Ceci est une version HTML d'une pièce jointe de la demande d'accès à l'information 'Meetings with FairSearch'.




Ref. Ares(2018)2554324 - 16/05/2018
Ref. Ares(2018)2751838 - 28/05/2018
FairSearch Europe Secretariat 
E: [adresse e-mail] 
W: www.fairsearcheurope.org  
 
@FairSearch 
 
March 2014 
 
Academic / scientific research 
Google’s  third  package  of  proposals  differs  only  minimally  from  the  second  set  of  proposals  which  were 
soundly  condemned  by  Commissioner  Almunia  as  failing  to  end  Google’s  anti-competitive  practices  and 
restore competition to search.  This means that most of the results of the expert studies testing the second 
package  remain  valid  and  relevant  to  the  third  package.  The  overview  below  provides  the  main  findings  of 
these studies.  
 
I. 

6 December 2013: Review of the likely effects of Google’s proposed Commitments, by Professors 
David J. Franklyn and David A. Hyman  

  Online interactive surveys of 3,500 U.K. residents during November, 2013 
  Commissioned by FairSearch Europe 
 
Similar to the findings of their expert study of 1 July 2013, Professors Hyman and Franklyn conclude that the 
second  set  of  Google’s  proposed  commitments  will  neither  materially  increase  consumer  attention,  offer 
consumers meaningful choices nor restore or improve competition in the vertical search markets.  The study 
demonstrates  that  it  is  both  the  size  and  the  placement  of  a  rival  service  on  the  search  results  page  that 
determines consumer click-thru rate. In more detail, the study finds that:  
 
  The three rival links are unlikely to attract significantly higher rates of consumer clicks. While the 
percentage  of  non-mobile  clicks  on  rival  links  is  modestly  higher  than  the  market  test  of  Google’s 
First  Commitments  (never  more  than  2%),  that  click  through  rates  for  rival  links  in  the  Second 
Commitments continue to lag far behind click through rates for Google’s own vertical search results. 
Google’s proposal sends up to 40 times more traffic to its own links than those of others.  
  The proposed rival link remedy is unstable. The observed slight increases in click-through rates on 
rival  links are easily eliminated  with modest  changes to the appearance of the search results page, 
such as the addition of a banner-strip similar to the one recently introduced in the United States.  
  Consumer  confusion  persists  as  to  the  difference  between  Google’s  specialised  search  results 
and  other  search  results.  The  study  finds  high  levels  of  consumer  confusion  as  to  the  source  and 
type  of  search  results  and  a  low  level  of  ability  to  correctly  differentiate  between  paid  and  unpaid 
results,  or  between  Google’s  vertical  search  and  generic  search  results.  In  addition,  the  proposed 
disclosure statement does not effectively communicate the necessary information, i.e. whether the 
region  in  question  is  paid  vs.  unpaid,  and  the  location  and  significance  of  the  ‘rival  links’.  The 
proposed language confused many respondents.  
 
        The study demonstrates also that  
  Parity of rival link presentation is easily attainable and would  substantially increase consumer 
clicks  on  rival  sites.  Visually  rich  appearance  is  an  important  component  in  Google’s  dominance. 
Professors  Hyman  and  Franklyn  tested  several  variations  to  determine  how  difficult  it  would  be  to 
present search results in a way that would substantially  increase consumer attention and click-thru 
rates on rival sites. The highest degree of rival link visibility and resulting consumer attention is found 
when rival links are displayed in a manner that is comparable to the manner in which Google’s own 
specialised search results are displayed. None of the Commitments achieve this objective.  
 
