Esta es la versión HTML de un fichero adjunto a una solicitud de acceso a la información 'Advisory Group for the Preparatory Action on Defence Research (E03523)'.


 
EUROPEAN COMMISSION 
 
 
Brussels, 14.11.2018 
C(2018) 7681 final 
 
 
Mr Bram Vranken 
Vredesactie 
Patriottenstraat 27 
2600 Berchem 
DECISION OF THE EUROPEAN COMMISSION PURSUANT TO ARTICLE 4 OF THE 
IMPLEMENTING RULES TO REGULATION (EC) N° 1049/20011 
Subject: 
Your confirmatory application for access to documents under 
Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001 –Gestdem 2017/7033  

Dear Mr Vranken, 
I refer to your email of 8 March 2018, registered on 9 March 2018, in which you submit, 
on  behalf  of  Vredesactie,  a  confirmatory  application  in  accordance  with  Article  7(2)  of 
Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001 regarding public access to European Parliament, Council 
and Commission documents2 ('Regulation 1049/2001').  
1. 
SCOPE OF YOUR REQUEST 
On  21  November  2017,  you  submitted  an  initial  application  in  which  you  requested 
access to documents containing the following information:  
‘1.  Details  of  all  stakeholders  consulted  (including  member  states,  industry, 
academia and others) on the decision to establish: 
a) The European Defence Fund; and 
b) The Defence Industrial Development Programme. 
2.  Details  of  all  meetings,  including  minutes  of  meetings,  with  all  stakeholders 
identified under 1(a) and 1(b) respectively, in relation to: 
                                                 

Official Journal L 345 of 29.12.2001, p. 94. 
2    Official Journal L 145 of 31.5.2001, p. 43. 
 
Commission européenne/Europese Commissie, 1049 Bruxelles/Brussel, BELGIQUE/BELGIË - Tel. +32 22991111 
http://ec.europa.eu/dgs/secretariat_general/ 
E-mail: xxxxxxxxxx@xx.xxxxxx.xx  
 

a) 
The European Defence Fund; and 
b) 
The Defence Industrial Development Programme. 
3.  All  correspondence  with  the  stakeholders  identified  under  1(a)  and  1(b) 
respectively, in relation to:  
a) 
The European Defence Fund; and 
b) 
The Defence Industrial Development Programme.’ 
This application was registered under reference number Gestdem 2017/7033. 
I  note  that  on  the  same  day,  you  submitted  another  initial  application  concerning 
documents relating to the Group of Personalities on Defence Research. That application 
was registered under the reference number Gestdem 2017/7037.   
Both  applications  were  attributed  to  the  Directorate-General  for  Internal  Market, 
Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs for handling and reply.  
On  23  February  2018,  the  Directorate-General  for  Internal  Market,  Industry, 
Entrepreneurship and SMEs provided its joint reply to your initial applications Gestdem 
2017/7033 and 2017/7037.  
In the reply, the Directorate-General for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and 
SMEs refused access to the relevant documents, on the basis of the exception protecting 
the  public  interest  as  regards  defence  and  military  matters,  provided  for  in  the  second 
indent of Article 4(1)(a) of Regulation 1049/2001, as well as the exception protecting the 
decision-making process, laid down in Article 4(3) of the said Regulation.     
In your confirmatory application, you request a review of this position. In particular, you 
argue  that  the  reply  of  the  Directorate-General  for  Internal  Market,  Industry, 
Entrepreneurship and SMEs does not provide any proper statement of reasons. You argue 
that,  ‘[t]he  reasons  [the  Directorate-General  for  Internal  Market,  Industry, 
Entrepreneurship and SMEs] have put forward to justify the application of the exceptions 
are strikingly vague and thus unsatisfactory’. Consequently, ‘[the Directorate-General for 
Internal  Market,  Industry,  Entrepreneurship  and  SMEs]  ha[s]  not  explained  how 
disclosure can “specifically  and actually” undermine the public interest  […] as  regards 
defence  and  public  security  matters  and  why  this  is  “reasonably  foreseeable  and  not 
purely hypothetical”, as required by case law […]’.  
Additionally,  you  argue  that  there  is  an  overriding  public  interest  warranting,  in  your 
view, the public disclosure of the documents concerned.      
 
