Dies ist eine HTML Version eines Anhanges der Informationsfreiheitsanfrage 'Meetings between Executive Vice-President Frans Timmermans' office and industry representatives'.





Ref. Ares(2020)255241 - 15/01/2020
Ref. Ares(2020)2450897 - 08/05/2020
E U R O P E A N I S S U E R S
V I S I O N   2 0 1 9 - 2 0 2 4
C O M P E T I T I V E N E S S   I S
T H E   C O R E   F O R   A
S U S T A I N A B L E   E U R O P E
S E R V I N G   Q U O T E D   C O M P A N I E S

8,000 companies  
covering markets worth €7.6 trillion 
through  taxes  a  strong  contributor  to  the 
EuropeanIssuers  is  a  pan-European  trade 
development of the countries.  
organisation  based  in  Brussels  which 
represents the interests of publicly quoted 
In  this  context,  EuropeanIssuers  aims  to 
companies  from  all  sectors  to  the  EU 
ensure  that  EU  policies  create  an 
institutions.  EuropeanIssuers  members 
environment  in  which  companies  of  all 
include  both  national  associations  and 
sizes—from emerging growth companies to 
companies,  covering  markets  worth  €7.6 
the  large  blue-chip  companies—can  easily 
trillion 
market 
capitalisation 
with 
raise  capital  through  public  markets  and 
approximately 8,000 companies.  
deliver  growth  over  the  long  term. 
EuropeanIssuers  has  a  special  interest  for 
The  activities  carried out  by  our  members 
more  companies  in  Europe  to  get  publicly 
are essential in fuelling the economy. They 
listed to raise additional funds through the 
bring growth and innovation to the society 
issuance  of  securities  and  spread  the 
in  which  their  businesses  are  established. 
ownership  among  a  large  group  of 
By  generating  economic  growth,  they  are 
shareholders. 
the  main  providers  of  employment  and 
 
1  A vision for companies in Europe 
1.1 Achieving Growth and Jobs through a competitive Europe  
To  support  the  objective  of  growth  and 
However,  the  strengthening  of  financial 
creation of jobs which are at the core of the 
regulation  has  burdened  non-financial 
EU  agenda,  the  European  Union  needs  to 
companies  in  a  disproportionate  manner 
strengthen  the  competitiveness  of  its 
with  new  requirements  to  access  market 
industry.  This  requires  taking  the  Single 
finance.  This  trend  continues  and  creates 
Market  to  a  new  level  and  simplifying  the 
legal uncertainty and costs for companies. 
regulatory 
environment 
in 
which 
In turn, EU decision-makers should focus on 
companies  operate.  To  deepen  the  Single 
the enforcement of the existing legislation 
Market  further  and  make  it  fairer,  a 
rather than on the elaboration of new rules.  
successful Capital Market Union is needed 
If  the  drafting of  EU  legislation  is  initiated 
to strengthen Europe’s economy.  
for  a good reason, the aggregate effect of 
The  regulatory  environment  needs  to  be 
all those justifications can attain a high level 
simplified  and  proportionate  to  reinforce 
of inconsistency. Therefore, we support the 
the Internal Market. 
Commission’s  initiatives  looking  at  the 
legislation in an “holistic” way, for example, 
The  regulatory  re-structuring  of  financial 
the  “Fitness  check  of  public  reporting  by 
markets to counter the detrimental effects 
companies”  and  the  “Fitness  check  of 
of the financial crisis in 2007/2008 has been 
supervisory reporting requirements”.
an important cornerstone to rebuild trust in 
the  financial  system  and  ensure  financial 
stability in Europe.  

 

We think that consistency should be found 
Our  industry  needs  a  diversification  of 
for  reporting  requirements  including  the 
financial  sources,  a  performing  and  well-
use  of  digitalisation  and  new  technologies 
established  Capital  Markets  Union  (CMU) 
and that the legislator should clearly define 
and  a  tax  framework  to  ensure  that 
the  purpose  of  the  reporting  in  order  to 
financial  markets  provide  the  necessary 
better  circumscribe  the  data  provided  by 
financing  for  growth  and  innovation. 
companies.  
EuropeanIssuers  has  thus  welcomed  from 
the 
very 
beginning 
the 
European 
For smaller companies, the cost to comply 
Commission’s  project  of  creating  a  Capital 
with  the  requirements  has  increased  and 
Markets Union to foster the flow of capital 
the regulation should be adapted to fit the 
throughout Europe.  
needs  of  the  12,000  quoted  companies 
across  Europe.  For  smaller  and  mid-size 
For the success of the CMU in the coming 
quoted  companies,  EU  Regulation  should 
years,  the  objectives  of  the  action  plan 
be  made  more  proportionate  to  promote 
should  be  reassessed  so  that  the 
SME listing. 
forthcoming proposals deliver practical and 
measurable  outcomes.  A  more  horizontal 
Access  to  finance  should  be  fostered  to 
perspective  is  needed,  especially  on  how 
strengthen the European economy. 
issuers interact with the financial system. 
 
1.2 Sustainability for the future of the European economy and the role of corporates 
Issuers  have  a  leading  role  to  play  in  the 
authorities  tend  to  develop  policies  that 
sustainability transition being the drivers of 
shift  responsibilities  more  from  states  to 
the 
change. 
They 
integrate 
ESG 
corporates. 
Those 
policies 
impose 
(Environment,  Social  and  Governance) 
disproportionate  obligations  to  achieve 
considerations 
as 
part 
of 
their 
policy  objectives  that  are  neither  the 
competitiveness and growth strategy.  This 
primary  purpose  nor  the  remit  of 
increases  the  number  of  sustainable 
companies. The companies are substituted 
projects 
and 
creates 
new 
market 
to the States or to the cooperation between 
opportunities for investors.  
States  in  some  of  their  responsibilities 
which  are  part  of  their  role  towards  the 
Corporates  take  interest  in  wider  social 
citizens  and  the  environment  in  the 
issues,  rather  than  just  those  that  only 
absence of a political solution at European 
impact  profit  margins.  They  are  aware  of 
or 
international 
level. 
This 
may 
the impact of their activities on society and 
consequently harm the competitiveness of 
the  environment. Their  business  approach 
European  companies  on  international 
includes corporate social responsibility. 
markets  and  in  turn,  also  affect  public 
As  businesses  become  more  global,  their 
wealth. We illustrate our narrative with two 
operational  processes  become  more 
specific  examples:  combatting  tax  evasion 
complex.  To  capture  this  evolution, 
and sustainability policies.  
 
