Dies ist eine HTML Version eines Anhanges der Informationsfreiheitsanfrage 'Advisory Group for the Preparatory Action on Defence Research (E03523)'.


 
EUROPEAN COMMISSION 
 
 
Brussels, 26.11.2018 
C(2018) 8060 final 
 
 
Mr Bram Vranken 
Vredesactie 
Patriottenstraat 27 
2600 Berchem 
Belgium 
 
DECISION OF THE EUROPEAN COMMISSION PURSUANT TO ARTICLE 4 OF THE 
IMPLEMENTING RULES TO REGULATION (EC) N° 1049/20011 
Subject: 
Your confirmatory application for access to documents under 
Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001 –Gestdem 2018/2431 

Dear Mr Vranken, 
I refer to your email of 26 July 2018, registered on 27 July 2018, in which you submit, on 
behalf  of  Vredesactie,  a  confirmatory  application,  in  accordance  with  Article  7(2)  of 
Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001 regarding public access to European Parliament, Council 
and Commission documents2 ('Regulation 1049/2001').  
1. 
SCOPE OF YOUR REQUEST 
On 23 April 2018 you submitted an initial application in which you requested access to: 
-  ‘the  list  of  members  appointed  to  the  Advisory  Group  and  the  Declaration  of 
Interests submitted by these members; 
-  [a]ll documents – including but not limited to emails, presentations, agendas and 
minutes  related  to  the  Advisory  Group  for  the  Preparatory  Action  on  Defence 
Research (E03523)’.  
                                                 

Official Journal L 345 of 29.12.2001, p. 94. 
2    Official Journal L 145 of 31.5.2001, p. 43. 
 
Commission européenne/Europese Commissie, 1049 Bruxelles/Brussel, BELGIQUE/BELGIË - Tel. +32 22991111 
http://ec.europa.eu/dgs/secretariat_general/ 
E-mail: xxxxxxxxxx@xx.xxxxxx.xx  
 

 
On 24 July 2018, the Directorate-General for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship 
and  SMEs  identified  13  documents,  listed  in  an  annex  to  its  reply,  as  falling  under  the 
scope of the request.  
In its reply, the Directorate-General for Internal Market,  Industry, Entrepreneurship and 
SMEs: 
-  granted access to document 9, subject only to the redaction of personal data; 
-  refused  access  to  the  remaining  12  documents  on  the  basis  of  the  exceptions  for, 
respectively,  the  protection  of  the  public  interest  as  regards  defence  and  military 
matters provided for in the second indent of Article 4(1)(a) of Regulation 1049/2001; 
the protection of privacy and integrity of the individual provided for in Article 4(1)(b) 
of  Regulation  1049/2001;  as  well  as  the  exception  protecting  the  decision-making 
process laid down in Article 4(3), first subparagraph of Regulation 1049/2001.     
In your confirmatory application, you request a review of this position. In particular, you 
argue  that  the  reply  of  the  Directorate-General  for  Internal  Market,  Industry, 
Entrepreneurship and SMEs does not provide a list of members appointed to the advisory 
group and the declaration of interests submitted by these members. You also argue that 
the  Directorate-General  for  Internal  Market,  Industry,  Entrepreneurship  and  SMEs  did 
not  provide any of the  presentations, agendas, minutes or any other relevant  documents 
referred to in the call for applications for the selection of members of the Advisory Group 
for the Preparatory Action on Defence Research.  
2. 
ASSESSMENT AND CONCLUSIONS UNDER REGULATION 1049/2001 
When  assessing  a  confirmatory  application  for  access  to  documents  submitted  pursuant 
to  Regulation  1049/2001,  the  Secretariat-General  conducts  a  fresh  review  of  the  reply 
given by the Directorate-General concerned at the initial stage. 
Concerning your request for access to the list of members of the advisory group and the 
corresponding  declarations  of  interests,  as  well  as  presentations,  agendas,  minutes  and 
other  documents  related  to  this  group,  please  note  that  the  Advisory  Group  for  the 
Preparatory  Action  has  not  yet  been  established  by  the  Directorate-General  for  Internal 
Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs. There is indeed an announcement of this 
group  made  in  the  register  of  expert  groups,  but  for  the  time  being,  no  members  have 
been appointed and no meetings have taken place.  
It  follows  that  there  are  no  documents  that  could  fall  under  the  scope  of  the  request 
related  to  the  activities  of  the  group.  In  light  of  the  above,  given  that  the  European 
Commission does not hold any of the documents to which you refer in your application, 
it is not possible to handle your application in so far as point 1 and the relevant parts of 
point 2 thereof are concerned.  
However,  the  Commission  has  identified  13  internal  documents,  including  the  call  for 
applications relating to the launching of the group which, as explained above, has not yet 
been set up. 