This  confirmatory  decision  concerns  only  the  documents  identified  as  falling  under  the 
scope of your application Gestdem 2017/7033. You will receive a separate reply to your 
application Gestdem 2017/7037 in due course.  
 


As regards application Gestdem 2017/7033, the European Commission has identified 39 
documents  falling  under  its  scope.  The  complete  list  of  the  documents  identified  is 
included in the annex to this decision.    
2. 
ASSESSMENT AND CONCLUSIONS UNDER REGULATION 1049/2001 
When  assessing  a  confirmatory  application  for  access  to  documents  submitted  pursuant 
to  Regulation  1049/2001,  the  Secretariat-General  conducts  a  fresh  review  of  the  reply 
given by the Directorate-General concerned at the initial stage. 
Your  initial  application  (point  1  and  2  thereof),  relates  to  ‘[d]etails  of  all  stakeholders 
consulted […] on the decision to establish The European Defence Fund and The Defence 
Industrial Development Programme’ and ‘[d]etails of all meetings, including minutes of 
meetings, with the [above-mentioned] stakeholders […]’.  
 
I consider that by ‘details of stockholders consulted’ and the ‘details of all meetings’, you 
refer to documents containing, respectively, a list of ‘stakeholders consulted’ and the list 
of meetings with the latter.  
 
I confirm that the European Commission has not identified any such documents. In line 
with the provisions of Article 2(3) and Article 10 of Regulation 1049/2001, the right of 
access guaranteed by that Regulation applies only to existing documents in possession of 
the institution concerned.  
Article  2(3)  provides  that  ‘[t]his  Regulation  shall  apply  to  all  documents  held  by  an 
institution, that is to say, documents drawn up or received by it and in its possession, in 
all areas of activity of the European Union’. 
Article  10(3)  provides  that  ‘[d]ocuments  shall  be  supplied  in  an  existing  version  and 
format […]’. 
In the light of the above, given that the European Commission does not hold any of the 
documents  to  which  you  refer  to  in  your  application,  it  is  not  possible  to  handle  your 
application, in so far as points 1 and 2 thereof are concerned.  
With  regard  to  the  documents  identified  as  falling  under  point  3  of  your  initial 
application, after careful review of the initial decision, I conclude that wide partial access 
is granted to documents 8, 16, 17, 18, 19, 21a, 21b, 21d, 22, 25a, 25b, 25c, 28, 29, 30, 31, 
32, 35, 36 and 38. The limited redactions are based on the exception protecting privacy 
and  the  integrity  of  the  individual  provided  for  in  Article  4(1)(b)  of  Regulation 
1049/2001. 
 
Partial access is granted to documents 21c and 25d. The redacted parts of the documents 
are  covered  by  the  exceptions  protecting  the  public  interest,  as  regards  defence  and 
military matters and the decision-making process provided for in Article 4(1)(a), second 
indent and Article 4(3), first subparagraph of Regulation 1049/2001. 
  


With regard to the remaining documents 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 20, 
23,  24,  26,  33,  34,  37  and  39,  access  is  refused.  The  underlying  exceptions  are  those 
protecting  the  public  interest,  as  regards  defence  and  military  matters  and  the  decision-
making  process  provided  for  in  Article  4(1)(a),  second  indent  and  Article  4(3),  first 
subparagraph of the above-mentioned Regulation 1049/2001. 
 
Additionally,  access  is  refused  to  document  27,  based  on  the  exception  protecting  the 
commercial interests of a natural or legal person provided for in Article 4(2), first indent 
of the said Regulation.   
 
The detailed reasons are set out below.  
 
