Ceci est une version HTML d'une pièce jointe de la demande d'accès à l'information 'Meetings with Amazon'.


 
EUROPEAN COMMISSION 
 
 
Brussels, 11.10.2019 
C(2019) 7468 final 
Ms Laura Kayali 
POLITICO 
Rue de la Loi 62 
1040 Brussels 
Belgium 
DECISION OF THE EUROPEAN COMMISSION PURSUANT TO ARTICLE 4 OF THE 
IMPLEMENTING RULES TO REGULATION (EC) NO 1049/20011 
Subject: 
Your confirmatory application for access to documents under 
Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001 - GESTDEM 2019/1317 

Dear Ms Kayali, 
I refer to your email of 27 May 2019, registered on the same day, in which you submit a 
confirmatory  application  in  accordance  with  Article  7(2)  of  Regulation  (EC)  No 
1049/2001  regarding  public  access  to  European  Parliament,  Council  and  Commission 
documents2 (hereafter ‘Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001’).  
1. 
SCOPE OF YOUR REQUEST 
In  your  initial  request  of  7  March  2019,  addressed  to  the  Directorate-General  for 
Communication Networks, Content and Technology, you requested access to: 
-  ‘a  list  of  lobby  meetings  held  with  Communication  Networks,  Content  and 
Technology  with  Amazon  or  its  intermediaries.  The  list  should  include:  date, 
individuals attending + organisational affiliation, the issues discussed;  
-  minutes and other reports of these meetings;  
-  all  correspondence  including  attachments  (i.e.  any  emails,  correspondence  or 
telephone  call  notes)  between  […]  DG  (including  the  Commissioner  and  the 
Cabinet) and Amazon or any intermediaries representing its interests;  
-  all  documents  prepared  for  the  meetings  and  exchanged  in  the  course  of  the 
meetings between both parties’.  
                                                 

Official Journal L 345 of 29.12.2001, p. 94. 
2   Official Journal L 145 of 31.5.2001, p. 43. 
 
Commission européenne/Europese Commissie, 1049 Bruxelles/Brussel, BELGIQUE/BELGIË - Tel. +32 22991111 

 
These documents should cover the period between November 2014 and March 2019. 
Since  25  simultaneous  requests  for  access  to  documents  concerning  meetings  between 
several  Directorates-General  of  the  European  Commission  and  Amazon,  Google, 
Microsoft  or  Facebook  were  introduced  on  behalf  of  your  organisation,  Politico,  the 
Secretariat-General sent you a fair solution proposal on 26 March 2019, registered under 
reference Ares(2019)2103936.  
In this proposal, the Secretariat-General informed you that the European Commission has 
received a very high number of very similar requests for access to documents submitted 
by you but also by other applicants concerning lobby meetings held within the European 
Commission with  Amazon, Google, Microsoft or Facebook or persons representing their 
interests. It explained that although the applicants are different entities, the requests were 
almost identical and were made at the same time. The circumstances of the introduction 
of these requests, their timing, their scope, as well as their wording gave the impression 
that they result from a coordinated action. It referred to the Court of First Instance3 which 
confirmed  in  its  Ryanair  judgment4  that  Article  6(3)  of  Regulation  (EC)  may  not  be 
evaded by splitting an application into several, seemingly separate, parts. It informed you 
that, as stated by the EU Courts, the European Commission must respect the principle of 
proportionality and ensure that the interest of the applicant for access is balanced against 
the  workload  resulting  from  the  processing  of  the  application  for  access  in  order  to 
safeguard the interests of good administration. 
The  Secretariat-General  described  in  detail  the  actions  needed  in  order  to  handle  these 
requests and concluded that the handling of your numerous simultaneous requests could 
not be completed within the normal time limits set out in Article 7 of Regulation (EC) No 
1049/2001.  It underlined that, in  accordance with the  case law of the EU  Courts, a fair 
solution  can  only  concern  the  content  or  the  number  of  documents  applied  for,  not  the 
deadline for replying.5 Based on Article 6(3) of Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001, it asked 
you  to  specify  your specific interest in the documents requested6, and  whether  you could 
narrow down the scope of your request, so as to reduce it to a more manageable number. In 
order to help you to narrow down your wide-scoped request, it transmitted to you lists of the 
lobby  meetings,  which  took  place  since  1  December  2014  between  the  Director-General 
concerned,  the  Commissioner  or  a  member  of  his  Cabinet  and  Amazon,  Google, 
Microsoft or Facebook or any intermediaries representing their interests.7 The Secretariat-
General  proposed  one  of  the  following  alternative  options  for  limiting  the  excessive 
administrative  burden  relating  to  the  handling  of  your  wide-scoped  request,  made  as 
seemingly separate 25 simultaneous requests: 
                                                 
3   Now ‘General Court’. 
4   Judgment  of  the  General  Court  of  10  December  2010,  Ryanair  v  Commission,  T-494/08, 
EU:T:2010:511, paragraph 34. 
5   Judgment of the Court of Justice of 2 October 2014, Guido Strack v Commission, C-127/13 (hereafter 
Guido Strack v Commission’)EU:C:2014:2250, paragraphs 26-28. 
6   Ibid,  paragraph  28;  Judgment  of  the  General  Court  of  22  May  2012,  EnBW  Energie  Baden-
Württemberg v Commission, T-344/08, EU:T:2012:242, paragraph 105. 
7   These 
lists 
are 
publicly 
available 
under 
the 
link: 
http://ec.europa.eu/transparencyregister/public/homePage.do?locale=en#en. 


