Ceci est une version HTML d'une pièce jointe de la demande d'accès à l'information 'Meetings with Amazon'.


 
 
EUROPEAN COMMISSION 
 
 
Brussels, 22.7.2019 
C(2019) 5593 final 
 
Ms Laura Kayali 
POLITICO 
Rue de la Loi 62 
1040 Brussels 
Belgium 
DECISION OF THE EUROPEAN COMMISSION PURSUANT TO ARTICLE 4 OF THE 
IMPLEMENTING RULES TO REGULATION (EC) NO 1049/20011 
Subject: 
Your confirmatory application for access to documents under 
Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001 - GESTDEM 2019/1323 and 
2019/1387 

Dear Ms Kayali, 
I refer to your email of 3 May 2019, registered on the same day, in which you submit a 
confirmatory  application  in  accordance  with  Article  7(2)  of  Regulation  (EC)  No 
1049/2001  regarding  public  access  to  European  Parliament,  Council  and  Commission 
documents2 (hereafter ‘Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001’).  
1. 
SCOPE OF YOUR REQUEST 
In  your  initial  application  of  7  March  2019,  addressed  to  the  Directorate-General  for 
Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs, you requested access to: 
-  ‘List of lobby meetings held with Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and 
SMEs  with  Amazon  or  its  intermediaries.  The  list  should  include:  date, 
individuals attending and organisational affiliation, the issues discussed;  
-  Minutes and other reports of these meetings;  
-  All  correspondence  including  attachments  (i.e.  any  emails,  correspondence  or 
telephone  call  notes)  between  [the  Directorate-General  for  Internal  Market, 
                                                 

Official Journal L 345 of 29.12.2001, p. 94. 
2    Official Journal L 145 of 31.5.2001, p. 43. 
 
Commission européenne/Europese Commissie, 1049 Bruxelles/Brussel, BELGIQUE/BELGIË - Tel. +32 22991111 

 
Industry,  Entrepreneurship  and  SMEs]  (including  the  Commissioner  and  the 
Cabinet) and Amazon or any intermediaries representing its interests;  
-  All  documents  prepared  for  the  meetings  and  exchanged  in  the  course  of  the 
meetings between both parties’.  
This  request,  addressed  to  the  Directorate-General  for  Internal  Market,  Industry, 
Entrepreneurship  and  SMEs  was  registered  under  the  reference  number  GESTDEM 
2019/1387.  Your  same  request  addressed  to  the  Directorate-General  for  Employment, 
Social  affairs  and  Inclusion  was  registered  under  the  reference  number  GESTDEM 
2019/1323.  Both  requests  were handled by the Directorate-General  for  Internal  Market, 
Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs in a single reply. 
These documents should cover the period between November 2014 and March 2019. 
Since  you  made  25  simultaneous  requests  for  access  to  documents  concerning  several 
Directorates-General  of  the  European  Commission  and  Amazon,  Google,  Microsoft  or 
Facebook, the Secretariat-General sent you a fair solution proposal on 26 March 2019.  
On  2  April  2019,  you  replied  to  the  proposal  by  agreeing  to  limit  the  intermediaries  of 
Amazon to law firms and/or consultants directly representing Amazon in meetings. 
As a preliminary remark, I would like to clarify that the term ‘lobby meeting’ is defined 
in  Article  2  the  Commission  Decision  of  25  November  2014  on  the  publication  of 
information  on  meetings  held  between  Directors-General  of  the  Commission  and 
organisations  or  self-employed  individuals  (2014/838/EU,  Euratom)3  and  Commission 
Decision  of  25  November  2014  on  the  publication  of  information  on  meetings  held 
between  Members  of  the  Commission  and  organisations  or  self-employed  individuals 
(2014/839/EU, Euratom)4.  
Based on the above, the European Commission has identified the following documents as 
falling under the scope of your request: 
 
Email  of  17  December  2014  addressed  to  Commissioner  Bieńkowska, 
which  includes  as  annex  a  letter  of  meeting  request,  reference 
Ares(2014)425086 (hereafter ‘document 1’); 
 