2.1 
Protection of the privacy and integrity of the individual  
Article  4(1)(b)  of  Regulation  1049/2001  provides  that  ‘[t]he  institutions  shall  refuse 
access to  a  document  where  disclosure  would  undermine  the  protection  of  […]  privacy 
and  the  integrity  of  the  individual,  in  particular  in  accordance  with  Community 
legislation regarding the protection of personal data’. 
The undisclosed parts of documents 16, 17, 18, 19, 21a, 21b, 21d, 22, 25a, 25b, 25c, 29, 
31,  35  and  36  contain  the  names,  surnames,  contact  details  (email  and  office  addresses 
and telephone numbers) of the staff members of the European Commission who do not 
hold any senior management positions. The undisclosed parts of documents 8, 28, 29, 30, 
32 and 35 contain also names, surnames, contact details (email addresses and telephone 
numbers)  of  representatives  and  employees  of  third  parties,  such  as  authorities  of  the 
Members States, organisations and economic operators.  
Furthermore,  the  relevant  undisclosed  parts  of  documents  8,  17,  19,  21a,  21b,  21d,  22, 
29, 31, 32, 36, 37, 38 contain biometric data (handwritten signatures of the staff members 
of the European Commission or third party representatives).   
These  undoubtedly  constitute  personal  data  within  the  meaning  of  Article  2(a)  of 
Regulation  45/2001,  which  defines  it  as  ‘any  information  relating  to  an  identified  or 
identifiable  natural  person  […];  an  identifiable  person  is  one  who  can  be  identified, 
directly or indirectly, in particular by reference to an identification number or to one or 
more factors specific to his or her physical, physiological, mental, economic, cultural or 
social identity’.  
It  follows  that  public  disclosure  of  all  above-mentioned  personal  information,  would 
constitute  processing  (transfer)  of  personal  data  within  the  meaning  of  Article  8(b)  of 
Regulation 45/2001.  
In  accordance  with  the  Bavarian  Lager  ruling3,  when  a  request  is  made  for  access  to 
documents  containing  personal  data,  Regulation  45/2001  becomes  fully  applicable. 
According  to  Article  8(b)  of  that  Regulation,  personal  data  shall  only  be  transferred  to 
                                                 

Judgment of the Court (Grand Chamber) of 29 June 2010 in Case C-28/08 P, European Commission v 
the Bavarian Lager Co. Ltd
,(ECLI:EU:C:2010:378), paragraph 63. 


recipients  if  the  recipient  establishes  the  necessity  of  having  the  data  transferred  and  if 
there  is  no  reason  to  assume  that  the  data  subject's  legitimate  interests  might  be 
prejudiced. Those two conditions are cumulative4.  
Only  if  both  conditions  are  fulfilled  and  the  transfer  constitutes  lawful  processing  in 
accordance with the requirements of Article 5 of  Regulation 45/2001, can the processing 
(transfer) of personal data occur.  
In that context, whoever requests such a transfer must first establish that it is necessary. If 
it  is  demonstrated  to  be  necessary,  it  is  then  for  the  institution  concerned  to  determine 
that there is no reason to assume that that transfer might prejudice the legitimate interests 
of the data subject5. Indeed, in its recent judgment in the ClientEarth case, the Court of 
Justice  ruled  that  ‘whoever  requests  such  a  transfer  must  first  establish  that  it  is 
necessary. If it is demonstrated to be necessary, it is then for the institution concerned to 
determine  that  there  is  no  reason  to  assume  that  that  transfer  might  prejudice  the 
legitimate interests of the data subject. If there is no such reason, the transfer requested 
must  be  made,  whereas,  if  there  is  such  a  reason,  the  institution  concerned  must  weigh 
the various competing interests in order to decide on the request for access’6. I refer also 
to the Strack case, where the Court of Justice ruled that the institution does not have to 
examine by itself the existence of a need for transferring personal data7.  
Neither  in  your  initial,  nor  in  your  confirmatory  application,  have  you  established  the 
necessity  of  disclosing  the  personal  data  included  in  documents  8,  16,  17,  18,  19,  21a, 
21b, 21d, 22, 25a, 25b, 25c, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 35, 36 and 38.   
Therefore, I conclude  that  the transfer of personal data through the public disclosure of 
the  personal  data  included  in  the  above-mentioned  documents  cannot  be  considered  as 
fulfilling the requirements of Regulation 45/2001. Consequently, the use of the exception 
under Article 4(1)(b) of Regulation 1049/2001 is justified, as there is no need to disclose 
publicly the personal data included therein, and it cannot be assumed that the legitimate 
rights of the data subjects concerned would not be prejudiced by such disclosure.  
Furthermore,  the  handwritten  signatures  of  the  staff  members  of  the  European 
Commission  and  third  party  representatives  are  biometric  data  and  there  is  a  risk  that 
their disclosure would prejudice the legitimate interests of the persons concerned. 
 
