Ceci est une version HTML d'une pièce jointe de la demande d'accès à l'information 'Documents relating to EU-US trade talks (since July 2018)'.



Ref. Ares(2019)2527775 - 10/04/2019
EUROPEAN COMMISSION 
Directorate-General for Trade 
 
 
 The Director General 
Brussels  
E.1/JVH/dd (2018) 1947546 
 
By registered letter with acknowledgment 
of receipt 
 
Ms Pia Eberhardt 
Rue d’Edimbourg 26 
1050 Brussels 
Belgium 
 
Advance copy by email: 
ask+request-6142-
[adresse e-mail] 
 
 
Subject: Your application for access to documents – Ref GestDem 2018/6323 
 
 
Dear Ms Eberhardt,  
 
I refer to  your application dated 28/11/2018, in which you make a request for access to 
documents under Regulation (EC) No 1049/20011, registered on the same date under the 
above mentioned reference number.  
 
In your request, you asked for access to the following: 
“1) a list of Commission services and officials as well as US regulatory agencies and 
officials  who  have  been  involved  in  EU-US  discussions  on  regulatory  issues  in  the 
context of the “executive working group”, which was set up by US President Donald 
Trump  and  European  Commission  President  Jean-Claude  Juncker  in  July  2018  to 
explore a path forward on trade talks between the EU and the US.  
 
2)  a  list  of  meetings  of  DG  Trade  officials  and/or  representatives  (including  the 
Commissioner  and  her  Cabinet)  and  representatives  of  individual  companies  and/or 
industry  federations  such  as  BusinessEurope,  the  European  Services  Forum  (ESF), 
AmCham  EU,  the  Transatlantic  Business  Council  (TABC),  the  European  Federation 
of  Pharmaceutical  Industries  (EFPIA),  the  European  Chemical  Industry  Council 
(CEFIC),  FoodDrinkEurope  and  the  European  Automobile  Manufacturers'  Council 
(ACEA),  in  which  EU-US  trade  relations  and  possible  new  negotiations  have  been 
discussed (since July 2018). The list should include the names of the individuals and 
organisations attending; the date; and any agendas / minutes / notes produced. 
 
3)  all  correspondence  (including  emails)  between  DG  Trade  officials  and/or 
representatives (including the Commissioner and her Cabinet) and representatives of 

                                                           
1 Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 20 May 2001 regarding 
public access to European Parliament, Council and Commission documents (OJ L 145, 31.5.2001, p. 43). 
 
Commission européenne/Europese Commissie, 1049 Bruxelles/Brussel, BELGIQUE/BELGIË - Tel. +32 22991111 

companies  and/  or  industry  federations,  relating  to  EU-US  trade  relations  and 
possible new negotiations (since July 2018).” 

 
After  the  preliminary  search  we  have  identified,  under  point  2  and  3  of your  request,  a 
list of 53 meetings and 17 correspondence documents, which after an initial assessment 
we considered to lead to a too large number of documents to be treated within the legal 
deadline.  
 
Further  to  the  fair  solution  negotiations  you  indicated  that  the  meetings  in  which  civil 
society  organisations  or  the  European  Economic  and  Social  Committee  participated 
should  be left  out  of consideration (you have indicated 9 items  from  the  provided table 
that have been excluded). Finally, after the final evaluation of the workload and resources 
needed to handle this request we proposed to assess for disclosure 44 documents related 
to the list of meetings  and 4 other documents selected by you (from the list of documents 
provided for point 3 of your request).  
 
Additionally, we would like to clarify  that most of the listed meetings did not focus on 
future  negotiations,  but  rather  on  the  broader  issue  of  overall  EU-US  trade  relations 
(including  the  USMCA  negotiations  and  US  sanctions  against  Russia)  and  on  the  US 
section  232  measures  and  EU  rebalancing.  Only  15  meetings  from  the  list  of  meetings 
were  held  specifically  to  discuss  aspects  of  potential  EU-US  voluntary  regulatory  co-
operation  and  standards  in  the  framework  of  the  executive  working  group.  The 
Commission welcomes comments on potential areas for regulatory co-operation with the 
US from all interested stakeholder groups, and to this end has recently launched a public 
call  for  proposals.2  The  results  of  this  consultation  will  be  published  on  the  website  of 
DG Trade. 
 
