Ceci est une version HTML d'une pièce jointe de la demande d'accès à l'information 'Transparency Register - SI (2018) 410'.


 
EUROPEAN COMMISSION 
 
 
Brussels, 18.1.2019 
C(2019) 594 final 
 
 
Ms Margarida da Silva 
Corporate Europe Observatory 
Rue d’Edimbourg 26 
1050 Brussels 
Belgium 
DECISION OF THE EUROPEAN COMMISSION PURSUANT TO ARTICLE 4 OF THE 
IMPLEMENTING RULES TO REGULATION NO 1049/20011 
Subject: 
Your confirmatory application for access to documents under 
Regulation No 1049/2001 - GESTDEM 2018/5149 

Dear Ms da Silva, 
I  refer  to  your  email  of  12  October  2018,  in  which  you  submitted  a  confirmatory 
application in accordance with Article 7(2) of Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001 regarding 
public  access  to  European  Parliament,  Council  and  Commission  documents2  (hereafter 
'Regulation No 1049/2001').  
I apologise for the delay in the handling of your request. 
1. 
SCOPE OF YOUR REQUEST 
In your initial application of 2 October 2018, addressed to the Secretariat-General of the 
European  Commission,  you  requested  access  to  ‘document  SI(2018)410  referring  to  a 
proposal on the reform of the Transparency Register […] mentioned in the minutes of the 
2263rd meeting of the European Commission […] on […] 18 July 2018 […].’ 
The European Commission has identified the document in question. 
In  its  initial  reply  of  11  October  2018,  the  Secretariat-General  refused  access  to  this 
document on the basis of the exception of Article 4(3), first subparagraph of Regulation 
No 1049/2001, which relates to the protection of the decision-making process.  
                                                 
1    Official Journal L 345 of 29.12.2001, page 94. 
2    Official Journal L 145 of 31.5.2001, page 43. 
 
Commission européenne/Europese Commissie, 1049 Bruxelles/Brussel, BELGIQUE/BELGIË - Tel. +32 22991111 

 
In  your  confirmatory  application,  you  request  a  review  of  this  position.  You  underpin 
your  request  with  detailed  arguments,  which  I  address  in  the  corresponding  sections 
below. 
2. 
ASSESSMENT AND CONCLUSIONS UNDER REGULATION NO 1049/2001 
When  assessing  a  confirmatory  application  for  access  to  documents  submitted  pursuant 
to  Regulation  No  1049/2001,  the  Secretariat-General  conducts  a  review  of  the  reply 
given at the initial stage. 
Following  this  review,  I  would  like  to  inform  you  that  partial  access  is  granted  to  the 
requested  document.  The  redacted  parts  of  the  document  fall  under  the  applicability  of 
the  exceptions  protecting  the  decision-making  process  (Article  4(3),  first  subparagraph, 
of  Regulation  No  1049/2001)  as  well  as  privacy  and  the  integrity  of  the  individual 
(Article 4(1)(b) of Regulation No 1049/2001).    
The reasons for these redactions are set out below. 
2.1.  Protection of the decision-making process 
Article 4(3), first subparagraph of Regulation No 1049/2001 provides that ‘[a]ccess to a 
document, drawn up by an institution for internal use or received by an institution, which 
relates  to  a  matter  where  the  decision  has  not  been  taken  by  the  institution,  shall  be 
refused  if  disclosure  of  the  document  would  seriously  undermine  the  institution’s 
decision-making process, unless there is an overriding public interest in disclosure.’ 
According to settled case law, Article 4 of Regulation No 1049/2001 must be interpreted 
and applied strictly, so as not to frustrate application of the general principle of giving the 
public  the  widest  possible  access  to  documents  held  by  the  institutions.3  Moreover,  the 
risk of a protected interest being undermined ‘must, in order to be capable of being relied 
on, be reasonably foreseeable and not purely hypothetical’.4 Furthermore, the principle of 
proportionality requires  that derogations remain within the limits of what  is  appropriate 
and necessary for achieving the aim in view.5  
In  this  instance,  the  requested  document  relates  to  the  negotiations  on  the  European 
Commission’s proposal for an interinstitutional agreement on a mandatory Transparency 
Register.  
 