2.1.  Protection of the public interest as regards defence and military matters and 
of the decision-making process 
Article  4,  paragraph  1,  a),  second  indent,  of  Regulation  1049/2001  provides  that  [t]he 
institutions  shall  refuse  access  to  a  document  where  disclosure  would  undermine  the 
protection of […] the public interest as regards […] defence and military matters […].  
                                                 

Ibid, paragraphs 77-78. 

Ibid. 

Judgment  of  the  Court  of  Justice  of  16  July  2015  in  Case  C-615/13  P,  ClientEarth  v  EFSA
(ECLI:EU:C:2015:219), paragraph 47. 

Judgment  of  the  Court  of  Justice  of  2  October  2014  in  Case  C-127/13 P,  Strack  v  Commission
(ECLI:EU:C:2014:2250), paragraph 106. 


 
Article  4(3),  first  subparagraph  of  Regulation  1049/2001  provides  that  ‘access  to  a 
document, drawn up by an institution for internal use or received by an institution, which 
relates  to  a  matter  where  the  decision  has  not  been  taken  by  the  institution,  shall  be 
refused  if  disclosure  of  the  document  would  seriously  undermine  the  institution's 
decision-making process, unless there is an overriding public interest in disclosure’. 
In the case at hand, the two above-mentioned exceptions are interlinked and therefore the 
corresponding reasons justifying their applicability are closely related.   
In  the  Kuijer  judgment,  the  General  Court  (previously,  Court  of  First  Instance) 
acknowledged  that  documents  containing  sensitive  military  information  may  have 
sufficient features in common for their disclosure to be refused8.  
 
Documents 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 20, 23, 24 and 34 contain positions of Member 
States  concerning  implementation  of  the  European  Defence  Industrial  Development 
Programme  and  the  European  Defence  Fund.  In  particular,  the  documents  concerned 
include positions regarding the priorities of the work programme of the above-mentioned 
Funds for 2019 - 2020, together with the description of characteristics of categories of the 
projects to be financed.  
 
Public  disclosure  of  the  above-mentioned  documents  would  reveal  information 
concerning defence-related aspects of the EU, as well as possible actions that particular 
Member States consider as priorities, thus indirectly revealing the information regarding 
the  lines  of  the  EU  and/or  Member  State  domestic  defence  policies  and  interests.  This 
type of information is by nature sensitive as it relates to military (defence) needs in light 
of,  for  example,  present  capabilities  of  the  Member  States  and  the  political  security 
environment.  That  in  turn  would  undermine  the  protection  of  the  public  interest  as 
regards  defence  matters,  as  provided  for  in  the  second  indent  of  Article  4(1)(a)  of 
Regulation 1049/2001.   
 
Indeed, the defence domain is particularly sensitive due to its very nature and its intrinsic 
link with the Member States and EU security. This is particularly true given the unstable 
international  context  and  the  fact  that  the  EU  faces  a  complex  and  challenging 
environment in  which new threats, such  as hybrid and cyber-attacks,  are emerging, and 
more conventional challenges are returning.    
 
Moreover,  the  defence  domain  is  relatively  recent  in  the  EU  context  and  requires  the 
exchange  of information  with  Member States in order  for the European Commission  to 
prepare  properly  its  policy  (translated  into  the  work  programmes  of  the  European 
Defence  Industrial  Development  Programme  and  the  European  Defence  Fund)  in  this 
                                                 
8   Judgment  of  the  Court  of  first  Instance  of  7  February  2002  in  Case  T-211/00,  Kuijer  v  Council
ECLI:EU:T:2002:30, paragraph 60.  
 


very specific  domain. This  exchange takes  place in  the framework of  an atmosphere of 
mutual  trust.  The  Member  States  share  this  type  of  information  with  the  European 
Commission  with  the  expectation  that  it  will  remain  confidential  and  will  not  be  made 
publicly available.   
 