 
1. 
ASSESSMENT AND CONCLUSIONS UNDER REGULATION 1049/2001 
 
In relation to point 1 of your request, I can confirm that the Commission does not hold 
any specific list of members and meetings of the executive working group. As specified 
in Article 2(3) of Regulation 1049/2001, the right of access as defined in that regulation 
applies only to existing documents in the possession of the institution. 
 
However,  by  way  of  information,  we  can  confirm  that  this  executive  working  group  is 
co-chaired by Commissioner Malmström and USTR Lighthizer in close cooperation with 
cabinet officials  and senior advisors of the National  Economic Council on the US  side, 
and  the  Cabinet  of  President  Juncker,  the  Secretariat-General  of  the  European 
Commission and Commission Services on the EU side, as indicated in our public report. 
There  is  no  participation  of  persons  or  organisations  other  than  officials  from  the 
respective administrations.  
 
In accordance with settled case law, when an institution is asked to disclose a document, 
it must assess, in each individual case, whether that document falls within the exceptions 
to the right of public access to documents set out in Article 4 of Regulation 1049/2001. 
Such assessment is carried out in a multi-step approach: first, the institution must satisfy 
itself that the document relates to one of the exceptions, and if so, decide which parts of it 
are covered by that exception; second, it must examine whether disclosure of the parts of 
the  document  in  question  pose  a  "reasonably  foreseeable  and  not  purely  hypothetical" 
                                                           
2 http://trade.ec.europa.eu/doclib/docs/2019/march/tradoc_157722.pdf 
 


risk  of  undermining  the  protection  of  the  interest  covered  by  the  exception;  third,  if  it 
takes  the  view  that  disclosure  would  undermine  the  protection  of  any  of  the  interests 
defined under Article 4(2) 3 and Article 4(3) of Regulation 1049/2001, the institution is 
required  "to  ascertain  whether  there  is  any  overriding  public  interest  justifying 
disclosure".  In view of the objectives pursued by Regulation 1049/2001, notably to give 
the public the widest possible right of access to documents, "the exceptions to that right 
[…] must be interpreted and applied strictly".   
 
After a careful review of all the documents related to the point 2 and 3 of your request, 
we have finally identified a total of 41 documents (37 reports from the meetings and 4 
other documents) falling within the scope of your request
 (Annex 1). In the process of 
this review, we realised that three of the meetings initially listed were actually outside the 
scope of your request. Of the 41 meetings, we have received reports for 37 of them. No 
report has been found for two meetings, while one report listed in the preliminary search 
was simply a duplicate of another report and finally one of the meeting identified in the 
preliminary search never actually took place. 
 
Having  examined  these  documents  under  the  applicable  legal  framework,  full  access  is 
granted to document 38, and partial access is granted to documents 1 - 2, 4 - 37, and 39 – 
41
. In particular, in documents 6-10, 12, 13, 16-18, 20, 22, 24-28, 31-35, 37 and 39-41 
only  personal  data  have  been  redacted  pursuant  to  article  4(1)(b)  of  Regulation 
1049/2001 and in accordance to Regulation  No 2018/1725. 
 
In  documents  1,  2,  4  11,  15,  19,  21,  23,  30  and  36,  in  addition  to  personal  data, 
information was redacted in accordance with article 4(1)(a) third indent (protection of the 
public  interest  as  regards  international  relations),  because  there  is  a  reasonably 
foreseeable  and  not  purely  hypothetical  risk  that  its  disclosure  would  undermine  the 
protection  of  the  public  interest  as  regards  international  relations,  as  set  out  in  Article 
4(1)(a) third indent of Regulation (EC) 1049/2001. In particular, the documents contain 
opinions for internal use regarding the deliberations of US interlocutors, or which would 
place the EU in a sensitive position vis à vis third countries. Disclosure of these elements 
would  undermine  the  protection  of  the  public  interest  as  regards  international  relations 
because it would reveal information that can be used by third countries to bring an undue 
pressure on the Commission in support of European interests and unduly limit the room 
for manoeuvre of the European Union on the international stage as well as jeopardise the 
European Union's international position.  
 