 
-  Restrict  the  temporary  scope  of  your  wide-scoped  request  to  a  period  of  your 
choice  not  exceeding  six  months  and  limit  its  scope  only  to  the  meetings 
published in the Transparency Register;  
-  Limit  the  number  of  your  seemingly  separate  requests  to  10  requests  of  your 
choice;  
-  Limit the scope of  your requests to  20 meetings of  your choice published in  the 
Transparency  Register  for  each  one  of  the  companies  you  are  interested  in 
(Google, Amazon, Microsoft and Facebook). 
On 2 April 2019, you replied to the proposal indicating that you were ‘not in the position 
to  accept  any  of  the  solutions  […],  which  [you]  don’t  consider  fair’.  You  stated  that 
‘[your]  decision  to  file  24  separate  requests  to  various  Directorates-General  was  not  a 
covert  attempt  to  circumvent  the  rules  set  in  Regulation  1049/2001,  but  a  deliberate 
choice  that  responds  to  rather  basic  knowledge  of  how  EU  policy  and  decision  making 
works’.  You  explained  that  ‘filing  these  requests  separately  was  a  deliberate  choice  as 
each DG holds meetings with stakeholders independently and at differentiated times. It is 
also  safe  to  assume  that  each  DG  has  access  to  their  own  set  of  documents,  including 
those that would fall under the scope of [your] request.’ You added further that, in your 
view, ‘it is not reasonable to expect each and every DG will need to undergo the same 
process  […]  in  order  to  respond  to  [your]  requests.  Some  DGs  will  identify  more 
documents than others, some of these documents will be more sensitive than others, and 
some  might  not  hold  documents  at  all.  At  the  same  time,  some  DGs  might  have  more 
staff  dedicated  to  access  to  documents  purposes  than  others,  which  would  result  in 
differentiated levels of effort time-wise and human resource-wise.’ 
You indicated that ‘whether [yours] and other requests were or were not filed as a result 
of  a  “coordinated  action”  is  not  incumbent  in  this  case’.  You  underlined  that  any 
‘possible  “coordinated  action”  between  [you]  and  other  requesters,  would  not,  in  any 
case,  fall  under  the  scope  of  the  cited  General  Court  jurisprudence.  It  would,  however, 
fall under the scope of Article 12 of the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights, which grants 
EU  civil  society  the  right  to  assemble  and  associate  in  order  to  work  together,  in  a 
coordinated  manner,  for  instance,  to  advance  a  political  and  civil  matter  such  as 
transparency of EU institutions.’ 
As to your ‘specific interest in the documents requested’, you stated that ‘the content and 
the  wording  of  [your]  initial  requests  are  self-explanatory:  [you  were]  interested  in 
knowing about the interactions between Commission branches and Amazon, for the sake 
of  knowing  about  the  interactions  between  Commission  branches  and  Amazon  […],  as 
[you]  believe  this  matter  is  in  the  public  interest.’  Moreover,  you  referred  to  previous 
requests made, where solutions were accepted ‘such as, instead of reducing the scope of 
the  initial  request,  splitting  the  request  into  various  individual  requests  to  be  processed 
separately  and  consecutively’  and  concluded  ‘such  a  solution  would  be  much  more 
reasonable and adequate than the ones proposed by the Commission’. Finally, you stated 
that ‘a fair solution  - which [you were] willing  to  debate and reach  - would require an 
agreement from the Commission on these two basis: 