Should  the  dialogue  between  the  Commission  and  the  Member  States  not  remain 
confidential, the latter would become very reluctant to continue the ongoing discussions. 
Consequently,  the  decision-making  process  linked  to  the  establishment  and  finalisation 
of the Work Programmes would be undermined.  
 
Documents 21c and 25d contain scoping papers of the European Commission, circulated 
to the Member States in order to gather their inputs as regards the Work Programme of 
the European Defence Industrial Development Programme and the various aspects of the 
European  Defence  Fund  after  2020.  The  undisclosed  parts  of  the  documents  include  a 
description  of  policy  options  for  the  future  shape  of  the  above-mentioned  programmes. 
Revealing  publically  these  policy  options,  would  seriously  undermine  the  margin  for 
manoeuvre of the European Commission' in exploring, in the framework of the ongoing 
negotiations  with  the  Member  States,  all  possible  (policy)  options  free  from  external 
pressure.  Similar  type  of  information,  in  particular  the  description  of  various  policy 
options  with  regard  to  the  financial  instruments  for  defence  and  security  purposes,  is 
included in documents 37 and 39.    
 
It should be underlined that, in reply to the scoping papers mentioned above, the Member 
States  provided  their  views,  which  are  included  in  documents  12,  13  and  33. 
Additionally,  documents  14  and  15  contain  the  positions  of  the  Member  States 
concerning the financial issues relating to the European Defence Fund in the context of 
the  Multiannual  Financial  Framework.  They  also  include  the  views  of  the  originators 
regarding various technical aspects concerning funding from the above-mentioned Fund 
and  the  European  Defence  Industrial  Development  Programme  (eligibility  of  cost, 
funding  schemes,  reimbursement  rates).  The  same  type  of  information  is  included  in 
document 26, originating from the Association of European Research Establishments in 
Aeronautics.   
 
Public  disclosure  of  the  information  included  therein  would  undermine  the  ongoing 
dialogue  between  the  stakeholders  (including  the  Member  States),  which,  as  mentioned 
above, requires an atmosphere of mutual trust, especially in the context of the sensitivity 
of the subject matter to which they relate.   
 
Having  regard  to  the  above,  I  consider  that  the  use  of  the  exceptions  under  Article 
4(1)(a),  second  indent  (protection  of  the  public  interest  as  regards  defence  and  military 
matters)  and  Article  4(3),  first  subparagraph,  of  Regulation  1049/2001  is  justified 
concerning documents 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12,13, 14, 15, 20, 21c, 23, 24, 25d ,26,  
33, 34, 37 and 39 and that access thereto must be refused on that basis. 