 
With regard to documents identified at the initial stage, I can inform you that full access 
is granted to documents 6 and 8 and wide partial access is granted to documents 1, 2, 3, 
4,  5,  7,  10,  11  and  12.  The  limited  redactions  are  based  on  the  exception  protecting 
privacy and the integrity of the individual, provided for in Article 4(1)(b) of Regulation 
1049/2001.  
 
With  regard  to  documents  1  and  13,  certain  parts  thereof  fall  out  of  the  scope  of  your 
request, as they concern a different subject matter.  
As  regards  the  part  of  document  13  containing  information  relevant  for  your  request, 
access is partially granted. The redacted part is covered by the exception provided for in 
Article  4(3),  first  subparagraph,  of  Regulation  1049/2001  (protection  of  the  decision-
making process). 
The detailed reasons are set out below.  
 
2.1. 
Protection of the privacy and integrity of the individual  
Article  4(1)(b)  of  Regulation  1049/2001  provides  that  ‘[t]he  institutions  shall  refuse 
access  to  a  document  where  disclosure  would  undermine  the  protection  of  […]  privacy 
and  the  integrity  of  the  individual,  in  particular  in  accordance  with  Community 
legislation regarding the protection of personal data’. 
The  undisclosed  parts  of  documents  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7,  10,  11  and  12  contain  the  names, 
surnames,  contact  details  (email  and  office  addresses  and  telephone  numbers)  of  staff 
members of the European Commission who do not hold any senior management position. 
The undisclosed parts of document 12 also contain names, surnames and contact details 
(email addresses and telephone numbers) of a third party representative to whom the call 
was addressed. 
Furthermore, the relevant undisclosed parts of the documents contain the biometric data 
(handwritten signatures of the staff members of the European Commission or third party 
representatives).   
These  undoubtedly  constitute  personal  data  within  the  meaning  of  Article  2(a)  of 
Regulation  45/2001,  which  defines  it  as  ‘any  information  relating  to  an  identified  or 
identifiable  natural  person  […];  an  identifiable  person  is  one  who  can  be  identified, 
directly or indirectly, in  particular by reference to an identification number or to one or 
more factors specific to his or her physical, physiological, mental, economic, cultural or 
social identity’.  
It  follows  that  public  disclosure  of  all  of  the  above-mentioned  personal  information 
would constitute processing (transfer) of personal data within the meaning of Article 8(b) 
of Regulation 45/2001.  