 
1.  that [your] requests be processed individually by each of the DGs [you] initially 
filed  the  requests  to,  with  which  [you  would]  be  willing  to  find  individual  fair 
solutions depending on the number of documents identified by each DG, and the 
workload that [your] request would require from each DG individually;  
2.  that  [your]  requests  be  treated  separately  from  any  other  requests,  as  similar  as 
they  might  be,  filed  previously  or  simultaneously.  [You  are]  only  interested  in 
documents  related  to  Amazon,  and  the  way  [your]  requests  are  handled  should 
reflect that limitation. 
Should the European Commission - and its DGs - agree on these two basis, [you] would 
of course be willing to reduce and/or limit the scope of [your] request per individual DG, 
if the situation within a DG would require to do so. 
On the other hand, [you have] agree[d] to limit the intermediaries [you were] interested 
in to law firms and/or consultants directly representing Amazon in meetings.’ 
As a preliminary remark, I would like to clarify that the term ‘lobby meeting’ is defined 
in  Article  2  the  Commission  Decision  of  25  November  2014  on  the  publication  of 
information  on  meetings  held  between  Directors-General  of  the  Commission  and 
organisations  or  self-employed  individuals  (2014/838/EU,  Euratom)8  and  Commission 
Decision  of  25  November  2014  on  the  publication  of  information  on  meetings  held 
between  Members  of  the  Commission  and  organisations  or  self-employed  individuals 
(2014/839/EU, Euratom)9.  
The  Directorate-General  for  Communication  Networks,  Content  and  Technology 
received  on  the  same  day  several  requests  for  access  to  documents  from  you  and  other 
applicants related to lobby meetings with Amazon, Google, Microsoft or Facebook. The 
estimated  number  of  documents  identified  by  the  Directorate-General  as  falling  within 
the scope of these requests was more than 185 documents, even after limiting the scope 
to  intermediaries  of  Facebook,  Amazon,  Microsoft  or  Google  to  law  firms  and/or 
consultants directly representing them in meetings. 
At  the  time  of  your  request,  the  Directorate-General  for  Communication  Networks, 
Content and Technology was already processing another request from your organisation, 
where it identified 17 documents as falling within the scope, and granted (full or partial) 
access to 11 documents. It refused access to 6 documents. 
In  order  to  treat  your  request,  and  that  of  other  applicants,  the  Directorate-General  for 
Communications  Networks,  Content  and  Technology  would  have  to  carry  out  a  certain 
number of tasks listed below: 
 
 
                                                 
8   Official Journal L 343 of 28.11.2004, p. 19. 
9   Official Journal L 343 of 28.11.2004, p. 22. 


 
-  search  for  documents  relating  to  meetings  with  Amazon,  Google,  Microsoft  or 
Facebook  both  at  the  level  of  the  Directorate-General  or  the  service  concerned 
and  at  the  level  of  the  Commissioner  and  his  Cabinet  in  several  document 
management systems of the Commission;  
-  retrieval  and establishment of a complete list of the documents falling under the 
scope of your requests;  
-  scanning of the documents which are in paper format;  
-  preliminary assessment of the content of the documents in light of the exceptions 
of Article 4 of Regulation EC (No) 1049/2001;  
-  assessment of the further procedural steps to undertake, for example whether third 
party consultations should be made; 
-  (possibly)  third-party  consultations  under  Article  4(4)  of  Regulation  1049/2001 
and  (possibly)  a  further  dialogue  with  the  third  party  originators  of  documents 
falling within the scope of your request; 
-  final assessment of the documents in light of the comments received, including of 
the possibility of granting (partial) access; 
-  redactions  of  the  relevant  parts  falling  under  exceptions  of  Regulation  EC  (No) 
1049/2001); 
-  preparation  of  the  draft  reply  for  each  of  your  requests  by  each  of  the  services 
concerned; 
-  (possible) consultation of the Legal Service; 
-  finalisation of the replies at administrative level and formal approvals of the draft 
decisions;  
-  final check of the documents to be (partially) released (if applicable) (scanning of 
the redacted versions, administrative treatment,…) and dispatch of the replies.  
 
Given the complexity of the tasks and the number of documents, amounting to more than 
185,  the  Directorate-General  for  Communications  Networks,  Content  and  Technology 
concluded  that  it  would  not  be  possible  to  carry  out  the  assessment  required  under 
Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001, within the time limits provided for in that regulation. 
Consequently,  the  Directorate-General  for  Communications  Networks,  Content  and 
Technology  unilaterally  restricted  the  scope  of  your  initial  application  to  documents 
related  to  meetings  between  the  Director-General  or  members  of  the  Cabinet  and 
Amazon  that  are  listed  in  the  Transparency  Register  for  the  period  1  January  2017  and 
the date of your request. 
Based on the above, the Directorate-General for Communications Networks, Content and 
Technology  has  identified  the  following  documents  as  falling  under  the  scope  of  your 
request: 
  Briefing for Vice-president Ansip for the Roundtable of 9 January 2018 between 
Vice-president  Ansip,  Commissioner  Gabriel  and  various  online  platforms, 
reference SG-PDT-VPs/4511 (hereafter ‘document 1’);  


