Ceci est une version HTML d'une pièce jointe de la demande d'accès à l'information 'Karmenu Vella's cabinet meetings with religious lobbyists'.


 
 
EUROPEAN COMMISSION 
 
 
Brussels, 22.7.2019 
C(2019) 5606 final 
 
Mr Alvaro Merino 
Calle Ricardo Ortiz 61, 1B  
28017 Madrid  
Spain 
DECISION OF THE EUROPEAN COMMISSION PURSUANT TO ARTICLE 4 OF THE 
IMPLEMENTING RULES TO REGULATION (EC) NO 1049/20011 
Subject:  Your  confirmatory  applications  for  access  to  documents  under  Regulation 
(EC) No 1049/2001 – GESTDEM 2018/1680 
Dear Mr Merino, 
I  refer  to  your  email  of  1  April  2019,  registered  on  3  April  2019,  in  which  you  submit  a 
confirmatory application in accordance with Article 7(2) of Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001 
regarding  public  access  to  European  Parliament,  Council  and  Commission  documents2 
(hereafter ʻRegulation (EC) No 1049/2001ʼ). Please accept our apologies for the late reply, 
due to the consultations with the author of most of the documents at issue. 
1. 
SCOPE OF YOUR APPLICATION  
On  14  March  2019,  you  submitted  an  initial  application  for  access  to  documents  under 
Regulation  (EC)  No  1049/2001  to  the  Directorate-General  for  Environment,  in  which  you 
requested  access  to  ʻa  list  of  all  lobby  meetings  held  by  the  commissioner  in  charge  of 
Environment,  Karmenu  Vella,  or  any  other  member  of  its  Cabinet  with  any  organisations 
representing  churches  and/or  religious  communities  since  2014  onwards,  including  all  
e-mails, minutes, reports or any other briefing papers related to all those meetings.’ 
This application was registered under reference number GESTDEM 2019/1680. 
In  its  initial  reply  dated  1  April  2019,  the  Directorate-General  for  Environment  provided 
you a list of meetings of Commissioner Vella with organisations representing churches and 
religious communities since 1 November 2014 when Commissioner Vella took his function. 
                                                 

Official Journal L 345 of 29.12.2001, p. 94. 
2    Official Journal L 145 of 31.5.2001, p. 43. 
Commission européenne/Europese Commissie, 1049 Bruxelles/Brussel, BELGIQUE/BELGIË - Tel. +32 229 91111  

Furthermore,  the  Directorate-General  for  Environment  identified  the  following  documents 
as falling within the scope of your request: 
1.  Invitation  from  Archbishop  Bartholomew    (Archbishop  of  Constantinople  -  New 
Rome  and  Ecumenical  Patriarch)  for  Green  Attica  Symposium  -  international 
ecological 
symposium 
in 
Athens, 
Greece, 
from 
June 
5-8 
2018,  
(Ares(2017)44464029, document 1); 
2.  Invitation from  Boda Chistel (European Union office of the Church of Jesus Christ 
of  Latter-Day  Saints)  for  VIP  reception  and  concert  of  the  Mormon  Tabernacle 
Choir  and  Orchestra  on  11  July  2016  in  Brussels,  (Ares(2016)2397560,  document 
2). 
In your confirmatory application, you question the absence of any other documents.  
2. 
ASSESSMENT AND CONCLUSIONS UNDER REGULATION (EC) NO 1049/2001 
When  assessing  a  confirmatory  application  for  access  to  documents  submitted  pursuant  to 
Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001, the Secretariat-General conducts a fresh review of the reply 
given by the Directorate-General concerned at the initial stage. 
Against  this  background,  the  European  Commission  has  carried  out  a  renewed,  thorough 
search  for  the  documents  requested.  Following  this  renewed  search,  eight  additional 
documents were identified as falling under the scope of your application: 
1.  Letter  of  12  August  2015  from  the  Ministry  of  Sustainable  Development    and 
Infrastructure to commissioners (document 3); 
2.  Briefing of 16 September 2015 for Commissioner Vella relating to Papal Audience 
with  EU  Ministers  for  Environment  and  Commissioners  on  ‘Laudato  Si’  with  2 
Annexes (document 4); 
3.  Briefing of 7 December  2015 for Commissioner Vella relating to  the meeting with 
His Excellency Monsignor Lebeaupin, Apostolic Nuncio to the EU (document 5); 
4.  Letter  of  1  September  2016  from  Mr  Lebeaupin,  Apostolic  Nuncio  to  the  EU,  to 
Commissioner Vella with 3 annexes (document 6, annexes 6a, 6b, 6c); 
5.  Letter  of  30  September  2016  from  Commissioners  Vella  and  Arias  Cañete  to  His 
Excellency 
Monsignor 
Lebeaupin, 
Apostolic 
Nuncio 
to 
the 
EU 
(Ares(2016)4918592, document 7); 
6.  Briefing  of  17  March  2017  for  Commissioner  Vella  relating  to  the  meeting  with 
Archbishop Lebeaupin (disclosed by DG MARE on 20/05/2019 in the framework of 
access  to  documents  request  Gestdem  2019/1985  subject  only  to  the  redactions  of 
personal data) (Ares(2019)3282868, document 8); 
7.  Letter of 17 March 2017 from Vice-President Mogherini and Commissioner Vella to 
His Holiness Francis (Ares(2017)1491757, document 9); 
8.  Video message (paper version) of 4 October 2017 from Commissioner Vella relating 
to public seminar ‘Laudato Si’ (document 10). 
 


