirm  the  absence  of  speech  or  other  serious 
defects that might hamper their teaching. Private institutions have more flexibility on 
entry procedures and can offer students more options. 
8.  
In any school the maximum number of teaching hours in a week is determined by the 
length  of  the school  day  and  the number  of  available classrooms in  the school.  It  is 
possible,  therefore,  to  determine  the  average  weekly  teaching  load  of  teachers  in 
individual  schools  by  multiplying  the  number  of  teaching  hours  in  a  week  by  the 
number  of  classrooms  in  that  school  and  dividing  it  by  the  number  of  teaching 
teachers  in  the  school.  In  a  number  of  schools  visited  by  the  review  team  the 
foregoing  formula  was  applied  and  it  was  found  that  the  average  teaching  load  was 
about 9 hours per week (i.e. 12 forty-five minute lessons per week or 2.4 lessons per 
day)  –  considerably  less  that  the  load  prescribed  by  the  MOE.  In  one  experimental 
school the average was about 19 lessons (14.5 hours) per week. 
9. 
Up to the revolution in 2011 50 hours (around 6 days) was required. 
 
 
 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

 CHAPTER 5: THE QUALITY OF TEACHERS AND TEACHING – 139 
 
 
References 
 
Abrahart, A. (2003), Egypt: Review of Technical and Vocational Education and Training, 
DFID and World Bank Collaboration on Knowledge and Skills in the New Economy, 
London, Washington, DC. 
Adams, A. (2010), The Mubarak Kohl Initiative – Dual System in Egypt: An Assessment 
of  its  Impact  on  the  School  to  Work  Transition,  German  Technical  Co-operation 
(GTZ),  Vocational  Education,  Training  and  Employment  Programme  (MKI-vetEP), 
Cairo. 
Adler,  M.J.  (1982),  The  Paideia  Proposal:  An  Educational  Manifesto,  Macmillan,  New 
York.  
Aguirre  International  (2002),  Quality  Basic  Education  for  All:  Strategy  Proposal, 
Volume I, Submitted to USAID/Egypt. 
Alexander, R.J. (1995), “Task, time, talk and text: Signposts to effective teaching”, paper 
presented at NCERT International Conference, New Delhi, 7-19 July 1995. 
Andrew,  M.  (1990),  “Differences  between  graduates  of  4-year  and  5-year  teacher 
preparation programs”, Journal of Teacher Education, Vol. 41/2, pp. 45-51. 
Andrew,  M.  and  R.L.  Schwab  (1995),  “Has  reform  in  teacher  education  influenced 
performance?  An  outcome  assessment  of  graduates  of  an  eleven-university 
consortium”, Action in Teacher Education, Vol. 17/3, pp. 43-53. 
Ashton, P. and L. Crocker (1987), “Systematic study of planned variations: The essential 
focus of teacher education reform”, Journal of Teacher Education, Vol. 38/3, pp. 2-8. 
Ball, D.L. and G.W. McDiarmid (1990), “The subject matter preparation of teachers”, in 
W.R. Houston (ed.),  Handbook of Research on Teacher Education,  Macmillan, New 
York, pp. 437-499. 
Ball, D.L., M.H. Thames and G. Phelps (2008), “Content knowledge for teaching: What 
makes it special?”, Journal of Teacher Education, Vol. 59/5, pp. 389-407. 
Beausaert, S.A.J., M.S.R Segers and D.P.A. Wiltink (2013), “The influence of teachers’ 
teaching  approaches  on  students’  learning  approaches:  The  student  perspective”, 
Educational Research, Vol. 55/1, pp. 1-15. 
Beeby,  C.  (1980),  “The  thesis  of  stages  fourteen  years  later”,  International  Review  of 
Education, Vol. 26/4, pp. 451-474. 
Beeby, C. (1966), The Quality of Education in Developing Countries, Harvard University 
Press, Cambridge, MA. 
Bennett, N. and C. Carré (eds.) (1993), Learning to Teach, Routledge, London. 
Berliner,  D.C.  (2000),  “A  personal  response  to  those  who  bash  teacher  education”, 
Journal of Teacher Education, Vol. 51/5, pp. 358-371. 
Berliner, D.C. (1987), “Knowledge is power: A talk to teachers about a revolution in the 
teaching profession”, in D.C. Berliner and R.V. Rosenshine (eds.), Talks to Teachers: 
A Festschrift for N.L. Gage
, Random House, New York. 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

140 – CHAPTER 5: THE QUALITY OF TEACHERS AND TEACHING 
 
 
Blackburn, V. and C. Moisan (1987), The In-Service Training of Teachers in the Twelve 
Member  States  of  the  European  Community,  Education  Policy  Series,  Presses 
Interuniversitaires Européennes, Maastricht. 
Buber, M. (1965), “Education”, in M. Buber,  Between Man and Man, Macmillan, New 
York. 
Burke, A. (2007), “Crosscurrents in the competencies / standards debate in teaching and 
teacher education”, in R. Dolan and J. Gleeson (eds.), The Competences Approach to 
Teacher  Professional  Development:  Current  Practice  and  Future  Prospects

SCoTENS (Standing Conference on Teacher Education North and South), The Centre 
for 
Cross-Border 
Studies, 
Armagh, 
pp. 67-96, 
http://scotens.org/docs/2007-
competences.pdf. 
Burke, A. (2002), Teaching: Retrospect and Prospect, 2nd Edition of OIDEAS, 39, 1992, 
St. Patrick’s College, Dublin. 
Burke, A. (2000), “The devil’s bargain revisited: The BEd degree under review”, Oideas, 
Vol. 48 (single-author issue). 
Burke,  A.  (1996),  “Professionalism:  Its  relevance  for  teachers  and  teacher  educators  in 
developing countries”, Prospects, Vol. 26/3, pp. 531-542. 
Burke, A. (1995), “In service education for teachers”, Paper presented at UNICEF/World 
Bank-sponsored  workshop  on  INSET,  Baguio,  Northern  Luzon,  Philippines,  10-15 
September 1995.  
Burke,  A.  and  Cuadra,  E.  (2013),  Lessons  Learned  During  the  Implementation  of  the 
Teacher Education Improvement Project, Ministry of Education, Ramallah. 
CAPMAS  (2012),  Egypt  in  Figures  2012,  CAPMAS  (Central  Agency  for  Public 
Mobilisation and Statistics), Cairo.  
Carron,  G.  and  T.N.  Chau  (1996),  The  Quality  of  Primary  Schools  in  Different 
Development  Contexts.  Paris:  UNESCO  (United  Nations  Educational,  Scientific  and 
Cultural Organization), Paris. 
Clarke, C.M. (1988), “Asking the right questions about teacher preparation: Contributions 
of research to teacher thinking”, Educational Researcher, Vol. 17/2, pp. 5-12. 
Cochran-Smith,  M.  et  al  (2012),  “Teachers’  education  and  outcomes:  Mapping  the 
research terrain”, Teachers College Record, Vol. 114/10, pp. 1-49. 
Cochran-Smith,  M.  and  K.M.  Zeichner  (eds),  (2005),  Studying  Teacher  Education:  The 
Report  of  the  AERA  Panel  on  Research  and  Teacher  Education,  Lawrence  Erbaum, 
London. 
Cohen, D. (1995), What standards for national standards? Phi Delta Kappan, Vol. 76/10, 
pp. 751-757. 
Cohen,  D.  and  H.  Hill  (2000),  “Instructional  policy  and  classroom  performance:  The 
mathematics  reform  in  California”,  Teachers  College  Record,  Vol.  102/2, 
pp. 294-343. 
Cohen,  D.  and  H.  Hill  (1998),  “State  policy  and  classroom  performance:  Mathematics 
reform  in  California”,  CPRE  Policy  Briefs.  RB-23-May,  Consortium  for  Policy 
Research in Education, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