 
  Briefing for Commissioner Gabriel of the Roundtable of 9 January 2018 between 
Vice-president  Ansip,  Commissioner  Gabriel  and  various  online  platforms, 
reference  CAB  GABRIEL/232  (hereafter  ‘document  2’),  which  contains  the 
following annexes: 
o  List  and  description  of  invited  online  platforms,  (hereafter  ‘document 
2.1’); 
o  Background  document  sent  to  invited  online  platforms,  (hereafter 
‘document 2.2’); 
o  Detailed  agenda  sent  to  invited  online  platforms,  (hereafter  ‘document 
2.3’); 
o  Details of participants representing online platforms, (hereafter ‘document 
2.4’); 
  Notes of the technical meeting with various online platforms of 9 January 2018, 
reference Ares(2019)6008320 (hereafter ‘document 3’);  
  Notes  of  the  high-level  meeting  with  platforms  of  9  January  2018,  reference 
Ares(2019)6008434 (hereafter ‘document 4’); 
  Notes  of  the  roundtable  with  platforms  of  9  January  2018,  reference 
Ares(2019)6008544 (hereafter ‘document 5’); 
  Summary  of  discussions  of  the  roundtable  with  platforms  of  9  January  2018, 
reference Ares(2019)6008640 (hereafter ‘document 6’); 
  European Commission Statement regarding removing illegal content online of 8 
January 2018, reference Ares(2019)3109197 (hereafter ‘document 7’); 
  Email  of  28  September  2018  requesting  a  meeting  with  Eric  Peters,  Cabinet 
Member  of  Commission  Gabriel,  reference  Ares(2019)5964190  (hereafter 
‘document 8’); 
  Steering Brief for Director-General Roberto Viola for a meeting with Amazon on 
28 November 2018, reference BASIS 7403 (hereafter ‘document 9’); 
  Back  to  Office  report  for  a  meeting  with  Amazon  on  28  November  2018, 
reference Ares(2019)1121472 (hereafter ‘document 10’); 
  Email  of  8  February  2019  requesting  a  meeting  with  Director-General  Roberto 
Viola, reference Ares(2019)1765720 (hereafter ‘document 11’) which contains the 
following annexes: 
o  Biography of Amazon representative (hereafter ‘document 11.1’); 
o  Invitation for a meeting (hereafter ‘document 11.2’); 
  Exchange of emails concerning logistics of the meeting starting on 26 February 
2019, reference Ares(2019)1765949 (hereafter ‘document 12’); 
  Steering Brief for Director-General Roberto Viola for a meeting with Amazon on 
26 February 2019, reference BASIS 7646 (hereafter ‘document 13’); 
  Back to Office report for a meeting with Amazon on 26 February 2019, reference 
Ares(2019)1761449 (hereafter ‘document 14’). 
In  its  initial  reply  of  10  May  2019,  the  Directorate-General  for  Communication 
Networks, Content and Technology granted: 
o  full access to documents 2.2 and 7;  


 
o  wide  partial  access  to  documents  1,  2,  11,  12,  and  14,  subject  only  to  the 
redaction of personal data based on the exception of Article 4(1)(b) (protection of 
privacy and integrity of the individual) of Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001; 
o  partial access to document 2.3, 8, 9, 10, 11.2 and 13 based on the exceptions of 
Article  4(3)  (protection  of  the  ongoing  decision-making  process)  and  the  first 
indent of Article 4(2) (protection of commercial interests) of Regulation (EC) No 
1049/2001; 
o  refused access to documents 2.1, 2.4, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 11.1 based on the exception 
of  Article  4(1)(b)  (protection  of  privacy  and  integrity  of  the  individual),  Article 
4(3)  (protection  of  the  ongoing  decision-making  process)  and  the  first  indent  of 
Article  4(2)  (protection  of  commercial  interests)  of  Regulation  (EC)  No 
1049/2001. 
In your confirmatory application, you request a review of this position. More specifically, 
you provide detailed arguments contesting the way the unilateral restriction of the scope 
was done at initial stage which I will assess below. 
In  addition,  you  request  a  review  of  the  position  of  the  Directorate-General  for 
Communication Networks, Content and Technology as far as it applied, too extensively 
in  your  view,  the  exceptions  provided  for  in  Article  4(3),  first  paragraph  (protection  of 
the decision-making process) of Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001. You expressly mention 
that you do not request the personal data present in the document, so they will not be in 
the scope of this review.  
2. 
ASSESSMENT AND CONCLUSIONS UNDER REGULATION (EC) NO 1049/2001 
When  assessing  a  confirmatory  application  for  access  to  documents  submitted  pursuant 
to Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001, the Secretariat-General conducts a fresh review of the 
reply given by the Directorate-General concerned at the initial stage. 
As a preliminary remark, I would like to clarify the scope of this confirmatory decision. 
Please note that pursuant to Article 7, paragraph 2 of Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001, the 
purpose of a confirmatory application is to review the initial position of the Directorate-
General in question to fully or partially refuse access to the documents which have been 
identified at initial stage.  
Hence, the review performed by the Secretariat-General at confirmatory stage will focus 
on two main aspects : 
-  The assessment of the way the unilateral restriction was performed at initial stage; 
-  The assessment of the application to this extend of the exceptions provided for in 
Article  4(3),  first  paragraph  (protection  of  the  decision-making  process)  and 
Article  4(2)  first  indent  (protection  of  commercial  interests)  of  Regulation  (EC) 
No 1049/2001 to the documents identified at initial stage.  
 