In addition to personal data, in documents 1, 2, 5, 14 and 29 some parts were redacted in 
accordance  with  article  4.2  first  indent  in  order  to  protect  the  public  interest  as  regards 
commercial interests.  
 
Finally,  in  relation  to  document  3  access  cannot  be  granted,  since  the  entirety  of  the 
document has been redacted on the basis of the three provisions mentioned above. 
 
The reasons justifying the application of the exceptions are set out below in Sections 1.1, 
1.2.  and  1.3.  Section  2  contains  an  assessment  of  whether  there  exists  an  overriding 
public interest in the disclosure. 
 
Please note that some parts of the documents are related to the issues not covered by the 
scope of this request so they have been redacted as out of scope. 
 
 
 
 


1.1. 
PROTECTION OF PRIVACY AND INTEGRITY OF THE INDIVIDUAL  
Pursuant to Article 4(1)(b) of Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001, access to a document has to 
be refused if its disclosure would undermine the protection of privacy and the integrity of 
the  individual,  in  particular  in  accordance  with  European  Union  legislation  regarding  the 
protection of personal data.  
 
The applicable legislation in this field is Regulation (EC) No 2018/1725 of the European 
Parliament  and  of  the  Council  of  23  October  2018  on  the  protection  of  natural  persons 
with regard to the processing of personal data by the Union institutions, bodies, offices and 
agencies and on the free movement of such data, and repealing Regulation (EC) No 45/2001 
and Decision No 1247/2002/EC3 (‘Regulation 2018/1725’). 
 
Indeed,  Article  3(1)  of  Regulation  2018/1725  provides  that  personal  data  "means  any 
information  relating  to  an  identified  or  identifiable  natural  person  […]
".  The  Court  of 
Justice has specified that any information, which by reason of its content, purpose or effect, 
is  linked  to  a  particular  person  is  to  be  considered  as  personal  data.4  Please  note  in  this 
respect that the names, signatures, functions, telephone numbers and/or initials pertaining to 
staff members of an institution are to be considered personal data.5 
 
In its judgment in Case C-28/08 P (Bavarian Lager)6, the Court of Justice ruled that when a 
request  is  made  for  access  to  documents  containing  personal  data,  the  Data  Protection 
Regulation becomes fully applicable7. 
 
Pursuant to Article 9(1)(b) of Regulation 2018/1725, personal data shall only be transmitted 
to  recipients  established  in  the  Union  other  than  Union  institutions  and  bodies  if    "[t]he 
recipient establishes that it is necessary to have the data transmitted for a specific purpose 
in the public interest and the controller, where there is any reason to assume that the data 
subject’s  legitimate  interests  might  be  prejudiced,  establishes  that  it  is  proportionate  to 
transmit the personal data for that specific purpose after having demonstrably weighed the 
various  competing  interests"
.  Only  if  these  conditions  are  fulfilled  and  the  processing 
constitutes lawful processing in accordance with the requirements of Article 5 of Regulation 
2018/1725, can the transmission of personal data occur. 
 
According  to  Article  9(1)(b)  of  Regulation  2018/1725,  the  European  Commission  has  to 
examine  the  further  conditions  for  a  lawful  processing  of  personal  data  only  if  the  first 
condition is fulfilled, namely if the recipient has established that it is necessary to have the 
data transmitted for a specific purpose in the public interest. It is only in this case that the 
European  Commission  has  to  examine  whether  there  is  a  reason  to  assume  that  the  data 
subject’s  legitimate  interests  might  be  prejudiced  and,  in  the  affirmative,  establish  the 
                                                           