 CHAPTER 5: THE QUALITY OF TEACHERS AND TEACHING – 141 
 
 
Conway,  P.,  R.  Murphy,  A.  Rath  and  K.  Hall  (2009),  Learning  to  Teach  and  its 
Implications  for  the  Continuum  of  Teacher  Education:  A  Nine-Country  Cross-
National Study, 
The Teaching Council, Dublin. 
Coultas, J.C.  and K.M.  Lewin  (2002), “Who  becomes  a  teacher? The characteristics  of 
student teachers in four countries” International Journal of Educational Development, 
Vol. 22/3pp. 243-260. 
Crowe, E. (2008), “Teaching as a profession: A bridge too far?”, in M. Cochran-Smith, S. 
Feiman-Nemser  and  D.J.  McIntyre  (eds.),  Handbook  of  Research  on  Teacher 
Education:  Enduring  Questions  in  Changing  Contexts,  
3rd  Edition,  Routledge, 
London, pp. 989-999. 
Darling-Hammond,  L.  (2012),  “The  right  start:  Creating  a  strong  foundation  for  the 
teaching career”, Phi Delta Kappan, Vol. 93/3, pp 8-13. 
Darling-Hammond,  L.  (2008),  “Knowledge  for  teaching:  What  do  we  know?”,  in  M. 
Cochran-Smith,  S.  Feiman-Nemser  and  D.J.  McIntyre  (eds.),  Handbook  of  Research 
on  Teacher  Education:  Enduring  Questions  in  Changing  Contexts,  
3rd  Edition, 
Routledge, London, pp. 1316-1323. 
Darling-Hammond,  L.  (2006),  Powerful  Teacher  Education:  Lessons  from  Exemplary 
Programs, Jossey-Bass, San Francisco. 
Darling-Hammond,  L.  (2000),  “Teacher  policy  and  student  achievement:  A  review  of 
state  policy  evidence”,  Education  Policy  Analysis  Archives,  Vol.8/1, 
http://epaa.asu.edu/ojs/issue/view/8.  
Darling-Hammond,  L.  (1999),  “Educating  teachers  for  the  next  century:  Rethinking 
practice  and  policy”,  in  G.A.  Griffin  (ed.),  The  Education  of  Teachers:  The  Ninety-
Eighth Yearbook of the National Society for the Study of Education, Part I
, National 
Society for the Study of Education, Chicago, IL, pp. 221-256. 
Darling-Hammond, L. (1998), “Teachers and teaching: Testing policy hypotheses from a 
National Commission Report”, Educational Researcher, Vol. 27/1, pp. 5-15. 
Darling-Hammond,  L.  (1992),  “Teaching  and  knowledge:  Policy  issues  posed  by 
alternative  certification  of  teachers”,  Peabody  Journal  of  Education,  Vol.  67/3, 
pp. 123-154. 
Darling-Hammond  and  J.  Bransford  (eds.)  (2005),  Preparing  Teachers  for  a  Changing 
World: What Teachers Should Learn and Be Able to Do, Jossey-Bass, San Francisco. 
Darling-Hammond,  L.  and  W.  McLaughlin  (1995),  “Policies  that  support  professional 
development in an era of reform”, Phi Delta Kappan, Vol. 76/8, pp. 597-604. 
Dembélé,  M.  and  Bé-Rammaj  Miaro-II  (2003),  “Pedagogical  renewal  and  teacher 
development in Sub-Saharan Africa: A thematic synthesis”, document commissioned 
by  ADEA  (Association  for  the  Development  of  Education in  Africa)  for its  Biennial 
Meeting, Grand Baie, Mauritius, 3-6 December 2003. 
Denemark,  G.  (1985),  “Educating  a  profession”,  Journal  of  Teacher  Education, 
Vol. 36/5, pp. 46-52. 
Dewey, J. (1904), “The relation of theory to practice in education”, in M.J. Holmes, J.A. 
Keith  and  L.  Seely  (eds.),  The  Relation  of  Theory  to  Practice  in  Education:  Second 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

142 – CHAPTER 5: THE QUALITY OF TEACHERS AND TEACHING 
 
 
Yearbook of the National Society for the Study of Education, Part ll, University Press, 
Chicago. 
Dewidar, A. (2012),  Regional Study on Teacher Policies  – Phase II: Egypt Case Study
World Bank, Washington, DC. 
Dreeben, R. (1970), The Nature of Teaching, Scott Foresman, Glenview, IL. 
Economist  Intelligence  Unit  (2012),  The  Learning  Curve:  Lessons  in  Country 
Performance in Education, Pearson, London, http://thelearningcurve.pearson.com/rep
orts/the-learning-curve-report-2012.
 
Education Next (2002), “New paths to teaching”, Special Issue, Education Next: Vol. 2/1. 
Eisner, E.W. (1983), “The art and craft of teaching”, Educational Leadership, Vol. 40/4, 
pp. 5-13. 
Eraut,  M.  (1994),  “Teacher  education:  In-service”,  in  T.  Husen  and  T.N.  Postlethwaite 
(eds.), The International Encyclopaedia of Education, 2nd Edition, Vol. X, Pergamon, 
New York, pp. 5966-5973. 
Erekson,  T.L.  and  L  Barr  (1985),  “Alternative  credentialing:  Lessons  from  vocational 
education”, Journal of Teacher Education, Vol. 36/6, pp. 16-19. 
ETF  (2015),  TorinoProcess  2014:  Egypt,  ETF  (European  Training  Foundation),  Turin,   
www.etf.europa.eu/web.nsf/pages/TRP_2014_Egypt. 
ETF (2013), Torino Process 2012: Southern and Eastern Mediterranean, ETF (European 
Training Foundation), Turin, www.etf.europa.eu/webatt.nsf/0/BC34444416C97254C1
257B640064ED15/$file/TRP%202012%20SEMED.pdf.
 
ETF  (2003),  Innovative  Practices  in  Teacher  and  Trainer  Training  in  the  Mashrek 
Region, Office for Official Publications of the European Communities, Luxembourg. 
ETF and World Bank (2006), Reforming Technical Vocational Education and Training in 
the  Middle  East  and  North  Africa:  Experiences  and  Challenges,  Office  for  Official 
Publications of the European Communities, Luxembourg. 
European  Commission/EACEA/Eurydice  (2013),  Key  Data  on  Teachers  and  School 
Leaders  in  Europe,  2013  Edition,  Eurydice  Report,  Publications  Office  of  the 
European Union, Luxembourg, http://eacea.ec.europa.eu/education/eurydice/document
s/key_data_series/151EN.pdf.
 