 
 

 

 
 
 
Example 1 
Example 2 
Combatting tax evasion 
Fostering sustainability 
European companies support the objective 
Without any doubt, sustainability is one of 
of  fighting  tax  evasion.  Most  European 
the  most  important  topics  society  and 
companies  fully  adhere  to  their  tax 
companies will face in the upcoming years. 
obligations and pay their fair share of taxes 
Companies across Europe have recognised 
they owe to the community. The approach 
the  challenge  and  are  transforming  their 
to  impose  on  European  companies  the 
processes  to  operate  in  a  sustainable 
disclosure of sensitive business information 
manner. However, no consensus has been 
to  the  public  as  proposed  in  the  Public 
reached  so  far  on  stricter  environmental 
Country  by  Country  Proposal  is  a 
provisions,  partly  because  of  the  lack  of 
competitive  disadvantage  towards  their 
effective  political  solution  at  the  global 
international  competitors.  Instead  of 
level. Due to the lack of a global approach 
putting  pressure  on  Member  States  that 
to tackle climate change, the  EU launched 
compete  on  corporate  tax  to  attract 
an  ambitious  sustainable  finance  action 
business  and  finding  a  timely  political 
plan which is driven by the political agenda. 
solution,  the  problem  is  shifted  on 
This approach may harm the functioning of 
companies,  thereby  ignoring  the  negative 
markets  and  run  counter  the  objective  of 
impact on EU competitiveness.  
building a Capital Markets Union in Europe. 
 
 
 
2  Overview of EuropeanIssuers objectives 
We have identified 6 major objectives and 21 specific actions to support our vision. The table 
with proposed actions is included in the annex.  
2.1 Attract companies to capital markets and retain existing ones by simplifying the 
regulatory environment  
Recent  political  developments,  creating 
number of potential IPOs (see Appendix 2; 
more  uncertainty,  do  not  encourage 
Table 1 § 2).  
companies to enter EU public markets nor 
The EU regulatory framework should strike 
to remain listed on those markets. Since the 
a  better  balance  between  entrepreneurial 
financial  crisis,  the  regulatory  burden  to 
freedom, investor protection and financial 
access and operate public markets has been 
stability  so  that  capital  markets  can  be 
constantly increasing. In addition, there is a 
effectively  used  for  the  financing  and  risk 
large  amount  of  funding  available  from 
management  of  European  companies. 
private  equity.  Companies  may  prefer  to 
Companies  need  more  flexible  access  to 
turn  to  private  equity  to  finance  their 
capital markets depending on their size and 
operations,  as  public  markets  are  over 
fundraising ambitions.  
regulated.  Those  are  among  the  reasons 
that  explain  the  recent  reduction  of  the 
The  regulatory  environment  should  be 
simplified. We observe too many new rules 

 

and stringent requirements. Administrative 
education  of  investors  we  would  achieve 
burdens on all companies must be reduced 
the  protection  they  need  rather  than  by 
and reporting requirements simplified.  We 
increasing  disclosure  requirements  for 
believe  that  through  increased  financial 
companies. 
2.2 Attract  investors  to  the  market,  promote  equity  culture  and  remove  national 
barriers to cross-border investments 
To  channel  more  funds  towards  capital 
capital  markets  as  a  source  of  finance  for 
markets, we need to incentivise investment 
the main users.     
in  equity  and  create  a  tax  framework  for 
Investors are institutional or retail and both 
savings and capital gains.  
need  to  have  access  to  the  same 
At  a  certain  stage  of  growth,  companies 
information.  However,  whilst  the  level  of 
need  capital  to  develop  their  activities.  
disclosure  of  information  from  the 
Going public is an effective way to access a 
companies  to  the  investors  has  increased 
wide  range  of  capital  market  financing 
(together with the costs and responsibility 
options. 
Investors 
provide 
money, 
related  to  that);  we  wonder  if  this 
experience  and  skills  to  grow  businesses.  
information  is  actually  used.  We  believe 
Investors provide funds in exchange for an 
that  confidence  of  investors  increases 
ownership  stake  or  future  return.  Two 
through  proper  dialogue  and  financial 
components  are  needed  to  have  efficient 
education  rather  than  new  disclosure 
capital  markets:  first,  investors  providing 
requirements. 
capital,  and  second,  liquidity  in  stock 
To access sources of long-term finance, the 
markets  meaning  investors  selling  and 
development  of  cross-border  market  for 
buying either at the time of the IPO (initial 
investment funds and the promotion of the 
public offer) or gradually once the company 
EU market for covered bonds is important. 
is listed. Those ingredients are essential to 
It  will  ease  cross-border  transactions  and 
assess the quality and proper functioning of 
provide certainty on securities and claims.  
2.3 Integrate competitiveness in the assessment of the sustainability requirements 
EuropeanIssuers supports the Commission’s 
need to have access to capital to develop a 
commitment  to  work  towards  more 
sustainable business. Conversely, those who 
competitive and innovative capital markets, 
act in a sustainable way will attract capital. 
while  aiming  at  creating  a  sustainable 
We  also  agree with the  fact  that  corporate 
economy. 
Environmental 
issues 
and 
boards should have a long-term view. This is 
especially 
climate 
change 
are 
risks 
the normal objective of a company to act in 
companies  face  and  manage.  Companies 
such a way to sustain its future. However, we 
agree that a long-term vision is necessary to 
would  like  to  draw  attention  to  the  rise  of 
ensure the sustainability of their activities. 
shareholder  activism  in  Europe  which,  in 
EuropeanIssuers  is  ready  to  support  the 
some forms, forces Boards to become overly 
Commission’s Sustainable Finance initiatives 
focused 
on 
short-term 
financial 
and offers to contribute to the development 
performance.  Aiming  for  the  short-term 
of  solutions  that  would  work  best  for 
profit of a company eventually  undermines 
investors,  companies  and  the  society. 
it,  to  the  benefit  of  external  interests,  and 
Indeed,  sustainability  is  a  matter  of 
therefore  against  the  collective  and  social 
innovation  in  technologies  and  companies 
interest that should prevail.