3 Official Journal L 205 of 21.11.2018, p. 39. 
4 Judgment of the Court of Justice of the European Union of 20 December 2017 in Case C-434/16, Peter 
Novak  v  Data  Protection  Commissioner,  request  for  a  preliminary  ruling,  paragraphs  33-35, 
ECLI:EU:T:2018:560.    
5  Judgment  of  the  General  Court  of  19  September  2018  in  case  T-39/17,  Port  de  Brest  v  Commission, 
paragraphs 43-44, ECLI:EU:T:2018:560. 
6  Judgment  of  29  June  2010  in  Case  C-28/08 P,  European  Commission  v  The  Bavarian  Lager  Co.  Ltd
EU:C:2010:378, paragraph 59.  
7 Whereas this judgment specifically related to Regulation (EC) No 45/2001 of the European Parliament 
and of the Council of 18 December 2000 on the protection of individuals with regard to the processing 
of personal data by the Community institutions and bodies and on the free movement of such data, the 
principles  set  out  therein  are  also  applicable  under  the  new  data  protection  regime  established  by 
Regulation 2018/1725.  
 


proportionality of the transmission of the personal data for that specific purpose after having 
demonstrably weighed the various competing interests. 
 
In your application, you do not put forward any arguments to establish the necessity to have 
the  data  transmitted  for  a  specific  purpose  in  the  public  interest.  Therefore,  the  European 
Commission  does  not  have  to  examine  whether  there  is  a  reason  to  assume  that  the  data 
subject’s legitimate interests might be prejudiced.  
 
Notwithstanding the above, please note that there are reasons to assume that the legitimate 
interests of the data subjects concerned would be prejudiced by disclosure of the personal 
data reflected in the documents, as there is a real and non-hypothetical risk that such public 
disclosure would harm their privacy and subject them to unsolicited external contacts.  
 
Consequently, I conclude that, pursuant to Article 4(1)(b) of Regulation 1049/2001, access 
cannot be granted to the personal data included in documents 1-37 and 39-41, as the need to 
obtain access thereto for a purpose in the public interest has not been substantiated and there 
is no reason to think that the legitimate interests of the individuals concerned would not be 
prejudiced by disclosure of the personal data concerned. 
 
1.2. 
PROTECTION  OF  THE  PUBLIC  INTEREST  AS  REGARDS  INTERNATIONAL 
RELATIONS 

 
Article  4(1)(a)  third  indent,  of  Regulation  1049/2001  provides  that  “[t]he  institutions 
shall  refuse  access  to  a  document  where  disclosure  would  undermine  the  protection  of: 
the public interest as regards: […] international relations.” 
 
According  to  settled  case-law,  "the  particularly  sensitive  and  essential  nature  of  the 
interests  protected  by  Article  4(1)(a)  of  Regulation  No  1049/2001,  combined  with  the 
fact that access must be refused by the institution, under that provision, if disclosure of a 
document to  the public would undermine those interests, confers on the decision which 
must thus be adopted by the institution a complex and delicate nature which calls for the 
exercise of particular care. Such a decision therefore requires a margin of appreciation".  
In this context, the Court of Justice has acknowledged that the institutions enjoy "a wide 
discretion for the purpose of determining whether the disclosure of documents relating to 
the fields covered by [the] exceptions [under Article 4(1)(a)] could undermine the public 
interest".   
 
Certain passages of the documents 1, 2, 4, 11, 15, 19, 21, 23, 30 and 36 as well as the 
whole  document  3
  have  been  withheld  as  their  disclosure  would  undermine  the 
protection  of  the  public  interest  as  regards  international  relations,  as  set  out  in  Article 
4(1)(a) third indent of Regulation (EC) 1049/2001. The documents contain opinions for 
internal use regarding the deliberations of US interlocutors.  
 
The documents reveal information that can be used by third countries to bring an undue 
pressure on the Commission in support of European interests and unduly limit the room 
for  manoeuvre  of  the  European  Union  on  the  international  stage  and  jeopardise  the 
European Union's international position. 
 