Exchange  of  emails  of  29  June  2015  addressed  to  the  Cabinet  of 
Commissioner  Bieńkowska,  reference  Ares(2019)2897190  (hereafter 
‘document 2’); 
 
Email  of  25  May  2016  addressed  to  the  Cabinet  of  Commissioner 
Bieńkowska, reference Ares(2016)2503476 (hereafter ‘document 3’); 
                                                 
3   Official Journal L 343 of 28.11.2004, p. 19. 
4   Official Journal L 343 of 28.11.2004, p. 22. 


 
 
Exchange of emails of 25 May, 13 June and 8 August 2016 addressed to 
Commissioner  Bieńkowska,  which includes  as annex a letter of meeting 
request, reference Ares(2016)4204690 (hereafter ‘document 4’); 
 
Exchange  of  emails  of  22  August  and  8  September  2016  addressed  to 
Commissioner  Bieńkowska,  reference  Ares(2016)4204690  (hereafter 
‘document 5’); 
 
Email  of  10  April  2017  addressed  to  the  Cabinet  of  Commissioner 
Bieńkowska, reference Ares(2017)2119964 (hereafter ‘document 6’); 
 
Email  of  24  May  2017  addressed  to  the  Cabinet  of  Commissioner 
Bieńkowska, reference Ares(2017)2640756 (hereafter ‘document 7’); 
 
Email  of  6  December  2017  addressed  to  the  Cabinet  of  Commissioner 
Bieńkowska,  which  includes  as  annex  a  letter  of  meeting  request  and  a 
Curriculum Vitae, and a reply to Amazon of 12 December 2017, reference 
Ares(2017)5990282 (hereafter ‘document 8’); 
 
Email  of  4  June  2018  addressed  to  the  Cabinet  of  Commissioner 
Bieńkowska  and  a  reply  to  Amazon  of  20  June  2018,  reference 
Ares(2018)2904802 (hereafter ‘document 9’); 
 
Email  of  18  June  2018  addressed  to  the  Cabinet  of  Commissioner 
Bieńkowska,  which  includes  as  annex  a  letter  of  meeting  request, 
reference Ares(2018)3213950 (hereafter ‘document 10’); 
 
Email  of  31  October  2018  addressed  to  the  Cabinet  of  Commissioner 
Bieńkowska, reference Ares(2018)5575824 (hereafter ‘document 11’); 
 
Email  of  5  November  2018  addressed  to  Commissioner  Bieńkowska, 
reference Ares(2018)5655155 (hereafter ‘document 12’); 
In its initial reply of 30 April 2019, the Directorate-General for Internal Market, Industry, 
Entrepreneurship and SMEs granted wide partial access to these documents, subject only 
to the redaction of personal data, based on the exception of Article 4(1)(b) (protection of 
privacy and integrity of the individual) of Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001.  
In  your confirmatory  application,  you do not  contest the redaction of personal  data, but 
you do request a review of the position of the competent Directorate-General as regards 
the identification of the documents. More specifically, you note that you did not receive 
all  the  answers  from  the  Commission,  which  make  it  hard  to  know  if  the  meetings 
requested did take place; any reports and/or minutes of the meetings that took place; any 
documents prepared for the purpose of the meetings and/or exchanged during the course 
of the meetings. 
 


 
2. 
ASSESSMENT AND CONCLUSIONS UNDER REGULATION (EC) NO 1049/2001 
When  assessing  a  confirmatory  application  for  access  to  documents  submitted  pursuant 
to Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001, the Secretariat-General conducts a fresh review of the 
reply given by the Directorate-General concerned at the initial stage. 
As  part  of  this  review,  the  European  Commission  has  carried  out  a  renewed,  thorough 
search for possible documents falling under the scope of your request. 
Based  on  this  renewed  search,  the  European  Commission  has  identified  the  following 
documents: 
 
briefing  for  Commissioner  Bieńkowska  for  the  meeting  of  13  October 
2016, reference Ares(2019)3452300 (hereafter ‘document 13’); 
 
