Ceci est une version HTML d'une pièce jointe de la demande d'accès à l'information 'Documents filed in ECJ cases'.


IN THE COURT OF JUSTICE OF THE EUROPEAN UNION 
 
CASE C-592/14 
 

 
 

THE EUROPEAN FEDERATION FOR COSMETIC INGREDIENTS 
 
 
 
 

 
WRITTEN OBSERVATIONS OF THE UNITED KINGDOM 
 
 
 
The United Kingdom is represented by Mr. Luke Barfoot of the European Law 
Group,  Government  Legal  Department,  acting  as  Agent,  and  by  Mr.  Josh 
Holmes, Barrister. 
 
 
 
Submitted by: 
 
Luke Barfoot  
 
   
      and 
 
Josh Holmes 
Agent for the United Kingdom 
 
 
 
Barrister 
EU Litigation, European Law Group 
Government Legal Department 
Room 3/02, 1 Horse Guards Road 
London, SW1A 2HQ 
 
Service may also be made by fax or email: 
Fax:   ++44 20 7276 0184 
Email: 
 
 
14 April 2015 


A.  
INTRODUCTION 
1. 
Pursuant  to  Article  23  of  the  Protocol  on  the  Statute  of  the  Court  of 
Justice of the European Union, the United Kingdom (‘the UK’) submits 
these Written Observations to the Court. 
2. 
The case arises out of a reference for preliminary ruling made by the 
High  Court  of  England  and  Wales  (‘the  Referring  Court’)  on  12 
December  2014,  regarding  the  interpretation  of  Article  18(1)(b)  of 
Regulation (EC) No. 1223/2009 of the European Parliament and of the 
Council  of  30  November  2009  on  cosmetic  products  (‘the 
Regulation’).  
3. 
That provision prohibits the placing on the market within the European 
Union  (‘the  EU’)  of  cosmetic  products  containing  ingredients  or 
combinations of ingredients which, in order to meet the requirements of 
the Regulation, have been the subject of animal testing. 
4. 
The Claimant is a trade association representing manufacturers within 
the  EU  of  ingredients  for  use  in  cosmetic  products.    Its  members,  or 
their  customers,  wishing  to  market  cosmetic  products  in  certain  third 
countries,  including  China,  must  subject  the  products  to  tests  on 
animals in order to demonstrate their safety for human health.  It has 
brought  proceedings  before  the  Referring  Court  to  determine  whether 
such persons may lawfully place products that have been tested in this 
way on the market in the EU, relying upon the data obtained from the 
animal testing in order to show that they are safe for the purposes of 
the Regulation. 
5. 
The  Referring  Court  considers  that  the  proper  interpretation  of  Article 
18(1)(b)  of  the  Regulation  is  not  free  from  doubt.    It  has  therefore 
decided  to  stay  the  national  proceedings  in  order  to  obtain  guidance 
from the Court of Justice. 


6. 
The  Referring  Court  has  referred  two  questions  for  preliminary  ruling, 
which  are  set  out  at  §24  of  the  order  for  reference.    In  summary,  the 
Court seeks: 
a.  To ascertain whether the prohibition in Article 18(1)(b) applies in 
the  case  of  cosmetic  products  containing  ingredients,  or 
combinations of ingredients, which have been tested on animals 
outside  the  EU  in  order  to  meet  the  legislative  or  regulatory 
requirements  imposed  by  third  countries  on  those  wishing  to 
market cosmetic products containing those ingredients in those 
countries; and 
b.  To  establish  the  relevance  of  various  factors  in  answering  that 
question, including in particular: 
i.  whether the data obtained from such testing are used in 
order  to  demonstrate,  for  the  purposes  of  the  safety 
assessment required by Article 10 of the Regulation, that 
the cosmetic product is safe for human health; and 
ii.  whether  the  third  country  requirements  relate  to  the 
safety of cosmetic products. 
7. 
The United Kingdom sets out below its interpretation of the prohibition 
contained  in  Article  18(1)(b)  of  the  Regulation  by  reference  to  those 
factors.  In summary, the United Kingdom submits that: 
a.  Point 1:  Article 18(1)(b) prohibits the placing on the market in 
the  EU  of  a  cosmetic  product  containing  ingredients,  or 
combinations of ingredients, which have been tested on animals 
outside  the  EU  in  order  to  satisfy  the  requirements  of  a  third 
country, in circumstances where: 