EURYDICE  (1995),  In-Service  Training  of  Teachers  in  the  European  Union  and  the 
EFTA/EEA Countries, EURYDICE, Brussels. 
Evertson,  C.M.,  W.D.  Hawley  and  M.  Zlotnik  (1985),  “Making  a  difference  in 
educational  quality  through  teacher  education”,  Journal  of  Teacher  Education
Vol. 36/3, pp. 2-12. 
Feiman-Nemser,  S.  (2001),  “From  preparation  to  practice;  designing  a  continuum  to 
strengthen and sustain teaching”, Teachers College Record, Vol.103/6, pp. 1013-1055. 
Ferguson,  R.  (1991),  “Paying  for  public  education:  New  evidence  on  how  and  why 
money matters”, Harvard Journal on Legislation, Vol. 28, pp. 265-298. 
Fisher,  C.W.  (1992),  “Making  a  difference  and  differences  worth  making:  An  essay-
review based on Goodlad’s Teachers for our Nation’s Schools, Teaching and Teacher 
Education, 
Vol. 8/2, pp. 219-224. 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

 CHAPTER 5: THE QUALITY OF TEACHERS AND TEACHING – 143 
 
 
Flexner,  A.  (1910),  Medical  Education  in  the  United  States  and  Canada,  Carnegie 
Foundation for Advanced Teaching, New York. 
Floden, R.E. and M. Miniketti (2008), “Research on the effects of coursework in the arts 
and sciences and in the foundations of education”, in M. Cochran-Smith, S. Feiman-
Nemser  and  D.J.  McIntyre  (eds.),  Handbook  of  Research  on  Teacher  Education: 
Enduring  Questions  in  Changing  Contexts,  
3rd  Edition,  Routledge,  London, 
pp. 261-308. 
Freire, P. (1972a), Pedagogy of the Oppressed, Herder & Herder, New York. 
Freire, P. (1972b), Cultural Action for Freedom, Penguin Books. 
Fullan, M.G. (2006), “Change theory: A force for school improvement”, Seminar Series
Paper No. 157, Centre for Strategic Education, Victoria, Australia. 
Fullan, M.G. (1993), Change Forces; Probing the Depths of Educational Reform, Falmer, 
London. 
Fullan,  M.G.  and  M.B.  Miles  (1992),  “Getting  reform  right:  What  works  and  what 
doesn’t”, Phi Delta Kappan, Vol. 73(10), pp. 745-752. 
Furlong,  J.  (2013),  Education  –  An  Anatomy  of  the  Discipline:  Rescuing  the  University 
Project?, Routledge, London. 
Gage,  N.L.  (1985),  Hard  Gains  in  the  Soft  Sciences:  The  Case  of  Pedagogy,  Center  on 
Evaluation and Research, Phi Delta Kappa, Bloomington, IN. 
Gallagher,  W.J.  (2005),  “The  contradictory  nature  of  professional  teaching  standards: 
Adjusting  for  common  misunderstandings”,  Phi  Delta  Kappan,,  Vol.  87/2, 
pp. 112-115. 
Gardner,  H.  (1991),  The  Unschooled  Mind:  How  Children  Think  and  How  Schools 
Should Teach, Basic Books, New York. 
Gardner,  H.  (1983),  Frames  of  Mind:  The  Theory  of Multiple Intelligences,  2nd  Edition, 
Fontana, London. 
Ginsburg,  M.  and  N.  Megahed  (2006),  “Teacher  education  and  the  construction  of 
worker-citizens 
in 
Egypt: 
Historical 
analysis 
of 
curricular 
goals 
in 
national/international  political  economic  context”,  in  N.  Popov,  C.  Wolhuter,  C. 
Heller,  &  M.  Kysilka  (eds.),  Comparative  Education  and  Teacher  Training,  Vol.  4., 
Bureau for Educational Services & Bulgarian Comparative Education Society, Sofia, 
Bulgaria. 
Ginsburg,  M.  and  N.  Megahed  (2011),  “Globalization  and  the  reform  of  faculties  of 
education  in  Egypt:  The  roles  of  individual  and  organizational,  national  and 
international actors, Educational Policy Analysis Archives, Vol. 19/15, pp. 1-25. 
Glazer,  J.L.  (2008),  “Educational  professionalism:  An  inside-out  view”,  American 
Journal of Education, Vol. 114/2, pp. 169-189. 
Good, T.L.,  B.J.  Biddle  and  I.F.  Goodson  (1997), “The  study  of teaching:  Modern and 
emerging  conceptions”,  in  B.J.  Biddle,  T.L.  Good  and  I.F.  Goodson  (eds.), 
International Handbook of Teachers and Teaching, Vol. 3, pp. 671-679. 
Goodlad, J.I. (1990), Teachers for our Nation’s Schools, Jossey-Bass, San Francisco. 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

144 – CHAPTER 5: THE QUALITY OF TEACHERS AND TEACHING 
 
 
Goodlad,  J.I.  (1984),  A  Place  Called  School:  Prospects  for  the  Future,  McGraw-Hill, 
New York. 
Goodlad,  J.I.,  E.  Soder  and  K.A.  Sirotnik  (eds.)  (1990),  The  Moral  Dimensions  of 
Teaching, Jossey-Bass, San Francisco. 
Goodson,  I.  (1995),  “Education  as  practical  matter:  Some  issues  and  concerns”, 
Cambridge Journal of Education, Vol. 25/2, pp. 137-148. 
Government  of  Ireland  (2002),  Preparing  Teachers  for  the  21st  Century:  Report  of  the 
Working Group on Primary Preservice Teacher Education, Stationery Office, Dublin. 
Greaney,  V.  (1996),  “Reading  in  developing  countries:  Problems  and  issues”,  in  V. 
Greaney  (ed.),  Promoting  Reading  in  Developing  Countries,  International  Reading 
Association, Newark, DE.  
Greaney,  V.,  A.  Burke  and  J.  McCann  (1999),  “Predictors  of  performance  in  primary-
school teaching”, Irish Journal of Education, Vol. 30, pp. 22-37. 
Greenberg,  J.D.  (1983),  “The  case  for  teacher  education:  Open  and  shut”,  Journal  of 
Teacher Education, Vol. 34/4, pp. 2-5. 
Greenwald, R., L.V. Hedges and R.D. Laine (1996), “The effect of school resources on 
student achievement”, Review of Educational Research, Vol. 66/3, pp. 361-396. 
Griffin, G.A. (1999), “Changes in teacher education: Looking to the future”,  G.A. Griffin 
(ed.), The Education of Teachers: The Ninety-Eighth Yearbook of the National Society 
for  the  Study  of  Education,  Part  I
,  National  Society  for  the  Study  of  Education, 
Chicago, IL, pp. 1-28. 
Grossman,  P.  (2008), “Responding  to our critics:  From  crisis to  opportunity  in research 
on teacher education”, Journal of Teacher Education, Vol. 59/1, pp. 10-23. 
Guskey,  T.R.  (2002),  “Professional  development  and  teacher  change”,  Teachers  and 
Teaching: Theory and Practice, Vol. 8/3, pp. 381-391. 
Guskey,  T.R.  (1995), “Professional  development  in  education:  In  search  of  the  optimal 
mix”,  in  T.R.  Guskey  and  M.  Huberman  (eds.),  Professional  Development  in 
Education:  New  Paradigms  and  Practices,  
Teachers  College  Press,  New  York, 
pp. 114-131. 
Guyton,  E.  and  E.  Farokhi  (1987),  “Relationships  among  academic  performance,  basic 
skills, subject matter knowledge, and teaching skills of teacher education graduates”, 
Journal of Teacher Education, Vol. 38/5, pp. 37-42. 
Hardman,  F.,  J.  Abd-Kadir  and  F.  Smith  (2008),  “Pedagogical  renewal:  Improving  the 
quality of classroom interaction in Nigerian primary schools”, International Journal of 
Educational Development,
 Vol. 28/1, pp. 55-69. 
Hargreaves,  A.  (2003),  Teaching  in  the  Knowledge  Society:  Education  in  the  Age  of 
Insecurity, Open University Press, Maidenhead. 
Hallett,  J.  (1987),  “Teacher  training  under  pressure”,  European  Journal  of  Teacher 
Education, Vol. 10(1), pp. 43-52. 
Hashweh,  M.  (2013),  “Pedagogical  content  knowledge:  Twenty  five  years  later”, 
in Cheryl  J.  Craig, Paulien  C.  Meijer  and Jan  Broeckmans (eds.), From  Teacher 
Thinking  to  Teachers  and  Teaching:  The  Evolution  of  a  Research  Community 

SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

 CHAPTER 5: THE QUALITY OF TEACHERS AND TEACHING – 145 
 
 
(Advances in Research on Teaching, Volume 19), Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 
pp. 115–140. 
Hashweh,  M.  (2005),  “Teacher  pedagogical  constructions:  A  reconfiguration  of 
pedagogical  content  knowledge”,  Teachers  and  Teaching:  Theory  and  Practice, 
Vol. 11/3, pp. 273-292. 
Hashweh,  M.  (1996),  “Effects  of  science  teachers’  epistemological  beliefs  in  teaching, 
Journal of Research in Science Teaching, Vol. 33/1, pp. 47-63. 
Hashweh,  M.  (1985),  “An  exploratory  study  of  teacher  knowledge  and  teaching:  The 
effects of science teachers' knowledge of their subject matter and their conceptions of 
learning  on  their  teaching”,  Unpublished  doctoral  dissertation,  Stanford  Graduate 
School of Education, Stanford, CA. 
Hawley, W.H. and L. Valli (1999), “The essentials of effective professional development: 
A  new  consensus”,  in  L.  Darling-Hammond  and  G.  Sykes  (eds.),  Teaching  as  the 
Learning  Profession:  Handbook
  of  Policy  and  Practice, Jossey-Bass,  San  Francisco, 
pp. 127-150. 
Hilton,  S.  and  L.  Southgate  (2007),  “Professionalism  in  medical  education”,  Teaching 
and Teacher Education, Vol. 23/3, pp. 265-279. 
Hirst, P.H. (1963), “Philosophy and educational theory”, British Journal of Educational 
Studies, Vol. 12/1, pp. 51-64. 
Holmes Group (1986), Tomorrow’s Teachers, Holmes Group, East Lansing, MI. 
Howey, K.R. and N.L. Zimpler (1989), Profiles of Preservice Teacher Education: Inquiry 
into the Nature of Programs, State University of New York Press, Albany, NY. 
iMOVE  (2012),  Marktstudie  Aegypten  fuer  den  Export  beruflicher  Aus-  und 
Weiterbildung,  iMOVE  (International  Marketing  of  Vocational  Education), 
Bundesinstitut fuer Berufsbildung (BIBB), Bonn. 
James, W. (1920),  Talks to Teachers on Psychology: And to Students on Some of Life’s 
Ideals, Longmans, Green & Co, London 
Kellaghan, T. (1971), “The university and education”, in Contemporary Developments in 
University Education, University College, Dublin. 
Kember, D. and L. Gow (1994), “Orientations to teaching and their effect on the quality 
of student learning”, Journal of Higher Education, Vol. 65/1, pp. 58-74. 
Kennedy,  M.M.  (1991),  “Some  surprising  findings  on  how  teachers  learn  to  teach”, 
Educational Leadership, Vol. 49/3, pp. 14-17. 
Kerr,  D.H.  (1987),  “Authority  and  responsibility  in  public  schooling”,  in  J.I.  Goodlad 
(ed.), The Ecology of School Renewal: Eighty-Sixth Yearbook of the National Society 
for the Study of Education, Part 1
, University of Chicago Press, Chicago, IL. 
KK Consulting Associates (2001), Study of Policy Options for the Rationalization of the 
Primary School Teaching Force in Tanzania: Final report, KK Consulting Associates, 
Nairobi. 
Kortagen, F.A. and J.P.A.M. Kessels (1999), “Linking theory and practice: Changing the 
pedagogy of teacher education”, Educational Researcher, Vol. 28/4, pp. 4-17. 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

146 – CHAPTER 5: THE QUALITY OF TEACHERS AND TEACHING 
 
 
Kuhn,  D.  (1986),  “Education  for  thinking”,  Teachers  College  Record,  Vol.  87/4, 
pp. 495-512. 
Kuruppu, L. (2001), “The ‘books in schools’ project in Sri Lanka”, International Journal 
of Educational Research, Vol. 35/2, pp. 181-91. 
Law, N., W.J. Pelgrim and T. Plomp (2008),  Pedagogy and ICT Use in Schools Around 
the  World:  Findings  from  IEA  SITES  2006  study,  CERC  Studies  in  Comparative 
Education,  23,  Comparative  Education  Research  Centre,  University  of  Hong  Kong, 
Springer. 
Lewin, K.M. (2004), The Pre-service Training of Teachers – Does it Meet its Objectives 
and  How  Can  it  be  Improved?,  Background  Paper  for  the  EFA  Global  Monitoring 
Report 2004, UNESCO, Paris. 
Lewin,  K.  M.  and  J.S.  Stuart  (2003),  “Insights  into  the  policy  and  practice  of  teacher 
education  in  low-income  countries:  The  Multi-Site  Teacher  Education  Research 
Project”, British Educational Research Journal, Vol. 29/5, pp. 691-707. 
Lieberman, A. and M. Grolnick (1996), “Networks and reform in American education”, 
Teachers College Record, Vol. 98/1, pp. 7-45. 
Lortie,  D.C.  (1975),  Schoolteacher:  A  Sociological  Study,  University  of  Chicago  Press, 
Chicago, IL. 
Maguire, M. (1995), “Dilemmas in teaching teachers: The tutor’s perspective”, Teachers 
and Teaching: Theory and Practice, Vol. 1/1, pp. 119-131. 
McKinsey  &  Company  (2009),  The  Economic  Impact  of  the  Achievement  Gap  in 
America’s  Schools,  McKinsey  &  Company, http://mckinseyonsociety.com/the-
economic-impact-of-the-achievement-gap-in-americas-
schools/,
 accessed 14 April 2012.  
Menand,  L.  (2001),  “College:  The  end  of  the  golden  age”,  New  York  Review 
of Books, www.nybooks.com/articles/archives/2001/oct/18/college-the-end-of-the-
golden-age/,
 18 October .  
Menand,  L.  (1997),  “Re-imagining  liberal  education”,  in  R.  Orill  (ed.),  Education  and 
Democracy:  Re-imagining  Liberal  Learning  in  America,  The  College  Board,  New 
York. 
Ministry  of  Education  (2011),  Pre-University  Education  in  Egypt:  Background  Report, 
Ministry of Education, Cairo. 
Ministry  of  Education  (2010),  Conditions  of  Education  in  Egypt  2010.  Report  on  the 
National Education Indicators, Ministry of Education, Cairo. 
Ministry  of  Education  (2007),  National  Strategic  Plan  for  Pre-University  Education  in 
Egypt  2007/08-2011/12:  Towards  an  Educational  Paradigm  Shift,  Ministry  of 
Education, Cairo. 
Ministry  of  Education  (2003),  National  Standards  of  Education  in  Egypt,  Ministry  of 
Education, Cairo. 
Moran,  S.  (2007),  “An  alternative  view:  The  teacher  as  phronimos”,  in  R.  Dolan  &  J. 
Gleeson  (Eds.),  The  Competences  Approach  to  Teacher  Professional  Development: 
Current Practice and Future Prospects, 
SCoTENS (Standing Conference on Teacher 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