 

We do not think there is a need to clarify the rules according to which directors are expected 
to  act  in  the  company’s  long-term  interest  and  to  develop  legislation  on  that  respect  for 
several reasons:  
  Many corporate governance codes already deal with that issue recommending the board 
of directors to promote long-term value creation taking into consideration the social and 
environmental  aspects  of  its  activities.  Flexibility  through  self-regulation  is  extremely 
important.  It  is  by  nature  progressive,  adaptable  to  the  companies’  specificities  and 
reactive;  it  empowers  the  actors  concerned  and  the  “comply  or  explain”  principle  on 
which corporate governance codes are based makes it possible to adapt to a variety of 
situations. 
  Companies are increasingly involving stakeholders through different forms of dialogue, 
including “stakeholder committees” with various composition and purposes. This process 
enables the participants and stakeholders to discuss about the new challenges companies 
are facing regarding their sustainable development policy.  
  Many  companies  already  incorporate  environmental,  social  and  governance  factors  in 
their strategies and reporting and some already have specific climate-related policies in 
place. Companies also have due diligence procedures in place to check their supply chains. 
According  to  the  Non-financial  Reporting  Directive  (NFRD),  companies  are  to  describe 
these due diligence procedures, addressing risks linked to the companies’ operations and 
their business relationships.  
Therefore,  before  engaging  in  new  policy  action,  an  assessment  should  be  made  of  the 
provisions and good practices that already exist in the Member States. Such an assessment 
will allow EU policymakers to decide whether there is evidence of failure and necessity to act.  
2.4 Improve access to finance for small companies and elaborate proportionate rules 
We  observe  that  companies  which  are  no 
costs of listing (for e.g. Prospectus), which 
longer  SMEs,  but  are  not  yet  large  ones, 
are 
disproportionate 
for 
smaller 
struggle  with  access  to  capital  markets. 
companies.   
Small  and  mid-cap  companies  have  the 
To  facilitate  healthy  and  thriving  public 
most  difficulties  complying  with  overly 
capital markets, it is important to recognise 
burdensome  regulation.  The  existing 
the  diverse  nature  of  companies  on  these 
requirements  and  listing  costs  in  both 
markets and ensure that the rules applying 
regulated  and  multilateral  trading  venues 
to  smaller  companies  are  appropriate  for 
continue to be disproportionate to the size 
their  size.  We  consider  that  to  boost  the 
and  level  of  sophistication  of  SME’s.    In 
number  of  initial  public  offerings  (IPOs)  a 
Europe,  the  regulatory  focus  is  too  often 
more  proportionate  regulatory  approach 
expended on the largest 20% of companies, 
should  be  adopted  as  a  key  principle  to 
which represent approximately 80% of the 
support  listing  of  smaller  companies.  We 
total market capitalisation, at the expense 
applaud 
the 
aim 
to 
reduce 
the 
of smaller companies. This deters many of 
administrative  burdens  and  the  high 
these  growing  companies  to  seek  or 
compliance costs faced by smaller issuers. 
maintain listing on a public market.  This is 
particularly  the  case  with  regards  to  the 
 

 

2.5 Integrate, adopt and follow a Better Regulation approach 
Despite  some  improvements,  we  still 
To  ensure  a  proper  dialogue  with  all 
observe  very  detailed  regulation  in  many 
stakeholders,  we  believe  that  businesses 
areas.  In  reviewing  existing  regulation  or 
interests  should  be  better  represented 
drafting  new  regulation,  the  Commission 
when 
formulating 
advice, 
should  strengthen  its  Better  Regulation 
recommendations,  at  every  stage  of  the 
approach 
and 
pursue 

simpler, 
process including expert groups and public 
proportionate  and  more  coherent  EU 
hearings.  
regulation,  and  flexible  access  to  capital 
In terms of Better Regulation entailing the 
markets, simplification and cost reduction. 
principle  of  proportionality,  we  are 
Moreover, the Commission should ensure a 
concerned  with  the  introduction  of  a 
more  harmonised  implementation  by 
collective  redress  mechanism  in  the 
national competent Authorities. We believe 
Member  States  concerning  violations  of 
that  soft  law  is  generally  more  effective 
rights granted under EU law. The risk is to 
than  hard  law  and  that  codes  of  conduct 
disproportionately expose EU companies to 
and  best  practices  should  be  favoured. 
abusive claims, who would face, under the 
Alternatively,  a  smart  mix  between  hard 
EU  proposal,  an  even  more  constraining 
law  and  soft  law  can  be  beneficial,  when 
environment than in the US and the rest of 
only key principles are defined at European 
the world.  
level and then supplemented by soft law. 
2.6 Develop a harmonised and simplified EU tax system 
The  present  situation  where  different 
limited local  taxation  at  the  discretion  of 
national  tax  systems  co-exist  is  globally 
the  country,  is  a  long-term  process before 
considered 
complex 
and 
creates 
implementation. 
high administrative 
costs 
in 
its 
implementation.    It  leads  to  forum 
Therefore,  we  propose  to  create  an 
shopping  and  tax  competition  between 
optional intermediary 
system 
of 
tax 
countries.    We  realise  that  the  way  to  an 
harmonisation for EU companies which will 
ideal  system  with  a  unified  basic  EU  tax 
create more certainty and avoid the burden 
system,  based  on  underlying  homogenous 
of  having  to  comply  with  every  single 
definitions, 
and 
where 
appropriate, 
national regime while operating in the EU. 
combined 
with 
a supplementary 
 
 

 

APPENDIX 1: Tables of proposed actions 
1.  Attract companies to capital markets and retain existing ones by simplifying the 
regulatory environment 
Legislation 
Proposed actions 
 