i.  the  data  obtained  from  the  animal  testing  are  used  in 
order to demonstrate that the cosmetic product is safe for 
human health for the purposes of the Regulation and 
ii.  the third country requirements are intended to ensure the 
safety of cosmetic products. 
b.  Point 2: Article 18(1)(b) does not prohibit the placing of such a 
product  on  the  market  in  the  EU  in  circumstances  where  the 
data  obtained  from  the  animal  testing  are  not  used  in  order  to 
demonstrate that the cosmetic product is safe for human health 
for the purposes of the Regulation  
c.  Point 3: Article 18(1)(b) does not prohibit the placing of such a 
product on the market in the EU in circumstances where: 
i.  the  data  obtained  from  the  animal  testing  are  used  in 
order to demonstrate that the cosmetic product is safe for 
human health for the purposes of the Regulation; but  
ii.  the  third  country  requirements  are  intended  to  ensure  a 
purpose other than the safety of the cosmetic product, for 
which animal testing remains lawful in the EU. 
B. 
ANALYSIS 
The United Kingdom’s proposed interpretation of Article 18(1)(b) of the 
Regulation 
Point 1 
8. 
In the United Kingdom’s submission, the prohibition in Article 18(1)(b) 
of  the  Regulation  applies  to  products  containing  ingredients,  or 
combinations  of  ingredients,  which  have  been  tested  on  animals 


outside the EU in order to satisfy the requirements of a third country, in 
circumstances where: 
a.  the results of such testing are used in order to demonstrate that 
the cosmetic product is safe for human health for the purposes 
of the Regulation; and  
b.  the  testing  is  required  to  be  undertaken  by  the  third  country 
concerned in order to achieve the same purpose as is pursued 
by  the  Regulation,  namely  ensuring  the  safety  of  cosmetic 
products. 
9. 
Such an interpretation accords with the purpose of Article 18(1)(b) as it 
emerges from the recitals in the preamble of the Regulation: 
a.  Recital (38) underlines the need ‘to pay full regard to the welfare 
requirements  of  animals  in  the  implementation  of  [EU]  policies, 
in  particular  with  regard  to  the  internal  market’.    Recital  (42) 
likewise identifies the objective of achieving ‘the highest possible 
degree of animal protection’. 
b.  Recital  (39)  refers  to  the  requirement  under  Directive 
86/609/EEC that ‘animal experiments be replaced by alternative 
methods,  where  such  methods  exist  and  are  scientifically 
satisfactory’. 
c.  Recital  (40)  records  that  ‘the  safety  of  cosmetic  products  and 
their ingredients may be ensured through the use of alternative 
methods’ to animal testing, and that ‘the use of such methods by 
the  whole  cosmetic  industry  should  be  promoted  and  their 
adoption  at  [EU]  level  ensured,  where  such  methods  offer  an 
equivalent level of protection to consumers’. 


10. 
It  would  be  inconsistent  with  those  objectives  if  the  Regulation  were 
construed as allowing cosmetic manufacturers to rely on data obtained 
from animal testing performed in third countries for the same purpose 
(of  ensuring  the  safety  of  cosmetic  products)  as  is  pursued  by  the 
Regulation itself. 
11. 
The  proposed  interpretation  also  accords  with  the  view  expressed  by 
the  Commission  in  its  communication  on  the  animal  testing  and 
marketing  ban  and  on  the  state  of  play  in  relation  to  alternative 
methods in the field of cosmetics (COM/2013/0135 final), at §3.1. 
12. 
Such  an  interpretation  would  enable  manufacturers  easily  to 
circumvent  the  requirements  of  Article  18(1)(b)  of  the  Regulation,  by 
purporting  to  place  a  product  containing  a  given  ingredient  on  the 
market in a third country where animal testing is required, carrying out 
animal  tests  and  using  the  data  resulting  from  such  tests  in  order  to 
meet the requirements of the Regulation. 
Point 2 
13. 
However, on its proper construction, Article 18(1)(b) of the Regulation 
does  not  go  so  far  as  to  preclude  the  placing  on  the  market  of  a 
product  containing  ingredients  which  have  been  the  subject  of  animal 
testing pursuant to the requirements of a third country, but where data 
obtained from such testing are not relied upon in order to demonstrate 
that the cosmetic product is safe for human health for the purposes of 
the Regulation. 
14. In  that  case,  it  cannot  be  said  that  the  tests  are  in  any  sense  being 
used ‘in order to meet the requirements of the Regulation’. 
15. It  would  be  disproportionately  onerous  to  require  manufacturers  to 
choose between marketing products containing particular ingredients in 
the EU and in third countries where animal testing is required. 