 
 
 


1.3. 
PROTECTION OF COMMERCIAL INTERESTS 
 
Article  4.2  first  indent  of  Regulation  1049/2001  provides  that  “[t]he  institutions  shall 
refuse  access  to  a  document  where  disclosure  would  undermine  the  protection  of 
[...]commercial interests of a natural or legal person, including intellectual property [...] 
unless there is an overriding public interest in disclosure". 
 
Not  any  information  concerning  a  company  and  its  business  is  protected  under  Article 
4.2 first indent.8 However, information which is covered by the obligation of professional 
secrecy  is  likely  to  fall  within  the  scope  of  this  exception.9  Therefore,  it  must  be 
information  that  is  "known  only  to  a  limited  number  of  persons  ",  "whose  disclosure  is 
liable to cause serious harm to the person who has provided it or to third parties" 
and for 
which  "the  interests  liable  to  be  harmed  by  disclosure  must,  objectively,  be  worthy  of 
protection."10 
 
The  redacted  parts  of  documents  1,  2,  5,  14  and  29  as  well  as  the  entire  document  3 
contain sensitive information on the companies’ commercial strategies and consequences 
for the EU, in the context of the US section 232 tariffs on steel and aluminium and EU 
rebalancing  measures,  the  US  section  232  investigation  on  cars  and  car  parts,  the 
renegotiation of US FTA’s, and the US sanctions on Russia. Putting these elements in the 
public  domain  would  undermine  the  commercial  interests  of  these  companies,  or  could 
reflect negatively on their reputation. 
 
 
2. 
OVERRIDING PUBLIC INTEREST 
 
The exceptions laid down in Article 4(2) of Regulation 1049/2001 apply unless there is 
an overriding public interest in disclosure of the document. Such an interest must, first, 
be  public  and,  secondly,  outweigh  the  harm  caused  by  disclosure.  Accordingly,  the 
presence  of  an  overriding  public  interest  in  disclosure  has  also  been  assessed.  In  the 
present  case,  there  is  no  such  evidence.  On  the  contrary,  the  prevailing  interest  in  this 
case rather lies in protecting the purpose of the Commission's internal consultations at the 
heart of these consultations. 
 
 
3. 

PARTIAL ACCESS 
 
Pursuant  to  Article  4(6)  of  Regulation  1049/2001  "[i]f  only  parts  of  the  requested 
document  are  covered  by  any  of  the  exceptions,  the  remaining  parts  of  the  document 
shall  be  released".  Accordingly,  we  have  also  considered  whether  partial  access  can  be 
granted  to  document  3.  After  careful  review,  we  have  concluded  that  document  3  is 
entirely  covered  by  the  exceptions  described  above  as  it  is  impossible  to  disclose  any 
parts of this  document  without undermining the protection of interests identified in  this 
reply,  notably  the  exceptions  laid  down  in  Article  4(1)(a)  third  indent,  Article  4(1)(b) 
second paragraph, and Article 4.2 first intend of Regulation 1049/2001. 
 
*** 
 
 
 
                                                           
8 Judgment in Terezakis v Commission, T-380/04, EU:T:2008:19, paragraph 93. 
9 See Article 339 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union. 
10 Judgment in Bank Austria v Commission, T-198/03, EU:T:2006:136, paragraph 29. 
 



In  accordance  with  Article  7(2)  of  Regulation  1049/2001,  you  are  entitled  to  make  a 
confirmatory application requesting the Commission to review this position.  
Such  a  confirmatory  application  should  be  addressed  within  15  working  days  upon 
receipt of this letter to the Secretary-General of the Commission at the following address: 
 
 
European Commission 
Secretary-General 
Transparency, Document Management & Access to Documents unit SG-C-1 
BERL 7/076 
1049 Bruxelles 
 
Or by email to: [adresse e-mail] 
 
 
Yours sincerely, 
 
 
Jean-Luc DEMARTY 
 
Annexes: 1.List of documents 
                2.List of meetings 
                3.Disclosed documents 
 
 
 


Document Outline