1.  Market Abuse 
Market Abuse Regulation has resulted in a complex regulation with heavy 
Regulation & 
burdensome procedures and we propose a set of measures to alleviate the 
Directive 
current regime:  
 
•  Exclude  non-regulated  markets  from  the  scope  of  certain  MAR 
 
provisions  to  ensure  that  companies  are  not  overburdened  with 
requirements and procedures. 
•  Clarify  the  conditions  for  the  delay  and  consider  it  a  natural 
counterbalance of the very broad definition of inside information. 
•  Clarify  that  the  leak  of  rumours  triggers  the  publication  of  inside 
information only when the leak comes from the issuer side. If it does 
not,  a  no  comment  policy  should  still  be  possible  to  protect  the 
legitimate interests of the issuer. 
•  Simplify provisions on insider lists.   
•  Raise  the  threshold  for  managers’  transactions  and  ensure  that 
competent  authorities  are  responsible  for  disclosing  managers’ 
transactions to the public. 
•  Exempt companies from drawing up and keeping lists of persons closely 
associated  to  PDMRs  (Art.  19  of  MAR)  and  exempt  non-financial 
companies  from  the  application  of  the  rules  on  prevention  and 
detection of market abuse (art. 16.2 MAR). 
•  Adjust  the  level  of  sanctions  for  certain  violations  (especially  on 
disclosures  and  insider  lists)  which  is  disproportionate  to  the  size  of 
many companies. 
•  Clarify the derogation regime regarding subscription to capital increase 
dedicated to employees  
 
2.  Audit rules   
The  implementation  of  the  Audit  Directive  and  Regulation  has  led  to  a 
confusing patchwork of different requirements in various Member States. 
 
Groups of companies currently must  follow track of different  rules in the 
Member  States  they  operate,  which  makes  the  audit  process  more 
burdensome and reduces audit quality.  
Groups  of  companies  should  be  allowed  to  steer  the  audit  process  of  its 
group via one single auditor network on parent company level in order to 
use synergies, keep the overview and thereby enhance audit quality. 
The Commission should undertake an evaluation of the implementation of 
the audit reform. This evaluation should include a comprehensive inventory 
of  the  various  options  exercised  and  be  followed  by  a  stakeholder 
consultation. We believe that the evaluation planned for June 2028 is too 
late. 
 
3.  Non-financial 
Companies  need  flexibility  when  choosing  any  framework  (international, 
information 
national  or  sectorial)  they  follow.  Non-financial  information  shall  be 
reporting  

 

disclosed to the extent necessary for the understanding of the company’s 
 
development, performance, position and impact on the activity.  
The concept of materiality is key and should be kept. The Commission itself 
recognises  the  fact  that  whether  an  issue  is  material  depends  on  the 
company’s business model, specificities, sectoral and geographical context. 
It is necessary to leave room for companies to exercise judgment as regards 
the materiality of information.  
The  EU  should  refrain  from  increasing  overall  reporting  burdens  for 
corporates.  The  diverse  nature  of  publicly  quoted  companies  means  that 
achieving  comparability  through  non-financial  reporting  is  a  burdensome 
task and therefore should not be an objective on the EU’s approach for non-
financial reporting 
 
4.  Public CBCR  
EuropeanIssuers  supports  the  introduction  of  measures  to  combat 
corruption and tax evasion at international level and considers country-by-
 
country  reporting  to  tax  administrations  as  foreseen  by  Action  13  of  the 
OECD  BEPS  plan  and  as  implemented  by  Directive  2016/881/EU  on 
mandatory automatic exchange of information in the field of taxation as an 
effective way to tackle these issues.  
On  the  contrary,  EuropeanIssuers  is  strongly  opposed  to  any  attempt  to 
encourage disclosure to the public country-by-country information. 
Public Country-By-Country Reporting would lead to disclosure of business 
sensitive  information  to  international  competitors  in  an  unprecedented 
way. This would place European companies in a disadvantageous position 
compared  to  their  international  competitors  who  don’t  have  to  abide  to 
similar rules. 
 
5.  eXtended 
The EU should refrain from imposing a  mandatory audit on the technical 
Business 
requirements  on  iXBRL  reporting  and  see  how  technology  can  facilitate 
Reporting 
access to relevant information and reduce burden and costs.   
Language (XBRL) 
 
or iXBRL  
6.  Prospectus 
For  secondary  issuances,  there  should  be  no  further  approval  of  the 
prospectus.  Alternatively, the  prospectus for secondary issuances should 
 
be replaced by a securities note only. 
All  other  information  is  already  public  and  integrated  in  the  price  of  the 
shares  and  with  technology  investors  receive  a  continuous  flow  of 
information.  Additionally,  as  issuers  will  assume  the  full  burden  of 
implementing  iXBRL,  which  is  supposed  to  make  it  easier  and  faster  for 
investors  and  authorities  to  absorb  and  control  financial  information, 
alleviations in various legislation, including prospectus, should be granted 
to issuers. 
 
7.  Future of MiFID 
We observe a reduction of investment research coverage to small and mid-
II 
caps as well as investors’ involvement. 
The unbundling of research from execution is one of the most controversial 
issues in MiFID II. Most  of the investor community have seen their list  of 
research providers decrease since MiFID II’s implementation.  

 