16. Recital (45) in the preamble of the Regulation shows that this was not 
the intention of the EU legislature.  That recital exhorts the Commission 
and the Member States to encourage the recognition by third countries 
of alternative methods to animal testing ‘so as to ensure that the export 
of  cosmetic  products  for  which  such  methods  have  been  used  is  not 
hindered and to prevent or avoid third countries requiring the repetition 
of such tests using animals’.  The recital therefore records the view of 
the legislature that unnecessary animal testing in third countries should 
be  prevented  or  avoided.    It  does  not  indicate  any  intention  that  the 
effect of such testing should be to block the marketing of the products 
in question within the EU. 
Point 3 
17. 
Equally,  on  its  proper  construction,  Article  18(1)(b)  of  the  Regulation 
does not prohibit a manufacturer from placing a product on the market 
in the EU which contains ingredients that have been tested on animals 
outside  the  EU  in  order  to  meet  a  third  country’s  requirements  where 
the  purpose  of  those  requirements  is  not  to  ensure  the  safety  of 
cosmetic products but to achieve some other objective (e.g. the safety 
testing  of  a  medicinal  product),  for  which  animal  testing  remains 
permissible within the EU. 
18. In such a case, the testing is not undertaken in order to meet the same 
underlying purpose as the Regulation – namely to ensure the safety of 
cosmetic  products  –  but  rather  to  meet  other  objectives  that  are 
recognised as legitimate reasons to undertake animal testing within the 
EU legal order. 
19. Such  testing  therefore  cannot  be  said  to  have  been  undertaken  ‘in 
order to meet the requirements of the Regulation’, even where the data 
are subsequently used to meet those requirements. 


Arguments  as  to  the  construction  of  Article  18(1)(b)  of  the  Regulation 
advanced by the Claimant in the national proceedings 
20. 
In the national proceedings, the Claimant contends that the Regulation 
permits  manufacturers  to  meet  the  requirements  of  the  Regulation  by 
reference to data obtained from animal testing undertaken outside the 
EU to meet the requirements of a third country, whatever the purpose 
underlying those requirements.   
21. 
The  Claimant  has  advanced  three  principal  arguments  in  support  of 
that  contention.    For  the  reasons  set  out  below,  those  arguments  are 
incorrect. 
22. 
First, the Claimant cites Articles 11(2)(e) and 20(3) of the Regulation, 
which both refer to animal testing in connection with products that are 
(lawfully) marketed in the EU, in support of a contextual interpretation 
of  Article  18(1)(b)  of  the  Regulation  as  permitting  reliance  on  data 
obtained from animal testing. 
23. 
Those  provisions  do  not  support  the  Claimant’s  case:  under  the 
interpretation of the United Kingdom, advanced above, a product may 
lawfully be marketed notwithstanding the fact that such animal testing 
has been undertaken in a third country.  This may occur, for example: 
a.  where  the  testing  was  undertaken  for  a  purpose  other  than  to 
ensure the safety of cosmetic products; or  
b.  where  the  results  of  the  testing  are  not  relied  on  to  show  the 
safety of the products for the purposes of the Regulation; or  
c.  where  the  testing  was  undertaken  before  the  deadline  for 
validation and adoption of alternative methods at EU level. 


24. 
Secondly, the Claimant refers to various recitals in the preamble of the 
Regulation, which show that the Regulation has as one of its purposes 
to achieve a functioning internal market in cosmetics.   
25. 
However,  it  is  also  clear  from  the  recitals  that  the  Regulation  was 
intended  to  achieve  a  high  level  of  human  health  and  respect  for  the 
welfare of animals.  The United Kingdom submits that its interpretation 
of Article 18(1)(b) of the Regulation best achieves the purposes of the 
Regulation, considered together. 
26. 
Thirdly, the Claimant identifies certain aspects of the legislative history 
of  (what  is  now)  Article  18(1)(b)  of  the  Regulation,  which  are  said  to 
support its interpretation.  In particular, it says that when the European 
Parliament first introduced an amendment providing for the prohibition 
now contained in that provision, the amendment referred to ingredients 
tested  on  animals  ‘in  order  to  assess  their  safety  or  efficacy’,  but  the 
prohibition  as  adopted  omitted  the  reference  to  ‘safety  or  efficacy’.  
This  is  said  to  support  a  narrow  interpretation  of  ‘the  requirements  of 
the  Regulation’,  excluding  safety  testing  originally  undertaken  to 
comply with third country requirements.   
27. 
However,  the  deletion  of  the  reference  to  safety  and  efficacy  could 
equally  have  been  made  because  the  legislature  thought  that  the 
deleted  words  were  otiose.    The  legislative  history  therefore  does  not 
provide any support for the Claimant’s position. 
C. 
CONCLUSION 
28. 
For  the  reasons  set  out  above,  the  UK  respectfully  submits  that  the 
Court should answer the questions referred as follows: 
Article  18(1)(b)  of  the  Regulation  prohibits  the  placing  on  the 
market  of  cosmetic  products  containing  ingredients  or 
combinations of ingredients the safety of which is proved, for the 
purposes  of  the  Regulation,  by  means  of  data  obtained  from 
animal  tests  carried  out  in  order  to  satisfy  the  legislative  and