 


 
Please note that the scope of this confirmatory decision would not extend to the analysis 
of  new  elements  raised  in  your  application  and  to  elements  unrelated  to  the  ones 
mentioned  above  or  unrelated  to  the  question  of  the  right  to  access  to  documents  in 
general. 
Notwithstanding  the  above,  I  would  like  to  clarify  that  the  mention  of  the  ‘Chatham 
house exception’ at initial stage, was not intended to replace the exceptions provided for 
in  Article  4  of  Regulation  (EC)  No  1049/2001.  It  was  mentioned  as  an  additional 
argument  which  in  no  circumstances  can  be  used  solely  to  justify  the  refusal  to  grant 
access to a specific document. 
Taking into account the above explanations, the European Commission has carried out a 
review of the initial  position of the Directorate-General  for Communications Networks, 
Content and Technology. 
Following  this  review,  I  regret  to  inform  you  that  I  have  to  confirm  the  position  of  the 
Directorate-General for Communications Networks, Content and Technology, insofar as 
the unilateral restriction of the scope of your initial application is concerned. 
As  regards  your  claim  that  the  exceptions  provided  for  in  Article  4  of  Regulation  (EC) 
No  1049/2001  were  applied  too  extensively,  I  can  inform  you  that  further  access  is 
granted to documents 2.1, 2.3, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11.2 and 13. 
2.1.  Unilateral restriction of the scope of the initial application 
In your confirmatory application, you contest the position of the Directorate-General for 
Communications Networks, Content and Technology, as regard the unilateral restriction 
of  the  scope  of  your  (initial)  application.  You  also  contest  the  fact  this  Directorate-
General did not engage further with a view to finding a fair solution.  
As  a  preliminary  remark,  I  would  like  to  clarify,  that  Regulation  (EC)  No  1049/2001 
clearly  stipulates  that  the  recipient  of  any  request  for  access  to  documents  is  the 
institution as such. This legal context is not altered by the fact that it is possible to send a 
request  for  access  to  documents  to  the  relevant  Directorate-General  or  department.  In 
conclusion, the requests addressed to these entities continue to be requests addressed to 
the  European  Commission  and  the  workload  related  to  them  is  also  incumbent  on  the 
European Commission. Although your requests were addressed to separate Directorates-
General,  they  form  a  wide-scope  request,  as  the  workload  they  imply  will  have  to  be 
assumed by the European Commission as the institution.  
As  mentioned  above,  at  the  time  of  your  request,  the  Directorate-General  for 
Communication  Networks,  Content  and  Technology  was  already  processing  one  other 
request  from  your  organisation,  where  it  identified  17  documents  as  falling  within  the 
scope, and granted (full or partial) access to 11 documents. In fact, Politico has submitted 
72  requests  for  access  to  documents  this  year  alone,  out  of  which  25  requests  were 
submitted by you personally. 


 
Indeed,  the  European  Commission  handled  simultaneously  25  from  the  Politico  and  66 
very similar requests from other applicants whose requests had the same wording.  
You  state  that  it  is  not  incumbent  in  this  case  whether  these  requests  resulted  from  a 
coordinated action or not and refer to the right of the EU civil society ‘to assemble and 
associate in order to work together, in a coordinated manner, for instance, to advance a 
political and civil matter such as transparency of EU institutions’. I note that you do not 
confirm  or  infirm  that  your  requests  form  part  of  a  coordinated  action.  I  would  like  to 
point out that the beneficiaries under Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001  are ‘any citizen of 
the Union, and any natural or legal person’, as specified in Article 2 of that regulation. 
Although  any  citizen  or  legal  person  has  the  right  to  request  documents  from  an 
institution, the civil society as such is not stipulated among the beneficiaries. Coordinated 
simultaneous requests for access to documents addressed to a specific institution neither 
correspond  to  the  conception  ‘an  application  for  access  to  a  document’  as  stipulated  in 
Article  7(1)  of  Regulation  (EC)  No  1049/2001  nor  can  they  be  handled  under  the 
deadlines  and  conditions  stipulated  in  that  regulation.  They  do  not  only  create  an 
extremely  heavy  workload  for  a  multitude  of  services,  but  they  also  cause  a  serious 
perturbation in its functioning.  
 Any  public  administration  with  limited  resources  has  the  obligation  to  safeguard  the 
interests  of  good  administration  and  to  ensure  the  proper  handling  of  confirmatory 
applications  originating  from  other  applicants.  This  has  been  repeatedly  acknowledged 
by the Court of Justice. In the case at hand, it flows from the principle of proportionality 
that  processing  this  and  the  other  requests  simultaneously  received  by  the  European 
Commission  would  involve  an  inappropriate  administrative  burden.  The  ‘self 
explanatory’ interest you have in receiving the requested documents has to be balanced 
against the workload resulting from the processing of this and your other applications for 
access in order to safeguard the interests of good administration.10 In this particular case, 
the  volume  of  your  requests,  their  wide  scope,  their  simultaneous  introduction  and  the 
circumstances under which they were introduced created an administrative burden which 
was particularly heavy and exceeded the limits of what may reasonably be required.  
The fact that since 2018 your organisation has filed 256 initial and confirmatory requests 
only reinforces this conclusion. 
In this particular case, the original scope of your initial application, covers 64 documents. 
Indeed,  the  total  number  of  documents  corresponding  to  the  initial  scope  of  all  the 
requests  addressed  to  the  Directorate-General  for  Communications  Networks,  Content 
and  Technology  on  lobby  meetings  with  Facebook,  Amazon,  Microsoft  or  Google 
amounts  to  185,  with  a  total  of  more  than  1133  pages.  According  to  the  preliminary 
estimates  based  on  past  experience,  such  assessment  (which  would  involve  the  tasks 
listed above) would require the workload corresponding to more than 739 working days. 
                                                 