Fund managers see the effect of MiFID II on the liquidity of mid and small-
cap stocks to be negative. They also expect this to lead to a decrease in the 
number of broking houses in both the short and long run.  
Research suggests that midcap companies have been most affected (small 
caps were already suffering) with falls in coverage and liquidity. Companies 
are trying to mitigate the effect making more direct contact with investors 
through capital market days and improved websites, though this in itself will 
not reverse the trend towards lower visibility and lower liquidity.  
2.  Attract investors to the market, promote equity culture and remove national barriers 
to cross-border investments 
Legislation 
Proposed actions 
8.  Taxation 
We support the creation of tax incentives to improve equity investment 
without worsening the tax treatment of debt.   
9.  Financial 
Renounce the proposal to create the European Financial Transaction Tax 
Transaction Tax 
(FTT),  which  would  run  counter  to  the  objective  of  promoting  equity 
culture and would be detrimental to the functioning of capital markets.  
It  is  likely  to  result  in  a  decrease  of  liquidity  in  stock  markets  thereby 
creating  additional  hurdles  for  companies  using  capital  markets  as  a 
source  of  finance.    Additionally,  costs  will  be  transferred  to  investors  – 
retail  investors  in  particular  –  and  companies,  and  thereby  to  the  real 
economy.   
10.  An EU framework 
Create  an  EU  investment  protection  framework  with  substantive  rights 
for investment 
and  effective  enforcement  tools  for  EU  investors  who  invest  in  EU 
protection  
Member States.  
Otherwise, the EU will risk losing EU investors as their legal protection will 
decrease  following  the  termination  of  all  currently  existing  Intra-EU 
investment protection treaties between Member States until the end of 
2019. 
Not  replacing  mentioned  investment  treaties  with  an  EU  investment 
protection  framework  would  also  lead  to  the  paradoxical situation  that 
third country investors investing in the EU would effectively have a greater 
protection due to EU-third country trade agreements than EU investors.   
 
11.  Shareholder 
Flexibility  through  self-regulation  is  extremely  important.  The  industry 
Rights’ Directive 
develops when necessary sets of recommendations and guidelines based 
on best practices. This allows companies to adapt according to the nature 
of the sectors in which they operate. Those principles are in some  cases 
incorporated in Codes of Corporate Governance.  
The guidelines of the Remuneration Report should  
•  remain non-binding and with no legal obligations. Soft law and 
national corporate governance codes should be favoured.   
•  be comprehensive concise, transparent, meaningful and simple.  

 

•  be  short  or  straightforward,  avoid  contradictions,  repetitive 
tables and duplicated information  
•  adopt  a  more  flexible  and  clearly  intelligible  approach 
throughout its entirety 
 
12.  Digitalisation of 
Publicly  traded  companies  should  be  allowed  to  be  dispensed  with  any 
Shareholder’s 
requirement  for  a  physical  meeting  as  it  is  already  the  case  in  the  US. 
General meetings 
Theses  fully  online  AGMs  whose  purpose  is  to  increase  participation, 
reduce  costs  and  environmental  impacts  (less  travel  and  fewer  printed 
materials) should be an option left to companies, subject to shareholders 
approval. A reflexion should be set up in order to determine its feasibility 
and the possible hurdles. 
3.  Integrate competitiveness in the assessment of the sustainability requirements 
Legislation 
Proposed Actions 
13.  Taxonomy 
Graduate and proportionate progress of the taxonomy. 
Integrate  a  forward-looking  approach  to  enable  ‘traditional’  or 
‘conventional’ 
business 
activities 
to 
transition 
and 
become 
environmentally sustainable. No activity should be excluded ex ante and 
even  the  highest  GHG  emitters  should  be  given  the  chance  to  become 
greener.  There  should  be  no  ‘black’  or  ‘brown’  list  of  unsustainable 
activities. 
No further reporting requirements should be imposed on corporates. 
Integrate non-financial companies in the sustainable finance platform  
A better balance between level 1 requirements and level 2 forthcoming 
measures.  
 
14.  Disclosures 
The evaluation to be undertaken 3 years after the entry into force of the 
Regulation will assess whether its functioning is inhibited  by the lack of 
data or their suboptimal quality, including indicators on adverse impacts 
on sustainability factors by investee companies.  
This  question  is  already  addressed  by  the  Non-financial  reporting 
directive.  Any  discussion  about  additional  disclosure  requirements  for 
investee  companies  should  take  place  in  the  framework  of  the  NFRD 
review,  be  subject  to  an  in-depth  analysis  of  the  matter,  taking  into 
account the outcome of the Fitness Check on Public Corporate reporting, 
a discussion with the corporates involving the most competent experts, 
and an impact assessment of any new provision. 
15.  Due diligence 
Companies are already doing a lot to control their supply chains and make 
alongside the 
sure they do not have a negative impact on human rights, social and health 
supply chain  
issues and the environment.  
As laid down in NFRD, they must describe the due diligence procedures 
they have put in place to address risks linked to their own operations and 
those of their business relationships.  
10 
 

At  this  stage,  we  believe  it  is  not  necessary  to  add  new  legislative 
requirements  in  the  field  of  due  diligence  but  to  provide  for  guidelines 
about the concept and practical implementation of due diligence.  
These  guidelines  should  be  in  line  with  internationally  recognised 
standards  such  as  UNGP  and  OECD  Guidelines  for  multinational 
companies.   
The development of a non-binding European approach on due diligence 
will also be useful to push for the same approach towards third country 
competitors. 
 
16.  Extra financial 
The  diversity  of  approaches  and  evaluation  methodologies  in 
rating agencies or 
sustainability  ratings  results  in  an  important  workload  for  companies 
sustainability 
which are facing numerous requests to fill in questionnaires from different 
agencies 
sustainability  rating  agencies.  To  improve  the  situation,  sustainability 
rating agencies should be required to adopt a code of conduct which they 
apply and report upon according to the “comply or explain” principle, and 
minimum transparency requirements. 
4.  Improve access to finance for small companies and elaborate proportionate rules 
Legislation 
Proposed Actions 
17.  SME Growth 
Less stringent, more proportionate approach to regulatory requirements 
Markets 
for smaller issuers notwithstanding the trading venue i.e. not only those 
listed in a SME Growth Markets but also those listed in other MTFs and 
RMs 
Definition of Small and Mid-Cap companies  
A  transitional,  graduated  approach  that  period  exempts  newly  listed 
companies on public markets from having to comply with all the rules at 
once. Companies move more gradually  to full compliance to spread the 
cost  of  adopting  regulation  over  a  number  of  years.  Such  companies 
would be highlighted to raise awareness among investors 
Companies on SME Growth Markets and MTFs should have the choice to 
use their local accounting standards (GAAP) or full IFRS 
Establish  an  EU  Commission  sponsored  European  Growth  Fund  to  co-
invest  alongside  private  sector  investors.  Some  of  the  benefit  for  the 
reduced  risk  for  private  sector  investors  to  be  passed  to  an  Equity 
Education Fund to raise awareness of the benefits of equity and IPOs 
Review State Aid rules to enable Member States to improve on existing, 
and create new tax incentives for investors and listed companies 
5.  Integrate, adopt and follow Better Regulation approach 
Legislation 
Proposed Actions 
18.  Call for evidence 
The perspective of non-financial companies as end-users of capital 
on the cumulative 
markets could have been better considered in the previous calls for 
impact of the EU 
evidence that focussed on financial market participants.  
financial services 
legislation 

11 
 

A follow-up therefore needs to be conducted, focussing on 
inconsistencies and incoherencies in Capital Markets regulation that 
negatively affect non-financial companies.  
 