 CHAPTER 5: THE QUALITY OF TEACHERS AND TEACHING – 147 
 
 
Education  North  and  South),  The  Centre  for  Cross-Border  Studies,  pp.62-69, 
http://scotens.org/docs/2007-competences.pdf. 
Mozambique Country Report (2008), “Country report: Mozambique”, in A. Mulkeen and 
D.  Chen  (eds.), Teachers  for  Rural  Schools:  Experiences  in  Lesotho,  Malawi, 
Mozambique,  Tanzania  and  Uganda
,  African  Human  Development  Series,  World 
Bank, Washington, DC, pp. 75-91. 
Murray,  F.B.  (2008),  “The  role  of  teacher  education  courses  in  teaching  by  second 
nature?”,  in  M.  Cochran-Smith,  S.  Feiman-Nemser  and  D.J.  McIntyre  (eds.), 
Handbook  of  Research  on  Teacher  Education:  Enduring  Questions  in  Changing 
Contexts, 
3rd Edition, Routledge, London, pp. 1228-1246. 
National  Commission  on  Teaching  and  America’s  Future  (1996),  What  Matters  Most: 
Teaching  for  America’s  Future,  The  National  Commission  on  Teaching  and 
America’s Future, New York. 
Netherlands  Ministry  of  Foreign  Affairs  (2003),  Local  Solutions  to  Global  Challenges: 
Towards Effective Partnership in Basic Education: Final Report,  Joint Evaluation of 
External  Support  to  Basic  Education  in  Developing  Countries,  Netherlands  Ministry 
of Foreign Affairs. 
O’Donoghue,  T.  and  C.  Whitehead  (eds.)  (2008),  Teacher  Education  in  the  English-
Speaking  World:  Past,  Present  and  Future,  Information  Age  Publishing,  Charlotte, 
NC. 
O’Sullivan,  M.  (2004),  “The  reconceptualisation  of  learner-centred  approaches:  A 
Namibian case study”, International Journal of Educational Development, Vol. 24/6, 
pp. 585-602. 
OECD  (2013),  Teachers  for  the  21st  Century:  Using  Evaluation  to  Improve  Teaching, 
International  Summit  on  the  Teaching  Profession,  OECD  Publishing,  Paris, 
http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/9789264193864-en.   
OECD (2010), Learning for Jobs, Synthesis Report of the OECD Reviews of Vocational 
Education  and  Training,  OECD  Publishing,  Paris,  www.oecd.org/edu/skills-beyond-
school/Learning%20for%20Jobs%20book.pdf.
 
OECD  (2005),  Teachers  Matter:  Attracting,  Developing  and  Retaining  Effective 
Teachers, 
Education 
and 
Training 
Policy, 
OECD 
Publishing, 
Paris, 
http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/9789264018044-en. 
OECD/World  Bank  (2010),  Reviews  of  National  Policies  for  Education:  Higher 
Education 
in 
Egypt 
2010: 
OECD 
Publishing, 
Paris, 
http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/9789264084346-en. 
Palmer,  P.J.  (1998),  The  Courage  to  Teach:  Exploring  the  Inner  Landscape  of  a 
Teacher’s Life, Jossey-Bass, San Francisco. 
Postafeff,  L.,  S.  Lindblom-Ylänne  and  A  Nevgi  (2007),  “The  effect  of  pedagogical 
training  on  teaching  in  higher  education”,  Teaching  and  Teacher  Education
Vol. 23/5, pp. 557-571. 
Pring, R. (2000), “School culture and ethos: Towards an understanding”, in C. Furlong 
and  L.  Monahan  (eds.),  School  Culture  and  Ethos:  Cracking  the  Code,  Marino 
Institute of Education, Dublin. 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

148 – CHAPTER 5: THE QUALITY OF TEACHERS AND TEACHING 
 
 
Raywed,  M.A.  (1987),  “Tomorrow’s  teachers  and  today’s  school”,  Teachers  College 
Record, Vol. 88/3, pp. 411-418. 
Reid,  I.  (ed.).  (2001),  “Improving  schools:  The  contribution  of  teacher  education  and 
training”,  Occasional  Paper,  No.  13,  University  Council  for  the  Educating  of 
Teachers, London. 
Reynolds, M. (1999), “Standards and professional practice: The TTA and initial teacher 
training”, British Journal of Educational Studies, Vol. 47/3, pp. 247-260. 
Riddell,  A.R.  (1997),  “Assessing  designs  for  school  effectiveness  research  and  school 
improvement  in  developing  countries”,  Comparative  Educational  Review,  Vol.  41/2, 
pp. 178-204. 
Riddell,  A.R.  (1989),  “Focus  on  challenges  to  prevailing  theories:  An  alternative 
approach to the study of school effectiveness in third world countries”,  Comparative 
Educational Review, 
Vol. 33/4, pp. 481-497. 
Roszak,  T.  (1981),  Person/Planet:  The  Createive  Disintegration  of  Industrial  Society
Granada, London. 
Sahlberg,  P.  (2007)  “Education  policies  for  raising  student  learning:  The  Finnish 
approach”, Journal of Education Policy, Vol. 22/2, pp. 147-171. 
Scheerens,  J.  (2000),  “Improving  school  effectiveness”,  Fundamentals  of  Educational 
Planning,  No.  68,  UNESCO  and  IIEP  (International  Institute  for  Educational 
Planning), Paris. 
Scheerens,  J.  (1999),  “School  effectiveness  in  developed  and  developing  countries:  A 
review of the research evidence”, World Bank, Washington DC.  
Schollar, E. (2001), “A review of two evaluations of the application of the READ primary 
schools program in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa”, International Journal 
of Educational Research, 
Vol.35/2, pp. 205-216. 
Schweisfurth,  M  (2011),  “Learner-centred  education  in  developing  country  contexts: 
From  solution  to  problem?”,  International  Journal  of  Educational  Development
Vol. 31/5, pp. 425-432. 
Schwille,  J.  and  Dembélé,  M.  (2007),  “Global  perspectives  on  teaching  and  learning: 
Improving  policy  and  practice”,  Fundmentals  of  Educational  Planning,  No.  84, 
UNESCO and IIEP, Paris. 
Shulman, L.S. (2005), “Teacher education does not exist”, The Stanford Educator, Fall, 
2005, https://ed.stanford.edu/sites/default/files/suse-educator-fall05.pdf.   
Shulman, L.S. (1998), “Theory, practice and the education of professionals”, Elementary 
School Journal, Vol. 98/5, pp. 511-527. 
Shulman, L. S. (1987a), “The wisdom of practice: Managing complexity in medicine and 
teaching”,  in  D.C.  Berliner  and  R.V.  Rosenshine  (eds.),  Talks  to  Teachers:  A 
Festschrift for N.L. Gage
, Random House, New York. 
Shulman,  L.S.  (1987b),  “Knowledge  and  teaching:  Foundations  of  the  new  reform”, 
Harvard Educational Review, Vol. 57/1, pp. 1-22. 
Shulman,  L.S.  (1986),  “Those  who  understand:  Knowledge  growth  in  teaching”, 
Educational Researcher, Vol. 15/2, pp. 4-14. 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