briefing for the deputy Head of Cabinet of Commissioner Bieńkowska for 
the  meeting  of  23  November  2017,  reference  Ares(2019)3452238 
(hereafter ‘document 14’); 
Following  this  review,  I  can  inform  you  that  partial  access  is  granted  to  documents  13 
and 14 based on the exception of Article 4(1)(b) (protection of privacy and the integrity 
of  the  individual)  and,  as  regards  document  13,  Article  4(3),  first  subparagraph 
(protection of on-going decision-making process), of Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001 for 
the reasons set out below. 
Concerning  the  remaining  documents  to  which  you  refer  in  your  confirmatory 
application, I confirm that the Commission does not hold any other documents than the 
ones identified. According to Article 2(3) of Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001, the right of 
access applies only to existing documents in the possession of the institution. 
2.1.  Protection of privacy and the integrity of the individual 
Article  4(1)(b)  of  Regulation  (EC)  No  1049/2001  provides  that  ‘[t]he  institutions  shall 
refuse  access  to  a  document  where  disclosure  would  undermine  the  protection  of  […] 
privacy and the integrity of the individual, in  particular in  accordance  with  Community 
legislation regarding the protection of personal data’. 
In  its  judgment  in  Case  C-28/08  P  (Bavarian  Lager)5,  the  Court  of  Justice  ruled  that 
when  a  request  is  made  for  access  to  documents  containing  personal  data,  Regulation 
(EC) No 45/2001 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 18 December 2000 
on  the  protection  of  individuals  with  regard  to  the  processing  of  personal  data  by  the 
Community  institutions  and  bodies  and  on  the  free  movement  of  such  data6 
(hereafter ‘Regulation (EC) No 45/2001’) becomes fully applicable.  
                                                 
5   Judgment of the Court of Justice of 29 June 2010,  European Commission v The Bavarian Lager Co. 
Ltd  (hereafter  referred  to  as  ‘European  Commission  v  The  Bavarian  Lager  judgment’)  C-28/08 P, 
EU:C:2010:378, paragraph 59. 
6   Official Journal L 8 of 12.1.2001, page 1.  


 
Please  note  that,  as  from  11  December  2018,  Regulation  (EC)  No  45/2001  has  been 
repealed by Regulation (EU) 2018/1725 of the European Parliament and of the Council 
of 23 October 2018 on the protection of natural persons with regard to the processing of 
personal  data  by  the  Union  institutions,  bodies,  offices  and  agencies  and  on  the  free 
movement  of  such  data,  and  repealing  Regulation  (EC)  No  45/2001  and  Decision  No 
1247/2002/EC7 (hereafter ‘Regulation (EU) 2018/1725’). 
However,  the  case  law  issued  with  regard  to  Regulation  (EC)  No  45/2001  remains 
relevant for the interpretation of Regulation (EU) 2018/1725. 
In  the  above-mentioned  judgment,  the  Court  stated  that  Article  4(1)(b)  of  Regulation  
(EC)  No  1049/2001  ‘requires  that  any  undermining  of  privacy  and  the  integrity  of  the 
individual  must  always  be  examined  and  assessed  in  conformity  with  the  legislation  of 
the  Union  concerning  the  protection  of  personal  data,  and  in  particular  with  […]  [the 
Data Protection] Regulation’.8 
Article  3(1)  of  Regulation  (EU)  2018/1725  provides  that  personal  data  ‘means  any 
information relating to an identified or identifiable natural person […]’.  
As the Court of Justice confirmed in Case C-465/00 (Rechnungshof), ‘there is no reason 
of principle to justify excluding activities of a professional […] nature from the notion of 
private life’.9 
Documents 13 and 14 contain personal data such as the names and telephone numbers of 
persons who do not form part of the senior management of the European Commission as 
well as names and curriculum vitae of representatives of third parties.  
The names10 of the persons concerned as well as other data from which their identity can 
be  deduced  undoubtedly  constitute  personal  data  in  the  meaning  of  Article  3(1)  of 
Regulation (EU) 2018/1725.  
Pursuant  to  Article  9(1)(b)  of  Regulation  (EU)  2018/1725,  ‘personal  data  shall  only  be 
transmitted to recipients established in the Union other than Union institutions and bodies 
if ‘[t]he recipient establishes that it is necessary to have the data transmitted for a specific 
purpose in the public interest and the controller, where there is any reason to assume that 
the  data  subject’s  legitimate  interests  might  be  prejudiced,  establishes  that  it  is 
proportionate  to  transmit  the  personal  data  for  that  specific  purpose  after  having 
demonstrably weighed the various competing interests’. 
Only if these conditions are fulfilled and the processing constitutes lawful processing in 
accordance  with  the  requirements  of  Article  5  of  Regulation  (EU)  2018/1725,  can  the 
transmission of personal data occur. 
                                                 