 
                                                 

See,  inter  alia,  judgment  of  18  December  2007,  C-64/05 P,  Sweden  v  Commission,  EU:C:2007:802, 
paragraph 66. 

Judgment  of  1  July  2008,  C-39/05 P  and  C-52/05  P,  Sweden  and  Turco  v  Council  and Commission, 
EU:C:2008:374, paragraph 43. 

Judgment of 6 December 2001, C-353/99 P, Council v Hautala, EU:C:2001:661, paragraph 28. 


 
The  said  proposal,  which  was  adopted  on  28  September  20166,  and  the  subsequent 
negotiations are based upon Article 295 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European 
Union, which provides that  ‘the European Parliament, the Council and the  Commission 
shall  consult  each  other  and  by  common  agreement  make  arrangements  for  their 
cooperation.  To  that  end,  they  may,  in  compliance  with  the  Treaties,  conclude 
interinstitutional agreements, which may be of a binding nature.’ 
The  requested  document  was  prepared  for  the  meeting  of  the  Commission’s 
Interinstitutional  Relations  Group  (‘Groupe  de  Relations  Interinstitutionnelles’)  of  12 
July  2018,  following  a  meeting  at  political  level  that  took  place  on  12  June  2018  in 
Strasbourg. Its purpose was to inform the College of Commissioners of the state of play 
in the negotiations on the European Commission’s proposal and to propose accordingly 
for  consideration  a  negotiating  position  to  be  endorsed  by  the  latter  ahead  of  the 
subsequent trilateral political meetings. 
Against this background, some of parts of the requested document reflect the positions of 
the  European  Parliament,  the  Council  of  the  European  Union  and  the  European 
Commission, as well as the state of play of the negotiations. 
On  the  basis  of  the  exception  provided  under  Article  4(3),  first  subparagraph  of 
Regulation  No  1049/2001,  I  must  refuse  access  to  some  parts  of  the  document,  which 
would  reveal  the  European  Commission’s  internal  assessment  of  the  respective 
negotiating positions of the European Parliament and the Council of the European Union 
in  the  framework  of  the  ongoing  interinstitutional  negotiations  on  a  mandatory 
Transparency Register. 
Indeed,  the  internal  critical  analysis  contained  in  the  redacted  parts  of  the  document 
remains sensitive.  
More  specifically,  the  public  disclosure  of  the  European  Commission’s  critical  and 
strategic  analysis  of  the  positions  of  the  other  two  institutions,  which  was  drafted  for 
internal  use  only,  would  disrupt  the  atmosphere  of  mutual  trust  between  the  three 
institutions at this stage of the process when negotiations are still ongoing.  
Moreover,  such  disclosure  would  weaken  the  negotiating  position  of  the  European 
Commission  and  its  negotiating  margin  towards  the  other  two  institutions  at  a  critical 
point,  where  fallback  options  and  negotiated  solutions  may  be  required  in  a  politically 
sensitive  field.  In  this  context,  the  European  Commission  also  notes  that  the  European 
Parliament is still supposed to vote on possible amendments to its Rules of Procedure to 
increase  the  transparency  of  the  legislative  process.  Depending  on  the  outcome,  such 
amendments may then become part of the political negotiation process on the mandatory 
Transparency Register.  
                                                 
6  Proposal for an Interinstitutional Agreement on a mandatory Transparency Register, COM(2016) 627 
final, 28.9.2016, available at: 
  
https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/en/TXT/?uri=CELEX:52016PC0627 
 