 
In  accordance  with  the  Bavarian  Lager  ruling3,  when  a  request  is  made  for  access  to 
documents  containing  personal  data,  Regulation  45/2001  becomes  fully  applicable. 
According  to  Article  8(b)  of  that  Regulation,  personal  data  shall  only  be  transferred  to 
recipients  if  the  recipient  establishes  the  necessity  of  having  the  data  transferred  and  if 
there  is  no  reason  to  assume  that  the  data  subject's  legitimate  interests  might  be 
prejudiced. Those two conditions are cumulative4.  
Only  if  both  conditions  are  fulfilled  and  the  transfer  constitutes  lawful  processing  in 
accordance with the requirements of Article 5 of  Regulation 45/2001, can the processing 
(transfer) of personal data occur.  
In that context, whoever requests such a transfer must first establish that it is necessary. If 
it  is  demonstrated  to  be  necessary,  it  is  then  for  the  institution  concerned  to  determine 
that there is no reason to assume that that transfer might prejudice the legitimate interests 
of the data subject5. Indeed, in its recent judgment in the ClientEarth case, the Court of 
Justice  ruled  that  ‘whoever  requests  such  a  transfer  must  first  establish  that  it  is 
necessary. If it is demonstrated to be necessary, it is then for the institution concerned to 
determine  that  there  is  no  reason  to  assume  that  that  transfer  might  prejudice  the 
legitimate interests of the data subject.  If there is no such reason, the transfer requested 
must  be  made,  whereas,  if  there  is  such  a  reason,  the  institution  concerned  must  weigh 
the various competing interests in order to decide on the request for access’6. I refer also 
to the Strack case, where the Court of Justice ruled that the institution does not have to 
examine by itself the existence of a need for transferring personal data7.  
Neither  in  your  initial,  nor  in  your  confirmatory  application,  have  you  established  the 
necessity of disclosing the personal data included in documents. 
Therefore,  I conclude that  the transfer of personal  data through the public disclosure of 
the  personal  data  included  in  the  above-mentioned  documents  cannot  be  considered  as 
fulfilling the requirements of Regulation 45/2001. Consequently, the use of the exception 
under Article 4(1)(b) of Regulation 1049/2001 is justified, as there is no need to disclose 
publicly the personal data included therein, and it cannot be assumed that the legitimate 
rights of the data subjects concerned would not be prejudiced by such disclosure.  
Furthermore,  as  regards  the  handwritten  signatures  of  staff  members  of  the  European 
Commission and third party representatives, which are biometric data, there is a risk that 
their disclosure would prejudice the legitimate interests of the persons concerned. 
                                                 

Judgment of the Court (Grand Chamber) of 29 June 2010 in Case C-28/08 P, European Commission v 
the Bavarian Lager Co. Ltd
,(ECLI:EU:C:2010:378), paragraph 63. 

Ibid, paragraphs 77-78. 

Ibid. 

Judgment  of  the  Court  of  Justice  of  16  July  2015  in  Case  C-615/13  P,  ClientEarth  v  EFSA
(ECLI:EU:C:2015:219), paragraph 47. 

Judgment  of  the  Court  of  Justice  of  2  October  2014  in  Case  C-127/13 P,  Strack  v  Commission
(ECLI:EU:C:2014:2250), paragraph 106. 


 
2.2. Protection of the decision-making process 
Article  4(3),  first  subparagraph  of  Regulation  1049/2001  provides  that  ‘access  to  a 
document, drawn up by an institution for internal use or received by an institution, which 
relates  to  a  matter  where  the  decision  has  not  been  taken  by  the  institution,  shall  be 
refused  if  disclosure  of  the  document  would  seriously  undermine  the  institution's 
decision-making process, unless there is an overriding public interest in disclosure’. 
As already explained, documents 1 and 13 are minutes of Commission internal meetings. 
Most parts of these documents are out of scope as they do not concern the establishment 
of  the  Advisory  Group  for  Preparatory  Research.  Two  paragraphs  contain  positions 
regarding  the  establishment  of  the  Advisory  Group  for  the  Preparatory  Action  on 
Defence Research. 
 
As the future of the group has not yet been decided, any possible disclosure at this stage 
would  seriously  harm  the  ongoing  decision-making  process  on  this  matter.  The  topic 
discussed could affect the orientations and strategic thinking about the actions on defence 
research and the decision-making initiatives of the European Defence Fund, which is in 
its implementation (project selection) phase, based on the preparatory action for defence 
research.   
 