Any impact analysis of a market intervention through policy, legislation 
or market regulation should be done looking at small and midcaps as a 
separate segment; this is to avoid an apparent overall market benefit 
whilst there is actual detriment to the small and midcap segment. This 
segmented cost benefit impact analysis should be a legal requirement 
and should apply to the EU Commission as well as NCAs in Member 
States.  
 
19.  Transition  
Ensure longer transition and implementation periods to ensure that 
especially necessary Level 2 measures for implementation can be 
delivered on time. 
 
20.  Disclosure  
Ensure public and transparent disclosure of documents at the different 
stages of the process 
The selection process of the technical expert groups is not objective nor 
transparent. The same applies to assessment of the adoption process at 
level II by member states. 
 
21.  Stage of 
Ensure substantial issues are dealt with in Level 1. Political deadlocks 
legislation 
should not be overcome by deferring crucial decisions to Level 2 and 3 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
12 
 

APPENDIX 2: Evolution of companies with listed shares (2015-2019) 
Table 1: Number of listed companies 
Stock Exchange 
June 2019  June 2018  June 2017  June 2016 
June 2015 
2019 vs 2015 
 
Athens Stock Exchange 
Total 
183 
200 
210 
224 
243 
-25% 
Domestic 
179 
196 
206 
220 
239 
-25% 
 
Foreign 





0% 
 
BME Spanish Exchanges 
Total 
2937 
3048 
3280 
3590 
3595 
-18% 
Domestic 
2910 
3022 
3254 
3563 
3564 
-18% 
 
Foreign 
27 
26 
26 
27 
31 
-13% 
 
Bucharest Stock Exchange  Total 
85 
87 
87 
85 
81 
5% 
Domestic 
83 
85 
85 
83 
79 
5% 
 
Foreign 





0% 
 
Budapest Stock Exchange 
Total 
41 
40 
41 
44 
42 
-2% 
 
Domestic 
41 
40 
41 
44 
42 
-2% 
 
Foreign 





0% 
Bulgarian Stock Exchange 
Total 
272 
276 
355 
357 
367 
-26% 
 
Domestic 
272 
276 
355 
357 
367 
-26% 
 
Foreign 





0% 
CEESEG – Ljubljana 
Total 
29 
34 
38 
41 
48 
-40% 
 
Domestic 
29 
34 
38 
41 
48 
-40% 
 
Foreign 





0% 
 
 
13 
 

 
Number of listed companies 
Stock Exchange 
 
June 2019  June 2018  June 2017 
June 2016 
June 2015 
2019 vs 2015 
CEESEG - Prague 
Total 
54 
54 
25 
25 
24 
125% 
 
Domestic 
16 
16 
14 
15 
14 
14% 
 
Foreign 
38 
38 
11 
10 
10 
280% 
CEESEG – Vienna* 
Total 
749 
622 
247 
87 
96 
680% 
 
Domestic 
72 
69 
70 
76 
82 
-12% 
 
Foreign 
677 
553 
177 
11 
14 
4736% 
Cyprus Stock Exchange 
Total 
107 
108 
76 
81 
87 
23% 
 
Domestic 
92 
96 
76 
81 
87 
6% 
 
Foreign 
15 
12 



15% 
Deutsche Börse AG 
Total 
519 
509 
451 
601 
644 
-19% 
 
Domestic 
469 
460 
407 
539 
576 
-19% 
 
Foreign 
50 
49 
44 
62 
68 
-26% 
Euronext 
Total 
1239 
1239 
1278 
1063 
1065 
16% 
 
Domestic 
1087 
1077 
1109 
944 
943 
15% 
 
Foreign 
152 
162 
169 
119 
122 
25% 
Irish Stock Exchange 
Total 
n/a 
54 
50 
53 
54 
0% 
 
Domestic 
n/a 
43 
39 
41 
45 
-4% 
 
Foreign 
n/a 
11 
11 
12 

22% 
 
 
14 
 

 
Number of listed companies 
Stock Exchange 
 
June 2019  June 2018  June 2017 
June 2016  June 2015  2019 vs 2015 
LSE Group 
Total 
2450 
2491 
2485 
2631 
2720 
-10% 
 
Domestic 
2049 
2071 
2049 
2139 
2177 
-6% 
 
Foreign 
401 
420 
436 
492 
543 
-26% 
Luxembourg Stock Exchange  Total 
158 
164 
177 
189 
197 
-20% 
 
Domestic 
27 
26 
29 
27 
25 
8% 
 
Foreign 
131 
138 
148 
162 
172 
-24% 
Malta Stock Exchange 
Total 
26 
25 
25 
23 
23 
13% 
 
Domestic 
26 
25 
25 
23 
23 
13% 
 
Foreign 





0% 
Nasdaq Nordic and Baltics 
Total 
1029 
1008 
920 
852 
817 
26% 
 
Domestic 
986 
964 
881 
817 
785 
26% 
 
Foreign 
43 
44 
39 
35 
32 
34% 
Oslo Børs 
Total 
243 
235 
221 
216 
214 
14% 
 
Domestic 
194 
188 
178 
172 
169 
15% 
 
Foreign 
49 
47 
43 
44 
45 
9% 
SIX Swiss Exchange 
Total 
274 
268 
265 
266 
276 
-7% 
 
Domestic 
240 
233 
227 
230 
240 
-7% 
 
Foreign 
34 
35 
38 
36 
36 
-13% 
 
 
15 
 

 
Number of listed companies 
 
Stock Exchange 
June 2019  June 2018  June 2017 
June 2016  June 2015  2019 vs 2015 
Warsaw Stock Exchange 
Total 
845 
876 
887 
896 
908 
-7% 
 