10   Judgments  of  the  Court  of  Justice  of  6  December  2001,  Council  v  Hautala,  C‑ 353/99  P, 
EU:C:2001:661, paragraph 30, and Guido Strack v Commission, cited above, paragraph 27. 


 
These estimates also take into account the fact that the staff concerned in the Directorate-
General  for  Communications  Networks,  Content  and  Technology  and  several  other 
Directorates-General would have to deal with other tasks and applications in parallel with 
the  handling  this  initial  application  of  yours  and  with  other  several  simultaneous 
applications you have made, as well as other very similar applications received by other 
applicants.  
In your confirmatory application, you argue that according to Article 6(1) of Regulation 
(EC) No 1049/2001 you are not obliged to state reasons for your application. While this 
is the case for normal requests for access to documents, the Court of Justice recognised in 
its  judgment  in  Guido  Strack  v  Commission11  that  in  case  of  wide-scope  requests 
(requests  that  involve  a  very  long  document  or  to  a  very  large  number  of  documents) 
‘institutions may, in particular cases in which the volume of documents for which access 
is  applied  or  in  which  the  number  of  passages  to  be  censured  would  involve  an 
inappropriate  administrative  burden,  balance  the  interest  of  the  applicant  for  access 
against the workload resulting from the processing of the application for access in  order 
to safeguard the interests of good administration’. This practice was also recognised by 
the Court in its judgment in EnBW Energie Baden-Württemberg v Commission. 12 
You further argue that, notwithstanding the fact that you weren’t obliged to provide any 
reasons for  your request,  you did provide a justification in saying that your request was 
self-explanatory,  I  quote:  ‘I  am  interested  in  knowing  about  the  interactions  that  have 
taken place between Commission branches and Amazon’. However, this statement does 
not explain your particular interest in the requested documents. As to the limitation of the 
scope  of  the  request  to  intermediaries,  namely  ‘law  firms  and/or  consultants  directly 
representing Amazon in  meetings’, this had no significant impact in  reducing the scope 
of  your  request.  You  do  not  dispute  that  the  handling  of  your  request  would  create 
unreasonable  workload.  However,  you  contest  the  fact  that  the  Directorate-General  for 
Communications  Networks,  Content  and  Technology  did  not  engage  further  with  you 
with the view of agreeing a fair solution with you.  
On  2  April  2019,  when  you  replied  to  the  fair  solution  proposal  of  the  Secretariat- 
General,  the  remaining  time  limit  to  reply  to  your  initial  application  was  16  working 
days. The  Directorate-General for Communications Networks, Content and Technology 
was  already  processing  another  simultaneous  application  (GESTDEM  2019/1355)  from 
your  organisation.  Striving  to  provide  you  with  a  reply  respecting  the  legal  time  limits 
imposed  by  Regulation  (EC)  No  1049/2001,  the  Directorate-General  for 
Communications Networks, Content and Technology opted to grant you partial access to 
13  documents.  This  solution  is  both  reasonable,  particularly  given  the  context  of  your 
requests, and favourable to your right of access. The practice to which you refer, namely 
of dealing with wide-scoped requests in batches, is neither prescribed by Regulation (EC) 
No 1049/2001  nor would it be proportionate given the context  of  your requests and the 
documents you had already received by several other Directorates-General.  
                                                 
11   Guido Strack v Commission, cited above, paragraphs 26-28. 
12   Judgment of the General Court of 22 May 2012,  EnBW Energie Baden-Württemberg v Commission,  
T-344/08 P, EU:T:2012:242, paragraph 105. 
10 