Having  carried  out  a  detailed  examination  of  the  documents  requested,  I  am  pleased  to 
inform you that wide partial access is granted to all the identified documents, subject only to 
the redactions of personal data, in accordance with Article 4(1)(b) (protection of privacy and 
the  integrity  of  the  individual)  of  Regulation  (EC)  No  1049/2001,  for  the  reasons  set  out 
below.   
2.1.  Protection of privacy and the integrity of the individual 
Article 4(1)(b) of Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001 provides that ‘the institutions shall refuse 
access to a document where disclosure would undermine the protection of […] privacy and 
the  integrity  of  the  individual,  in  particular  in  accordance  with  Community  legislation 
regarding the protection of personal data’. 
In its judgment in Case C-28/08 P (Bavarian Lager),3 the Court of Justice ruled that when a 
request  is  made  for  access  to  documents  containing  personal  data,  Regulation  (EC)  No 
45/2001  of  the  European  Parliament  and  of  the  Council  of  18  December  2000 
on  the  protection  of  individuals  with  regard  to  the  processing  of  personal  data  by  the 
Community  institutions  and  bodies  and  on  the  free  movement  of  such  data4  (hereafter 
‘Regulation (EC) No 45/2001’) becomes fully applicable. 
Please  note  that,  as  from  11  December  2018,  Regulation  (EC)  No  45/2001  has  been 
repealed by Regulation  (EU) 2018/1725 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 
23  October  2018  on  the  protection  of  natural  persons  with  regard  to  the  processing  of 
personal  data  by  the  Union  institutions,  bodies,  offices  and  agencies  and  on  the  free 
movement of such data.5 
However, the case law issued with regard to Regulation (EC) No 45/2001 remains relevant 
for the interpretation of Regulation (EU) No 2018/1725. 
Article  3(1)  of  Regulation  (EU)  No  2018/1725  provides  that  personal  data  ‘means  any 
information relating to an identified or identifiable natural person […]’. 
The  requested  document  includes  the  names,  surnames,  contact  details  (direct  telephone 
numbers,  office  and  email  addresses),  functions  and  handwritten  signatures  of  staff 
members of the European Commission not holding any senior management position. They 
include  also  the  names  and  surnames  of  third  parties  who  are  not  considered  as  public 
figures  (members  of  organisations  representing  churches  and  religious  communities).  This 
information clearly constitutes personal data in the sense of Article 3(1) of Regulation (EU) 
No 2018/1725 and in the sense of the Bavarian Lager judgment6. 
 
 
                                                 
3   Judgment of the Court of 29 June 2010, European Commission v The Bavarian Lager Co. Ltd, C-28/08 P, 
EU:C:2010:378, paragraph 59 (hereafter ‘Bavarian Lager’).  
4   Official Journal L 8 of 12.1.2001, p. 1.  

Official Journal L 205 of 21.11.2018, p. 39. 

Bavarian Lager, cited above, paragraph 70. 