 CHAPTER 5: THE QUALITY OF TEACHERS AND TEACHING – 149 
 
 
Shulman, L.S. (1984), “It’s harder to teach in class than be a physician”, Stanford School 
of Education News, Autumn, 3. 
Sizer,  T.R.  (1984),  “High  school  reform  and  the  reform  of  teacher  education”,  Ninth 
annual DeGarmo lecture, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. 
Soder,  R.,  and  Sirotnik,  K.A.  (1990),  “Beyond  reinventing  the  past:  The  politics  of 
teacher  education”,  in  J.I.  Goodlad,  R.  Soder  and  K.A.  Sirotnik,  Places  Where 
Teachers are Taught
, Jossey-Bass, Oxford. 
Spenser,  J.A.  and  R.K.  Jordan  (1999),  “Learner-centred  approaches  in  medical 
education”, British Medical Journal, Vol. 318, pp. 1280-1283. 
Sprinthall,  N.A.,  A.J.  Reiman  and  L.  Thies-Sprinthall  (1996),  “Teacher  professional 
development”, in J.  Sikula  (ed.),  Handbook of  Research  on  Teacher  Education,  2nd 
Edition, Macmillan, New York, pp. 666-703. 
Strauss,  R.P.  and  E.A.  Sawyer  (1986),  “Some  new  evidence  on  student  and  teacher 
competencies”, Economics of Education Review, Vol. 5/1, pp. 41-48. 
Stuart,  J.S.  (2002),  “College  tutors:  A  fulcrum  for  change?”,  International  Journal  of 
Educational Development, Vol. 22/3-4, pp. 367-379. 
Stuart,  J.S.  and  K.M.  Lewin  (2002),  “Editorial  foreword”,  International  Journal  of 
Educational Development, Vol. 223-4, pp. 211-219
Thompson, Paul (2013), “Learner-centred education and ‘cultural translation”, International 
Journal of Educational Development, Vol. 33/1, pp. 48-58. 
Tobin, K. (1987), “The role of wait time in higher cognitive level learning”,  Review of 
Educational Research, Vol. 5/1, pp. 69-96. 
Tondeur,  J.  .  Pareja  Roblin,  N.,  van  Braak,  J., Fisser,  P., and Voogt,  J.  (2013), 
“Technological  pedagogical  content  knowledge  in  teacher  education:  In  search  of  a 
new curriculum”, Educational Studies, Vol. 39/2, pp. 239-243. 
Torres, R.M. (1996), “Without the reform of teacher education there will be no reform of 
education”, Prospects, Vol. 26/3, pp. 447-467. 
Trigwell, L., M. Prosser, P. Ramsden and E. Martin (1998), “Improving student learning 
through  a  focus  on  the  teaching  context”,  in  C.  Rust  (ed.),  Improving  Student 
Learning
, Centre for Staff Development, Oxford. 
Trigwell,  L.,  M.  Prosser  and  F.  Waterhouse  (1999),  “Relations  between  teachers’ 
approaches to teaching and students’ approaches to learning”, Higher Education, 37/1, 
pp. 57-70. 
TVET  Reform  Programme  (2012),  Time  for  Change:  Draft  Egyptian  TVET  Reform 
Policy  2012-2017.  Sustainable  Development  and  Employment  through  Qualified 
Workforce
,  TVET  Reform  Programme,  co-funded  by  the  European  Union  and  the 
Government of Egypt. 
UNESCO  (United  Nations  Educational,  Scientific  and  Cultural  Organization)  (2005), 
Literacy  for  Life:  EFA  Global  Monitoring  Report  2006.  EFA  (Education  for  All) 
Global Monitoring Report, UNESCO, Paris. 
UNESCO  (2004),  Education  for  All  –  The  Quality  Imperative:  EFA  Global  Monitoring 
Report 2005, EFA Global Monitoring Report, UNESCO. Paris. 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

150 – CHAPTER 5: THE QUALITY OF TEACHERS AND TEACHING 
 
 
UNEVOC 
(2013), 
“Country 
Profiles: 
Egypt”, 
TVET 
World 
Database, 
www.unevoc.unesco.org/go.php?q=World+TVET+Database&lang=en&ct=EGY, 
accessed 17 April 2013. 
US Department of Education (1994), Who’s In Charge: Teachers’ Views on Control over 
School Policies and School Practices, US Department of Education, Washington, DC 
Van  Manen,  M.  (1995),  “On  the  epistemology  of  reflective  practice”,  Teachers  and 
Teaching: Theory and Practice, Vol. 1/1, pp. 33-49. 
Vavrus, F. (2009), “The cultural politics of constructivist pedagogies: Teacher education 
reform  in  the  United  Republic  of  Tanzania”,  International  Journal  of  Educational 
Development,
 Vol. 29/3, pp. 303-311. 
VSO  (2002),  What  Makes  Teachers  Tick?  A  Policy  Research  Report  on  Teachers’ 
Motivation in Developing Countries, VSO, London. 
Wang, M.C., G.D. Haertel, G.D. and H.J. Walberg (1993), “Towards a knowledge base 
for school learning”, Review of Educational Research, Vol. 63/3, pp. 249-294. 
Wayne, A.J., K.S. Yoon, P. Zhu, S. Cronen and M.S. Garet (2008), “Experimenting with 
teacher  professional  development:  Motives  and  methods”,  Educational  Researcher, 
Vol. 37(8), pp. 469-479. 
Wenglinsky,  H.  (2002),  “The  link  between  classroom  teaching  practices  and  student 
academic  performance”,  Education  Policy  Analysis,  Vol. 10/12,  pp. 1-64, 
http://dx.doi.org/10.14507/epaa.v10n12.2002. 
Weiland, S. (2008), “Teacher education towards liberal education”, in M. Cochran-Smith, 
S.  Feiman-Nemser  and  D.J.  McIntyre  (eds.),  Handbook  of  Research  on  Teacher 
Education:  Enduring  Questions  in  Changing  Contexts,  
3rd  Edition,  Routledge, 
London, pp. 1204-1227. 
Wideen, M., J. Mayer-Smith and B. Moon (1998), “A critical analysis of the research on 
learning to teach: Making the case for an ecological perspective on inquiry”, Review of 
Educational Research
, Vol. 682, pp.130-178. 
World  Bank  (2010),  SABER  Teacher  Country  Report:  Egypt  2010,  World  Bank, 
Washington, DC. 
World  Bank  (2006),  From  Schooling  Access  to  Learning  Outcomes:  An  Unfinished 
Agenda:  An  Evaluation  of  World  Bank  Support  to  Primary  Education,  World  Bank, 
Washington, DC. 
World  Bank  (2005),  Expanding  Opportunities  and  Building  Competencies  for  Young 
People: A New Agenda for Secondary Education, World Bank, Washington, DC. 
World  Bank  (1995),  Priorities  and  Strategies  for  Education:  A  World  Bank  Review
World Bank, Washington, DC. 
Zeichner, K.M. and H.G. Conklin (2005), “Teacher education programs”, in M. Cochran-
Smith  and  K.  M.  Zeichner  (eds.),  Studying  Teacher  Education:  The  Report  of  the 
AERA  Panel  on  Research  and  Teacher  Education
,  Lawrence  Erbaum,  London, 
pp. 645-736. 
Zeichner, K. and B.R. Tabachnick (1981), “Are the effects of university teacher education 
‘washed  out’  by  school  experience?”,  Journal  of  Teacher  Education,  Vol.  32/3, 
pp. 7-11. 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

 CHAPTER 5: THE QUALITY OF TEACHERS AND TEACHING – 151 
 
 
Zelloth, H. (2014), “Technical and vocational education and training (TVET) and career 
guidance:  The  interface”,  in  G.  Arulmani  et  al.  (eds.),  Handbook  of  Career 
Development: International Perspectives 
, Springer, New York, pp. 271-290. 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 


153 – CHAPTER 6: APPROPRIATE ASSESSEMENT 
 
 
 
Chapter 6. 
 
Appropriate assessment 
This chapter outlines the different purposes of educational assessment and evaluates the 
balance of approaches to assessment in the Egyptian education system. It gives particular 
attention to high-stakes examinations and their impact on curriculum and pedagogy, and 
student  opportunities  for  further  learning  and  work.  It  also  considers  a  number  of 
changes to assessment as a means of increasing student learning, enlarging educational 
opportunity, and improving public accountability reporting.
 