7   Official Journal L 205 of 21.11.2018, p. 39. 
8   European Commission v The Bavarian Lager judgment, cited above, paragraph 59. 
9   Judgment  of  the  Court  of  Justice  of  20  May  2003,  Rechnungshof  and  Others  v  Österreichischer 
Rundfunk, Joined Cases C-465/00, C-138/01 and C-139/01, EU:C:2003:294, paragraph 73. 
10   European Commission v The Bavarian Lager judgment, cited above, paragraph 68. 


 
In Case C-615/13 P (ClientEarth), the Court of Justice ruled that the institution does not 
have to examine by itself the existence of a need for transferring personal data.11 This is 
also  clear  from  Article  9(1)(b)  of  Regulation  (EU)  2018/1725,  which  requires  that  the 
necessity to have the personal data transmitted must be established by the recipient. 
According to  Article 9(1)(b) of Regulation  (EU)  2018/1725,  the European Commission 
has to  examine the  further conditions  for the lawful processing of personal  data only if 
the  first  condition  is  fulfilled,  namely  if  the  recipient  establishes  that  it  is  necessary  to 
have  the  data  transmitted  for  a  specific  purpose  in  the  public  interest.  It  is  only  in  this 
case that the European Commission has to examine whether there is a reason to assume 
that  the  data  subject’s  legitimate  interests  might  be  prejudiced  and,  in  the  affirmative, 
establish  the  proportionality  of  the  transmission  of  the  personal  data  for  that  specific 
purpose after having demonstrably weighed the various competing interests. 
In your confirmatory application, you do not put forward any arguments to establish the 
necessity  to  have  the  data  transmitted  for  a  specific  purpose  in  the  public  interest. 
Therefore, the European Commission does not have to examine whether there is a reason 
to assume that the data subjects’ legitimate interests might be prejudiced. 
Notwithstanding the above, there are reasons to assume that the legitimate interests of the 
data  subjects  concerned  would  be  prejudiced  by  the  disclosure  of  the  personal  data 
reflected  in  the  documents,  as  there  is  a  real  and non-hypothetical  risk  that  such  public 
disclosure would harm their privacy and subject them to unsolicited external contacts.  
Consequently,  I  conclude  that,  pursuant  to  Article  4(1)(b)  of  Regulation  (EC)  No 
1049/2001,  access  cannot  be  granted  to  the  personal  data,  as  the  need  to  obtain  access 
thereto  for  a  purpose  in  the  public  interest  has  not  been  substantiated  and  there  is  no 
reason  to  think  that  the  legitimate  interests  of  the  individuals  concerned  would  not  be 
prejudiced by the disclosure of the personal data concerned. 
2.2.  Protection of the decision-making process 
Article 4(3), first subparagraph of Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001 provides that ‘[a]ccess 
to a document, drawn up by an institution for internal use or received by an institution, 
which relates to a matter where the decision has not been taken by the institution, shall be 
refused  if  disclosure  of  the  document  would  seriously  undermine  the  institution's 
decision-making process, unless there is an overriding public interest in disclosure’. 
Document  13  is  an  internal  briefing  prepared  by  non-senior  Commission  staff  for  the 
attention of Commissioner Bieńkowska in view of one of the meetings mentioned in your 
request.  
The  withheld  parts  of  the  document  concern  a  limited  number  of  sensitive  views 
expressed by the Commission services related  to  matters on which the Commission has 
not  taken  a  decision  yet,  such  as  new  initiatives or  revisions  of  existing  legislative  acts 
                                                 