On  the  contrary,  the  names  and  surnames  of  public  figures,  such  as  Members  of  the 
European  Commission,  Members  of  Cabinets,  His  Holiness  Pope  Francis,  the  Apostolic 
Nuncio  to  the  EU  and  ministers  present  in  some  of  the  requested  documents,  can  be 
disclosed. 
Pursuant to Article 9(1)(b) of Regulation  (EU) No 2018/1725, ‘personal data shall only be 
transmitted to recipients established in the Union other than Union institutions and bodies if 
‘[t]he  recipient  establishes  that  it  is  necessary  to  have  the  data  transmitted  for  a  specific 
purpose in the public interest and the controller, where there is any reason to assume that the 
data subject’s legitimate interests might be prejudiced, establishes that it is proportionate to 
transmit the personal data for that specific purpose after having demonstrably weighed the 
various competing interests’. 
Only  if  these  conditions  are  fulfilled  and  the  processing  constitutes  lawful  processing  in 
accordance  with  the  requirements  of  Article  5  of  Regulation  (EU)  No  2018/1725,  can  the 
transmission of personal data occur. 
Furthermore, in Case C-615/13 P (ClientEarth), the Court of Justice ruled that the institution 
does not have to examine by itself the existence of a need for transferring personal data.7 This 
is  also  clear  from  Article  9(1)(b)  of  Regulation  (EU)  2018/1725,  which  requires  that  the 
necessity to have the personal data transmitted must be established by the recipient. 
According to Article 9(1)(b) of Regulation (EU) 2018/1725, the European Commission has 
to examine the further conditions for the lawful processing of personal data only if the first 
condition is fulfilled, namely if the recipient establishes that it is necessary to have the data 
transmitted  for  a  specific  purpose  in  the  public  interest.  It  is  only  in  this  case  that  the 
European  Commission  has  to  examine  whether  there  is  a  reason  to  assume  that  the  data 
subject’s  legitimate  interests  might  be  prejudiced  and,  in  the  affirmative,  establish  the 
proportionality of the transmission of the personal data for that specific purpose after having 
demonstrably weighed the various competing interests. 
In your application, you do not put forward any arguments to establish the necessity to have the 
data  transmitted  for  a  specific  purpose  in  the  public  interest.  Therefore,  the  European 
Commission  does  not  have  to  examine  whether  there  is  a  reason  to  assume  that  the  data 
subject’s legitimate interests might be prejudiced. 
In  this  context,  I  would  like  to  point  out  that  the  right  to  the  protection  of  the  privacy  is 
recognised as one of the fundamental rights in the Charter of Fundamental Rights, as is the 
transparency of the processes within the Institutions of the EU. The legislator has not given 
any  of  these  two  rights  primacy  over  each  other,  as  confirmed  by  the  Bavarian  Lager  
case-law referred to above8.  
                                                 
7   Judgment of the Court of Justice of 16 July 2015, ClientEarth v European Food Safety Agency,  
C-615/13 P, EU:C:2015:489, paragraph 47. 

Bavarian Lager, cited above, paragraph 56. 



Based on the information at my disposal, I note that there is a risk that the disclosure of the 
names of the individuals appearing in the requested document would prejudice the legitimate 
interests of the third-parties concerned.  
Consequently, I conclude that, pursuant to Article 4(1)(b) of Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001 
and Article 9(1)(b) of Regulation (EU) 2018/1725, access cannot be granted to the personal 
data,  as  the  need  to  obtain  access  thereto  for  a  purpose  in  the  public  interest  has  not  been 
substantiated and there is  no reason  to  think that the legitimate interests of the individuals 
concerned would not be prejudiced by disclosure of the personal data concerned.  
3. 
OVERRIDING PUBLIC INTEREST IN DISCLOSURE 
Please  note  that  article  4(1)(b)  of  Regulation  (EC)  No  1049/2001  does  not  include  the 
possibility for the exception defined therein to be set aside by an overriding public interest. 
4. 
PARTIAL ACCESS 
In  accordance  with  Article  4(6)  of  Regulation  (EC)  No  1049/2001,  I  have  examined  the 
possibility of granting partial access to the documents concerned. 
Wide partial access is granted to all the identified documents, subject only to the redaction 
of  personal  data.  For  the  reasons  explained  above,  no  meaningful  further  partial  access  to 
the  remaining  partially  disclosed  documents  is  possible  without  undermining  the  interests 
described above.  
5. 
MEANS OF REDRESS 
Finally,  I  draw  your  attention  to  the  means  of  redress  available  against  this  decision.  You 
may  either  bring  proceedings  before  the  General  Court  or  file  a  complaint  with  the 
European Ombudsman under the conditions specified respectively in  Articles 263 and 228 
of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union. 
Yours sincerely,  
For the Commission 
Martin SELMAYR 
Secretary-General 
 
 

 
Enclosures: (13) 


Document Outline