Public disclosure of the above-mentioned parts of document 13 would reveal information 
concerning the European Commission’s possible actions in the defence domain. 
 
Indeed, the defence domain is particularly sensitive due to its very nature and its intrinsic 
link with the security of the Member States and the European Union. This is particularly 
true  given  the  unstable  international  context  and  the  fact  that  the  European  Union  is 
facing a complex and challenging environment in which new threats, such as hybrid and 
cyber-attacks, are emerging, and more conventional challenges are returning.    
 
The  undisclosed  parts  of  the  documents  include  a  description  of  policy  options  for  the 
future  shape  of  the  above-mentioned  programmes.  Publically  revealing  these  policy 
options  would  seriously  undermine  the  margin  for  manoeuvre  of  the  European 
Commission  in  exploring,  in  the  framework  of  the  ongoing  negotiations  with  the 
Member  States,  all  possible  policy  options  free  from  external  pressure.    The  release  of 
these policy options (as reflected in document 13) would reveal steps and approaches to 
be taken and would therefore seriously undermine the current decision-making process. 
  
Having  regard to  the above,  I consider that the  use of the exception under Article 4(3), 
first subparagraph, of Regulation 1049/2001 is justified concerning parts of document 13 
and that access thereto must be refused on that basis. 
3. 
PARTIAL ACCESS 
As  explained above, wide partial access  is  granted to documents  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 10, 11 
and 12, subject to redaction of personal data. 


 
With  regard  to  remaining  document  13,  which  was  withheld  entirely  at  initial  stage, 
partial access is granted in accordance with Article 4(6) of Regulation 1049/2001. 
4. 
OVERRIDING PUBLIC INTEREST IN DISCLOSURE 
The exception laid down in Article 4(1)(b) of Regulation 1049/2001 does not need to be 
balanced against overriding public interest in disclosure.   
The exception laid down in Article 4(3) of Regulation 1049/2001 must be waived if there 
is an overriding public interest in disclosure. Such an interest must, firstly, be public and, 
secondly, outweigh the harm caused by disclosure. 
In  your  confirmatory  request,  you  do  not  put  forward  any  arguments  relating  to  an 
overriding  public  interest  in  disclosure.  In  this  context,  I  would  like  to  refer  to  the 
judgment in  the Strack case8,  where the Court of Justice ruled that in  order to  establish 
the existence of an overriding public interest in transparency, it is not sufficient merely to 
rely  on  that  principle  and  its  importance.  Instead,  an  applicant  has  to  show  why  in  the 
specific  situation  the  principle  of  transparency  is  in  some  sense  especially  pressing  and 
capable, therefore, of prevailing over the reasons justifying non-disclosure9.  
Based on my own analysis, I have not been able to identify any other elements capable of 
demonstrating  the  existence  of  a  public  interest  that  would  override  the  need  to  protect 
ongoing  decision-making  process  concerning  the  establishment  of  an  advisory  group 
under the preparatory  action on  defence  research, grounded in  the first  subparagraph of 
Article 4(3) of Regulation 1049/2001.  
 
 
                                                 
8   Judgment  of  the  Court  of  Justice  of  2  October  2014  in  Case  C-127/13 P,  Strack  v  European 
Commission, (ECLI:EU:C:2014:2250), paragraph 128. 
9   Ibid, paragraph 129. 



 
5. 
MEANS OF REDRESS 
Finally,  I  would  like  to  draw  your  attention  to  the  means  of  redress  that  are  available 
against  this  decision,  that  is,  judicial  proceedings  and  a  complaint  to  the  Ombudsman 
under the conditions specified respectively in Articles 263 and 228 of the Treaty on the 
Functioning of the European Union. 
 
Yours sincerely, 
 
For the Commission 
Martin SELMAYR 
Secretary-General 

 
 
 
 
Enclosures: (12) 


Document Outline