 

 

II. 
November 2013 Price Comparison Surveys 
  November 2013:  US Consumer Watchdog survey and complaint on higher prices that consumers 
pay on Google 
o  Read Consumer Watchdog’s study here:  
http://www.consumerwatchdog.org/resources/googlereport112513.pdf 
o  Press 
release: 
http://www.consumerwatchdog.org/newsrelease/consumer-watchdog-
complains-ftc-about-deception-google-shopping-results 
  24 November Financial Times AnalysisGoogle criticised as product listing adverts push up prices by 
Richard Waters (San Francisco) 
o  http://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/2/a004c830-552d-11e3-a321-
00144feabdc0.html#axzz2wCywZUzI 
 
The US consumer organisation, Consumer Watchdog and the Financial Times have both carried out separate 
and small surveys which indicate that consumers who rely on Google pay higher prices due to the way that 
Google’s algorithm now operates thanks to Google Shopping.   
  Comparing the featured price of 14 items featured in Google Shopping, the consumer group found 
that  it  was  higher  on  Google  in  eight  cases  than  the  same  item  on  a  competing  CSE  like  Nextag, 
Shopzilla or Pricegrabber. 
  The Financial Times analysis found five out of every six items highlighted on a Google search were 
more expensive than the same items from other merchants which were list way down in the Google 
Shopping service. The FT  found an average premium of 34 percent. 
 
 
III. 
 21 October 2013: Attention and selection behaviour on "universal search" result pages based on 
proposed Google commitments  

 
  Eye tracking pilot study with 35 test subjects conducted by the Institute of Communication and Media 
Research (IKM) at the German Sports University Cologne (DSHS),  
  Commissioned by the Initiative for a Competitive Online Market Place (ICOMP) 
 
The study illustrates an empirical approach regarding the distribution of attention and the selection behaviour 
on Google "Universal Search" result pages. The main findings of the study are:  
  Google placed "Sponsored" Google-own page elements grab a pre-dominant amount of total visual 
attention.  
  The  “alternative  search  sites"  even  with  small  logos  do  not  evoke  enough  visual  attention  to 
stimulate users to click on them. 
  Map  services  cannot  compete  against  Google  because  the  Google  Map  pane  and  Google  Images 
thumbnails get visual attention of users more, earlier and longer than all other page elements. 
  Google Ads presented as lateral skyscraper-shaped link lists are vastly irrelevant for visual attention 
as well as for mouse clicking behaviour. 
  The  visual  attention  for  organic  links  on  the  search  engine  result  pages  (SERPs)  is  negligible 
compared  to  those  Google  elements  placed  above  them,  enhanced  with  pictures.  With  browser 
windows not opened wide, organic links cannot be seen. 
 
 
 

 

IV. March 2014: Settlement will Provide Google with significant Additional Revenue 
  Economic Study on the Impact by ETTSA  
  Based on publicly available sources 
Focusing on the auction mechanism, this soon to be released study by ETTSA, representing the online travel 
sector,  is  based  on  publicly  available  sources  and  demonstrates  the  inequities  of  this  proposed  settlement.  
Under the auction mechanism, Google will select the three rivals to display their competing services based on 
a combination of the level of their bid and expected click through rates, thus maximising the revenue Google 
expects to make by displaying these ads.  The auction winners will be those most able to pay, not the most 
innovative  SMEs  and  not  those  providing  the  cheapest  or  best  products.  Moreover,  new  entrants  are 
specifically excluded by the minimum traffic threshold. 
 
So, in a sector like travel search, the remedy both fails to eliminate the abuse, but turns Google competitors 
into additional revenue sources for the dominant company.  To substantiate this claim, ETTSA shows that for 
the  top  20  travel  sites  alone  Google  will  generate additional  incremental  revenue  of  up  to  240  million 
euros/dollars  330  million  per  year  thanks  to  the  auction  mechanism.  Extrapolating  this  amount  to  other 
sectors  (such  as  travel  or  car  insurance  or  mortgages),  Google  will  earn  an  additional  revenue  from  these 
proposed  commitments  that  could  easily  reach  €1  billion annually.  By  creating  a  new  revenue  stream  for 
Google, this settlement creates new abuses of dominance, and is thus worse than having no settlement at all.