 
Consequently,  the  next  stages  of  the  ongoing  decision-making  process  of  the  European 
Commission would be seriously undermined in a reasonably foreseeable and not purely 
hypothetical way  within the meaning of the exception provided under Article 4(3), first 
subparagraph  of  Regulation  No  1049/2001,  as  construed  by  the  above-mentioned  case 
law. 
2.2.  Protection of privacy and the integrity of the individual 
Article 4(1)(b) of Regulation No 1049/2001 provides that ‘[t]he institutions shall refuse 
access to a document where disclosure would undermine the protection of […] privacy 
and  the  integrity  of  the  individual,  in  particular  in  accordance  with  Community 
legislation regarding the protection of personal data’. 
The applicable legislation in this field is Regulation (EC) No 2018/1725 of the European 
Parliament  and  of  the  Council  of  23  October  2018  on  the  protection  of  natural  persons 
with regard to the processing of personal data by the Union institutions, bodies, offices and 
agencies and on the free movement of such data, and repealing Regulation (EC) No 45/2001 
and Decision No 1247/2002/EC.7 
Article  3(1)  of  Regulation  No  2018/1725  provides  that  personal  data  ‘means  any 
information  relating  to  an  identified  or  identifiable  natural  person  […]’.  The  Court  of 
Justice ruled that any information, which due to its content, purpose or effect, is linked to a 
particular person, qualifies as personal data.8 
In the Rechnungshof case law, the Court of Justice further confirmed that ‘there is no reason 
of principle to justify excluding activities of a professional […] nature from the notion of 
private life’.9 
Accordingly, the names, signatures, functions, telephones numbers and/or initials pertaining 
to members of staff of an institution constitute personal data.10 
In  this  instance,  the  document  to  which  you  request  access  contains  personal  data,  in 
particular, the names, positions and direct telephone numbers of the European Commission 
officials who drafted it and who are not part of the senior management. 
Pursuant  to  Article  9(1)(b)  of  Regulation  No  2018/1725,  ‘personal  data  shall  only  be 
transmitted to recipients established in the Union other than Union institutions and bodies if 
[…] the recipient establishes that it is necessary to have the data transmitted for a specific 
purpose in the public interest and the controller, where there is any reason to assume that 
the  data  subject’s  legitimate  interests  might  be  prejudiced,  establishes  that  it  is 
                                                 

Official Journal L 205 of 21.11.2018, page 39, hereafter ‘Regulation 2018/1725’. 

Judgment  of  20  December  2017,  C-434/16,  Peter  Novak  v  Data  Protection  Commissioner, 
EU:T:2018:560, paragraphs 33-35 

Judgment  of  20  May  2003,  C-465/00,  C-138/01  and  C-139/01,  Rechnungshof  v  Österreichischer 
Rundfunk and others, EU:C:2003:294, paragraph 73. 
10  Judgment of 19 September 2018, T-39/17, Port de Brest v Commission, EU:T:2018:560, paragraphs 
43-44. 


 
proportionate  to  transmit  the  personal  data  for  that  specific  purpose  after  having 
demonstrably weighed the various competing interests.’ 
Only  if  both  of  these  conditions  are  fulfilled  and  the  processing  constitutes  lawful 
processing in accordance with the requirements of Article 5 of Regulation No 2018/1725, 
can the transmission of personal data occur. 
In  your  confirmatory  application,  you  do  not  put  forward  any  arguments  to  establish  the 
necessity to have the data transmitted for a specific purpose in the public interest. Therefore, 
the  European Commission  does  not  have  to  examine  whether there is  a  reason to  assume 
that the data subject’s legitimate interests might be prejudiced. 
Notwithstanding the above, please note that there are reasons to assume that the legitimate 
interests  of  the  data  subjects  concerned  would  be  prejudiced  by  the  disclosure  of  the 
personal  data  reflected  in  the  documents,  as  there  is  a  real  and  non-hypothetical  risk  that 
such public disclosure would harm their privacy and subject them to unsolicited contacts.  
Consequently,  I  conclude  that,  pursuant  to  Article  4(1)(b)  of  Regulation  No  1049/2001, 
access  cannot  be  granted  to  the  personal  data  included  in  the  requested  document,  as  the 
need to obtain access thereto for a purpose in the public interest has not been substantiated 
and there is no reason to consider that the legitimate interests of the individuals concerned 
would not be prejudiced by the disclosure of the personal data concerned. 
3. 
NO OVERRIDING PUBLIC INTEREST IN DISCLOSURE 
Whereas the exception provided under Article 4(1)(b) of Regulation No 1049/2001, does 
not include the possibility to be set aside by an overriding public interest; the exception 
laid  down  in  Article  4(3),  first  subparagraph  of  the  said  Regulation  must  be  waived  if 
there  is  an  overriding  public  interest  in  disclosure.  Such  an  interest  must,  firstly,  be 
public and, secondly, outweigh the harm caused by disclosure. 
In  your  confirmatory  application,  you  argue  that  ‘[t]here  is  a  widespread  interest  in  the 
issue of lobby transparency across the EU as it speaks directly to the accountability and 
scrutiny of policy-makers’ interactions with vested interests’. 
Moreover, you allege that ‘[the requested document] seems to be the current [European] 
Commission  position  in  the  negotiations  for  an  Interinstitutional  Agreement  which  is  a 
fairly non-transparent process itself.’  
Furthermore,  you  note  that,  as  ‘similar  documents  containing  assessments  on  the 
negotiations  have  been  released  by  the  European  Parliament  […]  [it  would  make  it 
unacceptable for the [European] Commission to not match that standard of transparency.’ 
You  conclude  that  ‘[t]here  is  a  pressing  and  obvious  need  to  be  transparent  about 
discussions on lobby transparency’. 
I would like to reassure you, that the European Commission is well aware of the public 
interest regarding the issue of interest representation in the context of the activities of the 