Domestic 
818 
848 
856 
864 
877 
-7% 
 
Foreign 
27 
28 
31 
32 
31 
-13% 
Zagreb Stock Exchange 
Total 
123 
145 
131 
140 
144 
-15% 
 
Domestic 
123 
145 
131 
140 
144 
-15% 
 
Foreign 





0% 
Total of All Exchanges 
Total 
11122 
11480 
11248 
11459 
11647 
-2% 
 
Domestic 
9521 
9912 
10067 
10411 
10529 
-8% 
 
Foreign 
1601 
1568 
1181 
1048 
1118 
47% 
*In CEESEG -Vienna, the global market** has been introduced in 2017, a market segment for international issuers, thus 
the reason for high increase in foreign listed companies.  
** The global market is a segment for shares only (including certificates representing shares) that are included in the 
Vienna MTF and listed on at least one other stock exchange, and for which at least the applicant – or an exchange member 
named by the applicant – assumes market making obligations.
 
Number of Listed Companies
11700
11600
11500
11400
11300
11200
11100
11000
June 2015
June 2016
June 2017
June 2018
June 2019
N° listed
Series1
LTinear
rendli  (S
ne eries1)
companies
16 
 

Table 2: Number of New Listings, Year to Date (New companies listed through an IPO and other new companies listed) 
 
 
June 2019 
2018 
2017 
2016 
2015 
Stock Exchange 
 
IPO 
Other 
IPO 
Other 
IPO  
Other 
IPO 
Other 
IPO 
Other 
Athens Stock Exchange 
Total 










 
Domestic 










 
Foreign 










BME Spanish Exchanges 
Total 



31 
10 
23 

36 
16 
169 
 
Domestic 



31 
10 
23 

36 
16 
169 
 
Foreign 










Bucharest Stock Exchange  Total 










 
Domestic 










 
Foreign 










Budapest Stock Exchange  Total 










 
Domestic 










 
Foreign 










Bulgarian Stock Exchange  Total 










 
Domestic 










 
Foreign 










CEESEG - Prague 
Total 










 
Domestic 










 
Foreign 










 
17 
 

Number of New Listings, Year to Date (New companies listed through an IPO and other new companies listed) 
 
 
June 2019 
2018 
2017 
2016 
2015 
Stock Exchange 
 
IPO 
Other 
IPO 
Other 
IPO  
Other 
IPO 
Other 
IPO 
Other 
CEESEG - Vienna 
Total 

77 

66 

333 




 
Domestic 










 
Foreign 

72 

65 

332 




Cyprus Stock Exchange  Total 










 
Domestic 










 
Foreign 










Deutsche Börse AG 
Total 


14 

12 


10 
14 
11 
 
Domestic 


13 

11 



11 

 
Foreign 










Euronext 
Total 


18 
14 
18 
12 
24 

40 

 
Domestic 


15 
10 
18 

23 

39 

 
Foreign 










Irish Stock Exchange 
Total 
n/a 
n/a 








 
Domestic 
n/a 
n/a 








 
Foreign 
n/a 
n/a 








LSE Group 
Total 
34 
27 
119 
55 
138 
59 
79 
53 
118 
58 
 
Domestic 
32 
20 
107 
37 
118 
51 
71 
43 
103 
46 
 
Foreign 


12 
18 
20 


10 
15 
12 
 
 
18 
 

 
Number of New Listings, Year to Date (New companies listed through an IPO and other new companies listed) 
 
 
June 2019 
2018 
2017 
2016 
2015 
Stock Exchange 
 
IPO 
Other 
IPO 
Other 
IPO   Other  IPO  Other  IPO  Other 
Luxembourg Stock Exchange  Total 










 
Domestic 










 
Foreign 










Malta Stock Exchange 
Total 










 
Domestic 










 
Foreign 










Nasdaq Nordic and Baltics 
Total 
17 
12 
54 
10 
86 
19 
62 
23 
76 
14 
 
Domestic 
16 

52 

85 
18 
60 
18 
76 
12 
 
Foreign 










Oslo Børs 
Total 



15 
11 
13 




 
Domestic 




11 





 
Foreign 










SIX Swiss Exchanges 
Total 










 
Domestic 










 
Foreign 










Warsaw Stock Exchange 
Total 



12 
13 

13 
15 
36 

 
Domestic 



12 
13 

13 
15 
32 

 
Foreign 










 
19 
 

 
Number of New Listings, Year to Date (New companies listed through an IPO and other new companies listed) 
 
 
June 2019 
2018 
2017 
2016 
2015 
Stock Exchange 
 
IPO 
Other 
IPO 
Other 
IPO  
Other 
IPO  Other  IPO  Other 
Zagreb Stock Exchange  Total 










 
Domestic 










 
Foreign 










Total of All Exchanges  Total 
79 
149 
241 
233 
305 
477 
214 
158 
318 
273 
 
Domestic 
69 
64 
218 
132 
279 
124 
194 
133 
291 
248 
 
Foreign 
10 
85 
23 
101 
26 
353 
20 
25 
27 
25 
 
Number of New Listings, 2018 vs 2015  
Change in Total % (IPO) 
-32% 
Change in Total % (Other)  
-17% 
Change in Total Domestic % (IPO) 
-33% 
Change in Total Foreign % (IPO) 
-17% 
Change in Total Domestic % (Other) 
-88% 
Change in Total Foreign % (IPO) 
75% 
 
Notes on the Tables: 
 1. Excluding investment funds besides BME; BME includes investment companies listed (open-end investment 
companies). 
2. Including Alternative and SME Markets 
 
Notes on the Exchanges: 
1. Euronext 2019 figure includes Irish Stock Exchange. 
2. Euronext includes Belgium, England, France, Netherlands and Portugal. 
3. LSE Group includes London Stock Exchange and Borsa Italiana. 
4.  Nasdaq  Nordic  Exchanges  include  Copenhagen,  Helsinki,  Iceland,  Stockholm,  Tallinn,  Riga  and  Vilnius  Stock 
Exchanges. 
 