 
The  Secretariat-General  had  genuinely  investigated  all  other  conceivable  options  to 
handle with all your requests and had proposed to you several options to reduce the scope 
of  your request; however, none of these options was acceptable to  you. Since  you have 
not explained in detail  your particular interest, as requested, the Directorate-General for 
Communications  Networks,  Content  and  Technology  proceeded  to  the  specific  and 
individual  examination  of  the  number  of  documents  it  could  reasonably  handle  in  the 
remaining time.  
Please note that according to the case law of the EU Court (referred to also in the initial 
reply  of  the  Directorate-General  for  Communications  Networks,  Content  and 
Technology), the fair solution under Article 6(3) of Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001 may 
concern only the number and content of the documents applied for but not the deadline 
for replying. 13 
Regarding your desire to ‘rectify its unilateral solution by widening the scope of [your] 
request  in  order  to  include  meetings  held  with  Amazon  and  intermediaries  (per  the 
restricted  definition  of  “intermediaries”  [you]  have  already  provided)  with  middle  and 
lower-level officials’, please note that given the context described above, I consider that 
the  unilateral  restriction  of  the  scope  of  your  request  was  justified.  Consequently,  I 
conclude  that  the  decision  of  the  Directorate-General  for  Communications  Networks, 
Content and Technology to unilaterally restrict the scope of your initial application was 
in line with the principle of proportionality and consistent with the applicable case law of 
the EU Courts. 
2.2.  Protection of the decision-making process 
The second subparagraph of Article 4(3) of Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001 provides that 
‘[a]ccess to a document containing opinions for internal use as part of deliberations and 
preliminary consultations within the institution concerned shall be refused even after the 
decision  has  been  taken  if  disclosure  of  the  document  would  seriously  undermine  the 
institution's  decision-making  process,  unless  there  is  an  overriding  public  interest  in 
disclosure.’ 
 
Documents  9  and  13  were  clearly  drawn-up  for  internal  use.  They  are  two  internal 
steering  briefs  prepared  by  the  staff  of  the  Directorate-General  for  Communication 
Networks,  Content  and  Technology  for  its  Director-General  in  preparation  for  two 
meetings with Amazon. They are meant to provide the Director-General with individual 
opinions  and  suggestions  on  the  line  to  take  with  the  purpose  of  preparing  him  for  the 
meeting.  Internal  opinions  of  Commission  services  on  similar  subjects  may  diverge  in 
view  of  the  various  policies  they  are  pursuing.  Consequently,  the  opinions  of  the 
services,  expressed  in  internal  briefings,  reflect  the  perspective  of  the  author  and  his 
internal suggestions. 
 
 
 
                                                 
13   Judgment in Guido Strack v Commission, cited above, paragraph 26. 
11 

 
It is important that the Commission can present, explain and defend its initiatives without 
having  to  disclose  internal  views  expressed  from  a  particular  perspective  by  individual 
staff members. Indeed, Commission services working on online terrorist are experiencing 
pressure  from  non-governmental  organisations,  the  industry  and  other  stakeholders 
lobbying for or against the Commission proposal. This fact is reinforced by the number 
and  content  of  amendments  tabled  by  the  European  Parliament  to  the  Commission’s 
proposal. 
 
Disclosing specific parts of the briefing aiming to present the personal perspective of the 
authors  to  the  Director-General  would  create  unjustified  expectations  of  the  public  and 
interested parties. In turn, this would risk increasing undue pressure on the Commission, 
thereby  seriously  undermining  its  current  and  future  decision-making  process  and  its 
margin of manoeuvre. 
 
Releasing these internal opinions is likely to bring a serious harm to the decision-making 
process  concerned,  as  it  would  deter  staff  members  of  the  European  Commission  from 
putting forward their views on this and other related matters in an open and independent 
way and without being unduly influenced by the prospect of disclosure. 
Indeed, as the General Court has held, ‘the possibility of expressing views independently 
within an institution helps to encourage internal discussions with a view to improving the 
functioning  of  that  institution  and  contributing  to  the  smooth  running  of  the  decision-
making process’.14  
Therefore, public release of the relevant withheld parts of documents 9 and 13 is likely to 
bring a serious harm to the decision-making process by severely affecting the ability of 
the  European  Commission  to  hold  frank  internal  discussions  on  issues  related  to  the 
interaction  with  private  stakeholders.  Given  the  likelihood  of  the  internal  debate  being 
severely impoverished by the disclosure of the internal opinions, I consider that this risk 
is reasonably foreseeable and non-hypothetical. 
Please note that, given the limited volume of the relevant redacted parts, it is not possible 
to  give  more  detailed  reasons  justifying  the  need  for  confidentiality  without  disclosing 
the  opinion  of  the  staff  members  and,  thereby,  depriving  the  exception  of  its  very 
purpose.15  
In  light  of  the  above,  the  relevant  undisclosed  parts  of  documents  9  and  13  should  be 
protected in accordance with Article 4(3), second subparagraph, of Regulation (EC) No 
1049/2001.  
                                                 