 
EU  institutions.  At  the  same  time,  the  institution  acknowledges  that  engaging  with 
stakeholders enhances the quality of decision-making by providing channels for the input 
of  external  views  and  expertise.  Accordingly,  the  European  Commission  is  strongly 
committed  to  ensuring  transparency  regarding  interest  representation  and  maintaining 
citizens’ trust in EU law making. 
A  reformed,  mandatory  Transparency  Register  covering  the  European  Parliament,  the 
Council of the European Union and the European Commission  is a key commitment of 
President  Juncker’s  political  guidelines  under  the  priority  entitled  ‘A  Union  of 
Democratic Change’.  
Therefore, the European Commission submitted a proposal aiming from the very start of 
the negotiations to achieve a strong, mandatory tripartite Transparency Register.   
Moreover, the European Commission committed, together with the two other institutions, 
to  ensure  that  the  process  regarding  the  interinstitutional  negotiations  on  a  mandatory 
Transparency  Register  is  highly  transparent  by  adopting  a  set  of  guiding  principles  on 
communication during the negotiations.11  
Furthermore,  the  European  Commission  publishes  a  press  release  after  every  political 
meeting.12  
Against  this  background,  I  consider  that  the  European  Commission  already  ensures  a 
high  degree  of  transparency  regarding  the  ongoing  negotiations  for  a  mandatory 
Transparency Register, which is matching the standard of the two other institutions.  
Finally,  I  would  like  to  draw  your  attention  to  the  fact  that  documents  that  do  not  fall 
under the scope of  an acknowledged  general  presumption  must be assessed specifically 
and individually, pursuant to Regulation No 1049/2001, as construed by the case law of 
the European Court of Justice. Therefore, the circumstance that similar documents have 
already been disclosed does not prejudge on the public release of others, which must be 
assessed in concreto, in light of their specific contents and the current particular legal and 
temporal circumstances.  
In  light  of  the  above,  I  conclude  that  you  have  not  established  the  existence  of  any 
overriding public interest that would warrant  the public disclosure of the withheld parts 
of  the  document  requested,  reflecting  the  European  Commission’s  internal  critical 
assessment  of  the  respective  negotiating  positions  of  the  European  Parliament  and  the 
Council of the European Union.  
Nor  have  I  been  able  to  identify  any  public  interest  capable  of  overriding  the  interest 
protected by Article 4(3), first subparagraph of Regulation No 1049/2001. 
                                                 
11    Available at: 
http://ec.europa.eu/transparencyregister/public/staticPage/displayStaticPage.do?locale=en&reference=
REFORM_NEGO 

12    Ibid. 



 
4. 
PARTIAL ACCESS 
In  accordance  with  Article  4(6)  of  Regulation  No  1049/2001,  partial  access  is  hereby 
granted to the document requested, subject to the redactions required under Article 4(3), 
first subparagraph and Article 4(1)(b) of the said Regulation, as detailed above. 
5. 
MEANS OF REDRESS 
Finally, I draw your attention to the means of redress available against this decision. You 
may  either  bring  proceedings  before  the  General  Court  or  file  a  complaint  with  the 
European  Ombudsman  under  the  conditions  provided  respectively  in  Article  263  and 
Article 228 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union. 
Yours sincerely, 
For the Commission 
Martin SELMAYR 
Secretary-General 

 
Enclosure: (1) 


Document Outline