2.2   Protection of commercial interests of a natural or legal person 
Article  4(2),  first  indent  of  Regulation  1049/2001  provides  that  ‘[t]he  institutions  shall 
refuse  access  to  a  document  where  disclosure  would  undermine  the  protection  of  
commercial  interests  of  a  natural  or  legal  person,  including  intellectual  property,  […], 
unless there is an overriding public interest in disclosure’. 
Document 27, which is the report from the meeting with representatives of the company 
Safran,  includes  information  about  the  involvement  of  the  latter  in  various  proposals 
financed through EU funds, as well as suggestions concerning types of research projects 
for which EU funding could be considered.  
The  above-mentioned  information  has  to  be  considered  as  commercially  sensitive 
business information of the economic operator in question (Safran).  
Its  disclosure  under  Regulation  1049/2001,  through  the  public  release  of  document  27 
would clearly undermine the commercial interests of the economic operator in question. 
It  can  be  presumed  that  the  latter  provided  the  commercially  sensitive  information 
contained in document 27 under the legitimate expectation that it would not be publicly 
released.  
In consequence, there is a real and non-hypothetical risk that public access to the above-
mentioned  information  would  undermine  the  commercial  interests  of  the  economic 
operator  in  question.  I  conclude,  therefore,  that  access  to  document  27  must  be  denied 
based  on  the  exception  laid  down  in  the  first  indent  of  Article  4(2)  of  Regulation 
1049/2001. 
3. 
PARTIAL ACCESS 
Wide  partial  access  is  granted  to  documents  8,  16,  17,  18,  19,  21a,  21b,  21d,  22,  25a, 
25b, 25c, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 35, 36, 38 and partial access is granted to documents 21c and 
25d.  With  regard  to  the  remaining  documents,  for  the  reasons  explained  above,  no 
meaningful  partial  access  is  possible  as  regards  the  requested  documents  without 
undermining the interests described above. 
4. 
OVERRIDING PUBLIC INTEREST IN DISCLOSURE 
The exceptions laid down in Article 4(1)(a) and Article 4(1)(b) of Regulation 1049/2001 
do not need to be balanced against overriding public interest in disclosure.   
The  exceptions  laid  down  in  Article  4(2)  and  (3)  of  Regulation  1049/2001  must  be 
waived  if  there  is  an  overriding  public  interest  in  disclosure.  Such  an  interest  must, 
firstly, be public and, secondly, outweigh the harm caused by disclosure. 
In your confirmatory application, you refer to the general need of transparency, which, in 
your  view,  should  be  ensured  with  regard  to  exchanges  between  the  European 
Commission  and  external  actors  concerning  the  European  Defence  Industrial 
Development Programme and the European Defence Fund. You underline ‘the existence 
of an overriding public interest in disclosure, stemming from the enhanced public debate 


and  increased  accountability  concerning  the  arms  industry's  influence  on  EU  defence 
policy  […]’.  In  your  view,  ‘[…]  getting  a  proper  overview  of  the  arms  industry's 
lobbying  in  respect  of  these  initiatives  [the  European  Defence  Industrial  Development 
Programme  and  the  European  Defence  Fund]  (ultimately  funded  by  EU  taxpayers)  is 
essential  for  the  ability  of  EU  citizens  and  the  civil  society  to  participate  more  fully  in 
those  decision-making  processes  as  well  as  to  oversee  that  the  decisions  taken  by  the 
European Commission are in the sole interest of EU citizens rather than being beholden 
to the arms lobby’.  
Even if members of the public have expressed an interest in the subject matter covered by 
the  documents  requested  and  have  pointed  to  an  alleged  general  need  for  public 
transparency  related  thereto,  I  would  like  to  refer  to  the  judgment  in  the  Strack  case9, 
where the Court of Justice ruled that in order to establish the existence of an overriding 
public interest in transparency, it is not sufficient to rely merely on that principle and its 
importance. Instead, an applicant has to show why in the specific situation the principle 
of transparency is in some sense especially pressing and capable, therefore, of prevailing 
over the reasons justifying non-disclosure10.  
Based  on  my  own  analysis,  I  have  not  been  able  to  identify  any  elements  capable  of 
demonstrating  the  existence  of  a  public  interest  that  would  override  the  need  to  protect 
the  commercial  interest  of  economic  operators  and  ongoing  decision-making  process 
concerning  various  technical  aspects  of  the  European  Defence  Industrial  Development 
Programme and the European Defence Fund, grounded in the first indent of Article 4(2) 
and the first subparagraph of Article 4(3) of Regulation 1049/2001.  
 
 
                                                 
9   Judgment  of  the  Court  of  Justice  of  2  October  2014  in  Case  C-127/13 P,  Strack  v  European 
Commission, (ECLI:EU:C:2014:2250), paragraph 128. 
10   Ibid, paragraph 129. 



 
5. 
MEANS OF REDRESS 
Finally,  I  would  like  to  draw  your  attention  to  the  means  of  redress  that  are  available 
against  this  decision,  that  is,  judicial  proceedings  and  complaint  to  the  Ombudsman 
under the conditions specified respectively in Articles 263 and 228 of the Treaty on the 
Functioning of the European Union. 
Yours sincerely, 
 
 
For the Commission 
Martin SELMAYR 
Secretary-General 

 
 
 
 
 
Annex:  
-  List of documents covered by your application, 
-  Copies of the documents to which partial access is granted. 
10 

Document Outline