14   Judgment of 15 September 2016, Phillip Morris v  Commission, T-18/15, EU:T:2016:487, paragraph 
87.  
15   Judgment  of  the  General  Court  of  24  May  2011,  NLG  v  Commision,  Joined  Cases  T-109/05  and  
T-444/05, EU:T:2011:235, paragraph 82. 
12 

 
2.3.  Protection of commercial interests of a natural or legal person 
Article  4(2),  first  indent,  of  Regulation  (EC)  No  1049/2001  provides  that  ‘[t]he 
institutions  shall  refuse  access  to  a  document  where  disclosure  would  undermine  the 
protection  of  commercial  interests  of  a  natural  or  legal  person,  including  intellectual 
property, […] unless there is an overriding public interest in disclosure’. 
Some  paragraphs  that  were  initially  redacted  as  falling  under  the  scope  of  Article  4(3), 
first  paragraph  of  Regulation  (EC)  No  1049/2001.  However,  after  review,  they  are 
considered to fall under Article 4(2), first indent, of Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001. 
These  redacted  parts  represent  opinions,  positions,  strategies  and  concerns  of  Amazon, 
which are not public, on certain policy approaches of the Commission. These constitute 
commercially sensitive information the public disclosure of which would seriously affect 
Amazon’s competitive position since it would put in the public domain information that 
could  be  used  by  their  competitors  and  other  parties  who  would  gain  access  to 
information about the company’s activities and thus provide a competitive advantage in 
the market.  
Based on the foregoing, it is considered that there is a real and non-hypothetical risk that 
public  access  to  these  parts  of  these  documents  would  seriously  undermine  Amazon’s 
commercial interests or reputation. 
Consequently,  I  conclude  that  access  to  the  above-mentioned  information  must  be 
refused based on the exception laid down in the first indent of Article 4(2) of Regulation 
(EC) No 1049/2001.  
3. 
OVERRIDING PUBLIC INTEREST IN DISCLOSURE 
The  exceptions  laid  down  in  Article  4(2)  and  Article  4(3)  of  Regulation  (EC)  No 
1049/2001 must be waived if there is an overriding public interest in disclosure. Such an 
interest must, firstly, be public and, secondly, outweigh the harm caused by disclosure.  
As  a  preliminary  remark,  it  must  be  noted  that  the  General  Court  recently  confirmed 
again that the right of access to documents does not depend on the nature of the particular 
interest  that  the  applicant  for  access  may  or  may  not  have  in  obtaining  the  information 
requested.16 
In  your  confirmatory  application,  you  do  not  put  forward  any  specific  arguments  to 
establish  the  existence  of  an  overriding  public  interest.  You  invoke  general 
considerations such as transparency and public accountability. In that regard, I would like 
to refer to the judgment in the Strack case, where the Court of Justice ruled that in order 
to  establish  the  existence  of  an  overriding  public  interest  in  transparency,  it  is  not 
sufficient to merely rely on that principle and its importance. Instead, an applicant has to 
show  why  in  the  specific  situation  the  principle  of  transparency  is  in  some  sense 
                                                 
16   Judgment of the General Court of 27 November 2018, VG v Commission, joined Cases T-314/16 and 
T-435/16, EU:T:2018:841, paragraph 55. 
13 


 
especially pressing and capable, therefore, of prevailing over the reasons justifying non-
disclosure.17 
Therefore,  I  conclude  that  these  considerations  of  a  general  nature  and  would  not 
outweigh  the  interests  protected  under  Article  4(2)  and  (3)  of  Regulation  (EC)  No 
1049/2001. 
4. 
PARTIAL ACCESS 
In accordance with Article 4(6) of Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001, I have considered the 
possibility of granting (further) partial access to the documents requested.  
For the reasons  explained above,  wider partial  access  is  now granted to  documents 2.1, 
2.3, 3-6, 8-10, 11.2 and 13 without undermining the interests described above. 
5. 
MEANS OF REDRESS 
Finally, I draw your attention to the means of redress available against this decision. You 
may  either  bring  proceedings  before  the  General  Court  or  file  a  complaint  with  the 
European  Ombudsman  under  the  conditions  specified  respectively  in  Articles  263  and 
228 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union. 
Yours sincerely, 
For the Commission 
Ilze JUHANSONE 
Acting Secretary-General 

 
 
 
Enclosures: (11) 
                                                 
17  
Judgment  of  the  Court  of  Justice  of  2  October  2014,  Strack  v  European  Commission,  C-127/13 P, 
EU:C:2014:2250, paragraph 131. 
14 

Document Outline