 
 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

154 – CHAPTER 6: APPROPRIATE ASSESSEMENT 
 
 
The different uses of assessment 
Assessment is arguably at the core of formal education, as it informs the validation of 
learning  and  decisions  about  educational  interventions  –  in  the  classroom  and  at  the 
system  level.  Educational  assessment  provides  a  basis  for  understanding  how  and  how 
well  student  learning  is  occurring,  according  to  which  judgments  can  be  made  about 
student progress in education (see Box 6.1). 
Assessment  is  the  means  by  which  student  attainment  is  noted,  recorded,  and 
referenced  –  whether  in  relation  to  set standards (criterion-referenced)  or  in  relation the 
achievement of others (norm-referenced). It guides ratings of student readiness for further 
learning.  This  could  be  for  diagnostic  purposes,  modifying  teaching  and  learning 
experiences  to  address  student  needs,  for  advancing  students  to  further  stages  of 
education, or recognising their successful completion of an education stage and awarding 
accreditation. 
Box 6.1 Diverse uses of assessment 
“Information  about  where  students  are  in  their  learning  can  be  used  in  many  different  ways, 
including  to  identify  starting  points  for  teaching,  to  diagnose  errors  and  misunderstandings,  to 
monitor  trends  in  average achievement  levels  over  time,  to  select  students for  entry  into  courses,  to 
evaluate  the  effectiveness  of  teaching  interventions,  and  to  benchmark  achievement  levels  against 
international standards.”  
Source:  Masters,  G.  (2013),  “Reforming  educational  assessment:  Imperatives,  principles  and  challenges”, 
Australian Education Review, No. 57, Australian Council for Educational Research, Melbourne.  
 
Assessment processes can provide data for evaluating teaching effectiveness, and the 
effectiveness  of  educational  programmes,  including  the  curriculum  and  the  organisation 
of learning experiences. Student assessment can inform appraisal of teacher performance, 
and  the  effectiveness  of  schools  and  educational  sub-systems,  on  a  regional  or 
stage-of-education  basis.  With  the  advent  of  international  initiatives  to  develop 
comparable educational assessment data, such as the Programme for International Student 
Asessment  (PISA)  and  the  Trends  in  International  Mathematics  and  Science  Study 
(TIMMS),  inferences  can  be  drawn,  however  inappropriately,  even  about  the  relative 
capacities  of  the  human  capital  of  nations.  Different  education  stakeholders  –  teachers, 
school  leaders,  school  governing  bodies,  parents,  educational  authorities,  employers, 
general  taxpayers,  parliamentarians  and  students  –  have  different  interests  and 
expectations regarding assessment. 
Traditional and evolving approaches to assessment 
As  noted  in  Chapter  4,  the  modern  world  of  citizenship  and  work  requires  more 
exacting  and  more  adaptable  abilities,  including  the  ability  to  work  in  teams,  use 
technology  effectively,  innovate,  solve  complex  problems,  analyse  and  evaluate  diverse 
information,  conduct  themselves  ethically,  and  to  accept  personal  responsibility. 
Appropriate  assessment  methods  are  required  for  understanding  how  well  students  are 
developing those abilities and characteristics.  
However,  current  assessment  and  reporting  practices  derive  from  an  earlier  era  of 
educational  expectations.  They  were  designed  to  support  the  traditional  whole-class 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

 CHAPTER 6: APPROPRIATE ASSESSEMENT – 155 
 
 
teaching  of  an  age-based,  graded  curriculum.  Teachers  had  the  role  of  delivering  the 
curriculum,  students  had  the  task  of  learning  what  was  taught,  and  assessment  had  the 
function  of  establishing  how  much  of  the  taught  curriculum  had  been  learnt  by  the 
students (Masters, 2013).  
Traditional  assessment  has  thus  been  oriented  towards judging  student “success”  in 
this linear production model of whole-class teaching, common curriculum and age-based 
progression. The structure and form of assessment, as well as its purposes, can influence 
what education systems do and how they function at every level. If a test can be prepared 
for, instead of acting as a measure of student ability and potential, it can become more a 
measure  of  the  preparation  effort,  including  familiarity  with  the  testing  culture  and 
rehearsed responses to test item types.  
“If there is no concerted effort to subordinate testing to explicit curricular goals, 
there is an ever-present potential danger that tests themselves with all their 
inherent limitations will become the purposes of the educational encounter by 
default.” 
(Henning, 1990) 
As noted in Chapter 5, in relation to the professionalisation of teaching, assessment is 
also shifting in line with practice in other professions, in a more diagnostic direction and 
with a greater interest in understanding than judging:  
“... in modern classrooms, assessment is seen as an essential and on-going 
component of effective teaching. Teachers use assessments to identify where 
individual students are in their learning, to diagnose errors and 
misunderstandings, to plan teaching, to provide feedback to guide student effort, 
to monitor the progress that individuals make over time, and to evaluate the 
effectiveness of their teaching strategies and interventions. In this sense, 
assessment has parallels with assessment in other professions such as medicine 
and psychology where the purpose is not so much to judge as to understand for 
the purposes of making informed decisions.” 
(Masters, 2013). 
A  common  distinction  is  made  between  “formative”  assessment,  made  during  the 
learning process and “summative” assessment at the end of it  – whether in terms of the 
purpose  or  focus  or  form  or  timing  of  assessment.  This  distinction  is  most  frequently 
drawn  in  education  systems  designed  to  select  students  for  higher  learning,  where 
summative  assessment  has  been  viewed  as largely  external to  the  teaching  and  learning 
process,  and  where  teachers  and  teacher  educators  have  sought  a  sharper  focus  on 
observations of formative student performance in order to help improve student learning 
(Newton, 2007). In the contemporary circumstances of education, where roles, goals and 
orientations  have  shifted  or  are  shifting  away  from  past approaches, then the traditional 
distinction  between  formative  and  summative  assessment  is  less  obvious,  and  mostly 
unhelpful.  
Conceptualising assessment as “the process of establishing where learners are in their 
learning” (Masters, 2013) enables assessments to be used in a complementary fashion, for 
learning and assessments of learning, both criterion-referenced and norm-referenced. 
 
 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

156 – CHAPTER 6: APPROPRIATE ASSESSEMENT 
 
 
Assessment design principles 
Masters  (2013)  has  put  forward  five  design  principles  for  a  “learning  assessment 
system”: 
1. Assessments  should  be  guided  by,  and  address,  an  empirically  based 
understanding of the relevant learning domain. 
  A domain may be a subject area of learning within which student attainment and 
progress  are  to  be  assessed  and  monitored.  A  domain  has  both  horizontal  and 
vertical sub-structures. The horizontal dimension, for instance, for the domain of 
Reading  Literacy  in  PISA,  there  are  three  sub-domains:  accessing/retrieving, 
integrating/  interpreting  and  reflecting/evaluating.  The  vertical  dimension 
identifies the nature of increasing proficiency within the domain. 
  Course syllabuses spell out the knowledge, skills and understanding that students 
are  expected to  develop,  ideally  grounded  in  discipline  knowledge.  They  should 
identify  knowledge  and  skills  essential  to  the  discipline,  with  a  particular 
emphasis  on  the  development  of  students’  understandings  of  key  concepts, 
principles  and  ideas  in  the  discipline.  They  should  be  built  from  an  empirically 
based  understanding  of  how  learning  occurs  within  the  discipline,  including  an 
understanding of how the course builds on prior and prerequisite learning, how it 
lays  the  foundations  for  further  learning,  and  how  content  is  best  sequenced 
within  the  course  to  promote  the  development  of  student  knowledge,  skills  and 
understandings. 
2. Assessment  methods  should  be  selected  for  their  ability  to  provide  useful 
information about where students are in their learning within the domain. 
  Different  assessment  methods  (e.g.  paper  and  pen  tasks,  student  performances, 
research  projects,  portfolios  of  student  work)  are  likely  to  be  valid  for  different 
kinds of learning. Once a general method of assessment has been chosen, specific 
assessment  activities  or  tasks  are  required.  In  developing  assessment  tasks, 
consideration needs to be given to a range of other criteria, including reliability, 
objectivity, inclusivity and feasibility (see below). 
3.  Response to, or performance on, assessment tasks should be recorded using one or more task 
“rubrics”. 
  Task rubrics (marking guides) provide the direct substantive link to the learning 
domain.  Through  their  ordered  levels  of  response  or  performance,  they 
operationalise  what  it  means  to  make  progress  within  the  domain  and  that  the 
direct connection is built back to the learning intentions. 
4.  Available assessment evidence should be used to draw a conclusion about where learners are in 
their progress within the learning domain. 
  Individual  assessment  tasks  are  rarely  of  intrinsic  interest.  They  are  convenient 
and  interchangeable  vehicles  for  gathering  evidence  and  drawing  conclusions 
about where learners are in their learning with a particular domain. 
5.  Feedback and reports of assessment should show where learners are in their learning at the time 
of assessment and, ideally, what progress they have made over time. 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