 
 
20 
 

Market Capitalisation, Value at Month End (EUROm) 
2019 vs  
Stock Exchange 
June 2019 
June 2018 
June 2017 
June 2016 
June 2015 
2015 
Athens Stock Exchange 
45.453,22 
40.561,31 
44.066,48 
30.132,99 
38.029,82 
20% 
BME Spanish Exchanges 
681.178,13 
728.846,35 
757.950,52 
587.462,85 
864.985,08 
-21% 
Bucharest Stock Exchange 
20.860,11 
20.291,92 
19.258,41 
14.999,49 
18.234,01 
14% 
Budapest Stock Exchange 
26.344,48 
22.576,15 
22.836,96 
17.251,86 
15.165,87 
74% 
Bulgarian Stock Exchange 
14.109,62 
12.135,72 
5.726,25 
4.122,80 
4.340,26 
225% 
CEESEG - Ljubljana 
6.775,50 
5.815,00 
5.264,20 
4.943,00 
5.857,00 
16% 
CEESEG - Prague 
24.131,15 
26.953,00 
23.393,99 
21.287,32 
24.139,61 
0% 
CEESEG - Vienna 
111.956,97 
126.097,39 
114.336,49 
78.276,47 
87.732,73 
28% 
Cyprus Stock Exchange 
3.850,60 
3.290,40 
2.758,34 
2.434,08 
3.105,50 
24% 
Deutsche Boerse AG 
1.713.288,81 
1.808.760,71 
1.745.369,90 
1.388.575,12 
1.577.657,82 
9% 
Euronext 
3.883.623,00 
3.715.436,00 
3.531.568,00 
2.964.845,00 
3.074.028 
26% 
Irish Stock Exchange 
n/a 
122.184,98 
119.106,42 
102.156,07 
140.587,13 
-13% 
LSE Group 
3.458.417,80 
3.693.457,60 
3.505.812,30 
3.139.467,80 
3.759.534,40 
-8% 
Luxembourg Stock 
Exchange 
41.810,29 
54.032,00 
52.617,02 
46.450,00 
54.142,00 
-23% 
Malta Stock Exchange 
4.816,20 
4.302,72 
4.350,97 
4.111,47 
3.678,33 
31% 
Nasdaq Nordic and Baltics 
1.304.696,94 
1.240.417,60 
1.288.879,39 
1.101.301,61 
1.114.416,18 
17% 
Oslo Børs 
255.223,08 
270.776,45 
210.232,58 
187.985,90 
203.140,81 
26% 
SIX Swiss Exchange 
1.494.707,62 
1.301.150,50 
1.444.220,47 
1.278.185,35 
1.397.704,76 
7% 
Warsaw Stock Exchange 
145.954,55 
138.357,32 
158.272,26 
116.351,58 
148.993,82 
-2% 
Zagreb Stock Exchange 
18.615,10 
18.937,41 
19.189,44 
16.471,01 
17.423,53 
7% 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
TOTAL 
13.255.813,17  13.354.380,53 
13.075.210,39 
11.106.811,77 
12.552.896,66 
6% 
 
Total Market   
Capitalization
(in Euro)
 
13.500.000,00
 
13.000.000,00
 
12.500.000,00
 
12.000.000,00
 
11.500.000,00
 
11.000.000,00
 
10.500.000,00
June 2015
June 2016
  June 2017
June 2018
June 2019
 
21 
 



Chart 1: Listed Companies and Market Capitalisation 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Source: Federation of European Securities Exchanges (FESE) 
 
Chart 2: New Listings and Investment Flows 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Source: Federation of European Securities Exchanges (FESE) 
 
 
22 
 


 
Chart 3: SME Markets  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Source: Federation of European Securities Exchanges (FESE) 
 
 
Note on the Charts:  
The charts do not include data from all the stock exchanges listed on above tables, but only member exchanges of 
Federation of European Securities Exchanges (FESE). 
 
Sources: Federation of European Securities Exchanges, World  Federation of  Exchanges, Athens Stock 
Exchange,  Budapest  Stock  Exchange,  Bulgarian  Stock  Exchange,  CEESEG  –  Vienna,  Cyprus  Stock 
Exchange, SIX Swiss Exchange, Zagreb Stock Exchange 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
23 
 


 
APPENDIX 3: Organisation of EuropeanIssuers  
EuropeanIssuers  combines  a  high-level  leadership  with  more  than  200  Board  members  of 
European listed companies and a strong capacity to provide solid input and technical expertise 
to shape effectively and proactively the future environment in which our listed companies do 
operate sharing the views of the leaders of the European economy. To support the European 
regulatory  framework,  EuropeanIssuers  maintains  a  constant  dialogue  with  the  main 
European  decision  and  policymakers.  Over  the  last  five-year  term,  we  held  around  200 
meetings with European representatives and issued approximately 100 positions papers and 
policy by including contributions. This figure is multiplied the work of our members.   
The  Policy  Committee  is  the  main  technical  working  body  of  the  association  composed  of 
senior legal and technical experts with first-hand practical experience. It convenes on a bi-
monthly basis, monitors developments  and draft position papers in which EuropeanIssuers 
publicly expresses its members’ views. 
The Smaller and Medium Issuers Listed in Europe Committee, created in 2008, focuses on the 
specific  needs  of  smaller  listed companies.  It  was  set  up  in  reaction to  the  increase  of  de-
listings and the decrease of new listings, due to the ever-growing volume of regulations for 
listed companies. 
EuropeanIssuers currently has 14 active working groups, set up to assist the Policy Committee 
in  considering  and  discussing  policy  issues  affecting  European  quoted  companies.  A  single 
working  group  can  cover  several  legislative  files  in  the  same  field  and  develops  common 
positions reflecting the views of the membership. A working group is composed by a team of 
experts  working  together  based  on  time  commitment,  knowledge  of  the  topic, 
communication  skills,  diversity  amongst  member  associations  and  companies  as  well  as 
geographical balance. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
EuropeanIssuers Registration number with the European Commission and Parliament 20935778703-23 
24