11   Judgment  of  the  Court  of  Justice  of  16  July  2015,  ClientEarth  v  European  Food  Safety  Agency,  
C-615/13 P, EU:C:2015:489, paragraph 47. 


 
and  their  future  aims.  These  issues  are  sensitive  because  they  relate  to  the  regulatory 
environment for the provision of digital services in Europe and its possible update. 
Disclosure  of  the  redacted  parts  of  the  documents  at  the  preliminary  stage  of  the 
elaboration  of  those  new  initiatives  would  seriously  undermine  the  protection  of  the 
decision-making  process  of  the  European  Commission  regarding  ongoing  reflexions  on 
some  of  the  pieces  of  legislation  mentioned  in  the  document.  It  would  reveal  internal 
considerations  of  a  strategic  nature  that  would  reduce  the  margin  of  manoeuvre  of  the 
Commission. 
Indeed,  the  Commission  has  an  obligation  to  protect  the  soundness  of  its  decision-
making  processes  from  undue  influence,  so  as  to  ensure  that,  ‘[i]n  carrying  out  its 
responsibilities, the Commission shall be completely independent’,  according to  Article 
17(3)  of  the  Treaty  on  the  Functioning  of  the  European  Union.  In  this  sense,  it  is 
important  for  the  quality  of  the  Commission’s  decision-making  process  that  documents 
drawn  up  for  internal  use  are  protected,  so  as  to  ensure  an  adequate  analysis  and 
discussion within the Commission services. The withheld part of the document concern 
possible  defensive  points  for  important  sensitive  questions  such  as  the  liability  regime 
concerning  illegal  content  and  how  this  could  be  regulated  in  the  future,  possible  new 
rules of intellectual property enforcement in e-Commerce, an approach to designing new 
measures  that  identify  and  disrupt  the  money  trail  for  commercial  scale  intellectual 
property infringing activities.  
There is a concrete risk that disclosing, at this stage, opinions on possible revision of the 
current legal framework, before the Commission has had the opportunity to take position, 
would  seriously  undermine  the  Commission’s  decision-making  process  as  it  would 
expose it to external pressure. The fact that the withheld parts of the document concern 
problems and possible solutions reinforces the conclusion that organised interests would 
exercise external pressure.  
In light of the above, the relevant undisclosed parts of document 13 should be protected 
in accordance with Article 4(3), first subparagraph, of Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001. 
3. 
OVERRIDING PUBLIC INTEREST IN DISCLOSURE 
The  exceptions  laid  down  in  Article  4(3)  of  Regulation  (EC)  No  1049/2001  must  be 
waived  if  there  is  an  overriding  public  interest  in  disclosure.  Such  an  interest  must, 
firstly, be public and, secondly, outweigh the harm caused by disclosure. 
In  your  confirmatory  application,  you  do  not  put  forward  any  reasoning  pointing  to  an 
overriding public interest in disclosing the documents requested.  
Nor have I been able to identify any public interest capable of overriding the public and 
private interests protected by in Article 4 (3) of Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001.  
Please  note  that  4(1)(b)  of  Regulation  (EC)  No  1049/2001  does  not  include  the 
possibility  for  the  exceptions  defined  therein  to  be  set  aside  by  an  overriding  public 
interest. 



 
4. 
PARTIAL ACCESS 
In accordance with Article 4(6) of Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001, I have considered the 
possibility of granting (further) partial access to the documents requested.  
For  the  reasons  explained  above,  partial  access  is  now  granted  to  the  requested 
documents without undermining the interests described above. 
5. 
MEANS OF REDRESS 
Finally, I draw your attention to the means of redress available against this decision. You 
may  either  bring  proceedings  before  the  General  Court  or  file  a  complaint  with  the 
European  Ombudsman  under  the  conditions  specified  respectively  in  Articles  263  and 
228 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union. 
Yours sincerely, 
 
 
For the Commission 
 
Martin SELMAYR 
Secretary-General 

Enclosures: (2) 


Document Outline