 CHAPTER 6: APPROPRIATE ASSESSEMENT – 157 
 
 
  Feedback  on  the  knowledge,  skills and  understanding  demonstrated  by  students 
reflects an appreciation of learning as an ongoing, long-term process. 
 
Box 6.2 International best practice in educational assessment 
“International best practice in educational assessment proceeds through the set of steps outlined 
above,  beginning  with  a  clearly  defined  learning  domain  grounded  in  discipline  knowledge  and 
evidence about how learning occurs within that domain. Assessment methods are chosen on the basis 
of  their  domain-relevance  (construct  validity)  rather  than  personal  preference.  Students’  task 
responses/performances  are  recorded  using  rubrics  (or  marking  guides)  that  are  informed  by,  and 
aligned  with,  the  learning  domain  and  learning  intentions.  Conclusions  about  where  students  are  in 
their  learning  within  the  area  being  assessed  are  then  based  on  evidence  provided  by  (usually 
multiple) assessment tasks.” 
Source : Masters, G. (2013), “Reforming educational assessment: Imperatives, principles and challenges”, 
Australian Education Review, No. 57, Australian Council for Educational Research, Melbourne. 
 
The OECD has undertaken a series of reviews of education evaluation and assessment 
in its member countries. The varying approaches identified reflect historical and cultural 
differences,  although  there  is  some  convergence  towards  adoption  of  the  principles 
outlined above by Masters. The OECD report on educational evaluation and assessment 
in the Netherlands notes: 
“The Dutch evaluation and assessment approach stands out internationally as 
striking a good balance between school-based and central elements, quantitative 
and qualitative approaches, improvement and accountability functions and 
vertical and horizontal responsibilities of schools.” (Nusche et al., 2014)  

Box 6.3 outlines key features of the Dutch approach. 
 
Box 6.3 Educational assessment in The Netherlands 
The Dutch approach consists of the following four components: 
Student assessment. Student assessment in The Netherlands is largely the responsibility of schools and classroom 
teachers,  supported  by  well-developed  standardised  assessment  tools.  For  formative  assessment,  nearly  all  primary 
schools  participate  in  the  Leerling  Volg  Systeem  (LVS),  a  longitudinal  student  monitoring  system  developed  by  the 
Central Institute for Test Development (Centraal Instituut voor Toetsontwikkeling, CITO) covering most subjects. For 
the  first  two  years  of  secondary  education,  the  CITO  also  offer  a  range  of  monitoring  assessments.  In  their  regular 
classroom  assessment,  teachers  choose  assessment  tools,  typically  drawn  from  tests  provided  by  the  particular 
textbooks or “methods” they use. Summative results are reported to students and parents three times a year on a  scale 
of one to ten.  
At the end of primary education, schools are required to report on the extent to which their students have reached 
expected core learning objectives. While schools are free to use different instruments for this purpose, 85% of schools 
use CITO’s end-of-primary test, which provides information on the school type most suitable for each student in the 
next  phase  of  education.  New  laws  that  will  be  implemented  from  the  2014/15  school  year  make  it  mandatory  for 
primary schools to administer regular student monitoring systems as well as a final test at the end of Year 8.  
 
SCHOOLS FOR SKILLS: A NEW LEARNING AGENDA FOR EGYPT © OECD 2015 

158 – CHAPTER 6: APPROPRIATE ASSESSEMENT 
 
 
Box 6.3 Educational assessment in The Netherlands (continued) 
Schools can choose to administer the tests developed by CITO or alternative tests provided that they meet central 
quality requirements. In the secondary sector, school-leaving examinations are administrated at the end of each track. 
These  examinations  consist  of  a  central  part  developed  by  CITO  following  guidance  from  the  College  for 
Examinations (College voor Examen, CVE), and a school-based part developed by teachers in conformance with the 
examination syllabuses. 
Teacher  appraisal.  Teacher  appraisal  is  under  the  jurisdiction  of  the  competent  authority  of  each  school.  The 
2006  Education  Professions  Act  requires  school  boards  to  establish  human  resource  policies  for  their  schools,  keep 
competency files for each teacher and ensure that teachers’ competencies are maintained. Central regulations specify 
that schools should have regular performance interviews with all staff, but there is little central guidance on how the 
performance of individual teachers should be evaluated. As the employing authorities for teachers, school boards are 
free to develop their own frameworks for teacher appraisal. Many school boards delegate the responsibility for human 
resource management, including teacher appraisal, to the school leaders, and practices vary from school to school. 
School evaluation. There is no legal obligation for schools to implement particular self-evaluation processes, but 
schools  are  required  to  draw  up  a  school  prospectus,  an  annual  report  and  a  4-year  school  plan,  which  is  typically 
based on an internal review of school quality. Schools benefit from analytical software systems and benchmarked data, 
and can choose to buy supporting materials and services from different providers. External evaluations are conducted 
by  the  Inspectorate  of  Education  at  least  every  four  years,  with  the  type  and  intensity  of  inspection  depending  on 
identified risks in each school. Schools that are considered at risk of underperformance are evaluated more frequently 
and  more  thoroughly  than  others.  The  initial  risk  analysis  is  based  on  a  review  of  each  school’s  outcomes,  annual 
accounts and “failure signals” such as complaints. For its inspection visits, the inspectorate uses a detailed framework 
of  quality  indicators  and  a  clear  set  of  decision  rules.  As  part  of  this  framework,  the  inspectorate  also  evaluates  the 
internal  quality  care  undertaken  by  schools.    A  range  of  different  databases  providing  school-level  information  and 
performance  indicators  are  connected  and  made  available  to  different  audiences  through  the  online  information 
systems Windows for Accountability (Vensters voor Verantwoording) and Schools on the Map (Scholen op de Kaart). 
School  evaluation  also  uses  information  recorded  in  the  Basic  Register  for  Education  (Basis  Register  Onderwijs, 
BRON). The inspectorate publishes its inspection reports, as well as School Quality Cards which provide information 
about the inspection regime schools are assigned to. 
System  evaluation.  The  overall  performance  of  the  Dutch  education  system  is  monitored  in  several  ways. 
Information on student learning outcomes is collected from international surveys, national monitoring sample surveys 
(Peridodiek  Peilings  Onderzoek,  PPON  and  Jaarlijks  Peilingsonderzoek  van  het  Onderwijsniveau,  JPON),  the 
longitudinal  Cohort  Survey  School  Careers  (Cohort  Onderzoek  Onderwijs